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Developmental Lesson Plan

Teacher Candidate: Stephanie Steinberg, Angela Davidheiser, Megan Fink Date: 11/4/18

Group Size: 20 Allotted Time: 40 minutes Grade Level: 2nd Grade

Subject or Topic: Newton’s Laws of Motion (Lesson 2)

Common Core/PA Standard(s):

● 3.2.1.B2 Demonstrate various types of motion. Observe and describe how pushes and
pulls change the motion of objects.
● 3.2.3.B1 Explain how movement can be described in many ways.
● 3.2.P.B6 Use Newton’s laws of motion and gravitation to describe and predict the
motion of objects ranging from atoms to the galaxies.

Learning Targets/Objectives:

● The second-grade students will identify various types of motion by creating a science
wheel that describes Newton’s Laws of Motion.
● The second-grade students will apply concepts of Newton’s Law by listing examples of
each Law of Motion.

Assessment Approaches: Evidence:

1. Turn and talk 1. Whole group discussion- share one


2. Science content wheel idea from each pair out loud
3. Exit Ticket 2. Observation and checklist
3. Pick one of Newton’s Law and give an
example of it.

Assessment Scale:

(Score accuracy of exit ticket using the scale below)

1- Below Basic 2- Basic 3- Proficient


( example does not match the law) ( example somewhat portrays the law) ( example accurately portrays the
law)

Subject Matter/Content:

Prerequisites:

● Basic examples of force in everyday life (ex: pushing a button in an elevator)


● Basic examples of motion in everyday life (ex: tires on a car)
● What does it mean to be “at rest”- (ex: to be still, or not moving)
● Basic concept of mass and matter
● Basic concept of weight (light versus heavy)

Key Vocabulary:

● Force- “a push or a pull”


● Motion- “a change in the position of an object”
● At rest- “to be still or not moving”
● First Law- “an object at rest will stay at rest unless acted on by an unbalanced force”
● Second Law- “the force exerted by an object is equal to the mass of that object times
its acceleration”
● Third Law- “for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction”
● Mass- “the amount of matter in an object”
● Matter- “anything that takes up space and has weight”
● Reaction- “an action that occurs because of another action”

Content/Facts:

● Force and Motion Description (PP slide 1)


○ Explain force and motion
○ Force (definition)
○ Motion (definition)
○ What does it mean to be “at rest”?
○ At rest (definition)
● Content connections with Newton’s Laws (PP slide 3)
○ Matter (definition)
○ What are some examples of things that are made out of matter?
○ Example: objects like a soccer ball, a school desk, a car, etc.
○ How is mass associated with Newton’s Laws?
○ Mass (definition)
○ Explain how mass is related to weight
○ Make connections between weight and movement
● Newton’s Laws of Motion (PP slides 4-7)
○ Isaac Newton (PP slide 4)
○ First Law (definition) (PP slide 5)
○ First Law real-life examples (PP slide 5)
○ Second Law (definition) (PP slide 6)
○ Second Law real-life examples (PP slide 6)
○ Third Law (definition) (PP slide 7)
○ Third Law real-life examples (PP slide 7))

Introduction/Activating/Launch Strategies:

● The teacher will open the PowerPoint slide on the computer and display the
presentation on the board.
● Slide One/Target question: “What are some ways that we can show motion? What kind
of actions could you use to make an object move that is not already moving?
● The teacher will introduce the lesson by facilitating a group discussion that inquires
about student’s background knowledge of motion.
● The teacher will begin by saying “Okay boys and girls, today we are going to think
about motion and investigate how motion works.”
● Next, the teacher will introduce the target question by reading it off the board.
● Teacher: “Let’s think about how motion works when you toss a ball in the air.”
● The teacher will quickly demonstrate how motion works by holding a ball and tossing
it gently in the air.
● The teacher will hold up a ball and apply force using their hands to push the ball into
the air. The ball will make an up/down motion, and may even make a spin motion in
the air.
● Through this quick example, students can see how force is related to motion.
● The teacher could say “Now, I want you to think about different types of motion that
you see every day. Let’s come up with some ideas to explain how we can make
something move.”
● Then the teacher will provide directions by telling the students to think about the target
question on their own, and then share with a partner to brainstorm and share ideas.
● The students will turn and talk with a partner, discussing the target question while the
teacher walks around to observe partner discussion.
● The teacher will bring the class back together by refocusing their attention on the target
question, and allowing time for the students to share an idea that they came up with
during the turn and talk activity.
● As we go through the turn and talk activity, make connections between matter, mass,
and weight, and how these aspects can affect motion.
● As we make begin to make connections, the teacher will move to slide two of the
PowerPoint, to further discuss content.

Development/Teaching Approaches

● Prior to the lesson, the teacher will place a materials box at each group’s work area.
● Each group will receive a materials box, a science wheel paper set per student, exit
ticket, scissors, and colored pencils.
● The teacher will pull up the second slide of the PowerPoint, revisiting concepts of
force, motion, and at rest from our gravity lesson on the previous day.
● As we make begin to make connections, the teacher will move to slide three of the
PowerPoint, to further discuss content such as matter, mass, and weight.
● During the first two PowerPoint slides, the students will explore their materials boxes
by using observation techniques.
● The students will work with their small groups to look at the objects, feel the objects,
think about how the objects are related to force and motion (based off of content from
PP slides), and use their background knowledge to experiment with how we can use
the objects to show various aspects of motion.
● The teacher will move to slide four: Isaac Newton
● The teacher will begin the content lesson by giving brief directions
● Directions (step 1): “Now that we’ve talked a little bit about what we already know,
were going to explore how Isaac Newton formed the Laws of Motion. As we go
through each slide, I want you to think about what information is important and write
the facts down on your science wheel under the correct heading. We will begin with
the first section titled, Isaac Newton. Everyone please flip to (Facts About Isaac
Newton).”
● Teacher will host a short discussion going over the information on the second slide and
allowing students to share what they are writing with members of their group.
● Teacher will move to slide five: First Law of Motion
● The teacher will define the First Law of Motion and ask students to raise their hand to
give some examples of the first law.
● The teacher will facilitate this discussion by asking questions and proposing real-world
examples.
● Teacher will move to slide six: Second Law of Motion
● The teacher will define the Second Law of Motion and ask students to raise their hand
to give some examples of the second law.
● The teacher will scaffold this discussion by asking questions and proposing real-world
examples.
● Teacher will move to slide seven: Third Law of Motion
● The teacher will define the Third Law of Motion and asks students to raise their hand
to give some examples of the third law.
● Upon conclusion of the powerpoint, the teacher will explain to the students what we
will do to complete our science wheels.
● Explanation: “Using the facts that we recorded on our wheels, I want everyone to write
one example of each Law and to draw a picture showing an example of each Law of
Motion.”
● As the teacher explains (step 2), the teacher will hold up a science wheel and show the
students where to put their illustrations and examples.
● As the students are working on the science wheel and collaborating with their groups,
the teacher will walk around, observe, and record data on checklists to monitor student
progress and comprehension in real time.
● The teacher will provide class time for students to finish coloring and recording facts
on their Laws of Motion science wheel.
● As we finish with this lesson, the teacher will hand out one exit ticket to each student
and give directions to complete it.
● Directions: “Please pick one of Newton’s Laws and either write or illustrate an
example of that law on the exit ticket. When you are finished, please turn in your exit
ticket!”

Closure/Summarizing Strategies:

● As the lesson closes, the teacher will show the students an incline plane manipulative.
● The teacher will tell the students to look at the tool and think about how it could be
used to show motion or movement of another object.
● The teacher may pose questions to facilitate student thinking.
● Q1: “How do you think we could use this tool to make another object move?”
● Q2: “What kind of object do you think we could use to show motion using this tool?
● The teacher will ask the students to brainstorm ideas for homework and come to class
the following day to share ideas.

Accommodations/Differentiation:

● A student with a physical disability who has difficulties using scissors, may have the
teacher or a cooperating student cut out the wheel for them.
● A student with a physical disability who has difficulty with fine motor skills like
writing, may have a teacher or a cooperating student scribe for them.
○ The student could tell the scribe what to write and the scribe may write it in the
appropriate sections.
● A student with a physical disability may find an image using educational search
engines to explain each of the three laws of motion rather than writing it down for the
exit ticket.
○ The student may verbally tell the teacher one example of each Law instead of
write it down while the teacher completes the assessment scale in real time.
Materials/Resources:

● Blank science wheel paper set (1 per person/20 per class size)
● Color pencil sets (1 per table/6 per class size)
● Scissors (1 per person/20 per class size)
● Stapler (1 per class size)
● Exit ticket slip
● Ball
● PowerPoint slides

Foresman, S. (2006). Science: See learning in a whole new light student edition. New York,

NY: Pearson Education, Inc.

Foresman, S. (2006). Science: See learning in a whole new light teacher’s edition. New York,

NY: Pearson Education, Inc.

Macmillan, McGraw-Hill. (2011). Science a closer look: Physical science teacher’s edition

grade 2. Columbus, OH: Macmillan/McGraw-Hill.


Reflective Response:
Report of Student Learning Target/Objectives Proficiency Levels

Remediation Plan (if applicable)

Personal Reflection Questions

Additional reflection/thoughts
Record Note Taking Sheet

Date: Teacher:

Objectives:
● 3.2.1.B2 Demonstrate various types of motion. Observe and describe how pushes and
pulls change the motion of objects.
● 3.2.3.B1 Explain how movement can be described in many ways.
● 3.2.P.B6 Use Newton’s laws of motion and gravitation to describe and predict the motion
of objects ranging from atoms to the galaxies.

Observed Comments

Student:

Student:
Exit Ticket

Name:___________________________________________Date:_______________________

Directions:

1. Pick one of Newton’s Laws

Newton’s ____________________ Law of Motion

2. Write and illustrate one example

Example:

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________

Example:
Observation and Checklist

Teacher: _____________________________ Student: _____________________

▢ The student is actively thinking about the main facts by determining which facts

from the PowerPoint are the most important.

▢ The student is participating by recording the important facts from the PowerPoint

on to the science wheel.

▢ The student shows that they understand the content by providing examples of

each of Newton’s Laws during the PowerPoint.

▢ The student practices illustrating examples by drawing or sketching their ideas.

▢ The student stays on task by following along with each PowerPoint slide and

participating in classroom discussion.

Additional Comments:

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