Sie sind auf Seite 1von 22

06/03/2017 Laparoscopic inguinal and femoral hernia repair in adults ­ UpToDate

Official reprint from UpToDate® 
www.uptodate.com ©2017 UpToDate®

Laparoscopic inguinal and femoral hernia repair in adults

Authors: George A Sarosi, Jr, MD, Kfir Ben­David, MD
Section Editor: Michael Rosen, MD
Deputy Editor: Wenliang Chen, MD, PhD поменять
прокси

All topics are updated as new evidence becomes available and our peer review process is complete.
Literature review current through: Feb 2017. | This topic last updated: Jan 27, 2016.

INTRODUCTION — Minimally invasive surgical approaches are increasingly popular because they offer the
potential for less postoperative pain and a quick return to normal activities. Laparoscopic repair of inguinal and
femoral hernia is no exception, with laparoscopic approaches first used to treat inguinal hernias in 1992 [1].
The learning curve for laparoscopic hernia repair is prolonged with estimates ranging between 50 and 100
procedures. However, when performed by an experienced surgeon (>100 repairs), hernia recurrence is low
[2].

Laparoscopic repair of inguinal and femoral hernias is discussed here. The classification and diagnosis of
inguinal and femoral hernias, treatment approach, and open surgical techniques for inguinal and femoral
hernia repair are discussed elsewhere. (See "Classification, clinical features and diagnosis of inguinal and
femoral hernias in adults" and "Overview of treatment for inguinal and femoral hernia in adults" and "Open
surgical repair of inguinal and femoral hernia in adults".)

ANATOMIC CONSIDERATIONS — A clear understanding of the anatomy of the groin and its anatomic
approaches is important for successful laparoscopic hernia repair (picture 1A­C). The general anatomy of the
abdominal wall and groin region and the course of the nerves to the abdominal wall are discussed elsewhere.
(See "Open surgical repair of inguinal and femoral hernia in adults", section on 'Anatomic considerations' and
"Open surgical repair of inguinal and femoral hernia in adults", section on 'Nerves of the groin region'.)

Laparoscopic repair approaches — When performing laparoscopic inguinal or femoral hernia repair, the
hernia defect is approached from its posterior aspect and the repair involves placing mesh in the preperitoneal
space (figure 1). The anatomic approach to the preperitoneal space depends upon the laparoscopic
technique used for hernia repair. The two commonly used approaches to laparoscopic repair of inguinal and
femoral hernias are the transabdominal preperitoneal hernia repair (TAPP) and the totally extraperitoneal
hernia repair (TEP) approaches.

TEP repair — TEP is performed in the preperitoneal space and was developed to avoid the risks
associated with entering the peritoneal cavity [3,4]. The surgeon develops a space between the peritoneum
and the anterior abdominal wall so that the peritoneum is never violated. In experienced hands, this approach
has the advantage of eliminating the risk of intraabdominal adhesion formation [4,5].

TAPP repair — TAPP repair involves the placement of mesh in a preperitoneal position, which is covered
by peritoneum to keep the mesh away from the bowel. Because TAPP is performed transabdominally, it has a
larger working space than TEP, with ready access to both groins, and can be attempted in patients with prior
lower abdominal surgery. However, TAPP can result in injuries to adjacent intraabdominal organs, adhesions
resulting in intestinal obstruction, or bowel herniation [5,6].

TAPP herniorrhaphy can be performed with or without robot assistance. Robot­assisted TAPP repair has the
same indications as the standard TAPP repair [7]. The use of a robot allows for easier suture fixation of the

Sci­Hub
mesh. However, no patient outcome data have been reported for this technique.
https://www.uptodate.com/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?

URL статьи или журнала, или DOI, или строка для поиска

http://www.uptodate.com.secure.sci­hub.cc/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?source=search_result&search=hern… 1/22
06/03/2017 Laparoscopic inguinal and femoral hernia repair in adults ­ UpToDate

INDICATIONS FOR LAPAROSCOPIC REPAIR — The definitive treatment of most hernias, regardless of their
origin or type, is surgical repair [2,8­10]. The indications for inguinal and femoral hernia repair in adults are
discussed elsewhere. (See "Overview of treatment for inguinal and femoral hernia in adults", section on
'Indications for surgical repair'.)

The laparoscopic approach to inguinal hernia repair is theoretically possible in nearly all inguinal hernias.
However, the precise role of laparoscopy in inguinal hernia repair remains somewhat controversial given the
increased costs and greater technical demands [11]. The laparoscopic approach is preferred by many
surgeons for bilateral, recurrent, and femoral hernias. The choice between open and laparoscopic inguinal поменять
and femoral hernia repair is discussed elsewhere. (See "Overview of treatment for inguinal and femoral hernia
прокси

in adults", section on 'Choosing a surgical approach'.)

Contraindications — Factors that may contraindicate a laparoscopic approach, and thus favor an open
approach, are listed below and are discussed in greater detail elsewhere. (See "Overview of treatment for
inguinal and femoral hernia in adults", section on 'Patients precluded from laparoscopic repair'.)

● Inability to tolerate general anesthesia
● Prior pelvic surgery in the preperitoneal space
● Incarcerated inguinal hernia
● Large scrotal hernia
● Ascites
● Active infection

PREOPERATIVE EVALUATION AND PREPARATION — Preoperative evaluation and preparation prior to
inguinal and femoral hernia repair, including thromboprophylaxis, prophylactic antibiotics, initial management
of complicated hernia, and choice of anesthesia, are discussed separately. Some surgeons require all patients
undergoing laparoscopic groin hernia repair to have a bladder catheter in place prior to beginning the
procedure to decompress the bladder and reduce the risk of bladder injury. Others use bladder catheterization
selectively in patients who are at risk for developing bladder distension during the procedure or urinary
retention after the procedure. (See "Overview of treatment for inguinal and femoral hernia in adults", section
on 'Preoperative preparation'.)

Equipment — Appropriate instrumentation and supplies should be readily available, and the proper
functioning of laparoscopic imaging equipment verified prior to initiating anesthesia. An angled laparoscope,
usually a 30° or a 45° scope, is used for these procedures, which allows for better visualization than a non­
angled laparoscope. (See "Instruments and devices used in laparoscopic surgery".)

● 10 mm 30° laparoscope

● Trocars ­ (2) 5 mm, (1) 10 to 12 mm

● Preperitoneal balloon dissector (eg, Spacemaker, Covidien), TEP only

● Polypropylene mesh, flat or preformed (eg, Bard 3D Max preformed mesh)

● Laparoscopic tack or strap applier (eg, Bard, Covidien, and Ethicon)

● Laparoscopic clip applier

Mesh for laparoscopic repair — Mesh is a necessary element of laparoscopic inguinal and femoral hernia
repair to provide a tension­free hernia repair, which is the recommended method [12­14]. Preformed mesh
that conforms to the preperitoneal space is available and is preferred by some surgeons over a flat piece of
mesh that needs to be trimmed to accommodate the patient's anatomy. The particular product or the method

Sci­Hub
used for placement is a matter of personal preference.
https://www.uptodate.com/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?

URL статьи или журнала, или DOI, или строка для поиска

http://www.uptodate.com.secure.sci­hub.cc/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?source=search_result&search=hern… 2/22
06/03/2017 Laparoscopic inguinal and femoral hernia repair in adults ­ UpToDate

Polypropylene woven mesh (eg, Marlex, Prolene, SurgiPro) has been used in essentially all studies
describing laparoscopic hernia repair and is preferred over other prosthetic materials. Expanded
polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE, Gore­Tex) is another material that is used extensively for incisional hernias,
but it has not been used for the laparoscopic inguinal and femoral hernia repair except for the intraperitoneal
onlay mesh (IPOM) technique. ePTFE provokes less of an inflammatory response, a process that is believed
to be particularly important in inguinal and femoral hernia repair. There are no direct trials comparing the two
materials, and in the absence of data describing the use of ePTFE for TEP or TAPP hernia repairs, we
suggest using polypropylene mesh for laparoscopic inguinal and femoral hernia repair. (See "Reconstructive
materials used in surgery: Classification and host response".) поменять
прокси

Polypropylene mesh is commercially available in light, medium, or heavy weight. In a systematic review of
patients who had laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair, the use of a light­weight mesh, as opposed to a heavy­
weight mesh, was associated with a lower incidence of chronic groin pain, groin stiffness, and foreign body
sensations without any increased risk for hernia recurrence [15].

Patient positioning — The patient is usually placed in 15° to 20° of Trendelenburg position to improve
exposure of the working area, which is particularly important with TAPP hernia repair to move the small bowel
away from the area of dissection.

CHOICE OF PROCEDURE: TEP OR TAPP? — There are limited data comparing the safety and
effectiveness of TEP with TAPP [16].

For surgeons with expertise in both techniques, we suggest the totally extraperitoneal (TEP) technique for
most male patients. For patients in whom the TEP technique is not appropriate or fails due to inability to
develop the preperitoneal space, conversion to a transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) approach can be
performed. On occasion, conversion to an open surgical approach may be necessary. Larger hernias,
especially large scrotal hernias, are probably best repaired open. In female patients with indirect inguinal
hernia, a TAPP approach may be easier. Indirect inguinal hernia sacs are frequently much more intimately
attached to the round ligament in women than are indirect sacs to the cord structures in males. In a large
series of hernia repairs in women, the TAPP repair produced the best outcomes, with low recurrence rates
[17].

A single randomized trial found less postoperative pain after TAPP, but shorter hospital stay with TEP [18]. A
systematic review that included this trial and eight retrospective studies found a lower risk of visceral injury
(small bowel, bladder), deep mesh infection, and incisional hernia with TEP repair [19]. However, the risk of
vascular injury (typically inferior epigastric artery) or conversion to an open procedure was lower with TAPP
repair. A later review evaluated complications and hernia recurrence rates for TEP and TAPP in studies
performed between 1990 and 1998 with those performed from 1999 to 2008 [16]. Overall complications and
recurrence rates improved in the second decade with increasing surgeon experience, and no significant
differences were identified between the techniques.

Both approaches are acceptable and one approach may be preferred over the other under specific clinical
circumstances. TAPP was the original approach, and TEP evolved to address some of the problems
associated with TAPP, but TEP repair is technically more challenging because of the limited working space,
which may explain higher conversion rates. Most surgical trainees in the United States learn TEP. Outside of
the United States, a TAPP approach may be more commonly used [16]. Although surgeons should learn both
techniques, they should use the technique with which they are most familiar.

● Favoring TEP:

• Intraabdominal adhesions – TEP avoids the abdominal space; however, if the peritoneum is violated
during the course of dissection, it is important to close the peritoneal defect to minimize adhesion

Sci­Hub
formation.
https://www.uptodate.com/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?

URL статьи или журнала, или DOI, или строка для поиска

http://www.uptodate.com.secure.sci­hub.cc/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?source=search_result&search=hern… 3/22
06/03/2017 Laparoscopic inguinal and femoral hernia repair in adults ­ UpToDate

• Can be used without general anesthesia – Rarely, TEP has been successfully accomplished with
neuraxial or local anesthesia with sedation [20­24]. However, patients who cannot tolerate general
anesthesia should generally undergo open inguinal herniorrhaphy instead of laparoscopic repair.

• Bilateral hernia – In a TEP repair, a single balloon dissection develops working spaces in both
groins, enabling placement of large pieces of mesh. With a TAPP approach, bilateral repair requires
two separate peritoneal incisions and dissections, which increase operative time and risk (eg,
adhesion formation, bowel obstruction or herniation). Nevertheless, some surgeons still prefer a
TAPP approach for bilateral hernia repair [25]. поменять
прокси
● Favoring TAPP:

• Prior pelvic surgery – In the face of prior preperitoneal pelvic dissection, it may not be possible to
develop the proper exposure for TEP repair.

• Occult hernia – For patients in whom a groin hernia is suspected but has been difficult to confirm on
imaging studies, a TAPP approach may offer a better view to determine the presence and location of
the hernia. (See "Classification, clinical features and diagnosis of inguinal and femoral hernias in
adults", section on 'Identifying occult hernia'.)

TECHNIQUES FOR REPAIR

Extraperitoneal exposure and dissection — The totally extraperitoneal (TEP) hernia repair avoids the
peritoneal cavity by developing a plane of dissection in the preperitoneal space. The anatomy of the
preperitoneal space and the location of the hernia defects are illustrated in the figure (figure 1). The TEP
approach allows access to both groin regions and provides exposure of the inferior epigastric vessels, femoral
vessels, pubic tubercle, Cooper's ligament, and spermatic cord.

Direct entry into the rectus sheath is via an incision just off the midline with blunt dissection to the linea
semicircularis (figure 1). The anatomic landmarks for entry into the preperitoneal space are the median
umbilical ligament and the hernia defect. The preperitoneal tissue is entered by establishing a plane between
the posterior surface of the rectus muscle and the posterior rectus sheath and peritoneum (figure 2).

To dissect the preperitoneal space and obtain exposure:

● Make an infraumbilical incision contralateral to the hernia, which increases the distance between the
incision and the hernia, and incise the anterior rectus sheath transversely. Retract the rectus muscle
laterally to allow a 10 mm blunt trocar to be placed (figure 3) through which a dissector can be used to
develop the preperitoneal space under direct vision using an angled laparoscope (figure 4). Alternatively,
a balloon dissector can be used to expand this potential space (figure 5).

● Bluntly dissect the preperitoneal space in the avascular plane between the peritoneum and the
transversalis fascia. Avoid the use of electrocautery during the dissection, as this can lead to nerve injury
[26].

● Identify the course of the epigastric artery and vein, and try to maintain their position anteriorly against
the abdominal wall. Occasionally, the balloon dissector may develop the wrong plane and will dissect the
epigastric vessels from the abdominal wall, which can make the remainder of the procedure more
challenging.

● Once the preperitoneal space is dissected below the arcuate line, place two additional 5 mm trocars in
the midline under direct vision (figure 3). Position one of these approximately 5 cm superior to the pubic
symphysis. Place the other cannula midway between the umbilicus and the pubic symphysis. Some
surgeons prefer to place these working cannulas lateral to the 10 mm umbilical trocar, contralateral to the

Sci­Hub https://www.uptodate.com/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?
hernia. Once the preperitoneal space is developed, insufflate the space through the 10 mm camera port.
URL статьи или журнала, или DOI, или строка для поиска

http://www.uptodate.com.secure.sci­hub.cc/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?source=search_result&search=hern… 4/22
06/03/2017 Laparoscopic inguinal and femoral hernia repair in adults ­ UpToDate

● The iliopubic tract (inguinal ligament) is not as well seen with a TEP approach, but can be felt at the lower
border of the internal inguinal ring. Direct hernia sacs often reduce spontaneously during the course of
dissection. Indirect sacs are more difficult to manage and can be quite adherent to the cord structures. To
identify an indirect sac, trace the epigastric vessels toward their origin to identify the spermatic cord as it
enters the internal ring (figure 6). Minimize dissection in the area of Cooper's ligament to avoid disrupting
the venous circle of Bendavid, a venous network fixed to the abdominal wall in the subinguinal space,
which can produce troublesome bleeding [27]. Avoid excessive dissection in the region of the femoral
canal, which can be identified by tracing Cooper's ligament laterally. Lymph nodes in the femoral canal
can produce bleeding, and excessive dissection can lead to the development of a femoral hernia.поменять
прокси

● Take care in dissecting an indirect hernia sac to ensure the vas deferens and the testicular blood vessels
are not injured. Oftentimes, a cord lipoma will also be removed during this process. Once a small (<1.5
cm) sac is mobilized, it should be returned back to the peritoneal cavity (figure 7). Larger indirect (>3 cm)
sacs that are difficult to dissect and reduce may need to be carefully divided just distal to the internal ring,
leaving the distal sac in situ within the inguinal canal.

Transabdominal exposure and dissection — As with most laparoscopic procedures, the peritoneal cavity
is entered during transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) hernia repair. The major advantage of the posterior
approach to groin hernias is that all three hernia defects (direct, indirect, and femoral) are well­visualized and
in close proximity to each other, allowing easy repair of any type of groin hernia.

To obtain exposure and dissect the preperitoneal space:

● Access the peritoneal cavity using standard techniques (eg, Hasson, Veress needle) at the umbilicus
using a 10 mm cannula. Once access to the peritoneal cavity has been established, insufflate the
abdomen and place two additional cannulas (5 mm) bilaterally in a horizontal plane with the umbilicus
(figure 8). Access techniques for laparoscopic surgery are discussed in detail elsewhere. (See
"Abdominal access techniques used in laparoscopic surgery".)

● Identify the median and medial umbilical ligaments, bladder, inferior epigastric vessels, vas deferens,
spermatic cord, iliac vessels, and hernia defects (figure 1). Incise the peritoneum beginning at the lateral
edge of the median umbilical ligament at least 4 cm above the hernia defect and extending 8 to 10 cm
laterally. For patients with bilateral hernias, a single transverse peritoneal incision extending from one
anterior superior iliac spine to another on the opposite side can be used rather than two separate
peritoneal incisions. It is important to make the incision sufficiently above the hernia defect to allow
dissection of 2 to 3 cm of normal fascia to provide sufficient mesh overlap after mesh placement.

● Develop the peritoneal flap in the avascular plane between the peritoneum and the transversalis fascia.
Mobilize the peritoneal flap to expose the pubic symphysis, Cooper's ligament, iliopubic tract, cord
structures, inferior epigastric vessels, and hernia spaces. Be careful to identify and avoid injury to the
femoral branch of the genitofemoral and lateral femoral cutaneous nerves.

● Gently reduce a direct inguinal hernia from the preperitoneal fat using gentle traction. Indirect sacs should
be mobilized from the cord structures and reduced into the peritoneal cavity (figure 9). A larger hernia
sac that is difficult to mobilize from the cord without undue trauma to the vas deferens or vasculature to
the testicle can be divided just distal to the internal ring, leaving the distal sac in situ within the inguinal
canal.

Mesh placement and fixation — Although some surgeons support nonfixation of mesh, we suggest mesh
fixation rather than nonfixation for laparoscopic hernia repair to avoid the complications associated with mesh
migration and mesh shrinkage.

Stapling/tacking injuries to the nerves are the most common source of postoperative neuralgia following

Sci­Hub https://www.uptodate.com/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?
laparoscopic hernia repair. This complication should be suspected if severe groin pain develops in the
URL статьи или журнала, или DOI, или строка для поиска

http://www.uptodate.com.secure.sci­hub.cc/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?source=search_result&search=hern… 5/22
06/03/2017 Laparoscopic inguinal and femoral hernia repair in adults ­ UpToDate

recovery room, and should prompt the surgeon to return to the operating room to remove the offending tack.
Inadvertently entrapping or otherwise injuring a nerve can also lead to chronic pain.

Although the nerves are essentially never seen during laparoscopic hernia repair except in the thinnest of
patients, nerve injuries can be prevented by avoiding the known course of the nerves relative to points of
mesh fixation. Some surgeons feel that not fixing the mesh is the best way to avoid injury, and also avoids the
costs of the staple and reduces operative time [28,29]. A systematic review of six randomized trials involving
772 patients compared mesh fixation with nonfixation [30]. An advantage was found for nonfixation in terms of
length of hospital stay (mean difference [MD] ­0.37, 95% CI ­0.57 to ­0.17 days), operative time ([MD] ­4.19,
поменять
95% CI ­7.77 to ­0.61 days), and cost. However, there was no significant difference in hernia recurrence, time
прокси

to return to normal activities, seroma, and postoperative pain. A later trial found similar outcomes, but worse
pain scores for staple fixation, but no differences in analgesic requirements [31]. Although nonfixation appears
to be safe in the short term, serious long­term complications can occur related to migration of the nonfixed
mesh, such as erosion of the mesh into adjacent organs. Thus, most surgeons continue to fix the mesh into
place using staples, tacks, or fibrin glue, each of which appear to have similar outcomes with regard to the risk
of recurrent hernia [32­35].

Metallic fixation devices (eg, Protak) provide greater fixation strength but can cause serious complications
such as adhesion formation or tack erosion into hollow viscera [36]. Other devices (eg, AbsorbaTack,
Permasorb, or SorbaFix) are bioabsorbable, but provide less fixation strength over time. Compared with
tacks, fibrin glue has been associated with less chronic groin pain when used to secure mesh during hernia
repairs [37].

Mesh placement for unilateral inguinal hernia repair is performed in a similar fashion for TEP and TAPP.
Bilateral repairs using a single piece of mesh can be performed much more easily with a TEP approach
because a single, large space is created, whereas with TAPP, each space is separately created. To place and
fix the mesh:

● Introduce a rolled up 15 X 10 cm piece of prosthetic mesh into the preperitoneal space through the 10
mm umbilical cannula once the dissection is completed and the hernia sac reduced.

● The landmarks for fixation of the mesh are the pubic tubercle, Cooper's ligament, posterior rectus sheath,
and the transversalis fascia at least 2 cm above to the hernia defect.

● Position the mesh so that it completely covers the direct, indirect, and femoral hernia spaces (figure 10).
Some surgeons slit the mesh longitudinally or vertically to accommodate the cord structures, however, we
prefer to simply place the mesh over the cord.

● Do not tack or staple the mesh below the iliopubic tract lateral to the spermatic cord and the epigastric
vessels to minimize the chance of damaging nerves and vascular structures [26]. This area contains the
"triangle of pain," which contains the lateral cutaneous nerve of the thigh and the femoral branch of the
genitofemoral nerve, and the adjacent "triangle of doom," which contains the external iliac artery and vein
defined medially by the vas deferens and laterally by the spermatic vessels.

Closure — Following the fixation of the mesh, the inferior peritoneal flap that is developed during TAPP repair
should be positioned over the mesh to isolate it from the peritoneal cavity using running suture, staples, tacks,
or a biological sealant. Avoid gaps when closing the peritoneum to minimize the likelihood of future small
bowel herniation and obstruction.

Once the hernia repair is completed, a long­acting local anesthetic (eg, bupivacaine) can be sprayed onto the
preperitoneal space and surfaces for preemptive analgesia.

The ports are removed and the preperitoneal space (TEP) or abdominal cavity (TAPP) is decompressed. The

Sci­Hub
fascia at the 10 mm umbilical cannula should be sutured to reduce the chance for future incisional hernia. We
https://www.uptodate.com/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?
use absorbable subcuticular sutures to close the skin incisions.
URL статьи или журнала, или DOI, или строка для поиска

http://www.uptodate.com.secure.sci­hub.cc/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?source=search_result&search=hern… 6/22
06/03/2017 Laparoscopic inguinal and femoral hernia repair in adults ­ UpToDate

TECHNIQUES FOR RECURRENT HERNIA REPAIR — When a laparoscopic repair is chosen for recurrent
inguinal hernia repair, either the TEP or TAPP repair can be used, but we prefer the TEP repair when
possible. The technical details of TEP and TAPP hernia repair are discussed in detail elsewhere. Several
technical points for laparoscopic repair of a recurrent inguinal hernia deserve mention and are discussed
below. (See 'TEP repair' above and 'TAPP repair' above.)

● The hernia sac may be difficult to reduce into the preperitoneal space because it often adheres densely
to the mesh from the prior anterior mesh repair, particularly prior mesh plug repairs. In this setting, divide
the indirect sac and seal over its proximal end using an endo­loop (detachable polypectomy snare) or поменять
clips. прокси

● Be prepared to manage pneumoperitoneum. Peritoneal tears are more common than during repairs of
primary hernias because of the dense adherence of the mesh to the peritoneum. Conversion to a TAPP
procedure may become necessary.

● Carefully examine the femoral space for the presence of a hernia during the dissection, since femoral
hernia is more common with recurrent hernia than with primary repairs [38].

Re­do laparoscopic repairs — Dissection of the preperitoneal plane is often difficult after a previous
posterior mesh repair. For that reason, an attempt at a repeat totally extraperitoneal (TEP) repair will often
result in a peritoneal breach, forcing conversion to a transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) repair. For patients
with prior lower midline or preperitoneal operations, either a laparoscopic TAPP repair with mesh or open
preperitoneal repair with mesh will be easier to perform with the ultimate choice of procedure depending upon
the expertise of the surgeon. In a patient who has not previously undergone an anterior repair, a tension­free
anterior mesh repair would be preferred over a laparoscopic repair for a hernia recurrence after a prior
laparoscopic repair.

POSTOPERATIVE CARE AND FOLLOW­UP — Most laparoscopic hernia repairs are performed on an
outpatient basis with the patient returning home once recovered from anesthesia. If the patient develops
severe groin pain in the recovery room, it may be a sign that a staple or tack has been inadvertently placed
through a nerve, and should prompt the surgeon to return to the operating room to remove the staple or tack.
Postoperative pain is usually well­controlled using nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents (NSAIDS), if not
contraindicated, with or without low dose narcotic agents. (See "Management of acute perioperative pain",
section on 'Oral analgesics'.)

Patients should be counseled to expect bruising and swelling in the groin. Follow­up in the office should be
scheduled for two weeks postoperatively, in the absence of other problems.

There are few high­quality data regarding the timing of return to work or strenuous activity following
laparoscopic hernia repair. Recommendations are tempered by the patient's pain tolerance. Patients can
generally return to work 48 hours after a laparoscopic hernia repair if they are not required to perform heavy
lifting or straining. If the patient is doing well without complications, they may resume any heavy lifting,
straining, or exercise two weeks after laparoscopic hernia repair.

COMPLICATIONS — Complications of laparoscopic inguinal and femoral hernia repair include wound or
mesh infection, seroma or hematoma formation, urinary retention, chronic groin pain, and hernia recurrence.
The same list of complications can also be seen after open repairs. (See "Overview of treatment for inguinal
and femoral hernia in adults", section on 'Morbidity and mortality' and "Overview of complications of inguinal
and femoral hernia repair".)

A 2012 metaanalysis found that patients who underwent laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair were more likely
to develop a recurrence than those who underwent open repairs (relative risk [RR] 2.06, 95% CI 1.26­3.37)
[39]. In subgroup analyses, totally extraperitoneal (TEP) (RR 3.72, 95% CI 1.66­8.35), but not transabdominal

Sci­Hub https://www.uptodate.com/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?
preperitoneal (TAPP) repair (RR 1.14, 95% CI 0.78­1.68), was associated with a higher recurrence rate
compared with open repairs. URL статьи или журнала, или DOI, или строка для поиска

http://www.uptodate.com.secure.sci­hub.cc/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?source=search_result&search=hern… 7/22
06/03/2017 Laparoscopic inguinal and femoral hernia repair in adults ­ UpToDate

Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair was also associated with more perioperative complications than open
repairs (RR 1.22, 95% CI 1.04­1.42). In this case, TAPP (RR 1.47, 95% CI 1.18­1.84), but not TEP (RR 1.05,
95% CI 0.85­1.30), was associated with a higher complication rate than open repairs.

The risk of chronic groin pain (RR 0.66, 95% CI 0.50­0.87) and numbness (RR 0.27, 95% CI 0.12­0.58) were
both lower in patients who underwent laparoscopic, as opposed to open, repairs.

The outcomes of inguinal and femoral hernia repair are further discussed in detail in another topic. (See
"Overview of complications of inguinal and femoral hernia repair".)
поменять
прокси
INFORMATION FOR PATIENTS — UpToDate offers two types of patient education materials, “The Basics”
and “Beyond the Basics.” The Basics patient education pieces are written in plain language, at the 5th to 6th
grade reading level, and they answer the four or five key questions a patient might have about a given
condition. These articles are best for patients who want a general overview and who prefer short, easy­to­
read materials. Beyond the Basics patient education pieces are longer, more sophisticated, and more
detailed. These articles are written at the 10th to 12th grade reading level and are best for patients who want
in­depth information and are comfortable with some medical jargon.

Here are the patient education articles that are relevant to this topic. We encourage you to print or e­mail
these topics to your patients. (You can also locate patient education articles on a variety of subjects by
searching on “patient info” and the keyword(s) of interest.)

● Basics topics (see "Patient education: Inguinal and femoral (groin) hernias (The Basics)")

SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS

● The two commonly used approaches for laparoscopic repair of groin hernia are the totally extraperitoneal
hernia repair (TEP) and the transabdominal preperitoneal hernia repair (TAPP), which approach the
hernia defect posteriorly. The drawback of the TAPP procedure is entry into the peritoneal cavity. The
TEP procedure, developed to avoid the risks of entering the peritoneal cavity, is technically more
challenging. (See 'Laparoscopic repair approaches' above.)

● Contraindications to a laparoscopic approach to inguinal and femoral hernia repair include prior surgery
in the preperitoneal space, active infection, incarcerated hernia, large scrotal hernias, ascites, and for
TAPP, inability to tolerate general anesthesia. (See 'Contraindications' above.)

● For most male patients, we suggest the totally extraperitoneal approach (TEP), provided the surgeon has
sufficient experience with the technique (Grade 2C). For patients in whom the TEP technique is not
appropriate (eg, large hernia, prior lower midline surgery) or fails due to inability to develop the
preperitoneal space, conversion to a transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) approach can be performed.
On occasion, conversion to an open surgical approach may be necessary. For most female patients, we
suggest the TAPP approach (Grade 2C). (See 'Choice of procedure: TEP or TAPP?' above.)

● We suggest mesh fixation, rather than no fixation, for all laparoscopic hernia repairs (Grade 2C). Mesh
fixation avoids complications associated with mesh migration and mesh shrinkage, although it can be
associated with inadvertent injury if a tack or suture is placed into a nerve. (See 'Mesh placement and
fixation' above.)

● Stapling/tacking injuries to the nerves are the most common source of postoperative neuralgia following
laparoscopic hernia repair. This complication should be suspected if severe groin pain develops in the
recovery room, and should prompt the surgeon to return to the operating room to remove the offending
tack. Inadvertently entrapping or otherwise injuring a nerve can also lead to chronic pain. (See 'Mesh
placement and fixation' above.)

Sci­Hub https://www.uptodate.com/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?
● Complications after laparoscopic inguinal/femoral hernia repairs are similar to those commonly seen after
open repairs. The overall rates of hernia recurrence and perioperative complications are higher with
URL статьи или журнала, или DOI, или строка для поиска

http://www.uptodate.com.secure.sci­hub.cc/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?source=search_result&search=hern… 8/22
06/03/2017 Laparoscopic inguinal and femoral hernia repair in adults ­ UpToDate

laparoscopic repairs than open repairs. Compared with TAPP, TEP is associated with a higher
recurrence rate but a lower complication rate. Both laparoscopic techniques are associated with less
chronic groin pain and numbness than open repairs. (See 'Complications' above.)

Use of UpToDate is subject to the Subscription and License Agreement.

Topic 3692 Version 21.0
поменять
прокси

Sci­Hub https://www.uptodate.com/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?

URL статьи или журнала, или DOI, или строка для поиска

http://www.uptodate.com.secure.sci­hub.cc/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?source=search_result&search=hern… 9/22
06/03/2017 Laparoscopic inguinal and femoral hernia repair in adults ­ UpToDate

GRAPHICS

Lap hernia still A

Image

поменять
прокси

Graphic 63005 Version 3.0

Sci­Hub https://www.uptodate.com/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?

URL статьи или журнала, или DOI, или строка для поиска

http://www.uptodate.com.secure.sci­hub.cc/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?source=search_result&search=her… 10/22
06/03/2017 Laparoscopic inguinal and femoral hernia repair in adults ­ UpToDate

Lap hernia still B

Image

поменять
прокси

Graphic 77859 Version 3.0

Sci­Hub https://www.uptodate.com/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?

URL статьи или журнала, или DOI, или строка для поиска

http://www.uptodate.com.secure.sci­hub.cc/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?source=search_result&search=her… 11/22
06/03/2017 Laparoscopic inguinal and femoral hernia repair in adults ­ UpToDate

Lap hernia still C

поменять
прокси

Graphic 57923 Version 3.0

Sci­Hub https://www.uptodate.com/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?

URL статьи или журнала, или DOI, или строка для поиска

http://www.uptodate.com.secure.sci­hub.cc/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?source=search_result&search=her… 12/22
06/03/2017 Laparoscopic inguinal and femoral hernia repair in adults ­ UpToDate

Laparoscopic view of inguinal anatomy

Image

поменять
прокси

Graphic 70359 Version 6.0

Sci­Hub https://www.uptodate.com/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?

URL статьи или журнала, или DOI, или строка для поиска

http://www.uptodate.com.secure.sci­hub.cc/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?source=search_result&search=her… 13/22
06/03/2017 Laparoscopic inguinal and femoral hernia repair in adults ­ UpToDate

Sectional view of the abdominal wall musculature

поменять
прокси

Graphic 77053 Version 4.0

Sci­Hub https://www.uptodate.com/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?

URL статьи или журнала, или DOI, или строка для поиска

http://www.uptodate.com.secure.sci­hub.cc/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?source=search_result&search=her… 14/22
06/03/2017 Laparoscopic inguinal and femoral hernia repair in adults ­ UpToDate

Port placement for TEP hernia repair

поменять
прокси

Graphic 54751 Version 3.0

Sci­Hub https://www.uptodate.com/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?

URL статьи или журнала, или DOI, или строка для поиска

http://www.uptodate.com.secure.sci­hub.cc/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?source=search_result&search=her… 15/22
06/03/2017 Laparoscopic inguinal and femoral hernia repair in adults ­ UpToDate

TEP access direct vision

Image

поменять
прокси

Reproduced with permission from: Jones DB, Maithel SK, Schneider BE. Atlas of minimally
invasive surgery. Ciné­Med, Woodbury, CT 2006. Copyright © 2006 Ciné­Med, Inc.

Graphic 56408 Version 8.0

Sci­Hub https://www.uptodate.com/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?

URL статьи или журнала, или DOI, или строка для поиска

http://www.uptodate.com.secure.sci­hub.cc/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?source=search_result&search=her… 16/22
06/03/2017 Laparoscopic inguinal and femoral hernia repair in adults ­ UpToDate

TEP access balloon dissector

поменять
прокси

Reproduced with permission from: Jones DB, Maithel SK, Schneider BE. Atlas of minimally
invasive surgery. Ciné­Med, Woodbury, CT 2006. Copyright © 2006 Ciné­Med, Inc.

Graphic 77369 Version 8.0

Sci­Hub https://www.uptodate.com/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?

URL статьи или журнала, или DOI, или строка для поиска

http://www.uptodate.com.secure.sci­hub.cc/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?source=search_result&search=her… 17/22
06/03/2017 Laparoscopic inguinal and femoral hernia repair in adults ­ UpToDate

Indirect inguinal hernia sac TEP dissection

поменять
прокси

This figure shows an indirect hernia viewed from within the extraperitoneal space. After
gently pulling the hernia sac from the inguinal canal into the abdomen, the end of the
hernia sac can be identified and bluntly dissected from the cord structures.

TEP: total extraperitoneal hernia repair.

Reproduced with permission from: Jones DB, Maithel SK, Schneider BE. Atlas of minimally
invasive surgery. Ciné­Med, Woodbury, CT 2006. Copyright © 2006 Ciné­Med, Inc.

Graphic 77800 Version 9.0

Sci­Hub https://www.uptodate.com/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?

URL статьи или журнала, или DOI, или строка для поиска

http://www.uptodate.com.secure.sci­hub.cc/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?source=search_result&search=her… 18/22
06/03/2017 Laparoscopic inguinal and femoral hernia repair in adults ­ UpToDate

TEP hernia reduction for direct inguinal hernia repair

поменять
прокси

This figure shows a small direct hernia viewed from the extraperitoneal
space. Gentle traction on  the peritoneum with one hand and pressure on the
abdominal wall with the other facilitates reduction of the direct hernia sac.

TEP: total extraperitoneal hernia repair

Reproduced with permission from: Jones DB, Maithel SK, Schneider BE. Atlas of
minimally invasive surgery. Ciné­Med, Woodbury, CT 2006. Copyright © 2006 Ciné­
Med, Inc.

Graphic 66073 Version 6.0

Sci­Hub https://www.uptodate.com/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?

URL статьи или журнала, или DOI, или строка для поиска

http://www.uptodate.com.secure.sci­hub.cc/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?source=search_result&search=her… 19/22
06/03/2017 Laparoscopic inguinal and femoral hernia repair in adults ­ UpToDate

Port placement for TAPP hernia repair

Image

поменять
прокси

Graphic 63523 Version 3.0

Sci­Hub https://www.uptodate.com/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?

URL статьи или журнала, или DOI, или строка для поиска

http://www.uptodate.com.secure.sci­hub.cc/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?source=search_result&search=her… 20/22
06/03/2017 Laparoscopic inguinal and femoral hernia repair in adults ­ UpToDate

TAPP hernia reduction

поменять
прокси

Reproduced with permission from: Jones DB, Maithel SK, Schneider BE. Atlas of
minimally invasive surgery. Ciné­Med, Woodbury, CT 2006. Copyright © 2006 Ciné­Med,
Inc.

Graphic 71264 Version 8.0

Sci­Hub https://www.uptodate.com/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?

URL статьи или журнала, или DOI, или строка для поиска

http://www.uptodate.com.secure.sci­hub.cc/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?source=search_result&search=her… 21/22
06/03/2017 Laparoscopic inguinal and femoral hernia repair in adults ­ UpToDate

Transabdominal preperitoneal hernia repair

поменять
прокси

Repair of a right inguinal hernia. Mesh fixation below the iliopubic tract is medial to the
epigastric vessels and spermatic cord.

Reproduced with permission from: Jones DB, Maithel SK, Schneider BE. Atlas of minimally
invasive surgery. Ciné­Med, Woodbury, CT 2006. Copyright © 2006 Ciné­Med, Inc.

Graphic 50283 Version 8.0

Sci­Hub https://www.uptodate.com/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?

URL статьи или журнала, или DOI, или строка для поиска

http://www.uptodate.com.secure.sci­hub.cc/contents/laparoscopic­inguinal­and­femoral­hernia­repair­in­adults/print?source=search_result&search=her… 22/22