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CAMBRIDGE CELTA

Lahore, Pakistan
July 9 – August 3, 2018
Table of Contents

COURSE MATERIALS .......................................................................................................................................4


TEACHING PRACTICE: THE FOCUS OF FEEDBACK ..............................................................................................5
LESSON FRAMEWORKS .................................................................................................................................................6
LESSON PLAN COVER PAGE ............................................................................................................................7
PROCEDURE PAGE .......................................................................................................................................................8
LESSON PLANNING: HOW TO..........................................................................................................................9
THE FRONT PAGE ..................................................................................................................................................... 10
THE BODY ............................................................................................................................................................... 13
VOCABULARY & FUNCTIONAL LANGUAGE ANALYSIS ....................................................................................................... 17
GRAMMAR ANALYSIS EXAMPLE .................................................................................................................................. 18
VOCAB ANALYSIS EXAMPLE........................................................................................................................................ 20
OBSERVATION TASKS ................................................................................................................................... 21
OBSERVATION OF TUTOR........................................................................................................................................... 21
GROUP 1: LEARNER/CLASS PROFILE ........................................................................................................................... 22
GROUP 2: LEARNER/CLASS PROFILE ........................................................................................................................... 23
OBSERVATION OF EXTERNAL TEACHER ......................................................................................................................... 24
OBSERVATION TASK FINAL TP: THE LESSON AS A JOURNEY.............................................................................................. 26
ASSIGNMENTS ............................................................................................................................................. 27
ASSIGNMENT: FOCUS ON THE LEARNER ....................................................................................................................... 28
Appendix 1: Student Questionnaire: FOL Assignment ..................................................................................... 32
Appendix 2: TP Student Writing Sample ......................................................................................................... 33
Appendix 3: FOL Grammar & Pronunciation Error Grid.................................................................................. 34
ASSIGNMENT: LANGUAGE RELATED TASK ..................................................................................................................... 36
ASSIGNMENT: SKILLS RELATED TASK ........................................................................................................................... 42
ASSIGNMENT: LESSONS FROM THE CLASSROOM ............................................................................................................ 45
PLAGIARISM POLICY..................................................................................................................................... 47
CAMBRIDGE GRADE DESCRIPTORS ............................................................................................................... 48
FINAL REPORT EXAMPLE .............................................................................................................................. 49
ACHIEVEMENTS IN INDIVIDUAL ASSESSMENT AREAS .................................................................................... 50
PERFORMANCE DESCRIPTOR FOR A PASS GRADE .......................................................................................... 50
CENTER COMPLAINTS PROCEDURE ............................................................................................................... 51
SELF-EVALUATION TASKS ............................................................................................................................. 53
SELF EVALUATION TASK TP 1: RAPPORT & DYNAMICS .................................................................................................. 53
SELF EVALUATION TASK TP 2: TEACHER TALK & TASK SETTING ....................................................................................... 55
SELF EVALUATION TASK TP 3: PLANNING .................................................................................................................... 57
SELF EVALUATION TASK TP 4: THE LEARNERS ............................................................................................................... 59
SELF EVALUATION TASK TP 5: TASK ACHIEVEMENT ....................................................................................................... 61
SELF EVALUATION TASK TP 6: GENERAL REFLECTION ..................................................................................................... 63
SELF EVALUATION TASK TP 7/8: GENERAL SELF-REFLECTION ......................................................................................... 65
SELF EVALUATION TASK TP 8/9: FINAL REFLECTIONS ..................................................................................................... 67

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COURSE MATERIALS
You are responsible for two items:

1. Personal Binder
Purchase a 2-inch thick binder, 75-100 page covers and a package of 4-6 dividers. You will keep
all of your own notes and handouts from input sessions in this. It is your private binder and will not
be assessed by the tutors or the Cambridge assessor.

Organize your binder as follows. Use the dividers to make 4 sections.


1. Input Schedule / Teaching Practice (TP) Schedule (1 page cover)
2. Teaching Practice points (1 page cover)
3. Input session handouts (there will be approximately 40 sessions– 1 page cover per
session)
4. Observation Tasks (2 page covers)

2. Portfolio
You will receive a portfolio on Day 1 of the course and you will be shown what documents to include
in your portfolio. This portfolio is the property of the school and MUST NEVER leave the building.
The documents in this folder will form your official assessment by Cambridge. At the end of the
course, in accordance with Cambridge regulations, the contents of your portfolio will either be
submitted to Cambridge for scrutiny or kept by the center for six months. If you want to keep any
of the documents in your portfolio, please make copies. The following documents will be kept in
your portfolio:
 Blue CELTA 5 course record booklet
 Lesson documentation (tutor’s written feedback, lesson plans, and language analysis,
lesson materials and self-evaluation (one page cover for each lesson)
 Four marked written assignments with tutor feedback sheets

Photocopiers
Photocopies from published materials must be fully acknowledged and included on each copy for
student. Reference information must include:
Course book name, authors, year, publisher, page number

Books and Materials


There will be one hard copy of the coursebook, teacher’s book and workbook you will be using to teach
your teaching practice lessons. You will have access to the books and the audio recordings on
computers at ICD. You will have to photocopy (and reference) the material for your students.

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TEACHING PRACTICE: THE FOCUS OF FEEDBACK

Stage One: TP 1, 2
Rapport
Setting up activities (using demos, giving concise instructions, using ICQs, clearly
assigning pairs/groups)
Eliciting
Inclusion of feedback stages
Awareness of self and students (monitoring)
Use of whiteboard
TTT and graded language

Stage Two: TP 3, 4
Achievement of lesson aims
Clarification of MFP
Awareness of errors and correction (language and phonology)
Pacing and timing
Provision of language practice
Contextualization of language
Completion of sufficient language analysis
Submission of detailed lesson plans
(Continual focus on Stage 1 aspects)

Stage Three: TP 5, 6
Balance and variety of activities
Student-centered correction
Monitoring and dealing with errors
Selection of language items based on students’ needs
Use of a variety of effective techniques in feedback stages
Increased implementation of S-centered principles
(Continued focus on aspects of Stages 1 & 2)

Stage Four: TP 7, 8, 9
Select suitable presentation method
Controlled to freer practice
Sufficient meaningful skills work
Student-centered activities
Relinquishing control over lessons
Demonstrate consistency in meeting all criteria
(Including aspects of Stages 1, 2, and 3)

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LESSON FRAMEWORKS
The frameworks below are not set in stone but many of the lessons you teach will follow one of these
patterns. Some stages may be essential and you may want to add others depending on your students’
needs and your choice of material. Please refer to example lesson plans and notes from input sessions
for more detail on lesson stages.

Skills:
Receptive & Productive

Receptive Skills: Reading & Productive Skills: Speaking &


Listening Writing

Speaking
Writing
* Lead-in
* Lead-in
Receptive Skills * Elicit/introduce necessary
* Focus on model of text type
language for task
* Lead-in/introduce text * Elicit/introduce necessary
* Preparation time
* Initial task (gist/specific info) language for task
* Speaking task
** Pre-teach vocab * Brainstorming / planning
* FB on content
* Deeper comprehension task * Writing Task
* FB on language
* Post task and/or Productive task * "Publishing"

Systems:
Grammar, Vocabulary,
Funtions

Test-Teach-Test Text-based Situational

* Set context * Lead-in * Set context

* Test: Ss do practice task; T * Gist task * Elicit/introduce examples of


monitors target language
* Pre-Teach vocab
* Teach: Meaning, Pron, * Language focus: Meaning,
* Highlight TL examples from the
Form/error correction test Pron, Form
* Test: controlled practice * Language focus: Meaning, Pron, * Controlled practice
* Freer practice Form * Freer practice
* Controlled practice
* Freer practice

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LESSON PLAN COVER P AGE
Teacher: TP No. Tutor:

Lesson Type: Length:

Lesson Aim: By the end of the lesson, students will be better able to/have improved at… in the context of…

Subsidiary Aim:

Personal aims During this lesson, I will be working on these action points from previous lessons (refer to tutor feedback from
previous lesson):

Tutor: Appropriate Personal Aims? Yes No N/A


Materials (What you will need in this lesson) Write title, author, year and publisher here and on your copies.

Tutor: Sources Acknowledged? Yes No N/A


Language Analysis (check all that apply): I have completed:
☐ a language analysis sheet (grammar)
☐ a language analysis sheet (vocabulary /functions)
☐ both
Tutor: Sufficient Analysis? Yes No N/A
Assumptions What do you expect the students will know about your target language/content of your lesson?

Anticipated problems (classroom management, content – Solutions to these problems:


NOT language):

1. 1.

2. 2.

3. 3.

White board plan: Draw the board as it will look at each stage of the lesson.

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Stage 1 Stage 2

Stage 3 Stage 4

PROCEDURE PAGE

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TP #: Date: Name:
Inter
Time Stage & Aim Procedure
action

LESSON PLANNING: HOW TO


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THE FRONT PAGE

Main Aim
Your main aim is the most important part of your lesson plan. This is what you want the students to be
able to do, or do better, at the end of the lesson that they couldn't do at the beginning. Think of your
lesson in terms of you, the teacher, taking your students on a journey. Your main aim is your
destination. You should only have one main aim (or possibly two in a long lesson).

Express your main aims in terms of STUDENT OUTCOMES (what the students will do in the lesson –
often stated in terms of the final communicative activity in the lesson), not teacher actions.

Examples of main aims are:

 By the end of the lesson, the Ss will be able to use the TL (affirmative, negative and question
forms of the past simple) to discuss last weekend and decide who had the best/worst weekend.

 By the end of the lesson, the students will be better able to understand the structure ‘used to +
infinitive’ and tell an anecdote about a childhood memory.

 By the end of the lesson, the Ss will be able to use the TL (lexical items related to sports) in
order to compare and find similarities and differences re: sports preferences.

 By the end of the lesson the Ss will be able to use the TL (expressions for making personal
arrangements) to discuss and agree on a plan for the weekend with their group.

 By the end of the lesson, Ss will have practiced and be better able to use the TL (functional
exponents for giving advice in writing) to respond to a partner’s letter.

 By the end of the lesson, the Ss will have improved accuracy re: the use of narrative tenses in
telling a story and will practice these in the oral sharing of a disastrous holiday.

 By the end of the lesson, the Ss will have given a talk on the best places to visit in their country.

 By the end of the lesson, the Ss will have further developed their sub-skills of listening for gist
and specific information by listening to a podcast on relationships and completing the
associated tasks. They will also be able to choose the most relevant suggestions for having a
successful relationship.

 By the end of the lesson, the Ss will have further developed their skills of listening for gist and
specific information by listening to an interview with a famous person and completing associated
tasks.

 By the end of the lesson, the Ss will be able to use the TL (linking structures for addition and
contrast) to write an informal letter to a friend about their experience studying English in the US.

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Subsidiary Aims
As well as your main aim, you might also have a subsidiary aims. These are aims that are not the main
focus of the lesson, but are aims that you hope will be achieved along the way on the journey to your
main aim.

Examples of subsidiary aims are:


 To revise yesterday's vocabulary on the topic of housework.

 To develop students’ skills of reading / listening for gist / specific information (if, for example, your
main aim is a new language point and you are presenting it through a text).

 To improve students' writing skills (if, for example, the writing is practice of a language point).

 To improve students' awareness of intonation (if, for example, you're teaching some functional
language).

 To introduce vocabulary items related to travel (if, for example you’re pre-teaching them for a
reading text).

NOTE: You don't have to have any subsidiary aim; it depends on your lesson. Leave this box blank if
you haven't got one.

Assumptions
These are the things relating to your lesson that you feel you can safely assume your students will
know. For example:

 The students will be familiar with past participles of the verbs used in the lesson.

 The students will be familiar with the present simple active (if, for example, you are teaching the
passive).

 The students will be familiar with meaning, pronunciation and form of the present perfect simple
(if, for example, you are following on from another teacher who is going to present the
language).

 The students will have a basic knowledge of the political systems in their own countries.

 The students will know the vocabulary included in the text (if you’re doing a reading / listening
lesson).

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Personal Aims
These are aims that relate to you as a teacher, rather than the lesson itself, and will help you focus on
your own personal development. These should be copied from your tutor’s feedback in the action
points section of previous lesson plan(s).

They could include such things as:


 To sit down more
 To make sure to include all the students
 To reduce teacher talk time
 To give clearer instructions
 To check instructions
 To monitor more effectively
 To maintain a good pace
 To correct more during drilling

Aids and Materials


These are the things you need to do the lesson; e.g. course book, workbook, flashcards, CD, map of
the world, cue-cards for controlled practice, handouts, dictionaries, etc. Listing them on the front of
your plan will help you make sure you've got everything ready, and will be useful when you look back at
the lesson after the course. Make sure you provide the source of all materials on your cover sheet
(including page and exercise numbers) as well as on the handouts you give to students – remember
copyrighting is a Cambridge requirement.

Anticipated Problems and Solutions re: Classroom Management (CM)


Note: this section is NOT meant for problems/solutions related to target language. Those issues should
be included on your language analysis. In this section, consider the following areas:

Skills
When anticipating problems during skills work, consider the content of the text, the degree of difficulty,
your students' different abilities, the length of the text and any cultural problems the text or topic might
produce. For productive skills (speaking and writing) you will need to consider whether the students
have the appropriate language to do the task, whether they'll be interested in the topic, problems with
grouping your students, whether the students will have enough ideas to contribute etc. Again, once you
have thought of your problems, work out your solutions.

Tasks
If you are setting up a complex task, you may need to anticipate problems due to lack of student
understanding and decide what you will do should they ariseYou may have a task which requires pairs
but it is possible you will have an odd number of students. There may be some students who shouldn’t
be paired together for some reason. Ss may arrive late – if you’re on first, it might be an idea to start
with a warmer/lead-in which is not too important for the main part of the lesson.

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THE BODY

Stages
Each lesson needs to be broken down into stages. You can have as many stages as you like,
depending on the lesson.

Examples of stages are:


 Lead-in
 Pre-teach vocabulary
 Presentation stage
 Controlled practice
 Freer (or less controlled) practice
 Board-work stage
 Feedback
 Listen for a deeper comprehension
 Correction slot
 Role-play

Stage aims
The stage aim is the answer to the question, “Why am I having Ss do this?“ Each stage must have an
aim. This aim must in some way help the students achieve the main aim on the front of the plan.

Examples of possible stage aims are:


 To generate interest in the topic of television

 To give students a written record of the language

 To present the question form and short answer

 To practice listening for gist

 To provide freer speaking practice

 To allow students to check their answers and peer teach

Procedure
This is the what and how of each stage. Your procedure says exactly what you are going to do in the
class to achieve that particular stage aim. You don't need to write every single word you are going to
say, although you might like to script your instructions, particularly at low levels.

Things you need to consider putting in your procedure are:

 Model sentences (sentences you are planning to use to highlight meaning / form /
pronunciation).

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 Concept questions (questions to check if students have the correct meaning of new language)
– these could, alternatively, be on your LA sheet.

 Your board work - what’s it going to look like? This could, alternatively, be on your board plan.

 Instructions (particularly at low levels).

 Vocabulary you are planning to pre-teach for skills work.

 How you are going to highlight potential problems (e.g. which words you’re going to drill, how
you’re going to highlight form on the board).

Timings and Interaction Patterns


You also need to estimate the time you think each stage will take. Try to be realistic here – very few
stages take two minutes! This will help you to time your lesson as a whole.

Finally, think about the interaction pattern of the class for each stage. This will help raise your
awareness to the amount of S<>S communication your lesson does/does not include.

Suggested interaction pattern symbols are:


 OC <> Open Class or WC <> Whole Class = Teacher and students talking together.
 T>Ss = Teacher talking to the whole class.
 S = Students working on their own.
 S<>S = Students working in pairs.
 GW / S<>S<>S = Students working in groups.
 Mingle / S<>S<>S = Students milling round the classroom.

Language Analysis
All lessons after TP 2 or 3 (See input schedule) need to have a language analysis sheet with:

 The language / lexical area.


 Target sentences / word lists.
 Features of meaning, pronunciation, form and appropriacy for each item
 Anticipated problems / solutions
 What context you are going to use.
 How you will convey the language.
 How you will check students have understood the language.

Grammar Analysis

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Complete this sheet for all grammar lessons that you teach.
Language area and use: What is the grammatical structure you intend to teach and how is it/are they
used? For example; modals of deduction, present continuous for future use…

Target language: Provide marker sentence(s) that you will use in the lesson.

Focus on meaning: What does the target language (TL) mean? What is it used for? How will you
CONVEY AND CHECK meaning of TL? (Include CCQs, answers, timelines…)

Focus of form: What is the breakdown of the form as it will appear on WB/Handout?

Focus on pronunciation: Write the marker sentence(s). Indicate relevant sentence stress,
contractions, intonation, weak forms, etc. with IPA of TL as you will do in your lesson.

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Potential problems: Meaning
1.

2.

Solution
1.

2.

Potential problems and solutions: Form


1.

2.

Solution:
1.

2.

Potential problem: Pronunciation


1.

2.

Solution:
1.

2.

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VOCABULARY & FUNCTIONAL LANGUAGE ANALYSIS
Please complete grid for each vocabulary or functional item.
Word/phrase

Meaning (keep it simple!)

What are your CCQs and answers?

Form

Pron

Potential problems/solutions: Meaning

Potential problems/solutions: Pronunciation

Potential problems/solutions: Form

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GRAMMAR ANALYSIS EXAMPLE
Language area and use: What is the grammatical structure you intend to teach and how is it/are they used? For
example; modals of deduction, present continuous for future use, …
Have something done (also called “causative have”)

Context: I’m going to have my house redecorated. There are several things that I will be getting someone to do
for me. I’m going to have the furniture replaced, the walls repainted and the lighting changed.

Target language: Provide marker sentence(s) that you will use in the lesson.

I’m going to have my house redecorated.

Focus on meaning: How will you CONVEY AND CHECK the meaning of the target language and its uses?
Concept checking questions and answers
Timelines (if applicable)

This structure means that someone else does something for you. You do not do it yourself.
I’ll convey meaning through the 2 cartoons from the course book, one of a woman with paint brushes ready to
decorate and one of a person pointing to the yellow pages, looking for professionals to redecorate her house. Ss
match the speech bubbles (“I’m going to redecorate my house” and “I’m going to have my house redecorated”) to
the correct cartoon.

To check meaning : CCQs/Answers


“In the first cartoon, is the woman going to do the work?” (YES)
“In the second cartoon, is the woman going to do the work? (NO)
“Who is going to do the work? (maybe a painting and decorating company).
“Will she pay?” (YES –probably)

Focus of form: Write marker sentence(s). Above the marker sentence(s) write the form rule.

Subj + be going to have + object + past participle

I am/are going to have my house redecorated.

Focus on pronunciation: Write marker sentence(s) and indicate word/phrase/sentences stress and
the TL in Phonemic script including linked sounds and schwas.
.
o o o
/aimgƏnƏæv my house redecorated.

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Grammar Analysis Example cont.
Meaning: Potential problems Solutions:
P1: Ss may think the action is done by the subject. S1: Clarify using CCQs. Did (the subject) do the
action?” No.

P2: Ss may confuse “have” with its lexical meaning of S2: If this problem arises ask, “Is this an action or a
“to possess” (a state) state?” Action.

S3: Refer Ss to the model of the form and the marker


P3: Ss may think that because we use the past
sentence and use the following CCQs:
participle this structure always refers to the past.
“Does this refer to the past, present or future?”
(Future). After the object, what is the verb form?” (Past
participle). “Does this mean it’s connected with the
past? (No)

Pronunciation: Potential Problems Solutions:


P1: Ss may put sentence stress on the wrong S1: Drill sentence using gestures to show sentence
syllable/word. stress.

P3: SS will not pronounce ‘going to’ naturally. S3: Drill while showing linking and omission of /g/ /t/ on
fingers.

Form: Potential problems Solutions:


P1: Ss may struggle to remember some irregular past S1&2: Monitor during spoken and written practice and
participles. conduct delayed correction. If the error is made by all,
correct on the spot by indicating there’s an error (facial
P2: Ss may invert the object and verb (I had painted expression, using fingers etc.), encourage S to self-
my house) correct, other Ss to peer correct.

P3: Ss may have come across the contracted form of S3: During the presentation stage I’ll ask “Is ‘have’ an
‘have’ when it’s used as an auxiliary verb (I’ve, he’s auxiliary or is it the main verb? (main verb) “I’ve my
etc.) and may over generalize and think you can use it hair cut every month”? Is this correct or incorrect?
here. (E.g. I’ve my house painted.)

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VOCAB ANALYSIS EXAMPLE
Word/phrase
Rush hour
How will meaning be conveyed?
Pre teach using a picture of cars bumper to bumper on a busy highway with a clock showing 8:00 am.
What are your CCQs?
Is 3:00 am rush hour? (No) Is 5:00 pm rush hour in New York? (Yes) During rush hour, are subway trains empty or full?
(Full) Does it take more or less time to travel in rush hour? (more)
Form
Adj + Noun
Anticipated problems
Meaning – P1: Ss may have different rush hour times in their countries
S1 - Ask, “When is rush hour in your country?”
Pron- P1: Ss may pronounce hour with an /h/ sound.
S1 - Highlight on board silent ‘h’, model and drill.
Form- None anticipated

Functional Language Analysis Example


Word/phrase
Would you like a drink?
Meaning (keep it simple!)
Exponent of the function: offer. Polite but not too formal.
What are your CCQs?
Is this a request? (No) Is this an offer? (Yes)
Form Pronunciation
Would you like + object o o
/wʊʤu:laɪkə/ drink?
Anticipated problems Solutions
Meaning: Meaning:
P1: Ss may confuse it with, “Would you…” for requests. S1: Use CCQs and 2-4 pics to reinforce request.

S2: Write on WB and mime asking incorrect Q but not


P2: Ss may say, “Do you like beer?” moving. Then asking marker sentence and bringing back a
beverage.

Pron: Ss will say ‘would’ and ‘you’ separately. Pron: S2: Show on fingers and drill /ʤ/ sound
demonstrating place and manner of articular.

Form: None anticipated.

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OBSERVATION TASKS

OBSERVATION OF TUTOR
When observing today’s lesson, consider the points below. What is there about the classroom, the activities, the
teacher and the students that helps to create conditions for effective learning?
The Classroom
Makes notes on the classroom, considering seating arrangements, teaching aids, pairing/grouping of students
and how these are changed during the lesson.

The Teacher
Comment on the rapport between teacher and students. What is the teacher’s role at various stages of the
lesson? What is the balance between teacher and student talking time? Comment on the teacher’s instructions
and use of voice. How does he/she get the student’s attention?

The Learners
How motivated are they? Why? Are they taking part in their own learning? Is the teacher challenging them or
doing most of the work him/herself? What did they learn in this lesson?

The Activities
Make notes of the activities used. What did students actually do? What was the balance between teacher and
student involvement? How were the activities set up and brought to a close?

Summary
What will you take away from this lesson?

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GROUP 1: LEARNER/CLASS PROFILE
Name, Sex Mario Puntillo
and Age Female

37

Country and Italy


L1
Italian

ESL Level Intermediate

Level of High school


Education

Degrees/Area
of study

Reasons for Better job


Learning opportunities
English
Wants to watch
the news in
English

Previous 5 years high


English Study school, 2 years
part-time in
language
schools

Effect of HS lessons
previous were grammar
learning on based with little
present spoken practice.
abilities Mario is familiar
with grammar
rules but
struggles with
spoken fluency

Relevant
personal info
(family,
children,
years in USA

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GROUP 2: LEARNER/CLASS PROFILE
Name, Sex Mario Puntillo
and Age Female

37

Country and Italy


L1
Italian

ESL Level Intermediate

Level of High school


Education

Degrees/Area
of study

Reasons for Better job


Learning opportunities
English
Wants to watch
the news in
English

Previous 5 years high


English Study school, 2 years
part-time in
language
schools

Effect of HS lessons
previous were grammar
learning on based with little
present spoken practice.
abilities Mario is familiar
with grammar
rules but
struggles with
spoken fluency

Relevant
personal info
(family,
children,
years in USA

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OBSERVATION OF EXTERNAL TEACHER

1. Describe the teacher’s rapport.

2. Is there a balance of activities?

3. How long does each stage of the lesson last?

4. What is the balance of students’ to teacher talking time?

5. How effective are the instructions?

6. Are there a variety of interaction patterns?

7. In what ways is the class, and the way it was run, different from the classes you've observed on the
CELTA course?

8. In what ways were the students similar and different from our students on the CELTA course?

9. What did you discover from the experience of attending a class at a language school?

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OBSERVATION TASK FINAL TP: THE LESSON AS A JOURNEY

Observe the lesson today, and draw your impression of it. (Draw the lesson, not the classroom, i.e. see it as a
journey.) You will present your picture to the teacher during feedback (as a gift) and provide some explanation of
it to the group. Be as creative (or as literal) as you want. If you’re creatively inclined, feel free to go wild!

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ASSIGNMENTS
Administration
 You must submit all 4 assignments in order to be eligible to receive a CELTA certificate. All
assignment submission and resubmission dates are on the CELTA timetable.
 Assignments must be typed and double-spaced (with the exception of LRT).
 Please hand in assignments by the time specified on the course timetable.
 Failure to hand in assignments on time will be considered a professionalism issue and will be
reflected in the comments on your final report that you will use to secure employment after
completing the course.
 All assignments have a minimum word count of 750 and a maximum word count of 1,000. You
must print the word count on your assignments.
Note: The assignments may not be assigned in the same order that you find them in your
handbook.

Pass on first submission


If the feedback sheet has 'pass on first submission' circled, you have successfully completed the
assignment and can file it in your CELTA portfolio.

Please record the assignment result in the appropriate box on page 11 of your blue Candidate Record
Booklet (CELTA 5), which is kept in your CELTA portfolio.

Resubmissions
If your assignment does not meet the criteria, you will need to resubmit it. Read the tutor's comments
on the feedback sheet and make any necessary of changes on a separate sheet paper to be
attached to the original. Do not rewrite the entire assignments.

Do not under any circumstances alter the original work. Do not use whiteout, correction tape,
scribbles or any other means to cover what you originally submitted. The Cambridge assessor needs to
be able to see your original work as well as any changes or additions you make for resubmission.

When you hand in a resubmission, attach the corrected version to the back of the original
submission. Include the ‘cover sheet’ as well as the entire original assignment.
You may resubmit each assignment only once.

If an assignment is a 'pass on resubmission', please mark this on page 10 of your Candidate Record
Booklet, in the appropriate box.

Fail on resubmission
If the resubmission does not meet the criteria, your assignment will be a 'fail on resubmission' and your
tutor with check this box on the feedback sheet.

You may fail one (1) of the four assignments and still be considered for a 'B' grade, provided that you
have been able to meet the criteria on which you failed in another way - i.e. during your teaching
practice. If you fail two (2) or more assignments, you automatically fail the course.

27
ASSIGNMENT: FOCUS ON THE LEARNER

Name: 1st Submission 2nd Submission

standard yet
To Standard

To standard

standard
Tutor feedback and Tutor feedback

Not to

Not to
resubmission guidance

Showing awareness of how a


learner’s background, previous
learning experience and learning
style affect learning

Identify one grammar problem


with two examples of the problem
identified

Select one appropriate activity to


address the grammar problem and
provide a rationale

Identify one pronunciation problem


with two examples of the problem
identified.

Select one appropriate activity to


address the pronunciation problem
and provide a rationale

Include 1-2 paragraphs


commenting on the students’ skills
ability. (reading, writing, listening,
speaking)

Correctly use terminology relating


to the description of language
systems

Use written language that is clear,


accurate and appropriate to the
task

Word count of 750-1000


Tutor signature and date:
Resubmit

Double marked By:


Pass

Pass

Fail

28
INSTRUCTIONS

In this assignment you will write a profile of one of the learners then work with him/her to identify areas
for improvement.

PREPARATION
Coordinate with your TP group so that you choose different students. Sit down with a TP student and
ask him/her about the areas listed in appendix 1. Make notes on their answers. This should be a
natural conversation so respond to what the students say, but as you’re listening, also pay attention to
the language the learner uses to answer your questions. Collect errors with grammar and
pronunciation. Ask the student for contact information, as you may need this later.

Observe your learner in teaching practice lessons and make notes on their language strengths and
weaknesses. Also, pay attention to their behavior and interaction and what this says about their
learning preference/style. Include the following in your profile of the learner: Learning preference/style,
(visual, auditory or kinesthetic), extrovert or introvert, intrinsically or extrinsically motivated. Note
specific examples to support your conclusions.

Set the homework task (appendix 3). You may need to adapt this task if you are working with a lower
level learner. Collect the text after the next lesson and analyze the learner’s linguistic and
communicative competence.

WRITING: Use the bullet points as headings when writing your assignment

Part 1: Profile (total of 300-400 words)


 Background – Include previous experience with language learning and the effect this is having
on current language learning
 Motivation - Intrinsic? Extrinsic? How do you know?
 Learning preference/style- you must provide examples/evidence from your observations.

Part Two: (total of 500-600 words)


 Skills
Note the student’s aptitude regarding receptive and productive skills. Does s/he get the answers to
tasks after one reading/listening or is more exposure to the text needed? Is s/he able to produce an
appropriate amount of writing/speaking output based on the level? Provide specific examples that you
have observed during your/your peers’ lessons.

 Pronunciation Problem (1) and Examples (2)


Identify 1 problem. Specify if it is a problem with phonemes (individual sounds), stress (word or
sentence) or intonation. Give 2 examples of the same problem, say what it should be and describe the
problem. Use the attached grid (appendix 2) to record the information. Submit the grid with your
assignment. Refer to Learner English for information about the common errors for learners with this
particular L1. Direct quotes must not exceed 2 sentences in your text.

 Pronunciation Activity and Rationale


Provide ONE pronunciation activity to address the problem you have identified. The activity must be
from a published source other than the textbooks used in TP classes. The activity should be submitted

29
as you would hand it out in a lesson and it should include answers. Briefly describe the activity within
the assignment, your rationale for choosing it and any scaffolding that would need to be done before
asking students to complete the attached activity.

Rationale: Describe how the activity addresses the problem area you identified. When writing the
rationale, note whether the activity focuses on: Recognition or production? Is the student able to self-
correct or does he/she need to be taught anything about articulation (phonemes), stress
pattern, grammar rules… before attempting the practice activity? Written or spoken language?
Controlled or free practice? Is the activity contextualized? Attach the activity as an appendix
to the assignment.

 Grammar Problem (1) and Examples (2) – Identify 1 problem. (What mistakes does the
learner make more than once?) Give 2 examples of the same problem, say what it should be
and describe the problem. Use the attached grid (appendix 2) to record the information. Submit
the grid with your assignment. Refer to Learner English for information about the common errors
for learners with this particular L1. Direct quotes must not exceed 2 sentences in your text.

 Grammar Activity and Rationale (See above)

*Keep in mind that a student who is unable to self-correct will first need to be shown/taught the rules
(grammar) or the method of articulation (pronunciation), then given practice activities. A student who is
able to self-correct already knows the rules but needs practice. Also note that if the error occurs while
speaking, then you will need to find a speaking task. If the error occurs in the written form, you will
need a written activity.

EXAMPLES:
Pronunciation Example: “In her interview, Junko struggled to correctly produce accurate /l/ sounds.
She said, for example, “I / rɑɪk /to shopping but I have/ rɪtər / money for it.” When she was made aware
of the problem, she was not able to self-correct. She needs practice both recognizing and producing
accurate /l/ and /r/ sounds. A discrimination exercise in which she must listen and check the correct
word from a minimal pair, e.g. light or right, would help improve her recognition. For production practice,
Junko needs to be taught the difference between the two sounds through gestures, diagrams and
demonstrations which illustrate the change in the position of the tongue (touching the back of the teeth
for /l/ and curled in toward the back of the throat for /r/) Then, she could read aloud sentences
containing /l/ sounds and a mix of /l/ and /r/ sounds, e.g. I like laughing a lot when I learn English. Next,
she could practice with the dialogue activity (attached) so that she gets practice using the sounds in a
meaningful context.

Grammar Example: “In her written text, Junko wrote, ‘When I first arrive in New York…’ and, ‘We see
a show on Broadway’. This indicates a problem with the past simple tense with both regular and
irregular verbs. Junko was able to self-correct when the error was brought to her attention indicating
that she is aware of the rule(s) but needs practice. An activity like “Pictures into Story” in Grammar
Practice Activities (Ur, 1998: p 215) would focus on this grammar problem. Students receive a set of
pictures, order the pictures as they like, then write the story. Junko could practice writing different forms
of the past simple in a meaningful, narrative context. This would also help her attain her aim of
becoming a more accurate writer in English.”

30
Look through published material (course books, supplementary resource books, etc.) to find suitable
activities to help your learner with the identified weaknesses. You may choose ONE activity from the
internet if you are unable to find an appropriate one in the published materials. Please note that
internet activities are generally not as effective as those from a published source. You may NOT use
the textbook you are using for TP. Do not include more than one activity for each problem unless an
additional activity is used to scaffold the main activity.

NOTE: You must reference sources both within the text (see above) and in a bibliography at the
end like this:

Author, date, title, publisher


e.g. Ur, P (1998), Grammar Practice Activities, CUP

Common reasons for resubmissions/failed assignments


 Not following instructions
 Not including info regarding skills aptitude
 Incorrectly identifying problem
 Identifying more than one problem
 Including examples that are not examples of problem identified
 Not including activities or including activities that are self-made
 Including several activities
 Not relating information from Learner English to problem identified

Cambridge Assessment Criteria


Demonstrate that you have met the assessment criteria by:
 showing awareness of how a learner’s/learners’ background(s), previous learning experience and
learning style(s) affect learning
 identifying the learner’s/learners language /skills needs
 correctly using terminology relating to the description of language systems and language skills
 selecting appropriate material and/or resources to aid the learner’s/learners’ language development
 providing a rationale for using specific activities with a learner/learners
 finding, selecting and referencing information from one or more sources using written language that
is clear, accurate and appropriate to the task

31
Appendix 1: Student Questionnaire: FOL Assignment
(Do not include this with your assignment.)
Name: ___________________________________________

Age: _____________________________________________

Nationality/First language: _____________________________

Job: _____________________________________________

Hobbies and interests: _________________________________

Why are you learning English? _________________________________________________

How long/where have you studied English? What was the focus of your previous lessons?

(Grammar, speaking…) _________________________________________________

Have you completed:

Secondary School? ________

University? (undergraduate) ________

University? (postgraduate) ________

When you learn, do you like:

(Circle as many as you like)

seeing pictures speaking in groups games and competitions

standing up and moving around listening to songs

taking notes writing on the whiteboard watching DVDs

listening to the teacher doing dramatisations and role-plays

repeating new words after the teacher using computers and technology

working on your own

32
Appendix 2: TP Student Writing Sample
(Do not include this with your assignment.)

Dear Student,
The teachers need to see an example of your writing. Please choose a topic and write 1-3 paragraphs
about it.

Thank you!

Lower levels:
 Your family
 Your job
 Your hobbies and interests

Higher levels:
 Compare 2 cities in your country or the city you are from and the city you now live in.
 What types of films, books, music do you prefer? What was the last movie you saw? Book
you read? What was it about?
 What are some of the similarities and differences between your city and the city you are in
now? Please give several examples.
 Describe a person you admire and why you feel this way about him/her.

33
Appendix 3: FOL Grammar & Pronunciation Error Grid
(Please include this with your assignment.)
Grammar
What the student said/wrote. What it should be Error
Provide full sentence. Provide full sentence.
1.

2.

Pronunciation
What the student said. What it should be (Provide the Error
(Provide the full sentence. full sentence. Use IPA for
Use IPA for error.) correction.)
1.

2.

34
35
ASSIGNMENT: LANGUAGE RELATED TASK

Name ________________________________________________ Date _____________________

Item Good *Weak Redo Notes


Part 1: Form
a. a.
b. b.
c. c.
d. d.
Part 2: Phonology
A

B a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
C a.
b.
D a.
b.
c.
Part 3: Meaning
A a.
b.
B a.
b.
C a.
b.
c.
d.
Part 4: Putting it all together
A a.
b.
Overall grade 1st submission 2nd submission
Pass/Resubmit Pass / Fail

Tutor Signature: Double marked:

Date: Date:

*Weak items: meets criteria for pass but see notes on assignment for your development.

36
Part 1: Form

Analyze the form of he underlined portions of the sentences below. Include the name of the verb tense and the
form rule. Write the title, author and page number of the reference book where you found this information.

Example: She is talking too loud. Present progressive


Reference: Azar, B. Understanding & Using English Grammar: p. 11
S + is / are + V_____ing.
a. I’ve taught student from all over the world.

Reference:

b. I will have been teaching for 2 years when I apply for the
DELTA.
Reference:

c. He can speak three languages

Reference:

d. The course book was written by Philip Kerr.

Reference:

Part 2: Phonology

A. Translate this into standard written English.

/Wen ðə laɪthaʊs kiːpərz lʌvli jʌŋ dɔːtər θelmə meɪks kræbIn lɒbstərəʊls tʊərɪsts kʌm frəm fɑr aenɪər
tuː ɪndʒɔɪ freʃeərən gʊd fuːd sɜrtʃɪŋ fɔr treʒərɒn ðə biːtʃ/
M. Fletcher, English Teaching Professional Issue 37, March 2015, adapted by M. Blanchard

____________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________

37
B. Transcribe the following underlined items as phonemic script. Indicate word stress for items a-c and
sentences stress for d and e.

a. Methodology

b. Observation

c. Phonology

O O
Example: I used to ski. /ju:stə/

d. Chocolate’s my favorite.

e. I’ve taught in Thailand and Australia.

C. Indicate the weak vowel phoneme (schwa) in the appropriate place.

a. What do you do?

b. He’s a lot more interesting than she is.

D. Indicate linking, elision (including contractions) and intrusion as you would if these were your marker
sentences and you were marking relevant features of pron on the WB.

a. I wish he would just go away.

b. I would like bacon and eggs and orange juice.

c. She would like to eat some ice cream.

38
Part 3: Meaning

A. Context and CCQs for Lexis


Write a context for each of the following lexical items and then write appropriate concept checking
questions and answers.

EX: I didn’t mean to break them.

Context CCQs & Answers

My sister has a lot of expensive jewelry. I tried Did I break the earrings? Yes
on some earrings and I broke them. She got Did I want to break them? No
angry but I told her I was sorry and that I Am I sorry? Yes
didn’t mean to break them.

a. I get along well with my sister.

Context CCQs & Answers

b. She can’t make ends meet.

Context CCQs & Answers

39
A. Context and CCQs for Grammar
Write a context for each of the following lexical items and then write appropriate concept checking
questions with answers.

a. I wish I’d been more romantic with her.

Context CCQs & Answers

b. Jack, if I were you, I’d stop smoking.

Context CCQs & Answers

B. Drawing timelines

EXAMPLE: I was taking a shower when he called.

<____________~~~~~~~~~__________________X___________________NOW_____>
Taking a shower he called

a. She left when I arrived.

<______________________________________________________________________>

40
b. I’ve been studying French for 3 years.

<______________________________________________________________________>

c. Next Saturday, I’ll be laying on a beach.

<______________________________________________________________________>

Part 4: Putting it all together

Fully analyze the following on a language analysis sheet and attach to assignment.

a. She’s been playing tennis since she was four.

b. You don’t have to wear a hat.

This assignment was developed by S. Vogel & adapted by M. Blanchard 2018.

Common reasons for resubmission


 Not following instructions
 Not using appropriate symbols for marking relevant features of pronunciation (IPA, linking, omitted sounds,
stress)
 Including irrelevant or inappropriate CCQs
 Including unclear or ineffective timelines

Cambridge Assessment Criteria: Successful candidates can demonstrate their learning by:
 Analyzing language correctly for teaching purposes
 Correctly using terminology relating to form, meaning and phonology when analyzing language
 Accessing reference materials and referencing information they have learned about language to an
appropriate source
 Using written language that is clear, accurate and appropriate to the task.

41
ASSIGNMENT: SKILLS RELATED TASK
Name: 1st Submission 2nd Submission

NOT TO STANDARD

TO STANDARD
Tutor feedback and Tutor feedback

STANDARD

STANDARD
NOT TO
resubmission guidance if

D YET
YET
necessary
Identify receptive skill to be practiced
and relate task design to skill practiced
using correct terminology (rationale 1)

Submit an appropriate receptive skills


task of your own design (1)

Identify receptive skill to be practiced


and relate task design to skill practiced
using correct terminology
(rationale 2)
Submit an appropriate receptive skills
task of your own design (2)

Identify productive skill to be practiced


and relate task design to skill practiced
using correct terminology (rationale 3)

Submit an appropriate productive skills


task of your own design.

Submit an outline of the receptive skills


lesson plan

Find, select, reference info from one or


more sources
Use written language that is clear,
accurate and appropriate to the task
Word count of 750-1000
Tutor signature and date:

Double marked by:


Resubmit
Pass

Pass

Fail

42
SKILLS RELATED TASK

WRITING
Use the bulleted points as headings in your assignment.

 Rationale for TEXT

Include a copy of the text and reference the source. Write a rationale for the text including both positive and
negative aspects where applicable. Comment on the following aspects:
Criteria: interest, level, vocabulary, format, genre, length (compare with textbook texts and audio scripts)

 Rationale for TASK 1 (receptive)


Identify which receptive skill and sub-skills could be practiced in relation to the text. Design a task that you could
use to practice these sub-skills. Provide a rationale for the task to explain why it is effective for the text you
chose and how it facilitates practice of the sub-skill. (See grid below). In the rationale, comment on the
following Criteria: sub-skill practiced, length of task, level of vocabulary in task, what makes the task engaging,
degree to which the task reflects ‘real life reading/ listening‘ text, top-down / bottom up order of tasks from
general to specific and any other relevant features.

Task type Sub-skill


TASK 1 (Choose ONE of the following (a or b)– either gist OR specific information depending on text.
a. Read for gist Skimming
b. Read for specific information Scanning
TASK 2
Read for a deeper comprehension Intensive reading
TASK 3
Production Task Writing or speaking (fluency)

Attach the task as appendices to the assignment. You must submit this task as you would give it to students.
Tasks should be professionally presented, appropriately referenced and should include the answers.

 Rationale for TASK 2 (receptive)


Repeat above for task 2.

 Rationale for TASK 3 (productive)


Identify which productive skills (writing or speaking) could be practiced after the receptive skills activities.
Design one task that you could use to practice this skill. Provide a rationale for the task to explain why it is
effective for the text you chose and how it facilitates practice of the productive skill. NOTE: “discuss/talk to your
partner about…” is not a task!

Attach the task as an appendix to the assignment. You must submit all tasks as you would give it to students in a
lesson.

43
You must do some background reading on language skills and reference this in the assignment. You might look
in Learning Teaching by Jim Scrivener or The Practice of English Language Teaching by Jeremy Harmer.
Information re: top down and bottom up approaches to a text is particularly relevant. Direct
quotes must not be longer than 2 typed sentences in your text. Quotes must be relevant to the tasks you
designed.

Word limit: 750-1000 words. Please include your word count. Word limit does NOT include materials in the
appendices.

 Lesson Plan Outline


Submit an outline of a 40-minute lesson indicating clearly the sequence of activities you might use. This is NOT a
full-blown lesson plan; you will only include the stages, stage aims and activity titles, not the procedure.

 Appendices MUST include:


Text (referenced)
Task 1 (with answers)
Task 2 (with answers)
Task 3 (with answers where appropriate)
Lesson Plan Outline (see below)
Appendices are NOT included in your word count.

Useful websites
 http://www.thetimesinplainenglish.com/
 https://breakingnewsenglish.com/
 https://simple.wikipedia.org
 https://www.theguardian.com/education/series/learning-english

Common reasons for resubmission/ failed assignments

 Not following instructions


 Assignment/tasks focuses on specific language (grammar or vocabulary) rather than skills.
 Tasks do not practice sub-skill described.
 Tasks are not professionally presented.
 Production tasks are not appropriately scaffolded

Cambridge Assessment Criteria for SRT Assignment


Candidates can demonstrate their learning by:
 Correctly using terminology that relates to skills and sub-skills
 Relating task design to language skills practice
 Finding, selecting and referencing information from one or more sources using written language that is
clear, accurate and appropriate to the task.

44
ASSIGNMENT: LESSONS FROM THE CLASSROOM
Name: 1st11st Submission 2nd Submission

NOT TO STANDARD YET

NOT TO STANDARD
Tutor feedback and Tutor feedback

TO STANDARD

TO STANDARD
standard yet
resubmission guidance if

standard
necessary

Noting their own T

teaching strengths in
different situations in
light of feedback from
learners, teachers and
teacher educators (2)

Noting their own


weaknesses in different
situations in light of
feedback from learners,
teachers and teacher
educators (2)

Describing in a specific
way how they might
develop their ELT
knowledge and skills
beyond the course (3)

Using written language


that is clear, accurate and
appropriate to the task

Word count of 750-1000


Tutor signature and date:

Double marked by:


Resubmit
Pass

Pass

Fail

45
Lessons from the Classroom

Part A
PARAGRAPH 1: STRENGTH #1
Identify the strength
Give a specific example of a time when you used this and say how it benefitted the lesson.

PARAGRAPH 2: REPEAT FOR STRENGTH #2

Part B
PARAGRAPH 3: AREA TO WORK ON #1
Give a specific example of a time when you saw a colleague or an experienced teacher do it well.
Say what you will do to improve this in the future.

PARAGRAPH 4: REPEAT FOR AREA TO WORK ON #2

Part C
PARAGRAPH 5: IDEA FOR FUTURE DEVELOPMENT #1
Specify what it is and how it will enable you to develop into a better teacher. Include professional development
opportunities (subscribing to journals, completing online grammar courses, attending conferences, studying a
foreign language, making presentations… Give specific examples. You can find this information on the internet.

PARAGRAPH 6: REPEAT IDEA FOR FUTURE DEVELOPMENT #2

PARAGRAPH 7: REPEAT IDEA FOR FUTURE DEVELOPMENT #3

THERE IS NO NEED TO WRITE MORE THAN A ONE-SENTENCE INTRODUCTION.

750 - 1000 words (maximum)

46
PLAGIARISM POLICY

“Plagiarism (from Latin plagiare "to kidnap") is the practice of claiming, or implying, original authorship or
incorporating material from someone else's written or creative work, in whole or in part, into one’s own without
adequate acknowledgment. (http://www.wikipedia.org accessed on April 22nd 2014)

In terms of the CELTA course, this would be


Copying someone else´s assignment (in whole or in part).
Getting another person to write an assignment for you.
Lifting ideas from published source without referencing it (this is especially important in the Language
Skills Related Task assignment)
Copying parts of published material without adequately referencing the source.

Of course you can, and are encouraged to, refer to sources of background reading. Here are some ways and
conventions for referencing:

Paraphrasing what the writer has said.


As Scrivener says, encouraging students to read quickly when reading for the first time can help build confidence
when they don´t understand every word (Scrivener, p 153)

Direct quotation from the book. Don´t overdo this. The quotation should not be longer than 2 lines.
According to Scrivener “it´s actually not necessary to understand every work in order to understand the
information you might need from a recording” (Scrivener, p 147)

Footnotes – quote directly or paraphrase, then footnote author / year / page number at bottom of page*

And…remember to include a bibliography of any books /resources you´ve quoted or consulted when writing an
assignment. This should be written like this:

Author surname, Author first name, year, Title of book in italics or underlined, publisher

E.g. Scrivener, Jim, 1994, Learning Teaching, Macmillan Heinemann

Failure to comply with the above guidelines may result in exclusion from the course with no warning.
I have read and understand the plagiarism policy.

____________________________________________________
Trainee signature

*
Like this: Scrivener, Jim, 1994, Learning Teaching, Macmillan Heinemann

47
CAMBRIDGE GRADE DESCRIPTORS
Pass: Candidates’ planning and teaching show satisfactory understanding of English language learning
and teaching processes.

Candidates can plan effectively with guidance. They can analyze target language adequately and generally select
appropriate resources and tasks for successful language and language skills development.

Candidates can deliver satisfactory language and skills lessons, using a variety of classroom teaching techniques
with a degree of success.

Candidates show some awareness of learners and some ability to respond so that learners benefit from the
lessons.

Candidates can reflect on some key strengths and weaknesses and generally use these reflections to develop
their teaching skills. 
 All CELTA assessment criteria are achieved. Some may be less well achieved. CELTA
requirements for written work are met. 


Pass B 
 Candidates’ planning and teaching show good understanding of English language learning and
teaching processes.

Candidates can plan effectively with some guidance. They can analyze target language well and select
appropriate resources and tasks for successful language and language skills development.

Candidates can deliver effective language and skills lessons, using a variety of classroom teaching techniques
successfully.

Candidates show good awareness of learners and can respond so that learners benefit from the lessons.

Candidates can reflect on key strengths and weaknesses and can generally use these reflections to develop their
teaching skills. 
 All CELTA assessment criteria are achieved and some are well achieved. CELTA requirements
for written work are met.

Pass A: Candidates’ planning and teaching show excellent understanding of English language learning
and teaching processes.

Candidates can plan effectively with minimal guidance. They can analyze target language thoroughly and select
highly appropriate resources and tasks for successful language and language skills development.

Candidates can deliver effective language and skills lessons, using a variety of classroom teaching techniques
successfully.

Candidates show very good awareness of learners and can respond so that learners benefit from the lessons.

Candidates can reflect on key strengths and weaknesses and can consistently use these reflections to develop
their teaching skills. 
 All CELTA assessment criteria are achieved and most are well achieved. CELTA
requirements for written work are met. 


Fail 
 Candidates’ planning and teaching show minimal understanding of English language learning and
teaching processes. 
 Candidates’ performance does not match all of the Pass descriptors. 
 Some CELTA
assessment criteria are not achieved and/or CELTA requirements for written work are not met.

48
FINAL REPORT EXAMPLE

School logo here

This is to certify that

Bahar Alif

Attended 120 hours of a 120-hour initial teacher training course leading to the

Cambridge Certificate in English Language Teaching to Adults (CELTA)

at

Centre Name

Course Date

The following provisional grade was awarded:

PASS
Please note that this is an internal course report and that the final grade is subject to
confirmation by Cambridge ESOL Teaching Awards.

The course included collaborative planning, peer observation and shared evaluation and feedback.
Within this framework each participant completed 6 hours of individual teaching, which was observed
and assessed by an experienced trainer. The course also included 60 hours of input and 6 hours of
observation of experienced teachers.
A more detailed report can be found on the reverse of this document.

49
ACHIEVEMENTS IN INDIVIDUAL ASSESSMENT AREAS
The grades in this section refer to the two assessment areas in the Cambridge CELTA Syllabus and Assessment
Guidelines. Please note that written assignments are graded Pass or Fail. Classroom teaching skills are graded as
Pass A, Pass B, Pass or Fail. A full description of topics covered in each area can be found on the Cambridge
website (www.cambridgeesol.org)
Preparing, planning and practising teaching: Grade: Pass
Written assignments: Grade: Pass
Overall recommended grade: PASS

PERFORMANCE DESCRIPTOR FOR A PASS GRADE


“Candidates’ planning and teaching show satisfactory understanding of English language learning and
teaching processes.
 Candidates can plan effectively with guidance. They can analyse target language
adequately and generally select appropriate resources and tasks for successful language
and language skills development.

 Candidates can deliver satisfactory language and skills lessons, using a variety of
classroom teaching techniques with a degree of success.

 Candidates show some awareness of learners and some ability to respond so that
learners benefit from the lessons.

 Candidates can reflect on some key strengths and weaknesses and generally use these
reflections to develop their teaching skills. 

“They will continue to need guidance to help them develop and broaden their range of skills as teachers
in post”.

OVERALL COMMENT
XXXX was a focused, hardworking member of the course. S/he worked hard to develop a solid understanding of
course principles and to apply these to a range of lessons including starting to prepare her/his lessons in
sufficient detail with guidance from tutors. S/he placed a high priority on developing her/his teaching skills and
became increasingly responsive to feedback. XXXX was professional and supportive of her/his colleagues and
would work well within a team. As part of an action plan for her/his own professional development, XXX could
continue to focus on the following action points:

1)
2)
3)

Missy Blanchard Jackie Hadel


Main Course Tutor Assistant Course Tutor

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CENTRE COMPLAINTS PROCEDURE

In compliance with Cambridge CELTA policy, candidates are reminded that if they experience problems outside
the expected level of stress and the factors they accepted in signing the Disclaimer on the application form; or if
they feel they have a justifiable complaint about the delivery of the course, they should first raise the issue with
the Main Course Tutor.

In order to ensure that the issue is given due attention, the candidate should first make an appointment with
the Main Course Tutor to discuss the problem at a private meeting.

At the meeting, the candidate should state clearly the grounds for his or her complaint, and the Main Course
Tutor will, with the candidate, decide on a path of action to address the area of difficulty to their mutual
satisfaction. If necessary, a follow-up meeting will be scheduled.

Finally, if the issue cannot be resolved satisfactorily at this level, the candidate has the right to request that the
complaint be forwarded to Cambridge ESOL by the Center. The Center is bound under the terms of the Course
Provision Agreement to adhere to this request

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SELF-EVALUATION TASKS
SELF EVALUATION TASK TP 1: RAPPORT & DYNAMICS

1. Did you introduce yourself and write your name on the board?

2. Do you know the learners’ names? Yes/Mostly/Partially/No

3. Did you use the learners’ names?

4. Did you smile?

5. Did you speak to the learners as if they were a) normal people, or b) just students?

6. Did you speak to them as if they were children instead of adults?

7. Did learners tell you anything personal about themselves of interest to you?

8. Did you show interest in the content of what they were saying? How?

9. Were you able to have a laugh or joke with them at any point?

10. Did you allow learners sufficient time to speak themselves or did you tend to dominate?

11. Did you use a combination of a) sitting b) standing and c) monitoring/circulating?

12. Was there enough variety of interaction patterns: individual/pair/group/whole class?

13. How many times did you praise individual learners? Whole class?

14. Were you relaxed? Yes/Mostly/Partially/No

15. What 2 things could you do to feel more relaxed or confident?

a)

b)

16. Were you aware of any personal habits that present themselves when you teach, e.g. mumbling,
fidgeting, speaking too fast or too much, speaking too loud or too softly repeating something like “Okay”
a lot, etc.?

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SELF EVALUATION TASK TP 2: TEACHER TALK & TASK SETTING
Teacher Talk

1. How was the volume of your voice? Too loud/About right/Too soft

2. Are you able to vary your volume depending on whether you are talking to individual learners or the
whole group? Yes/Mostly/Sometimes/No

3. Was your own use of language accurate? Yes/Mostly/Needs improvement

4. Was your own speech clear? Yes/Mostly/Partially/No

5. Did you resort to inappropriately simplified English at any point? Yes/No

6. Did you speak to the learners as if they were:


a) normal people, or
b) just students there to be taught?

7. Did you speak to them as if they were children instead of adults? Yes/No

8. How was the quantity of your Teacher Talking Time (TTT)? Too much/About right

9. What effect on rapport do you think too much TTT has?

Eliciting

10. One way of minimizing TTT and maximizing learners’ STT while activating more of their thought/learning
processes is to employ the technique of eliciting. Were there any examples of effective eliciting in your
lesson? What were they?

11. Were there any ineffective examples of eliciting from your lesson?

12. Which of the following techniques for eliciting could you use in your next lesson?
a) verbal eliciting
b) eliciting from visuals (pictures/slide/drawing /handout/course book?
c) eliciting from realia (an object)
d) all of the above

(Continued on next page)

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TP 2 continued: Task Setting

1. Were you able to successfully get the attention of the whole group? Yes/Sometimes/No

2. If yes, how did you achieve this? If not, what could you do to achieve this more successfully in
subsequent lessons?

3. Did you remember to handout materials AFTER setting up task?

4. Did you have students “restrict access to text” while setting up tasks? (Having students fold paper to
reveal only one activity or having students turn papers over while tasks were being set).

5. Instruction checking questions (ICQs) are one way of checking to make sure that learners understand
what to do. Did you use these at any point? Were they effective?

6. Demonstrations or use of ‘demos’ not only help to set up task effectively, they also provide
contextualized transitions between various stages of your lesson. Which of the following types of
demos did you include in todays lesson?

a) Demonstrating an activity yourself


b) Demonstrating an activity with a stronger learner
c) Doing the first example of an exercise together as a class
d) Showing how to do an exercise on the board

7. Rate your instructions giving today. Excellent/Reasonable/Needs work/Abysmal

8. Why do you think this was the case?

9. What 3 things could you do to improve your instructions?


a)
b)
c)

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SELF EVALUATION TASK TP 3: PLANNING

1. Consider how successfully this particular lesson worked for these particular learners. Name 3 things
that were most successful:
a)
b)
c)

2. Name 3 things that you would do differently of you were able to teach this lesson again:
a)
b)
c)

3. Lesson planning doesn’t just involve the lesson plan document itself, but all the processes that go into
conceiving of and preparing a lesson for a group of learners. How long did you spend planning this
lesson?

4. What was our favorite aspect of planning this lesson?

5. What was your least favorite aspect of planning this lesson?

6. Did planning make you feel more confident with the lesson?

7. Did the plan help provide direction for you:

a) during the planning stage?


b) during the lesson?

8. Consider our procedural detail. How did this provide direction for you?

9. Could a substitute teacher teach your lesson from this lesson plan?

10. Consider your analysis of language. How did this help you?

11. Consider your anticipated problems/solutions. Hos did these help you?

12. Did you plan for a variety of interaction patterns, activity types and types of materials? For example?

13. If you taught this lesson again, what changes/additions would you make in planning?

14. What aspects of planning would you like more clarification on from your tutor(s)?

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SELF EVALUATION TASK TP 4: THE LEARNERS
1. Consider how successfully this particular lesson worked for this particular group of learners. Name 3
things that were most successful.
a)

b)

c)

2. Name 3 things that you would do differently if you we able to teach this lesson again.
a)

b)

c)

3. What’s your understanding of the principle behind these statements? And do you agree?
“Teach the learners and not the plan.” “People are more important than plans.”

4. What advice can you give the new teachers taking on this group of learners in terms of:
a. Planning

b. Teaching

5. What are this group’s primary / ongoing learning priorities or needs at this point? (And provide
evidence for this if you can, e.g. examples/errors, etc.)
a)

b)

c)

6. What do you anticipate you will need to focus on with the new level in terms of:
a) Their needs at the new level
b) Your own teaching skills at the new level

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SELF EVALUATION TASK TP 5: TASK ACHIEVEMENT
1. In general, did learners do what you wanted them to do today? Why? Why not?

2. Consider timing and level of challenge. Did learners actually complete all the tasks activities you set for
them today? Why? Why not?

3. Consider task achievement. How successful were the learners at those tasks/activities? Why? Why not?

4. So overall, what did learners learn from the lesson today?

5. Was the planning of this lesson successful? Why? Why not?

6. What did you learn:


a) from planning this lesson?

b) from delivering this lesson?

c) about the differences between the levels (if you taught the new level today?)

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SELF EVALUATION TASK TP 6: GENERAL REFLECTION
1. What were the 3 main strengths from the lesson?
a)

b)

c)

2. How did these help the learners achieve the lesson aims?

3. If you taught a language focused lesson (grammar lexis, functions), how effectively were your
techniques for clarifying meaning, form, pronunciation (e.g. eliciting, concept checking, drilling,
highlighting form, and guided discovery?

4. If you taught a skills lesson (reading, listening, speaking, writing) how did you make sure that learners
actually did the tasks in the way that you wanted them to and thereby practiced or developed what you
actually wanted them to practice / develop?

5. What issues did learners have with what you were teaching them? Provide concrete evidence for this,
e.g. examples of specific errors, completing tasks incorrectly, etc.

6. Did you support learners with these issues? If yes, how did you do this? If not, how could you have
supported them?

7. Considering all the above, were your lesson aims met? Why? Why not?

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SELF EVALUATION TASK TP 7/8: GENERAL SELF-REFLECTION
1. What were the 3 main strengths from the lesson?
a)

b)

c)

How did these help you achieve your lesson aims?


a)

b)

c)

2. If you taught a language focused lesson (grammar lexis, functions), how effectively were your
techniques for clarifying meaning, form, pronunciation (e.g. eliciting, concept checking, drilling,
highlighting form, guided discovery, etc.) OR how effective were your feedback and correction
techniques?

3. If you taught a skills lesson (reading, listening, speaking, writing) how did you make sure that learners
actually did the tasks in the way that you wanted them to and thereby practiced or developed what you
actually wanted them to practice / develop?

4. What issues did learners have with what you were teaching them? Provide concrete evidence for this,
e.g. examples of specific errors, completing tasks incorrectly, etc.

5. Did you support learners with these issues? If yes, how did you do this? If not, how could you have
supported them?

6. Considering all the above, were your lesson aims met? Why? Why not?

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SELF EVALUATION TASK TP 8/9: FINAL REFLECTIONS
1. What 2-3 things were the learners able to do (or do better) at the end of the lesson? What evidence fo
you have of this?

a)

Evidence:

b)

Evidence:

c)

Evidence:

2. If you could change 2 things about the way you taught today’s lesson, what would you change?
a)

b)

3. On a scale of 1-5 (5 being the highest) how engaged were the learners throughout the lesson?

1 2 3 4 5 What evidence do you have of this?

Final Thoughts
List the three aspects of the CELTA that you found most useful.

a)

b)

c)

What advice would you give anyone taking the CELTA?

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