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INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

ON FUNCTIONAL NANOMATERIALS
AND NANODEVICES

Symposiа

Energy Conversion Catalysis for Clean Energy


and Storage Materials and Chemical Production

Synthesis and Characterization Nanobiotechnologies


of Nanomaterials

September 24-27, 2017


Budapest, Hungary

ORGANIZED BY
EUROPEAN NANOSCIENCE AND
NANOTECHNOLOGY ASSOCIATION WWW.NANOMAT2017.COM
INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE
ON FUNCTIONAL NANOMATERIALS
AND NANODEVICES

Symposiа

Energy Conversion Catalysis for Clean Energy


and Storage Materials and Chemical Production

Synthesis and Characterization Nanobiotechnologies


of Nanomaterials

September 24-27, 2017


Budapest, Hungary

ORGANIZED BY
EUROPEAN NANOSCIENCE AND
NANOTECHNOLOGY ASSOCIATION WWW.NANOMAT2017.COM
© All rights reversed

Prepress and press:

ISBN 978-954-2987-31-4
Conference Venue
Hotel Hungaria City Center****
Str. Rákóczi 90, Budapest 1074, Hungary
http://www.danubiushotels.com

Operating Organization

European Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Association (ENNA)


Address: Str. G.S. Rakovski 111, Sofia 1000, Bulgaria
www.europenanoscience.org / E-mail: info@europenanoscience.org
Our Platinum Sponsors

www.europenanoscience.org / E-mail: info@europenanoscience.org

Media Partners
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary

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International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary

Program Committee
Executive Chairs
Saim Emin, President, European Nanoscience Alexandre Loukanov, Vice president, European
and Nanotechnology Association, Bulgaria; As- Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Association,
sistant Professor, University of Nova Gorica, Slo- Bulgaria; Associate Professor, University of Min-
venia ing and Geology “St. Ivan Rilski”, Bulgaria; As-
sociate Professor, Saitama University, Japan
Symposium Chairs
Dror Fixler, Professor, Faculty of Engineering Sudhasatwa Basu, Associate Dean Research &
Institute of Nanotechnology & Advanced Mate- Development (R&D), Professor of Chemical En-
rials gineering Department, Indian Institute of Tech-
Bar-Ilan University, Israel nology Delhi, India
Alexandre Loukanov, Saitama University, Japan Saim Emin, University of Nova Gorica, Slovenia
Junwang Tang, Department of Chemical Engi- Lioz Etgar, Associate Proffesor at the Institute of
neering, University College London, London, UK Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem,
Israel
Scientific Advisory Board Members
Prof. Dr. Michael R. Hoffmann Prof. Bunsho Ohtani
California Institute of Technology, USA Institute for Catalysis, Hokkaido University, Japan
Prof. Rachela Popovtzer Prof. Christelle Prinz
Bar-Ilan University, Israel Lund University, Sweden
Dr. Stefano Cabrini Prof. Wu Lu
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA Ohio State University, USA
Prof. Dror Fixler Prof. Martin Wilkening
Bar Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel TU Graz, Austria
Prof. Nicola Pinna Prof. Mahendra Sunkara
Humboldt-Universitat, Berlin, Germany University of Louisville, USA
Prof. Giovanni Palmisano Prof. Dr. Qiang Zhang
Masdar Institute, United Arab Emirates Tsinghua University, Beijing, China
Prof. Suddhasatwa Basu Prof. Hongjin Fan
Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, India NTU, Singapore
Assoc. Prof. Genki Kobayashi Prof. Christina Scheu
National Institute for Natural Sciences, Okazaki, Max-Planck-Institut, Germany
Japan Assoc. Prof. Fu-Ming Wang
Prof. Lioz Etgar National Taiwan University of Science and Technol-
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel ogy, Taiwan
Dr. Vinodkumar Etacheri Prof. Bingqing Wei
IMDEA Materials, Spain University of Delaware, USA
Prof. Xuemei Wang Assoc. Prof. Doh Chang Lee
Southeast University, Nanjing, China KAIST, South Korea
Prof. Richard L. McCreery Prof. Hua Chun Zeng
University of Alberta, Canada National University of Singapore, Singapore
Prof. Noritada Kaji Prof. Yongfang Li
Nagoya University, Japan Chinese Academy of Sciences, China
Prof. Dr. Yan Lu Priv.-Doz. Dr. Michael Krüger
Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Germany Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, Germany
Prof. Dr. Oliver G. Schmidt Prof. Atsushi Urakawa
Leibniz IFW Dresden e.V., Germany Institute of Chemical Research of Catalonia, Spain
Prof. Wallace C. H. Choy Prof. Shaohua Shen
The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Xi’an Jiaotong University, China
Prof. Ken-ichi Fukui Prof .Dr. Qun Xu
Osaka University, Japan Zhengzhou University, China
Prof. Han-Ki Kim Prof. Dr. Jen-Jie Chieh
Kyung Hee University, South Korea National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan
Prof. Michel W. Barsoum Prof. Sei Kwang Hahn
Drexel University, USA POSTECH, Korea

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International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary

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International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary

Welcome Message

Dear colleagues and friends,

On behalf of the Conference Organizing Committee, we would like to welcome you to


the 1st International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices (NANO-
MAT2017). The three-day program starts with 4 symposia and 3 plenary talks on various
aspects of nanoscience and nanotechnology. NANOMAT2017 was fortunate to attract
very high interests among the community. We are thankful to all authors who trusted
us with their work; without their support holding the conference would be impossible.
The field of nanotechnology is experiencing fast growth. Learning about the different
aspects of nanotechnology will ultimately lead to breakthrough discoveries in interdis-
ciplinary areas like energy storage/conversion devices, alternative fuel production or in
biotechnologies. The conference program covers wide scientific disciplines in the field
of nanotechnology among which are materials sciences, chemistry, physics, engineering,
medicine, etc.
Special thanks to symposia organizers prof. Dror Fixler (Bar-Ilan University, Israel), as-
soc. prof./Dr. Lioz Etgar (The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel), prof. Suddhasatwa
Basu (Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, India), and prof. Junwang Tang, (University
College London, UK). We also appreciate the generosity of sponsors: PLASMIONIQUE
and WHOVA.

We hope all of you enjoy NANOMAT2017 and find productive to learn, exchange ideas,
and establish new contacts.

Sincerely Yours,

Saim Emin, Ph.D. Alexandre Loukanov, Ph.D.

Chair, European Nanoscience & Co-chair, European Nanoscience &


Nanotechnology Association Nanotechnology Association

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International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary

–8–
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary

Time
Time Sep-24
Sep-24
17:00-18:00
17:00-18:00 Registration
Registration
18:00-19:30
18:00-19:30 Wellcome
Wellcome Reception
Reception

Time
Time Sep-25
Sep-25
Symposium 1
Symposium 1 Symposium 2
Symposium 2 Symposia 3&4
Symposia 3&4
7:45 -- 8:45
7:45 8:45 Registration
Registration
8:45 -- 9:00
8:45 9:00 Conference
Conference Opening
Opening
9:00
9:00 -- 9:50
9:50 Plenary
Plenary Speaker - Michael Hoffmann
Speaker - Michael Hoffmann
9:50-10:40
9:50-10:40 Plenary
Plenary Speaker
Speaker -- Stefano
Stefano Cabrini
Cabrini
Group
Group Photo
Photo
10:40-11:00
10:40-11:00 Coffee
Coffee Break
Break
Session on
on Energy
Energy Storage
Storage Session
Session on
on Session
Session on
on synthesis
synthesis of
of 0D,
0D, 1D,
1D,
Session
Materials Nanobiotechnologies
Nanobiotechnologies and 2D Nano/Materials
and 2D Nano/Materials
Materials
11:00
11:00 -- 11:30
11:30 Bingqing
Bingqing Wei
Wei Dror
Dror Fixler
Fixler Michel
Michel Barsoum
Barsoum
11:30
11:30 -- 12:00
12:00 Martin
Martin Wilkening
Wilkening Christelle
Christelle Prinz
Prinz P.
P. Davide
Davide Cozzoli
Cozzoli
12:00 -- 12:30
12:00 12:30 Mahendra Sunkara
Mahendra Sunkara Jen-Jie Chieh
Jen-Jie Chieh Maria
Maria Ibanez
Ibanez
12:30 -- 13:30
12:30 13:30 Lunch
Lunch
Session
Session on
on Energy
Energy Conversion Session Session
Session on
on Catalysis
Catalysis for
for Clean
Conversion Session on
on Clean
Materials
Materials Nanobiotechnologies Energy and
Energy and Chemical
Chemical Production
Production
Nanobiotechnologies
13:30
13:30 -- 14:00
14:00 Lioz
Lioz Etgar
Etgar Noritada
Noritada Kaji
Kaji Bunsho
Bunsho Ohtani
Ohtani
14:00
14:00 -- 14:30
14:30 Yongfang
Yongfang LiLi Michael
Michael Hirtz
Hirtz Dominik
Dominik Eder
Eder
14:30
14:30 -- 15:00
15:00 Wallace C.
Wallace C. H. Choy
H. Choy Martin
Martin Falk
Falk Christina
Christina Scheu
Scheu
15:00
15:00 -- 15:15
15:15 Jin-Yeong
Jin-Yeong Park
Park Maria
Maria Martinez
Martinez Velencoso
Velencoso Jiadong Xiao
Jiadong Xiao
15:15
15:15 -- 15:40
15:40 Coffee
Coffee Break
Break
Session
Session on
on Energy
Energy Storage
Storage Session
Session on
on Session
Session on
on Catalysis
Catalysis for
for Clean
Clean
Materials
Materials Nanobiotechnologies
Nanobiotechnologies Energy and Chemical Production
Energy and Chemical Production
15:40
15:40 -- 16:10
16:10 Qun
Qun Xu
Xu Sei
Sei Kwang
Kwang Hahn
Hahn Thomas
Thomas Berger
Berger
16:10
16:10 -- 16:40
16:40 Hongjin
Hongjin Fan
Fan Yuri
Yuri Moshkin
Moshkin Junwang
Junwang Tang
Tang
16:40
16:40 -- 16:55
16:55 Caroline
Caroline Hiebl
Hiebl Maria
Maria Kokkinopoulou
Kokkinopoulou David
David Beke
Beke
16:55 -- 17:10
16:55 17:10 Su Young
Su Young Ryu
Ryu Biju Silvanose
Biju Silvanose Arka Saha
Arka Saha
17:10 -- 17:25
17:10 17:25 Marina Brinek
Marina Brinek Poornima B.
Poornima B. Santhosh
Santhosh
17:30
17:30 - 18:30
- 18:30 Face-to-Face
Face-to-Face Table
Table Meetings
Meetings and
and Poster
Poster Session
Session

Session Chairs
Lioz Etgar Session on Energy Storage Materials 11:00 – 12:30 Symposium 1
Martin Wilkening Session on Energy Storage Materials 13:30 – 15:15 Symposium 1
Mahendra Sunkara Session on Energy Storage Materials 15:40 – 17:25 Symposium 1
Alexandre Loukanov Session on Nanobiotechnologies 11:00 – 12:30 Symposium 2
Dror Fixler Session on Nanobiotechnologies 13:30 – 15:15 Symposium 2
Noritada Kaji Session on Nanobiotechnologies 15:40 – 17:25 Symposium 2
Junwang Tang Session on Catalysis for Clean Energy 11:00 – 12:30 Symposium ¾
Thomas Berger Session on Catalysis for Clean Energy 13:30 – 15:15 Symposium ¾
Bunsho Ohtani Session on Catalysis for Clean Energy 15:40 – 17:25 Symposium ¾

–9–
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary

Sep-26
Symposium 1 Symposium 2 Symposia 3&4
8:40 - 9:30 Plenary Speaker - Prof. Rachela Popovtzer
Session on Energy Storage Session on synthesis of 0D,
Session on
and Energy Conversion 1D, 2D and 3D
Nanobiotechnologies
Nano/Materials Nano/Materials
9:35 - 10:05 Dr. Qiang Zhang 9:35 - 10:05 Oliver G. Schmidt 9:35 - 10:05 Richard L. McCreery
10:05 - 10:35 Vinodkumar Etacheri 10:05 - 10:35 Wu Lu 10:05 - 10:35 Simone Bertolazzi
10:35 - 11:05 Coffee Break
11:05 - 11:35 Han-Ki Kim 10:35 - 11:05 Xuemei Wang 10:35 - 11:05 Doh Chang Lee
11:35 - 12:05 Michael Krüger 11:05 - 11:35 Aboma Merdasa 11:05 - 11:35 Suela Kellici
12:05 - 12:20 Michele Piana 11:35 - 11:50 Dong Xiawei 11:35 - 12:50 Pierre Roumanille
11:50 - 12:05 Avinash Gothwal 12:50 - 12:05 Jianan Zhang
12:05 - 12:20 Elad Segev
12:35 - 13:30 Lunch
Session on Energy Storage Session on Catalysis for
and Energy Conversion Session on Nanobiotechnologies Clean Energy and Chemical
Materials Producon
13:30 - 14:00 Ken-ichi Fukui 13:30 - 14:00 Akshaya Bansal 13:30 - 14:00 Nicola Pinna
14:00 - 14:30 Wu Lu 14:00 - 14:15 Alexandre Loukanov 14:00 - 14:30 Atsushi Urakawa (I)
14:00 - 14:15 Roman Zel 14:15 - 14:30 Saravanan Krishnan 14:30 - 15:00 Giovanni Palmisano
14:15 - 14:30 Hameed U. Wazir 15:00 - 15:15 Elton Dias
14:30 - 14:45 Jieun Lim 15:15 - 15:30 Jooyoung Lee
15:30 - 15:45 Coffee Break
Session on synthesis of 0D, Session on Catalysis for
1D, 2D and 3D Clean Energy and Chemical
Nano/Materials Producon
15:45 - 16:15 Dr. Yan Lu 15:45 - 16:15 Camille Pet
16:15 - 16:30 Shilin Mei 16:15 - 16:45 Hua Chung Zeng
16:30 - 16:45 Andranik Sarkissian 16:45 - 17:15 Renata Solarska
16:45 - 17:00 Guh-Hwan Lim 17:15 - 17:30 Nouria Fatah
17:00 - 17:15 Zoltan Klencsar 17:30 - 17:45 Yumei Ren
18:30 - 20:30 Gala Dinner

Session Chairs
Ken-ichi Fukui Session on Energy Storage Materials 9:35 – 10:35 Symposium 1
Yongfang Li Session on Energy Conversion Materials 11:05-12:20 Symposium 1
Vinodkumar Etacheri Session on Energy Storage Materials 13:30 – 14:45 Symposium 1
Michael Krüger Session on Energy Storage Materials 15:45 – 17:10 Symposium 1
Xumie Wang Session on Nanobiotechnologies 9:35 – 10:35 Symposium 2
Wu Lu Session on Nanobiotechnologies 10:35 – 12:05 Symposium 2
Oliver Schmidt Session on Nanobiotechnologies 13:30 – 14:45 Symposium 2
Ferando Fresno Session on Catalysis for Clean Energy 15:45 – 17:45 Symposium 2
Atsushi Urakawa Session on Catalysis for Clean Energy 10:35 – 12:20 Symposium ¾
Renata Solarska Session on synthesis of 0D, 1D, 2D…. 9:35 – 10:05 Symposium ¾
Camille Petit Session on Catalysis for Clean Energy 13:30 – 15:15 Symposium ¾

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International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary

Sep-27
Symposium 1 Symposium 3
Session on Energy Conversion Session on Photo/Catalysis
8:30 - 9:00 Hutomo Suryo Wasisto 8:30 - 9:00 Shouhua Shen
9:00 - 9:30 Muhammad Y. Bashouti 9:00 - 9:30 Fernando Fresno
9:30 - 9:45 Tangyou Sun 09:30 - 9:45 Atsushi Urakawa (II)
9:45 - 10:05 Himani Sharma
10:00 - 10:15 Coffee Break
Session on Photo/Catalysis
10:15 - 10:45 Takayoshi Oshima
10:45 - 11:00 Charu Dwivedi
11:00 - 11:15 Saim Emin
End of Lectures
12:00 -13:00 Lunch

Session Chairs
Michael Hoffmann Session on Energy Conversion Materials 8:30 – 9:45 Symposium 3
Stefano Cabrini Session on Photo/Catalysis 8:30 – 10:05 Symposium 1
Alexandre Loukanov Session on Photo/Catalysis 10:15 – 11:15 Symposium 1

Posters
N Person Title Institution
1 Jinwen Shi WO3/g-C3N4 composites: One-pot preparation and Ji’an Jiaotong University,
enhanced photocatalytic H2 production under China
visible-light irradiation
2 Dánil Á. Effect of pH on the complex formation of SiC Budapest University of
Major nanoparticle and BSA molecule Technology and Economics,
Hungary
3 Jin-Yeong Blue Laser welding of slot died coated Ag Nanowire Kyung Hee University,
Park network electrodes for flexible thin film heater and Republic of Korea
organic solar cells
4 Boriana Evolution of the structural, adsorption and photo- University of Sofia
Donkova catalytic properties of nanostructured ZnO in the “St. Kliment Ohridski”,
process of mechanical high-energy grinding Bulgaria
5 Yong Hee Enhancing Stimulus Performance of Multi-Elec- Electronics and Telecommu-
Kim trode array with Iridium Oxide-Electrodeposited nications Research Institute
Nanoporous Gold (ETRI), Republic of Korea
6 Jiuen Lim Flexible, stretchable, and hydrophobic Ag nanowire Kyung Hee University,
network electrode passivated by sputtered PTFE Republic of Korea
layer
7 Ábrahám Behaviour of polymeric nanoparticles at various Institute of Chemistry, Eötvös
Ágnes interfaces modelling cell membrane Loránd University Budapest,
Hungary
8 Saim Emin Tungsten carbide thin films for electrochemical University of Nova Gorica,
water splitting studies Slovenia

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International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary

Symposium on Energy Conversion and Storage Materials


Lioz Etgar
Two Dimensional organic-inorganic perovskite from nanostructures to solar cells
Vinodkumar Etacheri
Electrode architectures for enhanced Na-ion battery performance
Martin Wilkening
All-solid-state batteries with nanocrystalline electrolytes: Ion transport in lithium boron hydride
Mahendra Sunkara
Nanowire Based Materials for High Energy Density Li-ion Batteries
Qiang Zhang
The principle on the full use of sulfur and lithium metal in advanced Li-S batteries
Hongjin Fan
Nanoarray electrodes for Na-ion batteries and supercapacitors
Bingqing Wei
Tailoring Carbon Nanostructures for Energy Storage Applications
Yongfang Li
Side chain engineering of photovoltaic materials for high efficiency polymer solar cells
Michael Krüger
Integration of functionalized graphene into hybrid solar cells for significant performance enhancement
Qun Xu
Supercritical CO2-assisted fabrication of two-dimensional materials and their further application
Wallace C. H. Choy
New classes of carrier transport layers & transparent flexible electrodes for high performance Organic/Inorganic
Solar Cells
Ken-ichi Fukui
Potential-Dependent Local Structure and Dynamics of Electric Double Layer at Ionic Liquid / Electrode Interfaces
Analyzed by Electrochemical FM-AFM and MD calculatio
Han-Ki Kim
Highly transparent and flexible electrodes for flexible organic solar cells and perovskite solar cells
Wu Lu
Graphene supercapacitor with both high power and energy density
Jin-Yeong Park
Stretchable Ag Nanowire network/PEDOT:PSS hybrid electrodes with polyurethane substrates for flexible poly-
mer-dispersed liquid crystal smart window
Hameed Ullah Wazir
NiF2 Hollow spheres fabricated for the first time and applied as cathode materials in Lithium Ion batteries
Michele Piana
A new perspective on the electronic structure of layered oxides and structurally-related materials – a soft-XAS
study
Marina Brinek
Sodium insertion into nanocrystalline spinel-type lithium titanate: Na diffusion and electrochemical performance
in half-cells
Roman Zettl
Lithium-ion conductors based on porous MIL-121 metal organic frameworks
Caroline Hiebl
Lithium-Ion transport in mechanochemically synthesized nanocrystalline garnets
Su Young Ryu
Application of Ni materials to rechargeable battery or supercapacitors: nanotechnology offers new approach to
increasing storage ability
Ji-Eun Lim
Highly stretchable and transparent Ag Nanowire/PEDOT:PSS hybrid electrodes prepared by simple brush Painting

– 12 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary

Symposium on Nanobiotechnologies
Dror Fixler
Biological Computing Using Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Measurements
Christelle Prinz
Semiconductor nanowires for biology applications
Jen-Jie Chieh
Non-invasive and fast imaging tumors by SQUID biosusceptometry and magnetic nanoparticles
Sei Kwang Hahn
Smart photonic nanomaterials for theranostic applications
Aboma Merdasa
Super-resolution microscopy of functional materials: unravelling photophysics at the nano-scale
Xuemei Wang
Real-time tracking and bioimaging of cancer cells through multifunctional nanoscale probes
Noritada Kaji
Lab on a chip technologies for a single cell and bacterium analysis
Oliver G. Schmidt
Interfacing microtubular NEMS with single cells and biomolecules
Martin Falk
Metal nanoparticles in tumor cell radiosensitization
Akshaya Bansal
Fluorescent Nanoparticles for Bioimaging and Phototherapy
Yuri Moshkin
Nanoparticles’ neuronal trafficking and cellular interactions
Michael Hirtz
Polymer pen lithography for bioactive surface functionalization
Wu Lu
3-D nanochannel electroporation for high-throughput cell transfection with high uniformity and dosage control
Maria Kokkinopoulou
Visualizing of the protein corona: towards a biomolecular understanding of nanoparticle-cell-interactions
Alexandre Loukanov
Artificially fabricated nanomachines based on the quantum nanoparticles for photodynamic cancer therapy
Avinash Gothwal
Dendrimer Mediated Approach for the Improved Stability and Efficacy of a Mustine Drug: Evidences in Leukemic
THP-1 cells and EAT Solid Tumor in Balb/c Mice
Dong Xiawei
An intracellular temperature nanoprobe based on biosynthesized fluorescent copper nanoclusters
Swathi Sudhakar
Role of Surface Charge of Nanoparticles on Amyloid Beta Fibrillation
Biju Silvanose
Biocompatible Lanthanide fluoride magnetic/luminescent nano-architectures as versatile multimodal contrast
agents for low to ultrahigh field MRI and Optical imaging
Maria Martinez Velencoso
Enhanced flame retardancy of epoxy resin with polymeric DOPO-nanocontainers
Poornima Budime Santhosh
Phospholipid stabilized gold nanorods: Towards improved colloidal stability and biocompatibility
Saravanan Krishnan
Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles in Candida parapsilosis ATCC 7330: Mechanistic studies

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International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary

Symposium on Synthesis of Nanomaterials


Richard L. McCreery
Nanometric Building Blocks for Robust Multifunctional Molecular Junctions

Yan Lu
Colloidal synthesis approach for energy materials

P. Davide Cozzoli
Colloidal nanocrystals with reduced symmetry

Simone Bertolazzi
Tailoring the properties of two-dimensional materials with molecular systems

Hutomo Suryo Wasisto


3D GaN nanoarchitectures: from vertical electronics to multi-sensor platforms

Michel W. Barsoum
From MAX to MXene - From 3D to 2D

Maria Ibanez
Nanocrystal Surface Ligands to Tune Electronic Properties of Bottom-Up Engineered Nanomaterials

Doh Chang Lee


Interactions of Excitons in Heterostructure Nanocrystal Quantum Dots

Muhammad Y. Bashouti
Hybrid Si Nanowires for Optoelectronic Applications

Suela Kellici
New Pathways in the Synthesis of New 2-Dimensional Materials

Saim Emin
Metal oxide and metal carbides thin films for photo/electrochemical water splitting studies

Pierre Roumanille
Study of the Bismuth Oxalates Thermal Decomposition and the Low Melting Behavior of Resulting Bismuth
Nanoparticles

Shilin Mei
Block copolymer template-directed synthesis of composite particles with complex nanostructures

Elad Segev
New Cubic Phase Nanocrystal Stability in the IV-VI Monochalcogenide System across Known Surfaces

Himani Sharma
Structural modification and improved electron emission in few layers of graphene using ion induced irradiation

David Beke
Size Selective Optical and Photocatalytical Properties of Silicon Carbide Nanoparticles

Guh-Hwan Lim
Fully Stretchable and Highly Durable Triboelectric Nanogenerators Based on Gold Nanosheet Electrodes for
Self-Powered Human Motion Detection

Tangyou Sun
Anodic aluminum oxide pattern-dependent surface antireflection nanostructures for light extraction efficiency
enhancement of LEDs

Andranik Sarkissian
Plasma Assisted Synthesis Strategies Applied to Nanostructured Materials, Surface Engineering and Devices

Megha Singh
Generic PVD Approach For Synthesis Of Nanostructured Thin Films Of Vanadium Oxides

– 14 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary

Symposium on Photo/Catalysis for Clean Energy and Chemical Production


Bunsho Ohtani
Fundamental Study on Photocatalysis: How Does Photocatalyst-particle Size Give Influence on the Kinetics?
Mahendra Sunkara
Heterogeneous and Electro-Catalysts by Design Using Nanowire Based Materials
Christina Scheu
Nb307(OH) – a promising candidate for photocatalyst: synthesis, nanostructure and functionality
Nicola Pinna
Facile synthesis of nanostructured phosphide electrocatalysts
Atsushi Urakawa
Continuous catalytic conversion of CO2 to chemical energy carriers
Atsushi Urakawa
Catalyst and reactor design for PEM-based water electrolysis and electrolysis-assisted hydrogenation
Shaohua Shen
Surface Modified Hematite and Silicon for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting
Junwang Tang
Efficient strategies to improve charge separation and light absorption of polymer photocatalysts
Renata Solarska
Recent advances in photo-driven catalytic processes at nanostructured metal oxides.
Hua Chun Zeng
Architecture of Nanocomposite Materials for Heterogeneous Catalysis
Camille Petit
Towards multifunctional materials: from design to energy and environmental applications
Fernando Fresno
Boosting photocatalysis for energy applications – A materials point of view
Takayoshi Oshima
Light induced H2 evolution on metal oxide nanosheet
Dominik Eder
Hybridization and mesostructuring as tools towards functional photocatalysts
Thomas Berger
Title: Hydrogen-derived electron centers in semiconducting oxides – properties and function
Giovanni Palmisano
N-doped brookite-rutile photocatalysts grown on graphene for water remediation under LED visible radiation
Nouria Fatah
Dry coating process for high activity Co/Al2O3 Fischer-Tropsch catalysts
Elton Dias
Investigation of the electronic and structural properties of g-C3N4 based photocatalysts for H2 generation
Yumei Ren
Construction of Multi-component Heterostructures with Assistance of Supercritical CO2
Jianan Zhang
Structural Engineering and modification of Carbon-Based Electrocatalysts for Efficient Energy Conversion
Jiadong Xiao
Ozone-assisted visible-light photocatalysis with C3N4 nanosheet towards superior yield of •OH radicals for water
decontamination
Jooyoung Lee
Nanostructures as Highly Active Electrocatalysts for Electrochemical Water Splitting
Arka Saha
Hydrogenated MoS2 QDs-TiO2 (001) heterojunction mediated efficient solar hydrogen production
Charu Dwivedi
Catalytic Degradation of Nitrophenols using Ag-Au and Au-Pt Nanoalloys: A Mechanistic and Kinetic Study

– 15 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary

Plenary Speakers
Prof. Dr. Michael R. Hoffmann
California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, USA
E-mail: mrh@caltech.edu
Title: Tunable nanoparticle semiconductor electrode activity via selective
modification of reactive surface site charge density
Professor Michael Hoffmann received a BA degree from Northwestern
University in 1968, a PhD degree from Brown University in 1973, and a post-
doctoral fellowship from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences at the California
Institute of Technology from 1973 to 1975. He has been a Professor of Environmental Chemistry
since 1975. From 1975 to 1980, he was a member of the faculty at the University of Minnesota, and
since 1980 as a member of the professorial faculty at Caltech. He has published more than 300 peer-
reviewed professional papers and is the holder of 7 patents. His research over 40 years has spanned
the subject areas of atmospheric chemistry, chemical kinetics, catalytic oxidation and reduction,
photochemistry, photocatalysis, nanotechnology, sonochemistry, photo-electrochemistry, pulsed-
power plasma chemistry, environmental water chemistry, and microbiology. http://hoffmann.
caltech.edu/biography/

Prof. Rachela Popovtzer


Bar-Ilan University, Israel
E-mail: rachela.popovtzer@biu.ac.il
Title: The future of nanomedicine: Promises and limitations
Rachela Popovtzer is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Engineering
and a member of the Bar-Ilan Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced
Materials (BINA), Israel. She is currently the head of the Bioengineering
track and the Laboratory for Nano-medicine in the faculty of Engineering.
Rachela Popovtzer is a winner of numerous international grants and awards, such as the
Intel Prize, the EU Environment and Living Foundation Prize and the Atol Charitable Trust
Fellow in Nano Medicine. Her current research interest focuses on the development of ’smart’
nanoprobes for theranostic applications. http://www.eng.biu.ac.il/rachelap/

Dr. Stefano Cabrini


Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley California, USA
E-mail: scabrini@lbl.gov
Title: 3-Dimensional single digit nanofabrication: organization of nano-
structures with dimensions below 10 nm
Dr. Stefano Cabrini is the Director of the Nanofabrication Facility at the
Molecular Foundry (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) since 2006;
leader of the interfacility Single Digit Nano Fabrication and Assembling program. He has over
170 publications in the field of nanofabrication and 25 years of experience in experimental
physics, 18 years of experience in micro-nano-fabrication, electron-beam lithography, focused ion
beam lithography, thin-film deposition and plasma etch processing. Recently he focuses on the
so called Single Digit Nano Fabrication, or exact fabrication and organization of nanostructures
with dimensions below 10 nm. He is the co-editor with Prof Satoshi Kawata of the book:
“Nanofabrication Handbook” CRC Press 2012

– 16 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary

Invited Speakers
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Lioz Etgar
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel
E-mail: lioz.etgar@mail.huji.ac.il
Title: Two Dimensional organic-inorganic perovskite from nanostructures
to solar cells
Dr. Lioz Etgar is a senior lecturer at the Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew
University of Jerusalem since 2012. In 2010 Dr. Etgar has been a recipient
of a prestigious Marie Curie Intra-European Fellowships (IEF). He has co-
authored more than 45 publications in peer reviewed international journals.

Dr. Vinodkumar Etacheri


IMDEA Materials, Spain
E-mail: vinodkumar.etacheri@imdea.org
Title: Electrode architectures for enhanced Na-ion battery performance
Dr. Vinodkumar Etacheri is a research scientist and electrochemistry
group leader at IMDEA Materials Institute, Spain. His research areas
extend from solar energy conversion to electrochemical energy storage
materials and devices. He co-authored around 25 papers (> 3100 citations)
in international peer reviewed journals, 2 book chapters, and 8 patents.

Prof. Dr. Dror Fixler


Bar-Ilan University, Israel
E-mail: dror.fixler@biu.ac.il
Title: Biological Computing Using Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Mea-
surements
Prof. Dror Fixler is a member of the Faculty of Engineering and the Nano
Center of Bar-Ilan University. He has published over 70 original research
papers and holds over 11 issued patents. His research interests include
fluorescence measurements (FLIM), optical super resolution, high-end
electro-optical system engineering and light-tissue interaction.

Prof. Dr. Nicola Pinna


Humboldt-Universität, Berlin, Germany
E-mail:
nicola.pinna@hu-berlin.de
Title: Facile synthesis of nanostructured phosphide electrocatalysts
In July 2012 prof. Nicola Pinna joined the Department of Chemistry of the
Humboldt University in Berlin. In 2011 he was ranked among the top 100
materials scientists of the past decade by impact. His research activity is
focused on the development of novel routes to nanostructured materials, their characterization,
and the study of their physical properties.

– 17 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary

Dr. Maria Ibanez


ETH Zurich, Zürich
E-mail: ibanez@inorg.chem.ethz.ch
Title: Nanocrystal Surface Ligands to Tune Electronic Properties of
Bottom-Up Engineered Nanomaterials
Maria Ibáñez is a research fellow at ETH Zürich since 2014 when she
joined Prof. Kovalenko’s group. Her research focus is to develop new
nanomaterials, in particular nanocomposites, from the bottom-up assembly
of precisely designed nanoparticles and to characterize their functional
properties for different applications in the field of energy conversion and energy storage

Prof. Dr. Giovanni Palmisano


Masdar Institute, United Arab Emirates
E-mail: gpalmisano@masdar.ac.ae
Title: N-doped brookite-rutile photocatalysts grown on graphene for water
remediation under LED visible radiation
Dr. Giovanni Palmisano joined Masdar Institute as a faculty member in
July 2014. His research concerns photo-catalytic processes for organic
chemistry, hydrogen production, water and air remediation, and self-
cleaning coatings. He has co-authored ca. 80 papers in peer-reviewed international journals,
6 patents, 6 books and 6 invited book chapters. The citations which his publication received
exceed 2300.

Prof. Dr. Christelle Prinz


Lund University, Sweden
E-mail: christelle.prinz@ftf.lth.se
Title: Semiconductor nanowires for biology applications
Christelle Prinz joined Lund University in 2003, where she is now an
Associate Professor at the Division of Solid State Physics. Her present
research focuses on semiconductor nanowires and their interactions with
living cells and tissue. She was awarded an ERC consolidator grant in 2015 to
explore possible applications of nanowires in the field of single cell analysis.

Prof. Dr. Bunsho Ohtani


Institute for Catalysis, Hokkaido University, Japan
E-mail: ohtani@cat.hokudai.ac.jp
Title: Fundamental study on photocatalysis: How does photocatalyst-parti-
cle size give influence on the kinetics?
Professor Ohtani has been studying photocatalysis and relating topics for
more than 30 years and published more than 200 original papers (h-index:
57) and two single-author books. He got a full professor position in Catalysis
Research Center (presently Institute for Catalysis), Hokkaido University in
1998. He was awarded 2005 Scientific Achievement Award of The Electrochemical Society
of Japan, The Japanese Photochemistry Association Award 2006 and Catalysis Society of
Japan Award for 2013 for his works on photocatalysis.

– 18 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary

Prof. Dr. Martin Wilkening


TU Graz, Austria,
E-mail: wilkening@tugraz.at
Title: All-solid-state batteries with nanocrystalline electrolytes: Ion
transport in lithium boron hydride
Martin Wilkening has been the Director of the Institute for Chemistry and
Technology of Materials at the TU Graz since 2016. He authored more than
100 peer-reviewed papers dealing with ion transport in solids and solid-
state electrochemistry. In his workgroup, ion dynamics in solids are studied by NMR and
impedance spectroscopy with a focus on nanostructured and amorphous energy materials
including mechanosynthesized non-equilibrium compounds.

Prof. Dr. Qiang Zhang


Tsinghua University, Beijing, China
E-mail: zhang-qiang@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn
Title: The principle on the full use of sulfur and lithium metal in advanced
Li-S batteries
Qiang Zhang is an associate professor of chemical engineering of Tsinghua
University. He held the Newton Advanced Fellowship from Royal Society,
UK and the NSFC Young Scholar in China. His current research interests
are advanced energy materials (lithium metal anode, lithium sulfur batteries, electrocatalysis).
Dr. Zhang is with an h-index of 53.

Prof. Dr. Mahendra Sunkara


University of Louisville, USA
E-mail: mksunk01@louisville.edu
Title: Nanowire based materials for high energy density Li-ion batteries
Mahendra Sunkara is the Director of the Conn Center for Renewable
Engineering Research, Professor of Chemical Engineering and
Distinguished University Scholar at University of Louisville. His research
interests include solar cells, Li Ion batteries, production of hydrogen from
water and process development for growing large crystals of diamond, gallium nitride and
bulk quantities of nanowires. He has published over 130 articles in refereed journals, four
book chapters, and was awarded over 15 U.S. patents. His research articles were cited about
6800 times with an h-index of 39.

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Hongjin Fan


Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore
E-mail: fanhj@ntu.edu.sg
Title: Nanoarray electrodes for Na-ion batteries and supercapacitors
Dr. Fan is currently an associate professor at Nanyang Technological
University (NTU). Dr. Fan’s research interests include semiconductor
nanowires and related heterostructures, energy conversion and storage
applications of nanomaterials (including photolysis and electrolysis of
water, batteries and supercapacitors). He has published more than 170
journal papers with an H-index of 54.

– 19 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary

Prof. Dr. Bingqing Wei


University of Delaware, Newark, USA
E-mail: weib@udel.edu
Title: Tailoring carbon nanostructures for energy storage applications
Dr. Bingqing Wei is a Professor in the Department of Mechanical
Engineering at the University of Delaware, USA. His recent research
focuses on the controllable synthesis of macroscale nanotube architectures
with 1-, 2-, and 3-dimensions; physical, chemical, electrochemical, and
mechanical property characterizations of nanotubes; and energy storage
device applications. Dr. Wei published more than 260 papers in refereed international journals,
including Nature and Science, and delivered 170 plus invited talks and seminars in academia
and industry worldwide. His research work has been cited more than 14500 times by peer
scientists with the h-index of 60 (ISI) and has also been highlighted many times in scientific
journals, web journals, and public media.

Prof. Dr. Hua Chun Zeng


National University of Singapore, Singapore
E-mail: chezhc@nus.edu.sg
Title: Architecture of nanocomposite materials for heterogeneous catalysis
Professor Hua Chun Zeng joined the faculty at National University of
Singapore in 1991. His research interests are, at present, focused on the
exploratory design and synthesis of inorganic nanostructures, with an
emphasis on catalysis. Prof Zeng is ranked among the Top 100 Chemists
over the period of 2000-2010 by Thomson Reuters and Times Higher
Education. In recent years, Prof Zeng is also listed among Highly Cited Researchers by
Thomson Reuters in 2014 and among Most Cited Researchers by Shanghai Ranking in 2016,
respectively.

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Doh Chang Lee


KAIST, South Korea
E-mail: dclee@kaist.edu
Title: Interactions of Excitons in Heterostructure Nanocrystal Quantum Dots
Doh C. Lee is an Associate Professor in the Department of Chemical and
Biomolecular Engineering at Korea Advanced Institute of Science and
Technology (KAIST). He received his Ph.D. in Chemical engineering
from the University of Texas at Austin in 2007. His research group at
KAIST focuses on the semiconductor nanocrystals for the use in photoca-
talysis and light-emitting devices.

Priv.-Doz. Dr. Michael Krüger


Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg Institut für Physik, Oldenburg,
Germany
E-mail: michael.krueger@uol.de / michael.krueger@uni-oldenburg.de
Title: Integration of functionalized graphene into hybrid solar cells for
significant performance enhancement
Dr. Krueger has authored and co-authored over 150 scientific contributions
(peer-reviews, conferences, book chapters, patents and talks). His main
research interests are the synthesis and modification of nanomaterials and
nanostructures and their integration into applications such as photovoltaics. He is currently
working as senior scientist at the University of Oldenburg, Germany

– 20 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary

Prof. Dr. Yongfan Li


Chinese Academy of Sciences, China
E-mail: liyf@iccas.ac.cn
​Title: Side chain engineering of photovoltaic materials for high efficiency
polymer solar cells
Yongfang Li is a professor in Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy
of Sciences (ICCAS) and in Soochow University. His present research
interests are photovoltaic materials and devices for polymer solar cells. He
has published more than 600 papers and the published papers were cited by
others for more than 24500 times with h-index of 81.

Prof. Dr. Shaohua Shen


Xi’an Jiaotong University, China
E-mail: shshen_xjtu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn
Title: Surface modified hematite and silicon for photoelectrochemical wa-
ter splitting
Shaohua Shen is currently a full professor at Xi’an Jiaotong University,
China, and the receipt of National Top-notch Young Professionals in
China. His research interests include synthesis of nanomaterials and
development of devices for photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical solar
energy conversion. He has published 80 papers in Nature Photonics, Chemical Reviews,
Advanced Materials, Nano Letters, etc., that have received more than 4000 citations. He is
the Editor of Scientific Reports, Youth Editor of Chinese Chemical Letters and Guest Editor
of Nanotechnology and Journal of Materiomics, and has given more than 40 plenary/keynote/
invited talks in international conferences and symposia

Prof. Dr. Atsushi Urakawa


Institute of Chemical Research of Catalonia (ICIQ), Spain
E-mail: aurakawa@iciq.es
Title 1: Continuous catalytic conversion of CO2 to chemical energy carriers
Title 2: Catalyst and reactor design for PEM-based water electrolysis and
electrolysis-assisted hydrogenation
Professor Urakawa joined ICIQ in January 2010. He leads a research group
with emphasis on the development of heterogeneous catalysts and process-
es based on rational understanding aided by in situ and operando spectro-
scopic methods. His current major research activities are centered on catalysis for environ-
mental protection (e.g. automotive catalysis) and synthesis of future chemical energy carriers
such as hydrogen and methanol by making use of advanced chemical engineering concepts

Prof .Dr. Qun Xu


Zhengzhou University, China
E-mail: qunxu@zzu.edu.cn
Title: Supercritical CO2-assisted fabrication of two-dimensional materials
and their further application
Qun Xu is currently a full professor at Zhengzhou University, China, and
is leading a research group for fabrication of low-dimensional materials
and Exploring the application in energy conversion and storage. She has
published more than 90 papers in Angew.Chem.Int.Ed, ACS Nano, Adv.
Funct.Mater, etc. In 2008 she was nominated Chinese Youth Woman Scientist, in 2009 she
obtained the Distinguished Lectureship Award from the Chemical Society of Japan.

– 21 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary

Dr. Aboma Merdasa


Lund University,Lund, Sweden
E-mail: aboma.erdasa@chemphys.lu.se
Title: Super-resoution microscopy of functional materials: unraveling pho-
tophysics at the nano-scale
Dr. Aboma Merdasa is a currently a researcher at the Chemical Physics de-
partment at Lund University in the group of Assoc. Prof. Eva Unger. His
work particularly focused on the combination of optical super-resolution
microscopy and spectroscopy to study light-induced processes on the nano-meter length-
scale. - metal halide perovskites. Since 2009 he has also been involved in founding the Afri-
can Spectral Imaging Network (AFSIN), which currently includes 6 countries in Africa and
focuses on building a platform for relevant scientific research in developing countries.
Prof. Dr. Jen-Jie Chieh
Institute of Electro-Optical Science and Technology, National Taiwan
Normal University, Taiwan
E-mail: jjchieh@ntnu.edu.tw
Title: Nonn-invasive and fast imaging tumors by SQUID biosusceptometry
and magnetic nanoparticles
Professor Jen-Jie Chieh, Ph.D. of Mechanics, has been working for National
Taiwan Normal University (NTNU) for 13 years. He has published more
than 70 SCI papers (most ranking < 30% in the journals), representative one
in ACS Nano, and obtained more than 5 authorized patents. He has won projects of excellent
young research investigators from Ministry of Science and Technology two times, financial
rewards for special talents in universities from NTNU almost every year, the outstanding
award of academic-industry cooperation from NTNU, and the honor of Excellent-hired
Teacher from NTNU two times.
Prof. Dr. Richard L. McCreery
University of Alberta, Canada
E-mail: richard.mccreery@ualberta.ca
Title: Nanometric building blocks for robust multifunctional molecular
junctions
Richard L. McCreery is currently Professor of Chemistry at the University
of Alberta, with a joint appointment as a Senior Research Officer at the
National Institute for Nanotechnology. His research involves spectroscopic
probes of electrochemical processes, the electronic and electrochemical
properties of carbon materials, and carbon-based molecular electronics. A practical application
of carbon-based molecular electronics to audio processing in electronic music became
available commercially in late 2015. McCreery has written over 240 refereed publications,
including one book and ten U.S. Patents, with three of those extended to Europe and Japan.
Prof. Dr. Sei Kwang Hahn
Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Korea
E-mail: skhanb@postech.ac.kr
Title: Smart photonic nanomaterials for theranostic applications
Prof. Sei Kwang Hahn is a professor in the Department of Materials Science
and Engineering at POSTECH. In 2012, he joined in the Wellman Center for
Photomedicine, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital
for his sabbatical research. He received Korean President Award in 2015 and
Korean Minister of Education Award in 2013. He published more than 110
journal papers including Nature Photonics, Nature Communications, Progress in Polymer Science,
Advanced Materials, and ACS Nano, and filed more than 120 Korean and international patents.
He founded a bio-venture company of “PHI BioMed” in 2014. He is a current member of the
Samsung Future Technology Committee, and National Science and Technology Council.

– 22 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary

Prof. Xuemei Wang


Southeast University, Nanjing, China
E-mail: xuewang@seu.edu.cn
Title: Real-time tracking and bioimaging of cancer cells through
multifunctional nanoscale probes
Dr. Xuemei Wang is currently a full professor in School of Biological Science
and Medical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing, China. She was
elected in New Century Excellent Talents Support Program in China in 2005
and won Chinese Young Women Scientists’ Award in 2007. In 2013, she
won The National Science Fund for Distinguished Young Scholars in China.
She has published more than 100 papers in some important journals including Angewandte
Chemie International Edition, Adv. Funct. Mater., Biomaterials, etc. Her current research
interests include biomaterials and biosensors, nanomedicine, and multimode bioimaging,
especially focused on the in vivo self-bio-labelling of tumours and other disease through the
in-situ biosynthesized biocompatible multifunctional metal nano-clusters and nanoscale probes.
Prof. Dr. Noritada Kaji
Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Japan
E-mail: kaji@apchem.nagoya-u.ac.jp
Title: Lab on a chip technologies for a single cell and bacterium analysis
Dr. Noritada Kaji is an associate professor of the Graduate School of
Engineering at Nagoya University, Japan. His current research interests are
mainly divided into the following parts; Development of nanostructures on
a chip for single molecule biophysics and molecular biology, integration of
whole biological processes on a single chip for systems biology.
Prof. Dr. Junwang Tang
University College London, UK
E-mail: junwang.tang@ucl.ac.uk
Title: Efficient strategies to improve charge separation and light
absorption of polymer photocatalysts
Dr. Junwang Tang is Director of UCL Materials Hub, Reader in Energy in
the Department of Chemical Engineering, and a Fellow of the RSC. His
research interests encompass structure-controlled nanomaterials synthesis
by a flow system powered by microwave irradiation, solar H2 synthesis from water, CO2 capture
and conversion to a renewable fuel, photocatalytic environmental purification and ammonia
synthesis. His research has led to >100 papers with >6000 citations, 11 patents, a few book
chapters and many invited lectures in the international conference. He is the Editor-in-Chief of
the Journal of Advanced Chemical Engineering, an Associate Editor of Asia-Pacific Journal of
Chemical Engineering, an Editor of the Frontiers in Energy Research, the guest Editor-in-Chief
of the International Journal of Photoenergy, 2012 and Associate Editor of Chin J. Catalysis.
Prof. Dr. Yan Lu
Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Berlin, Germany
Institute of Chemistry, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany
E-mail: yan.lu@helmholtz-berlin.de
Title: Colloidal synthesis approach for energy materials
Since 2009, Dr. Yan Lu joined the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien
und Energie as a group leader in Colloid Chemistry. In 2017, she became a
professor in the Institute of Chemistry at University of Potsdam. She was
awarded “APi-Prize” in 2005 and “Dr. Hermann-Schnell-Stipendium” in
2011 by the German Chemical Society. In 2015, she was selected as top female researchers
(W2/W3-Programme) in Helmholtz Association. Her research interests cover synthesis and
characterization of functional hybrid colloidal particles and their application as (photo)
catalyst, optics and energy storage materials.

– 23 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary

Prof. Dr. Oliver G. Schmidt


Leibniz IFW, Dresden, Germany
E-mail: o.schmidt@ifw-dresden.de
Title: Interfacing microtubular NEMS with single cells and biomolecules
Prof. Dr. Oliver G. Schmidt is a Director at the Leibniz IFW Dresden,
Germany, and holds a full Professorship for Material Systems for
Nanoelectronics at the Chemnitz University of Technology, Germany. His
interdisciplinary activities bridge across several research fields, ranging
from microrobotics and bionanotechnologies to energy storage and
nanophotonics. He has received several awards: the Otto-Hahn Medal from the Max-Planck-
Society in 2000, the Philip-Morris Research Award in 2002 and the Carus-Medal from the
German Academy of Natural Scientists Leopoldina in 2005. In 2010, he was awarded the
Guinness World Record for the smallest man-made jet engine. More recently, he was awarded
the International Dresden Barkhausen Award 2013 for his work on “Materials, Architectures
and Integration of Nanomembranes”. He has published more than 650 papers in peer-reviewed
journals and has an H-Index of 79.

Prof. Dr. P. Davide Cozzoli


University of Salento, CNR Institute of Nanotechnology, Lecce, Italy
E-mail: davide.cozzoli@unisalento.it
Title: Colloidal nanocrystals with reduced symmetry
Since 2015 he holds a permanent position as Associate Professor of
Experimental Matter Physics at the University of Salento, Lecce, Italy, and he
is head of the Nanochemistry Department of the newly founded CNR Institute
of Nanotechnology, Lecce, Italy. Currently, he serves as Associate Editor of
the peer-reviewed journals... So far, he has published about 117 contributions,
edited one book and two conference proceedings. His scientific work has
overall attracted about 6400 citations (H-index=39). His research is focused
on the development of advanced colloidal nanocrystal architectures with controlled structural
and topological features for applications in (photo)catalysis, photovoltaics, optoelectronics and
biomedicine.

Prof. Dr. Thomas Berger


University of Salzburg, Austria
E-mail: thomas.berger@sbg.ac.at
Title: Hydrogen-derived electron centers in semiconducting oxides –
properties and function
Since 2013 Thomas Berger holds a tenure track position at the University
of Salzburg (Austria). His main scientific interests are concerned with the
physical chemistry of oxide nanomaterials, which includes the application
of spectroscopic and/or electrochemical techniques to the study of the semiconductor/gas and
the semiconductor/solution interface.

Prof. Dr. ChristinaScheu


Max-Planck-Institt für Eisenforschung GmbH, Düsseldorf, Germany
E-mail: c.sche@umpie.de
Title: Nb307(OH) – a promising candidate for photocatalyst: synthesis,
nanostructure and functionality
Since April 2014 Christina Scheu holds a joint position as an independent
group leader at the Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH (MPIE)
in Düsseldorf and as a full professor at the RWTH Aachen, Germany. She
has more than 170 publication in journals and conference proceedings.
http://www.mpie.de/3106007/group_leader1

– 24 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary

Dr. Renata Solarska


Centre of New Technologies, University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland
E-mail: rsolarska@gmail.com
Title: Recent advances in photo-driven catalytic processes at
nanostructured metal oxides.
Renata Solarska is an Assistant Professor in the Center of New Technology
at University of Warsaw. She has nearly two decades of expertise in
electrochemistry, followed by photoelectrochemistry and photophysiscs
of semiconductor, metals and hybrid nanostructures. Besides her research
activity, she is also involved in the activity of the Europe Section of the Electrochemical
Society as a vice-chair.
Prof. Dr. Wallace C. H. Choy
The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
E-mail: chchoy@eee.hku.hk
Title: New classes of carrier transport layers & transparent flexible
electrodes for high performance Organic/Inorganic Solar Cells.
Wallace Choy is a professor of Department of Electrical and Electronic
Engineering, the University of Hong Kong. His current research interests
are concerned with organic/inorganic optoelectronic devices, plasmonic
structures, and nano-material devices and physics. Prof. Choy has been recognized as the Top
1% of most-cited scientists in Thomson Reuter’s Essential Science Indicators (ESI) in 2014,
2015 and 2016. He has published over 160 internationally peer-reviewed journal papers,
contributed to seven book chapters, US and China patents and edited one book published in
Springer. He is a fellow of OSA and a senior member of IEEE.
Dr. Camille Petit (senior lecturer)
Imperial College, London, UK
E-mail; camille.petit@imperial.ac.uk
Title: Towards multifunctional materials: from design to energy and
environmental applications
Dr. Camille Petit is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Chemical
Engineering at Imperial College, which she joined in September 2013.
She currently leads the Multifunctional Materials Laboratory. Her research
interests broadly encompass the development of nanomaterials for applications relevant to the
energy and environmental sectors. Specifically, she focuses on the synthesis, characterisation
and testing of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)- and nitride-based nanomaterials for gas
separations and photocatalysis.
Dr. Michael Hirtz
Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Germany
E-mail: michael.hirtz@kit.edu
Title: Polymer pen lithography for bioactive surface functionalization
Dr. Michael Hirtz is research scientist and leader of the “Dip-pen Nanoli-
thography and Related Techniques” group at the Institute of Nanotechnol-
ogy (INT) of the Karlsruher Institut of Technology (KIT), Germany. His
current research focus is on the functionalization of surfaces and devices by
scanning probe lithography methods for biomedical applications and sens-
ing. He authored and co-authored over 70 papers (attracting over 1000 citations) in internation-
al, peer-reviewed journals. He was awarded with the Tan Chin Tuan Exchange Fellowship at
Nanyang Technological University Singapore in 2013 and parts of his works are supported by
the ERC, the European Union, and the DFG in different projects.

– 25 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary

Dr. Simone Bertolazzi


Université de Strasbourg, France
E-mail: bertolazzi@unistra.fr
Title: Tailoring the properties of two-dimensional materials with
molecular systems
Dr. Bertolazzi is Marie-Curie Intra-European Research Fellow at the Institut
de Science et d’Ingénierie Supramoléculaires (France), working with Prof.
Paolo Samorì. His current research activities focus on multifunctional
materials based on two-dimensional crystals and molecular systems.

RNDr. Martin Falk


Institute of Biophysics of the Czech Academy of Sciences (Brno, CR)
E-mail: mfalk76@gmail.com
Title: Metal nanoparticles in tumor cell radiosensitization
Martin Falk has completed his Ph.D from Masaryk University in Brno, CR.
He is the leader of the Department of Cell Biology and Radiobiology at
the Institute of Biophysics of the Czech Academy of Sciences (Brno, CR).
Martin Falk’s current research interests include DNA damage and repair,
carcinogenesis, tumor cells radio-sensitization, and radiobiology in general.
Important publications: Falk et al. BBA-MCR 1773/10(2007), BBA-MCR 1783/12(2008),
Mutation Research 704(2010), Lukasova et al., BBA-MCR 1833/3(2013); Hofer et al. J Med
Chem. 59(7):3003-17 (2016) and Stefancikova et al. J Nanobiotechnology 14(1):63 (2016).

Dr. Akshaya Bansal


National Universit of Singapore, Singapore
E-mail: bieab@nus.edu.sg
Title: FluorescentNanoparticles for Bioimaging and Phototherapy
Dr. Akshaya Bansal is a research fellow in the Department of Biomedical
Engineering, National University of Singapore (NUS). Her research inter-
ests include nanobiophotonics, therapeutic photoactivation and bioelec-
tronics. Her work has been published in international journals such as ACS
NANO, Small and Nature Protocols along with reviews in high impact
journals such as Accounts of Chemical Research and Chemical Society
Reviews.

Dr. Fernando Fresno


IMDEA Energy Instutite, Madrid, Spain
E-mail: fernando.fresno@imdea.org
Title: Boosting photocatalysis for energy applications – A materials
point of view
Fernando Fresno is a Marie Sklodowska-Curie Fellow at the Photoactivated
Processes Unit of the IMDEA Energy Institute in Madrid, Spain, where
he works on the development of inorganic and hybrid photocatalysts for
the production of fuels from carbon dioxide, water and biomass derivatives. His 30 papers
in SCI journals have been cited more than 1200 times. He has contributed with more than 70
communications to national and international conferences and is co-inventor of two patents.

– 26 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary

Mr. Takayoshi Oshima


On behalf of Prof. Kazuhiko Maeda, Tokyo Institute of Technology,
Japan
E-mail: oshima.t.ae@m.titech.ac.jp
Title: Light induced H2 evolution on metal oxide nanosheet
Takayoshi Oshima gained B.S and M.S. in Department of Chemistry
under supervise of Prof. Kazuhiko Maeda at the Department of Chemistry
in the Tokyo Institute of Technology and he continue as a PhD student in
his group. He is also selected as a research fellow of Japan Society for
the Promotion of Science from 2016. His research interests include water
splitting over semiconductor photocatalyst, especially metal oxide nanosheet photocatalyst.

Prof. Dr. Han-Ki Kim


Kyung Hee University, Seoul, South Korea
E-mail: imdlhkkim@khu.ac.kr
Title: Highly transparent and flexible electrodes for flexible organic solar
cells and perovskite solar cells
Since 2009, Han-Ki Kim has been a professor in the Department of Ad-
vanced Materials Science and Engineering for Information and Electronics
at Kyung Hee University. His research interests include transparent elec-
trode materials for flexible OLED, flexible OPVs, perovskite solar cells, touch panels, smart
windows, flexible/stretchable and transparent electronics, and printable electronics. He has
published over 240 articles and holds 100 patents for transparent electrode materials, process,
and equipment.

Prof. Ken-ichi Fukui


Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Japan
E-mail: kfukui@chem.es.osaka-u.ac.jp
Title: Potential-Dependent Local Structure and Dynamics of Electric Dou-
ble Layer at Ionic Liquid / Electrode Interfaces Analyzed by Electrochemi-
cal FM-AFM and MD calculation
Prof. Ken-ichi Fukui is a Full Professor at Osaka University since 2008. His
present research interests cover the microscopic mechanism of catalyses
at solid surfaces/interfaces and the molecular view of electric double layer at liquid/solid
interfaces for efficient energy conversion. He has also been working as an Editor of Surface
Science (Elsevier) since 2015. Representative awards - Nanoprobe Technology Award from
the JSPS (2015), and the CSJ Award for Creative Work from the Chemistry Society of Japan
(2017).

Prof. Dr. Yuri Moshkin


Institute of Cytology and Genetics, Novosibirsk, Russia
E-mail: yury.moshkin@gmail.com
Title: Nanoparticles’ neuronal trafficking and cellular interactions
Yuri Moshkin is a vice-chair of the Department of Translational Genetics,
Institute of Cytology & Genetics, Novosibirsk, Russia (since 2015). His
longstanding research interests are in the biology of chromatin and gene
regulation. However, recently, he is also involved in the research of biolog-
ical interactions of nanomaterials.

– 27 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary

Dr. Suela Kellici


London South Bank University, UK
E-mail: kellicis@lsbu.ac.uk
Title: New pathways in the synthesis of new 2-Dimensional materials
Dr Suela Kellici is a Senior Lecturer and head of the Nano2D group at Lon-
don South Bank University (LSBU) [www.nano2d.co.uk]. Dr Kellici is an
expert in innovative supercritical fluid technologies and materials chemistry.
She sits on the Editorial Board for the Euro-Mediterranean Journal for Environmental Integra-
tion and LSBU’s Research Committee. The research in her group is focused in designing and
discovering advanced functional nanomaterials using a target-oriented approach and technol-
ogies that provide effective solutions for energy, biomedical and environmental applications.
Dr.-Ing. Hutomo Suryo Wasisto
Braunschweig University of Technology, Braunschweig, Germany
E-mail: h.wasisto@tu-braunschweig.de
Title: 3D GaN nanoarchitectures: from vertical electronics to multi-sensor
platforms
Dr.-Ing. Hutomo Wasisto published more than 70 papers in internation-
al scientific peer-reviewed journals and conference proceedings as well as
two European and German patents. Since 2016, he has been an initiator
and chief executive officer of the Indonesian-German Center for Nano and
Quantum Technologies (IG-Nano), Braunschweig, Germany. In 2014, he received the Wal-
ter-Kertz-Studienpreis (Walter Kertz Study Award) for his excellent doctoral dissertation and
achievements of scientific studies at the interface between physics, electrical engineering, and
information technology from the TU Braunschweig, Germany.

Prof. Dr. Dominik Eder


Technische Universität Wien, Vienna, Austria
E-mail: dominik.eder@tuwien.ac.at
Title: Hybridization and mesostructuring as tools towards functional
photocatalysts
Prof. Eder has co-authored around 60 papers (2500 citations, h-index: 27)
and has been instrumental in the introduction and development of nanocar-
bon-inorganic hybrid materials as a new class of functional composites by
publishing early examples, the first review article and the first text book. His research interests
include nanocarbons, functional inorganic nanostructures and ordered mesoporous transition
metal oxides and zeolites for photocatalysis and electrochemical storage applications.
Assist. Prof. Dr. Muhammad Y. Bashouti
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel
E-mail: bashouti@bgu.ac.il
Title: Hybrid Si nanowires for optoelectronic applications
Dr. Muhammad Y. Bashouti is now a Senior Lecturer (Assistant Professor),
the head of the Molecular Optoelectronic Research Laboratory at the En-
vironmental Physics and Solar Energy Department of the Jacob Blaustein
Institutes for Desert Research, Sede Boqer Campus, Ben-Gurion Univer-
sity of the Negev, Israel. Currently Dr. Bashoutis’ researches focus on the
molecular-surface interaction for optoelectronic applications such as sensors and molecular
logic gates. Dr. Bashouti got the Maof grant award and a research awards such as Max-Planck,
Vatat and the award of the Ministry of Science-Israel.

– 28 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary

Prof. Dr. Wu Lu
Ohio State University, USA
E-mail: lu.173@osu.edu
Title 1: Graphene supercapacitor with both high power and energy den-
sity
Title 2: 3-D nanochannel electroporation for high-throughput cell trans-
fection with high uniformity and dosage control
Wu Lu has been a faculty of the Department of Electrical and Computer
Engineering at The Ohio State University (OSU) since 2002. He has been working on
III-V, SiGe, and III-nitrides high electron mobility transistors and heterojunction bipolar
transistors for over 20 years. His current research interests focus on nanofabrication and
nano-electronics, III-nitride high power and low noise electronics, compound semiconductor
devices and circuits for microwave and optoelectronic applications, solid state chemical/
biological sensors, energy storage devices, and bionanotechnology. Dr. Lu has published over
125 journal papers.

– 29 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 001
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Plenary Speaker

Tuning of photoelectrochemical activity by altering catalytic


binding site charge density

Cody E. Finke, Justin T. Jasper, Stefan Omelchenko, & Michael R. Hoffmann*

California Institute of Technology, Division of Engineering & Applied Science,


1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, California 91125, USA

Heterogeneous photoelectrocatalytic activity is found to be function of the charge density


at specific substrate-catalyst surface binding sites. Herein, we demonstrate that the performan-
ce and activity for chlorine evolution (CER) on IrO2, can be tuned via atomic layer deposition
(ALD) of TiO2 in successive molecular layers. We find that the optimal catalytic performance
occurs after three molecular layers of TiO2 have been deposited on IrO2. The three molecular
layers of TiO2 overcoating IrO2 yield an intrinsic catalytic activity (i0) and overpotential com-
mensurate with the highest reported CER efficiency achieved using RuO2. The catalytic per-
formance is correlated to the IrO2/TiO2 substrate surface species complex charge density state,
which can be tuned from by controlling the thickness of the deposited TiO2 layers. The results
presented here provide a platform to rationally designing and control heterogeneous photoe-
lectrocatalytic activity of earth-abundant semiconductor catalysts for specific reactions.

Figure Caption. Ave-


rage exchange current
densities (i0) (A) and ave-
rage overpotentials (B)
of each IrO2 based elec-
trode coated with TiO2
via cycles of ALD. Bare
RuO2 is shown as a red
square for comparison.
As thickness of TiO2 in-
creased beyond reasona-
bly thick layers, the overpotential continued to increase considerbly due to the high resistivity
of TiO2. Exchange current densities are obtained by fitting the polarization curve data to the
Tafel equation and solving for the current density at the intersection between the log(current
density) axis and the data fit line. Overpotentials are obtained by fitting the polarization curve
data to the Tafel equation and solving for the applied potential less the Nernstian thermodya-
mic potential at zero current density.

The data presented here indicate that by adding successive layers of a metal oxide conta-
ining an electron-poor metal coupled with an electron-rich oxygen on top of a metal oxide
with a less electron deficient metal and a less electron-rich oxygen will effectively tune the
surface charge density of the reactive catalytic sites. Furthermore, these data show that when
the charge density is matched to that of a better catalyst, the catalytic parameters may be pre-
dicted by the Sabatier principal.

– 30 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 002
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Plenary Speaker

3 Dimensional Single Digit Nanofabrication: organization of nano-


structures with dimensions below 10 nm

Dr. Stefano Cabrini

Molecular Foundry Nanofabrication Facility Director, Lawrence Berkeley


National Laboratory, Berkeley California USA

We use the term “single-digit nanofabrication” (SDN) to describe the structuring and char-
acterization of materials whose key features are defined and resolved on a scale of 10 nm or
less. Achieving single-digit nano resolution in synthesis and fabrication is a central challenge
for the development of next-generation functional nanoscale and mesoscale materials Single
digit nanostructured materials have special properties with regard to the control and flow of
energy. Energy can take, for example, electronic, magnetic, thermal or photonic forms. We
will focus on how material components can be structured with high accuracy and precision in
classical lithographic processes 2D and how we can achieve new or improved properties in
3D fabrication. A special attention will be devoted to nanophotonics. Nanophotonics covers
light interactions with transparent dielectric materials and plasmonic effects in metallic struc-
tures. In addition, we have emerging efforts in exciton transport in organized nanomaterials.
We will discuss these advances and future directions in the subsequent sections.

– 31 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 003
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Plenary Speaker

The future of nanomedicine: Promises and limitations

Rachela Popovtzer
Faculty of Engineering and the Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Mate-
rials,
Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel

Gold nanoparticles have emerged as one of the most extensively utilized nanoplatforms for
imaging, monitoring, diagnosis and treatment of malignant diseases. Nanoparticles are expec-
ted to play a major role in the future of medical theranostics due to their many advantages over
low-molecular-weight molecules, such as prolonged blood circulation time, controlled bio-
logical clearance pathways and specific molecular targeting capabilities. However, selective
and successful delivery of nanoparticles to specific pathological areas remains a challenging
task. In my presentation, I will share our recent work with gold nanoparticles towards enhan-
ced delivery of nanoparticles to solid tumors and the development of molecular and functional
nanoparticle-based CT contrast agents. In addition, the use of gold nanoparticles for in-vivo
cell tracking in cancer immunotherapy and neuropsychiatric disorders will be introduced.

– 32 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 004
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Tailoring carbon nanostructures for energy storage applications

Bingqing Wei a, b

a
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE
19716, USA
b
Center for Nano Energy Materials, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an
710072, China
E-mail: weib@udel.edu

Sustainable and renewable energy sources from hydropower, solar, and wind power are ex-
pected to release the heavy burdens on the current energy infrastructure and the environmental
concerns. As these renewable energy sources such as solar and wind power are intermittent in
nature, reliable electrochemical energy storage systems, mainly including rechargeable batte-
ries and electrochemical capacitors, are purposely explored to promote efficient utilization of
these energy sources and are a growing challenge. The development of high energy storage
devices has been one of the most important research areas in recent years and relies mostly
on the successful engineering of electrode materials. Carbon nanostructures such as carbon
nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene have been full of surprises since their emergence and are
intensively investigated for use as electrode materials in energy storage devices. Utilizing
CNTs, graphene, and their composites for various energy storage applications such as Li-ion
and L-S batteries, and supercapacitors are under scrutiny because of their improved electro-
chemical activity, cost effectiveness, environmental benign nature, and promising electroche-
mical performance. In this presentation, I will discuss our research strategies and efforts to
employ carbon nanostructures for different energy storage applications including flexible and
even stretchable electricity storage devices.

References
1) Jian-Gan Wang, et al. Highly Flexible Graphene/Mn3O4 Nanocomposite Membrane as
Advanced Anodes for Li-Ion Batteries. ACS Nano, 10, 6227-6234 (2016).
2) Han, Fangming, et al. Dielectric Capacitors with Three-Dimensional Nanoscale Interdig-
ital Electrodes for Energy Storage. Science Advances, 1, e1500605. (2015).
3) Zhang, Q. Anomalous Capacitive Behaviors of Graphene Oxide Based Solid State Super-
capacitors. Nano Letters, 14, 1938 (2014).
4) Cao, Z.Y. Wei, B.Q. A Perspective: Carbon Nanotube Macro-films for Energy Storage.
Energy & Environmental Science, 6, 3183 (2013).
5) Yu, C. et al. Stretchable Supercapacitors Based on Buckled Carbon Nanotube Mac-
ro-Films. Advanced Materials, 21, 4793 (2009).

– 33 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 005
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

All-solid-state batteries with nanocrystalline electrolytes:


Ion transport in lithium boron hydride

Martin Wilkening

Institute for Chemistry and Technology of Materials,


Christian Doppler Laboratory for Lithium Batteries, Graz University of Technology,
Stremayrgasse 9, A-8010 Graz.
E-mail: wilkening@tugraz.at

Li and Na (ion) batteries with solid electrolytes such as oxidic or sulfidic ceramics are con-
sidered as intrinsically safe; they are expected to offer a long cycle life with stable capacity
retention. Compared to systems with liquid electrolytes such systems may, however, suffer from
low discharge rates due to large inner resistances especially at the macroscopic interfaces. More-
over, mechanical instability and yet unknown methods of large-scale production may delay their
availability. Over the last couple of years, we witnessed an impressive progress in developing
highly conducting solids, see, e.g., ref. [1]. The materials presented so far are single ion conduc-
tors with room-temperature conductivities in some cases, particularly if sulphides are regarded,
reaching values known for conventional liquid, but flammable electrolytes, see, e.g., ref. [2].

Here, we investigated the suitability of LiBH4-based nanocrystalline solid electrolytes [3]


that were mechanically treated in high-energy ball mills to obtain fine nanocrystalline pow-
ders. These powders that can be cold-pressed to fabricate Li|LiBH4|nano-Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) and
Li|LiBH4|nano-rutile cells, respectively. Below ca. 100 °C LiBH4 crystallises with orthorhom-
bic structure; enhanced ion transport, i.e., Li diffusivity, in nanocrystallineBH4 was studied
by 7Li NMR relaxometry. Variable-temperature 7Li NMR line shapes clearly revealed fast ion
dynamics in the interfacial regions of the nanostructures material [4]. At higher temperatures
it transforms into the highly conducting hexagonal, layer-structured polymorph [5,6]. We car-
ried out cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic cycling at different discharge rates, impedance
measurements as well as polarisation experiments to understand i) electrochemical stabili-
ty, ii) interfacial resistances, iii) possible self-discharge processes and iv) long-term cycling
behaviour of our cells. First results show that the batteries withstand high temperatures and
operate at reversible discharge capacities in the order of 125 mAh/g, which is an encouraging
value if we take the theoretical capacity of the cathode material into account.

References
1) J. C. Bachmann et al. Chem. Rev. 116 (2016) 140.
2) N. Kamaya et al. Nature Mater. 10 (2011) 682; V. Epp, O. Gün, H.-J. Deiseroth, M.
Wilkening, J. Phys. Chem. Lett., 4 (2013) 2118; Y. Seino et al. Energy Environ. Sci. 7
(2014) 627.
3) D. Sveinbjörnsson et al. J. Electrochem. Soc. 161 (2014) A1432.
4) V. Epp, M. Wilkening, ChemPhysChem 14 (2013) 3706.
5) H. Maekawa et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 131 (2009) 894.
6) V. Epp and M. Wilkening, Phys. Rev. B 82 (2010) 020301.

– 34 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 006
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Nanowire based materials for high energy density Li-ion batteries

Mahendra K. Sunkara

Conn Center for Renewable Energy Research and Chemical Engineering,


University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292
E-mail: mksunk01@louisville.edu

One-dimensional nanostructures, especially nanowires (NWs) have garnered tremendous


interest as electrode materials for batteries due to their high surface area to volume ratio, fas-
ter charge transport, better conducting pathways and good strain relaxation. However, several
challenges such as high capacity retention and scalable synthesis of NW electrodes still remain.
This talk gives an overview of the several synthesis strategies being developed in our group to
address these challenges. In the case of tin based anodes, we demonstrated that Sn nanocluster
covered tin oxide nanowires exhibited a stable capacity of 815 mAh/g even after 100 cycles.
This high capacity retention could be explained with kinetically limited de-lithiation behavior in
the nanocluster covered tin oxide NW powders.1,2 Thin protective coatings (~ 2 nm) on nanostru-
ctured materials are interesting for improving durability during cycling. However, in the case of
tin oxide NWs, the cycling exhibited migration of tin through coating layers.3 MoO3 NW array
electrodes also exhibited high capacity retention. Further, the MoO3 NW arrays could serve as
platform for depositing silicon for improving energy density without the use of any binders.4,5
This concept of silicon coating on MoO3 NW arrays could be achieved at low temperatures thus
making it highly scalable for manufacturing. Silicon NW arrays are also promising candidates
for high energy density anodes. However, high temperature synthesis methods to-date make it
difficult to produce over large areas. In this regard, a low-temperature synthesis method is being
developed for growing silicon NW arrays at temperatures lower than 350 ℃ on thin metal foils.
In addition to anodes, the NW based materials also show promise for cathodes as well. Exam-
ples using lithium manganese oxide nanowires will be provided.

Acknowledgements: Acknowledge present support from National Science Foundation (NSF)


EPSCOR Program (Grant 1355438) and DOE EPSCoR grant (DE-FG02-07ER46375)

References
1) P. Meduri, C. Pendyala, V. Kumar, G. U. Sumanasekera, M. K. Sunkara, Nano lett. 2009,
9, 612.
2) P. Meduri, E. Clark, E. Dayalan, G. U. Sumanasekera and M. K. Sunkara, Energy &
Environ. Sci. 2011, 4, 1695-1699.
3) T. Q. Nguyen, A.K. Thapa, V.K. Vendra, J.B. Jasinski, G.U. Sumanasekera and M.K.
Sunkara , RSC Adv., (2013).
4) P. Meduri, E. Clark, J. H. Kim, E. Dayalan, G. U. Sumanasekera,, Nano Lett. 2012, 12,
1784−1788.
5) A. Martinez-Garcia, A.K. Thapa, R. Dharmadasa, T.Q. Nguyen, J. Jasinski, T. L. Druffel
and M.K. Sunkara, “High rate and durable, binder free anode based on silicon loaded MoO3
nanoplatelets”, Scientific Reports (Nature), 5, 10530, doi:10.1038/srep10530 (2015).
6) V.K. Vendra, T.Q. Nguyen, A.K. Thapa, J.B. Jasinski, and M.K. Sunkara, “Scalable
Synthesis and Surface Stabilization of Li2MnO3 Cathode Materials in Li-Ion Batteries”,
RSC Advances, 5, 36906 – 36912 (2015).

– 35 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 007
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Two dimensional organic-inorganic perovskite from


nanostructures to solar cells
Lioz Etgar

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, The Institute of Chemistry, Casali Center for
Applied Chemistry, Jerusalem, Israel

E-mail: lioz.etgar@mail.huji.ac.il

Perovskite is a promising light harvester for use in photovoltaic solar cells. In recent years,
the power conversion efficiency of perovskite solar cells has been dramatically increased,
making them a competitive source of renewable energy.
This work will discusses new directions related to organic inorganic perovskite and their
applications in solar cells.

In low dimensional systems, stability of excitons in quantum wells is greatly enhanced due
to the confined effect and the coulomb interaction. The exciton binding energy of the typical
2D organic-inorganic perovskites is up to 300 meV and their self-assembled films exhibit
bright photoluminescence at room temperature.

 In this work we will show the dimensionality in the perovskite structure. The 2D perov-
skite structure should provide stable perovskite structure compare to the 3D structure.
The additional long organic cation, which is added to the perovskite structure (in the 2D
structure), is expected to provide hydrophobicity, which will enhance the resistivity of the
perovskite to humidity. Moreover we will demonstrate the use of 2D perovskite in high
efficiency solar cells.

 Organometal halide perovskite is used mainly in its “bulk” form in the solar cell. Confined
perovskite nanostructures could be a promising candidate for efficient optoelectronic devi-
ces, taking advantage of the superior bulk properties of organo-metal halide perovskite, as
well as the nanoscale properties. In this work, we present facile low temperature synthesis
of two-dimensional (2D) lead halide perovskite nanorods (NRs). These NRs show a shift
to higher energies in the absorbance and in the photoluminescence compared to the bulk
material, which supports their 2D structure. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of the NRs,
demonstrates their 2D nature combined with the tetragonal 3D perovskite structure. In ad-
dition, by alternating the halide composition, we were able to tune the optical properties of
the NRs. Fast Fourier Transform, and electron diffraction show the tetragonal structure of
these NRs. By varying the ligands ratio (e.g. octylammonium to oleic acid) in the synthe-
sis, we were able to provide the formation mechanism of these novel 2D perovskite NRs.
2D perovskite NRs are promising candidates for a variety of optoelectronic applications,
such as light emitting diodes, lasing, solar cells and sensors.

– 36 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 008
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Side-chain engineering of photovoltaic materials for high performance


polymer solar cells

Yongfang Lia,b,

a
Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China
b
College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science,
Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123, China.
E-mail: liyf@iccas.ac.cn

Polymer solar cells (PSCs) have attracted great attention in the past decade, because of
the advantages of simple device structure, light weight and capability to be fabricated into
flexible and semitransparent devices.1 The key photovoltaic materials of PSCs are conjugat-
ed polymer donors and the fullerene or non-fullerene acceptors. Recently, the nonfullerene
n-type organic semiconductor (n-OS) (such as the low bandgap n-OS ITIC) acceptors have
been developed quickly. To match with the low bandgap ITIC acceptor, we developed a series
of medium bandgap 2D-conjugated D-A copolymer donors based on bithienyl-benzodith-
iophene (BDTT) as donor unit and fluorobenzotriazole (FBTA) as acceptor unit. The D-A
copolymer donors possess complementary absorption spectra and matching electronic energy
levels with ITIC acceptor. By side chain engineering (alkyl2, alkylthio3 trialkylsilyl4 and fluo-
rine5 substitution) on the thiophene conjugated side chains of the medium bandgap polymers,
the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the PSCs with the polymers as donor and ITIC as
acceptor reached 9~11%2-5. By side chain isomerization of ITIC, the PCE of the nonfullerene
PSCs was further improved to 11.77%6. The results indicate that the side chain engineering of
the conjugated polymer donors and n-OS acceptors are efficient way to improve photovoltaic
performance of the nonfullerene PSC.

References:

1) Y. F. Li, Acc. Chem. Res. 45(2012), 723–733.


2) L. Gao, Z.-G. Zhang, H. J. Bin, L. Xue, Y. Yang, C. Wang, F. Liu, T. P. Russell, Y. F. Li,
Adv. Mater., 28(2016), 8288–8295.
3) H. J. Bin, Z.-G. Zhang, L. Gao, S. Chen, L. Zhong, L. Xue, C. Yang, Y. F. Li, J. Am.
Chem. Soc., 138(2016), 4657–4664.
4) H. J. Bin, L. Gao, Z.-G. Zhang, Y. K. Yang, Y. Zhang, C. Zhang, S. Chen, L. Xue, C.
Yang, M. Xiao, Y. F. Li, Nature Commun, 7(2016), 13651.
5) L. Xue, Y. K. Yang, J. Xu, C. Zhang, H. Bin, Z.–G. Zhang, B. Qiu, X. Li, C. Sun, L. Gao,
J. Yao, X. Chen, Y. Yang, M. Xiao, Y. F. Li, Adv. Mater., (2017), 1703344.
6) Y. K. Yang, Z.-G. Zhang, S. Chen, H. J. Bin, L. Gao, L. Xue, C. Yang, Y. F. Li, J. Am.
Chem. Soc., 138(2016), 15011–15018.

– 37 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 009
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

New classes of carrier transport layers & transparent flexible electrodes


for high performance Organic/Inorganic solar cells.

Wallace C. H. Choy

Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Hong


Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong.
chchoy@eee.hku.hk

While high temperature evaporation and sputtering are commonly used for forming metal
oxide semiconductors, we will discuss our room-temperature solution approaches for forming
various metal oxide nanomaterials. To demonstrate their good electron and hole transport pro-
perties, we will use them for all solution-processed organic/inorganic optoelectronics such as or-
ganic solar cells (OSCs), perovskite solar cells, dye sensitized solar cells, organic light emitting
diodes, etc which can favor the efficient transport of carriers between the photoactive layer and
electrode as well as high optical transparency [1-5]. With the incorporation of metal nanopar-
ticles in the oxide based carrier transport layers [7-9], we demonstrate abnormal plasmon-elec-
trical effects to enhance the performance of solar cells. The interesting features of the novel
carrier extraction layers are low temperature, solution process, water free and high electrical
conduction for high performance optoelectronics such as OSCs with power conversion efficien-
cy (PCE) of 10.5% [1-9]. In addition, we have developed some room-temperature processed
Ag nano-network which can serve as transparent flexible electrodes [10]. With the knowledge
of solution processed organic and inorganic materials, we also propose different approaches for
highly stable and efficient perovskite SCs [11] with no hysteresis and most recent PCE of 20.5%.

References
1) F. Jiang, W.C.H. Choy, X. Li, D. Zhang, J. Cheng, Adv. Mat., 27, 2930, 2015.
2) F. Xie, W.C.H. Choy, C. Wang, X. Li, S. Zhang, J. Hou, Adv. Mat., 25, 2051, 2013.
3) X.C. Li, W.C.H. Choy, et al. Light: Sci. & Applications, 4, e273, 2015.; S. Lu, X. Guan, F. Huang,
W.C.H. Choy, et al, Adv. Energy Mat., 5, 1500631, 2015; S. Lu, W.C.H. Choy, et al, Adv. Energy
Mater., DOI: 10.1002/aenm.201701164.
4) X.C. Li, F.X. Xie, S.Q. Zhang, J.H. Hou, W.C.H. Choy, Adv. Function. Mat., 24, 7348, 2014.
5) F.X. Xie, C.M. Chen, W.C.H. Choy et al, ACS Appl. Mat. & Interfaces, 6, 5367, 2014; D. Zhang,
W.C.H. Choy, et al, Org. Electron, 13 2042, 2012.
6) F.X. Xie, W.C.H. Choy, et al, Energy Environ. Sci., 6, 3372, 2013; D. Zhang, W.C.H. Choy, et al,
Adv. Funct. Mat., 23, 4255, 2013.
7) D. Zhang, F. Xie, P. Lin, W.C.H. Choy, ACS Nano, 7, 1740, 2013.
8) X.C. Li, W.C.H. Choy, F. Xie, et al, J. Mater. Chem. A, 1, 6614, 2013; J. Liu, X. Li, W.C. H. Choy
et al, Adv. Mat. Interface, 2, 1500324, 2015.
9) X. Ren, W.C.H. Choy, et al Small, 12, 5200, 2016.
10) H. Lu, W. C. H. Choy, et. al. Adv Function. Mat., 25, 4211, 2015; H. Lu, W. C. H. Choy et al, ACS Nano, 8,
10980, 2014; H. Lu, X. Ren, H.P. Ho, W. C. H. Choy, et. al. Scientific Reports, 5, 7876, 2015..
11) F.X. Xie, W.C.H. Choy, et. al., ACS Nano, 9, 639, 2015; H. Zhang, W.C. H. Choy, et al. Adv. Energy
Mat., 5, 1501354, 2015. H. Zhang, W.C.H. Choy, et al. ACS Nano, 10, 1503, 2016; H. Lu, W.C.H.
Choy, et. al., Nanoscale, 8, 5946, 2016; J. Liu, W.C.H. Choy, et. al., Nanoscale, 8, 3638, 2016; X.
Zhang, W.C.H. Choy, et. al., Nano Lett., 16, 1415, 2016; H. Zhu, W.C.H. Choy, et. al., ACS Nano,
10, 6808, 2016; J. Mao, W.C.H. Choy, et. al., Adv. Funct. Mat., DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201606525.;
H. Zhu, W.C.H. Choy, et. al, Adv. Funct. Mat., DOI:10.1002/adfm.201605469; H. Zhang, W. C. H.
Choy, et.al, Adv. Mat. DOI:10.1002/ adma.201604695.
– 38 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 010
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Regular Speaker

Stretchable Ag nanowire network/PEDOT:PSS hybrid electrodes


with polyurethane substrates for flexible polymer-dispersed liquid
crystal smart window

Jin-Yeong Parka, Dong-Ju Kimb, Jun-Yong Bakb, Han-Ki Kima*

a Department of Advanced Materials Engineering for Information and Electronics,


Kyung Hee University, Deogyeong-daero 1732, Republic of Korea
bDynamic Korea Technology, R&D Center, Sanho-daero 116-60, Republic of
Korea

E-mail: imdlhkkim@khu.ac.kr

We report printing of Ag nanowire (NW) network/PEDOT :PSS films using a bar coater


to replace conventional ITO film for cost-effective flexible polymer-dispersed liquid crystal
(PDLC). To substitute vacuum-based high cost and brittle ITO electrodes, we adopted a Ag
NW network/PEDOT :PSS electrode on PU substrate using bar coater. Outer/inner bending,
twisting, and rolling tests as well as dynamic fatigue tests demonstrated that the mechanical
flexibility of the slot-die coated Ag NW films was superior to that of conventional ITO films.
To show the feasibility of bar coated Ag NW network/PEDOT :PSS electrode on PU substra-
te, we fabricated 2.5 by 2 PDLC-based smart window on a optimized Ag NW/PEDOT :PSS
network electrodes (30 Ohm/square, 90% optical transmittance). Superior flexibility of bar
coated Ag NW/PEDOT :PSS electrode than sputtered ITO electrode indicated the possibility
of the bar coated Ag NW network/PEDOT :PSS electrode for highly flexible smart windows.
Also successful operation of flexible and stretchable PDLC-based smart window with Ag
NW/PEDOT  :PSS electrodes indicates that bar coated Ag NW/PEDOT  :PSS films on PU
substrate are promising low cost, high performance, and flexible transparent electrodes for
cost-effective large-area smart window and can be substituted for ITO films, which have high
sheet resistance and are brittle.

References

1). Hadi Hosseinzadeh Khaligh, Sol. Energy 132 (2015) 337-341


2). Yanhua Liu, Opt Express 24 (2016) 25774-25784
3). Han-Ki Kim et al, Scientific Reports 6 (2016) 34322

– 39 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 011
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Supercritical CO2-assisted fabrication of two-dimensional layer


materials and their further application in energy conversion

Qun Xu

College of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou


450001, P.R. China

E-mail: qunxu@zzu.edu.cn

Since the isolation of graphene, more atomically thin two dimensional (2D) nanomaterials
have been inspired worldwide because of their fascinating properties in condensed matter
physics, materials science and chemistry. Layered transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs),
featuring particularly dramatic physical, optoelectronic and catalytic properties owing to their
distinct quantum confinement and semiconducting effects, have emerged as a new class of 2D
nanomaterials.Their unique lateral size, ultrathin thickness and high flexibility render them as
basic building blocks for constructing new nanostructures. Therefore, aiming to find a facile
and convenient route to design and scalable fabricate such heterostructures in high quality
hold particular promise in practical applications. On the basis of the materials design, how-
ever, it raises an intriguing question: how to controllably and selectively construct a novel
functional heterostructure with multi-components and chosen sequence-stacking?
Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC CO2), combing the advantages of both liquid-phase and
gas-phase, such as efficient dissolution property, low viscosity, high diffusivity and zero sur-
face tension, has been widely used as reaction medium to construct novel structures. For ex-
ample, SC CO2 can successfully exfoliate bulk layered materials into monolayer and few-lay-
ers with clean surfaces by efficient expansion and intercalation. Moreover, SC CO2 can be
used as an ideal external stimulus to induce phase transformation and chemical reaction.
In our work, by virtue of the peculiar properties of SC CO2, we focused on the following
work.
1) SC CO2-assisted fabrication of 2D materials;
2) SC CO2-assisted building lateral heterostructure;
3) SC CO2-assisted phase engineering;
4) SC CO2-assisted fabrication of amorphous 2D materials;
5) SC CO2-assisted selective stacking complex heterostructure. Accurately, we demon-
strate that the SC CO2 can also facilitate the sequence-stacking of 2D WS2-WO3·H2O/1T-2H
MoS2 heterostructures. We prepared WS2-WO3·H2O and 1T-2H MoS2 lateral heterostructures
with the assistance of the SC CO2. To circumvent the limitation in the lateral WS2-WO3·H2O
and 1T-2H MoS2 heterostructures, we then built up a novel quaternary heterostructures WS2-
WO3·H2O/1T-2H MoS2 with precisely controlled sequence-stacking in the SC CO2 system.
Furthermore, the formation mechanism and the optoelectronic performance are investigated
as well.

– 40 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 011
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

References
1) “CO2-Assisted Fabrication of Two-Dimensional Amorphous Molybdenum Oxide Na-
nosheets for Enhanced Plasmon Resonances”, Wei Liu, Qun Xu*, Weili Cui, Chuanhui
Zhu, Yuhang Qi., Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.  2017, 56, 1600;
2) “CO2-Assisted Fabrication of Novel Heterostructures of h-MoO3/1T-MoS2 for Enhan-
ced Photoelectrocatalytic Performance”, Chuanhui Zhu, Qun Xu*, et al., Aplied Surface
Science, 2017, 425, 56;
3) “Supercritical CO2-assisted phase transformation from orthorhombic to hexagonal MoO3”,
Xuzhe Wang, Weili Cui, Meng Chen, Qun Xu*, Materials Letters, 2017, 201, 129;
4) “CO2-Assisted Solution-Phase Selective Assembling of 2D WS2-WO3•H2O and 1T-2H
MoS2 to Desirable Complex Heterostructures”, Yumei Ren, Qun Xu*, et al, ChemNano-
Mat. 2017, DOI: 10.1002/cnma.201700058.
5) “CO2-Induced Defect Engineering: A New Protocol by Doping Vacancies in 2D Hete-
rostructures for Enhanced Visible-Light Photocatalysis”, Yumei Ren, Chongze Wang, Yu-
hang Qi, Zhimin Chen, Yu Jia, Qun Xu*, Applied Surface Science, 2017, 419, 573.
6) “Triphasic 2D Materials by Vertically Stacking Laterally Heterostructured 2H-/1T’-MoS2
on Graphene for Enhanced Photoresponse”, Weili Cui, Shanshan Xu, Bo Yan, Zhihua
Guo, Qun Xu,* Bobby G. Sumpter, Jingsong Huang, Shiwei Yin, Huijun Zhao, and Yun
Wang*, Adv. Electron. Mater. 2017, 1700024. DOI: 10.1002/aelm.201700024;
7) “Supercritical CO2–Assisted Reverse-Micelle Induced Solution- Phase Fabrication of
Two-Dimensional Metallic 1T-MoS2 and 1T-WS2”, Xin Tong, Yuhang Qi, Jing Chen, Nan
Wang, Qun Xu*, ChemNanoMat  2017, DOI:10.1002/cnma.201700011;
8) “Fabrication and assembly of two-dimensional TiO2/WO3·H2O heterostructures with type
II band alignment for enhanced photocatalytic performance”, Applied Surface Science.
2017,403,564;
9) “CO2-Induced Phase Engineering: Protocol for Enhanced Photoelectrocatalytic Perfor-
mance of 2D MoS2 Nanosheets”, Yuhang Qi, Qun Xu*,Yun Wang, Bo Yan, Zhimin Chen,
ACS Nano, 2016, 10, 2903;
10) “High-effiency exfoliation of layered materials into 2D nanosheets in switchable CO2/Sur-
factant/H2O system”, Nan Wang, Qun Xu,* et al, Scientific Reports, 2015, DOI: 10.1038/
srep16764;
11) “Fabrication of Two-Dimensional Lateral Heterostructures of WS2/WO3•H2O Through
Selective Oxidation of Monolayer WS2”, Pengshang Zhou, Qun Xu,* Hongxiang Li, Yun
Wang,* Bo Yan, et al, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2015, 54, 15226;
12) “Reverse-MicelleInduced Exfoliation of Graphite into Graphene Nanosheets with Assis-
tance of Supercritical  CO2”,  Shanshan Xu, Qun Xu*, Nan Wang,et al, Chemistry of Ma-
terials, 2015, 27, 3262-3272.

– 41 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 012
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Nanoarray electrodes for high-rate Na-ion batteries

Hong Jin Fan

School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University,


Singapore.
Email: fanhj@ntu.edu.sg

The performance of electrochemical energy storage devices relies largely on a scrupulous


design of nanoarchitectures and smart hybridization of active materials. Nanoarray electrodes
are particularly investigated for power source in microelectronics, which requires high rates,
high areal capacity/capacitance and long cycle stability. When the metal-ion battery electrode
materials are designed into nanostructures (e.g., 1D array, 2D nanosheets), there appear new
charge storage processes that can boost the high-rate performance and long-cycle stability.
Our group has been actively working on nanoarray materials directly on conductive substrates
as electrodes for thin-film batteries. In this talk, I will articulate our material design strategies
for both Li-ion and Na-ion storage electrodes and elaborate how the extrinsic pseudocapac-
itance effect contributes to the high-rate performance. These materials include VO2, SnS,
and MoSe1-xSx. In addition, surface engineering and functionalization strategies, including
atomic layer deposition (ALD) and carbon dots will be mentioned for performance enhance-
ment.

– 42 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 013
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Regular Speaker

Lithium-Ion transport in mechanochemically synthesized na-


nocrystalline garnets

Caroline Hiebl, Marlena Uitz, Daniel Rettenwander, Mar-


tin Wilkening
Institute for Chemistry and Technology of Materials, Graz University of Techno-
logy, Christian Doppler Laboratory for Lithium Batteries, Stremayrgasse 9, 8010
Graz, Austria
E-Mail: caroline.hiebl@tugraz.at

Lithium-ion batteries are indispensable in our mobile electronic devices. Although consi-
dered as promising next-generation storage systems for green energy, safety aspects are of top
priority of current research. The root of the safety issues associated with lithium-ion batteries
lies in the electrolyte materials used at present. Those are based on flammable non-aqueous
liquid electrolytes. Irrespective of these risk they could not been replaced so far because of the
lack of inherently safe inorganic solids which should show both very high ionic diffusivities1,2
and a practicable electrochemical stability. Since a couple of years garnet-type metal oxides,3
such as Li7La3Zr2O12 (LLZO), are considered as suitable candidates as they fulfil many of the
requirements to realize, e.g., thin-film batteries. The synthesis of highly conducting Li-bea-
ring garnets needs, however, high sintering temperatures, which makes the control of the Li
stoichiometry in, e.g., Al-stabilized garnets a challenging task.
The present work is aimed at investigating the possibilities to use mechanochemistry assis-
ted by soft annealing to reduce the synthesis temperatures to prepare phase pure Al-stabilized
LLZO as well as samples stabilized by the incorporation of, e.g., Fe. After mechanical activa-
tion of the starting materials an amorphous, nanocrystalline phase was formed that transforms
after single or multistep sintering processes into the desired cubic modification of LLZO.
While X-ray powder diffraction helped identify foreign phases, broadband conductivity spec-
troscopy was used to characterize the ionic transport parameters, i.e., bulk and g.b. electrical
responses. As an example, for Li6.1Al0.3La3Zr2O12 (97 vol. % of cubic LLZO) prepared we
obtained conductivities almost reaching 10-5 S cm-1 at ambient conditions.

We thank the Austrian Federal Ministry for Science, Research and Economy as well as
the ChristianDoppler Forschungsgesellschaft for financial support.

References

1) V. Epp, O. Gün, H.-J. Deiseroth, M. Wilkening, J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 4 (2013) 2118.
2) M. Uitz, V. Epp, P. Bottke, M. Wilkening, J. Electroceram. (2017), in press.
3) Thangadurai et al., Chem. Soc. Rev. 43 (2014) 4714.

– 43 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 014
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Regular Speaker

Application of Ni materials to rechargeable battery or


supercapacitors: Nanotechnology offers new approach
to increasing storage ability

Su Young Ryu, Michael R. Hoffmann

Environmental Science and Engineering, Linde + Robinson Laboratory, California


Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA91125, USA
E-mail: syryu@caltech.edu

Today, capacitors have attracted considerable attention as a key component of portable


electronics to electric vehicles with advantages of high power density, long cycle life and fast
delivery of energy. However, capacitors still lag behind Li-ion batteries in terms of energy
density as giving a relatively poor storage capacity while Li-ion battery offers high storage
of energy. In here we introduce our considerable efforts that devoted to improving storage
capacity on NiO/Ni(OH)2 nanoflakes as electrochemical pseudocapacitor active materials.

In current designs containing NiO/Ni(OH)2 electrodes, the battery capacity is generally


limited by the nickel electrode. To improve the energy density of the electrode, we employed
the nanomaterials, graphene and Ag nanoparticles with functionalized TiO2 nanoparticles.

References

1). Dong Un Lee et al., ACS Nano Lett. 16 (2016) 1794-1802.


2). Bastakoti et al., Chem. Commun. 48 (2012) 9150-9152.

– 44 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 015
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Regular Speaker

Sodium insertion into nanocrystalline spinel-type lithium titanate:


Na diffusion and electrochemical performance in half-cells
M. Brinek, P. Posch, S. Lunghammer, M. Uitz, D. Prutsch, I. Hanzu, M. Wilkening

Institute for Chemistry and Technology of Materials, Graz University of Technology,


and Christian
Doppler Laboratory for Li Batteries, Stremayrgasse 9, A-8010 Graz, Austria
E-Mail: marina.brinek@tugraz.at
Sodium ion batteries are gaining more and more attention as sodium is known for its low
cost and high natural abundance [1]. These aspects are beneficial for establishing large sca-
le energy storage technologies that can store electricity from intermittent sources. Li4Ti5O12
(LTO) is known as a very robust anode material regarding cycleability and rate capability.
At the very early stages of Li insertion it immediately turns into a fast (mixed) conductor [2]
and survives many thousands of full cycles in Li ion batteries without severe ageing effects.
Therefore, it is highly suited to act as electrode material in large-scale, i.e., stationary, energy
storage systems. Its use in Na-ion batteries has been reported before [3]. It is, however, still
not fully clear whether nanostructuring is useful to significantly influence the electrochemical
performance in Na-ion batteries.
In the present study we took advantage of high-energy ball milling to prepare nanocrystal-
line LTO samples. We varied the milling conditions (dry milling, milling in ethanol or even
water, milling time to prepare different batches for our electrochemical analyses comparing
the results for the unmilled sample with those milled up to 240 min in a planetary mill. Cyc-
lic voltammetry points to several consecutive insertion processes, see also ref. [3]. For the
samples prepared by milling in ethanol we observed that the charge capacity clearly incre-
ases with milling time, i.e., nanostructuring of the material. Galvanostatic cycling revealed
reversible specific capacities of up to 125 mAh/g; the theoretic capacity of LTO is ca. 170
mAh/g. Interestingly, galvanostatic intermittent titration showed that the (average) Na chemi-
cal diffusion coefficient was in the order of only 10-20 cm2/s. This observation is in line with
first 23Na NMR line shape measurements that reveal dipolarly broadened lines which do not
show any significant motion-induced narrowing with temperature. Most likely surface effects
should be considered when explaining the stable cycling performance and the attractive ca-
pacities obtained. Moreover, preliminary ex-situ X-ray diffraction experiments revealed that
a tiny amount of new phases form at an insertion potential of approximately 0.4 V. Further
experiments are currently performed to clarify its nature, origin and potential relevance for the
electrochemical performance of the half cells studied so far.

References
We thank F. Mautner and B. Bitschnau for their help with the X-ray diffraction measure-
ments. Financial support by the Austrian Federal Ministry for Science, Research and Eco-
nomy as well as the ChristianDoppler Forschungsgesellschaft is highly appreciated.
1) Slater M.D., Kim D., Lee E., Johnson C.S., Adv. Funct. Mater. 23 (2013) 947.
2) W. Schmidt, P. Bottke, M. Sternad, P. Gollob, V. Hennige, M. Wilkening, Chem. Mater.
27 (2015) 1740.
3) Sun Y., Zhao L., Pan H., et al. Nat. Commun. 4 (2013) 1870.

– 45 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 016
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Biological computing using fluorescence lifetime


imaging measurements

Eran Barnoy, Rachela Popovtzer, Dror Fixler

Faculty of Engineering and the Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materi-


als, Bar Ilan University, Ramat Gan 5290002, Israel
E-mail: Dror.Fixler@biu.ac.il

We describe recent research in which we explored the viability of describing biologically


relevant logic gates using gold nanoparticles (GNPs) conjugated to fluorophores and tracing
the results remotely by and time-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM).
GNPs have a well-known effect on nearby fluorophores in terms of their fluorescence
intensity (FI- increase or decrease) as well as fluorescence lifetime (FLT). We have designed
a few bio-switch systems in which the FLIM-detected fluorescence varies after biologically
relevant stimulation. Some of our tools include fluorescein diacetate (FDA) which can be
activated by either esterases or pH), peptide chains cleavable by caspase 3, and the polymer
polyacrylic acid (which varies in size based on surrounding pH). After conjugating GNPs to
chosen fluorophores, we have successfully demonstrated the logic gates of NOT, AND, OR,
NAND, NOR, and XOR by imaging different stages of activation. These logic gates have
been demonstrated both in solutions as well as within cultured cells, thereby possibly opening
the door for nanoparticulate in vivo smart detection.
While these initial probes are mainly tools for intelligent detection systems, they lay the foun-
dation for logic gates functioning in conjunction so as to lead to a form of ¬in vivo biological
computing, where the system would be able to release proper treatment options in specific
situations without external influence.

References

1) Eran A. Barnoy, Rachela Popovtzer and Dror Fixler, Development of a molecular bio-
switch using fluorescence lifetime imaging: incremental activation of fluorescein diace-
tate, Journal of Biophotonics doi:10.1002/jbio.201700084 (2017).

– 46 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 017
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Semiconductor nanowires for biology applications


Christelle N. Prinz
Division of Solid State Physics and NanoLund, Lund University, 221 00 Lund, Sweden
E-mail: christelle.prinz@ftf.lth.se

Semiconductor nanowires are very promising tools for biological applications. Their small
dimensions, which are on the same length scale as many cell components, make them an ideal
tool to probe and stimulate cells with minimal perturbation. In this talk I will review our work
towards using nanowires for neural implant and cellular force sensor applications, as well as
our studies towards understanding and controlling the cell-nanowire interface.
Neural implants. Achieving stable, long-term communication with the central nervous sys-
tem is a prerequisite in order to understand how the brain functions. Current brain implants elicit
a foreign body reaction that results in the encapsulation of the implant by glial cells, which in
turn, results in loss of signal and implant dysfunction. Nanostructured implants are expected to
reduce the glial cell response and hence enhance the implant lifetime. In particular, nanowires
are promising for the development of neural implants. Our work deals with the investigation of
the interactions of nanowires with living cells, including neurons and glial cells. We are growing
gallium phosphide (GaP) nanowires using metal organic vapor phase epitaxy, from catalytic
gold nanoparticles deposited on a (111)B GaP substrate. We have shown that neurons from both
the peripheral and central nervous system thrive on GaP nanowires 1,2. In the case of retinal cells,
nanowires elicit extensive neurite outgrowth without favoring spreading and adhesion of glial
cells2. By making alternating patterns of nanowire arrays and flat regions using electron beam li-
thography, we were able to confine the glial cells on the flat regions while most neurons grow on
the nanowires3. The distinct behavior of neurons and glial cells on nanowires may be explained
by difference in cell proliferation rates and motility4,5.
Cellular force sensors. Mechanical forces are exerted in many crucial cellular processes
and the investigation of cellular forces is expected to yield important information on, e.g.,
cancer formation and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (metastasis). We are using arrays
of vertical nanowires to measure forces exerted by cells growing on top of the array. The
nanowires are arranged in a hexagonal array using EBL. The nanowire base is made of GaP,
which is not fluorescent and the nanowire tip is made of gallium indium phosphide (GaInP)6,
which is inherently fluorescent, with negligible bleaching, making it possible to monitor the
nanowire deflection (i.e. the force exerted on the nanowire) using fluorescence microscopy.
We are using this method to measure forces exerted by normal and cancerous breast cells.

References
1) W. Hällström, T. Mårtensson, C. Prinz, P. Gustavsson, L. Montelius, L. Samuelson and M. Kanje,
Nano Lett., 2007, 7, 2960–5.
2) G. Piret, M. T. Perez and C. N. Prinz, Biomaterials, 2013, 34, 875–887.
3) G. Piret, M.-T. Perez and C. N. Prinz, ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces, 2015, 7, 18944–18948.
4) H. Persson, C. Købler, K. Mølhave, L. Samuelson, J. O. Tegenfeldt, S. Oredsson and C. N. Prinz,
Small, 2013, 9, 4006–16.
5) H. Persson, Z. Li, J. O. Tegenfeldt, S. Oredsson and C. N. Prinz, Sci. Rep., 2015, 5, 18535.
6) K. Adolfsson, H. Persson, J. Wallentin, S. Oredsson, L. Samuelson, J. O. Tegenfeldt, M. T. Bor-
gstrom and C. N. Prinz, Nano Lett., 2013, 13, 4728–4732.

– 47 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 018
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Nonn-invasive and fast imaging tumors by SQUID biosusceptome-


try and magnetic nanoparticles

Jen-Jie Chieh*

Institute of Electro-Optical Science and Technology,


National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan
E-mail: jjchieh@ntnu.edu.tw

1. Dual In-Vivo and Ex-Vivo Imaging of Tumor cells For intraoperative imaging in op-
erating theaters or preoperative imaging in clinics, compact and economic integration rather
than large and expensive equipment is required to coregister structural and functional imag-
ing. However, current technologies, such as those integrating optical and gamma cameras
or infrared and fluorescence imaging, involve certain drawbacks, including the radioactive
biorisks of nuclear medicine indicators and the inconvenience of conducting measurements
in dark environments. A novel dual-imaging model system integrating an optical camera and
magnetic scanning superconducting-quantum-interference device (SQUID) biosusceptome-
try (SSB) was proposed. The simultaneous coregistration of low-field magnetic images of
MNP distributions and optical images of anatomical regions enabled the tumor distribution to
be determined easily and in real time. To simulate targeted MNPs within animals, fewer re-
agents than the injected dose were contained in a microtube as a sample for the phantom test.
The positioning and discrimination of liver tumors implanted on the backs and livers of rats
were verified by conducting in vivo and ex vivo tests. The results of tissue staining verified the
feasibility of using this method to determine the distribution of liver tumors.

2. Dual Magneto-Immunohistochemistry After a needle biopsy, immunohistochemistry


is generally used to stain tissue slices for clinically confirming tumours. However, the obser-
vation must be performed by experienced pathologists, and producing a qualitative analysis
is time consuming. Therefore, this study proposes a SSB and the dual modalities of fluores-
cent and magnetic reagent. Tissue slices were rapidly imaged using the developed SSB for
obtaining coregistered optical and magnetic images. A traditional observation methodology
entailing the use of a fluorescence microscope was also performed as the gold standard. This
study determined high consistency between the fluorescent and magnetic spots in different
regions of the tissue slices, demonstrating the feasibility of the proposed approach, which will
benefit future clinical pathology.

– 48 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 019
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

A micro-palpation device for a single cell analysis

Noritada Kajia,b,c, Mamiko Sanoa, Shiori Itoa, Hirotoshi Yasakia,b, Takao Yasuia,b,c,
Yoshinobu Babaa,c,d
a
Department of Biomolecular Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Uni-
versity, Nagoya 464-8603, Japan
b
ImPACT Research Center for Advanced Nanobiodevices, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-
8603, Japan
c
JST, PRESTO, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603, Japan
d
National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Hayashi-cho
2217-14, Takamatsu 761-0395, Japan
E-mail: kaji@chembio.nagoya-u.ac.jp

The mechanical properties of a cell are extremely important because changes in the mechanical
properties are indicative of diseases ranging from diabetes to malignant transformation. Conside-
ring the heterogeneity within a population of cancer cells and stem cells, a robust measurement
system at the single cell level is required in both research and clinical situations. Recent develo-
pments in microfluidic devices have advanced the throughput of mechanophenotyping measu-
rements [1]. However, since most of these assay techniques essentially rely on optical detection
systems, the spatial resolution was limited to a few μm in the xy plane and less in the z direction. In
the last µTAS conference, we proposed the microfluidic device with two consecutive constrictions
for a single cell sizing and deformability measurements based on blocking ion current [2]. In this
work, we validated the methodology and expanded the application field to stem cell research.
For a single cell measurements, a syringe pump was connected to a reservoir and operated
in withdrawal mode to hydrodynamically drive the cells. We could obtain two consecutive
signals of the blocking ion current and the front and the rear signal corresponds to cell size
and deformability, respectivley. To validate the detection system, signal intensities of the front
peak corresponding to an object’s size were measured using polystyrene bead of 10 µm in
diameter under different flow rate, 5, 10, and 15 µl/min. The results indicated that the beads
velocity passing through the first constriction did not affect the precision of sizing. The device
reproducibility was also validated and no statistically significant difference was observed in
the signal intensity and residence time.
To elucidate the ability of this mechanophenotyping device, two experiments were perfor-
med; influence of chemical labeling of a cell and passage of stem cells. In the chemical labe-
ling experiment, H358 lung cancer was labeling by CellTrackerTM and measured the size and
deformability by the device. The correlation curve of cell sizes and deformability is almost the
same but the cells stained by CellTrackerTM seems larger than the control cells. This might be
derived from the working principle of CellTrackerTM, comsuming a lutathione S-transferase
which prevents actin polymerization. In the passage of stem cells experiment, we measured
different passage of ASCs. The cells of higher passage showed longer residence time at the
second constriction, which means that less deformable than the cells of lower passage.

References
1) “High-Throughput Assessment of Cellular Mechanical Properties,” E. M. Darling, and D.
Di Carlo, Annual Review of Biomedical Engineering, 17, 35 (2015).
2) “Millisecond Measurement of Single Cell Size and Deformability by Electrical Detection
Microfluidic Device with Two Consecutive Constrictions,” N. Kaji, M. Sano, H. Yasaki,
T. Yasui, Y. Baba, The Proceedings of μTAS 2016, 341 (2016).

– 49 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 020
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Polymer pen lithography for bioactive surface functionalization

Michael Hirtza, Christof M. Niemeyerb, Harald Fuchsa,c

a
Institute of Nanotechnology (INT) and Karlsruhe Nano Micro Facility (KNMF),
Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Germany
b
Institute for Biological Interfaces (IBG 1), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT),
Germany
c
Physical Institute and Center for Nanotechnology (CeNTech), University of Mün-
ster, Germany
E-mail: michael.hirtz@kit.edu

Microarrays and high-density, highly localized chemical surface modifications have be-
come an important tool in biomedical applications for research and diagnostics. Polymer Pen
Lithography (PPL)1 is a powerful method to generate such patterns with features in the nano-
to microrange over large surfaces areas (square centimeters). In particular, interdigitated and
multiplexed patterns with more than one chemical component within the area of a single cell
can be produced.2 This makes the technology very attractive for multiple applications in bio-
sensing,3,4 biomedical experiments,5,6 and medical diagnostics.7

In this talk, we present the application of PPL for the multiplexed deposition of oligo-nu-
cleotides to surfaces. These can be used as versatile yet highly specific binding motifs for
DNA-directed immobilization (DDI). The resulting arrays and surface patterns offer flexible
platforms for the presentation of arbitrary proteins to single cells. In conjunction with DNA
origami structures, the technique allows for a multi-scale presentation of proteins with precise
control over number and spatial positioning of proteins ranging from the micro to the na-
noscale. The response of adhered MCF7 cells to different spatial nano-arrangement of same
number of EGF-ligand (a growth factor), is discussed as an example of application.

References

1). Huo et al., Science 321 (2008) 1658–1660.


2). Brinkmann et al., Small 9 (2013), 3266–3275.
3). Bog et al., Small 10 (2014) 3863–3868.
4). Bog et al., ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces 9 (2017) 12109–12117.
5). Kumar et al., Small 12 (2016) 5330–5338.
6). Chen et al., Angew. Chemie Int. Ed. 56 (2017) 5916–5920.
7). Brinkmann et al., Sci. Rep. 5 (2015) 15342.
8). Kumar et al., Chem. Commun. 52 (2016) 12310–12313.
9). Angelin et al., Angew. Chemie Int. Ed. 54 (2015) 15813–15817.

– 50 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 021
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Metal nanoparticles in tumor cell radiosensitization

Eva Pagacováa, Lenka Stefancikovaa,b, Sandrine Lacombeb, Daniela Saladob, Erika


Porcelb, Daniel Depesa, Iva Falkovaa, Alena Bacikovaa, Olivier Tillementc, François
Luxc, Stanislav Kozubeka, and Martin Falka

Department of Cell Biology and Radiobiology,


a

Institute of Biophysics of CAS, Brno, CR


b
Institute des Sciences Moléculaires d’Orsay, Université Paris Sud, Orsay Cedex,
France
c
Institut Lumière Matière, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Villeurbanne cedex,
France
E-mail: mfalk76@gmail.com

Tumor cell radioresistance poses a serious obstacle in therapy of many cancers. While
proton and especially ion beam cancer therapy (IBCT) can improve therapeutic results, there
is still need for tumor radiosensitizing agents. Metal nanoparticles seem to be promising in
this respect since they are preferentially internalized by tumor cells, locally amplify radiation
dose, and improve selective targeting of radiation effects to tumors. Hence, metal nanoparti-
cles delivered in tumor cells might increase tumor-specificity and efficiency of radiotherapy
at the same time. Importantly, though physical mechanisms related to radiation dose ampli-
fication by nanoparticles have already been well described, cellular structures targeted by
nanoparticles and biological processes behind the nanoparticle-mediated cell radiosensitiza-
tion remain unknown.
In this work, we present quite surprising results on a possible mechanism of nanoparti-
cles-mediated radiosensitization: Under the conditions where 2-nm gadolinium nanoparticles
amplify the radiation effects, they remain localized in the cytoplasm and their influence on
DSB induction and repair is not significant. This suggests that the radiosensitization caused
by gadolinium and potentially (some) other nanoparticles, like gold or platinum, might be a
cytoplasmic event that is independent of the nuclear DNA breakage, commonly accepted as
the main cause of radiation-induced cell killing. Based on recognized intracellular localiza-
tion of nanoparticles involved in this study, we hypothesize about possible non-DNA targets
for (some) nanoparticles. For details see Stefancikova et al. J Nanobiotechnology 14(1):63
(2016).

Acknowledgement
The work was supported by the following projects: the Ministry of Health of CR (16-29835A),
the Czech Science Foundation (P302/12/G157 and 16-12454S), EU COST MP1002 Na-
no-IBCT, and the Czech contribution to JINR Dubna 2015/2016-2018. The research leading
to these results has received funding from the People Programme (Marie Curie Actions) of
the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under REA grant
agreement n°[624370].

– 51 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 022
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Regular Speaker

Enhanced flame retardancy of epoxy resin with polymeric DO-


PO-nanocontainers
Maria M.Velencosoa, Frederik R. Wurma, Katharina Landfestera
a
Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, Mainz, Germany.
www.chemistry-islife.de
E-mail: martinez@mpip-mainz.mpg.de

In the past decades, the demand of flame retardants has experienced a rapid growth in
industry and everyday life. This is due to the increase of fire damages associated with the
massive use of organic polymeric materials. We live in the polymer age, mainly due to the
remarkable combination of properties of materials achieved with polymers, such as low we-
ight and ease of processing. These properties make them an irreplaceable material for many
products. One disadvantage is the high flammability of plastics and the production of toxic
gases and smoke during combustion. Consequently, the improvement of their fire retardant
behaviour is a major challenge for materials science.

In this area, nanotechnology provides us some badly needed new approaches. Herein, a
new approach based on the development of flame retardant polymeric nanocontainers with
high thermal stability, low flammability and good compatibility with polymeric matrices is
presented. These nanocontainers will help solve the problems of poor dispersion and low in-
terfacial adhesion of the inorganic and hybrid nanomaterials applied so far.

A novel nanocontainer was synthesized via polyaddition reaction in inverse miniemulsion


using 9,10dihydro-9-oxa-10-phosphapenantrene-10-oxide (DOPO) as structural subunit to
enhance the flame retardancy of the nanomaterials. A microfluidizer was chosen to produce
spherical nanocontainers (200 nm of diameter) to satisfy the demanded scaling for flame
retardant applications. The introduction of the nanocontainers in different epoxy resins at
different process conditions was studied to get a good stabilization and dispersion of the na-
nocontainers in the epoxy media. Furthermore, a good thermal stability and a reduced impact
on the mechanical properties of the epoxy resins were observed.

Acknowledgements: The authors thank the Marie Skłodowska-Curie fellowship


705054-NOFLAME (Flame Retardant Nanocontainers) project.

– 52 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 023
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Smart photonic nanomaterials for theranostic applications

Sei Kwang Hahn, Dohee Keum, Ho Sang Jung, Min Young Lee

Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and School of Interdisciplinary


Bioscience and Bioengineering, POSTECH, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784, Korea
Email: skhanb@postech.ac.kr

We developed melanoidin nanoparticles for in vivo noninvasive photoacoustic mapping of


sentinel lymph nodes, photoacoustic tomography of gastro-intestinal tracts, and photothermal
ablation cancer therapy. In addition, we developed cell-integrated poly(ethylene glycol) hy-
drogels for in vivo optogenetic sensing and therapy. Real-time optical readout of encapsulated
heat-shock-protein-coupled fluorescent reporter cells made it possible to measure the nano-
toxicity of cadmium-based quantum dots in vivo. Using optogenetic cells producing gluca-
gon-like peptide-1, we performed light-controlled diabetic therapy for glucose homeostasis.
Finally, we developed a smart contact lens composed of biosensors, drug delivery systems,
and power sources for the treatment of diabetes as a model disease.

– 53 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 024
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Nanoparticles‘ neuronal trafficking and cellular interactions

Alexander V. Romashchenkoa, Dmitry V. Petrovskia, Ludmila A. Gerlinskayaa,


Mikhail P. Moshkina, Yuri M. Moshkina,b

a
The Federal Research Center, Institute Cytology and Genetics, Novosibirsk
630090, Russia
b
Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia
E-mail: yury.moshkin@gmail.com

Nanoparticles are capable of penetrating into the brain, and recent epidemiologic studies
suggest they can be a risk factor in the development of neurological disorders, such as demen-
tia. However, little is known about nanoparticles’ neuronal trafficking and their cellular inter-
actions. To address these questions, we performed MRI quantification of neuronal trafficking
of manganese oxide nanoparticles engulfed by the olfactory receptors and showed that they
are capable of reaching deep brain structures following precisely olfactory neuronal tract. Our
results revealed that accumulation rates of nanoparticles are in line with fast axonal transport,
while their elimination rates are orders of magnitude slower. Accumulation of nanoparticles
drops exponentially down the olfactory neuronal tract suggesting that synaptic transmission
confers a significant barrier for nanoparticles’ neuronal transport.
Next, we assessed intracellular targets of nanoparticles and showed that inorganic nanopar-
ticles bind to low-complexity, intrinsically disordered proteins extracted from human cells.
Intrinsic protein disorder associates with polypeptide flexibility suggesting that side-chain
mobility plays an important role in driving of protein-nanoparticle interactions. Disordered
proteins are represented by a diverse group of RNA-binding proteins, which, under cellular
stress conditions, transit into hydrogel-like phase resulting in the assembly of stress granules.
We suggest that, within a cell, nanoparticles might cause a range of cellular responses by pro-
moting the formation of stress granules1.
Formation of pathological stress granules is thought to be among prime triggers of neuro-
degenerative diseases. Thus, our results indicate a possible mechanism associating nanoparti-
cles with the development of neurological disorders.

References

1). Romashchenko et al., ACS Nano 11 (2017) 1328−1339.

– 54 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 025
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Regular Speaker

Visualizing of the protein corona: towards a biomolecular under-


standing of nanoparticle-cell-interactions

Maria Kokkinopoulou1, Johanna Simon1, Katharina Landfester1, Volker Mailänder2,


Ingo Lieberwirth1
1
Max Planck-Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz, Ger-
many
2
Clinic of Dermatology, University Medicine Mainz, Langenbeckstraße 1, 55131
Mainz, Germany
E-mail: kokkinopoulou@mpip-mainz.mpg.de

Nanoparticles can carry drugs to cells, allowing a targeted delivery and protection from
degradation. Their research is of great interest, as it can contribute to a safer and more ef-
fective nanomedicine. When they are introduced in the body, the proteins adsorb onto their
surface and form a coating known as the “protein corona”, which determines the biological
identity of the nanocarriers. The protein corona is divided into the “soft” and “hard” corona,
depending on the binding strength and exchange rates of the proteins. The morphology of
the protein corona was believed to be a dense layered shell. Due to its complexity it has been
challenging to characterize. Here, using polymeric nanoparticles1 synthesized by free-radi-
cal mini-emulsion polymerization2, we present for the first time by means of Transmission
Electron Microscopy and Tomography, that the protein corona is a loose network of proteins.
We were able to discriminate between the soft and hard corona, demonstrate their evolution
during different steps and show their effects on the cellular uptake and intracellular traffick-
ing. Our findings, supported by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy, Dynamic Light Scat-
tering and Mass Spectrometry data, offer a quantitative and qualitative analysis of the protein
corona and new insights into its real structure and the nanoparticle-cell interactions.

References

1) P. Renz, M. Kokkinopoulou, K. Landfester and I. Lieberwirth, Macromol. Chem. Phys.,


2016, 217, 1879–1885
2) K. Landfester, Annu. Rev. Mater. Res., 2006, 36, 231-279

– 55 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 026
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Regular Speaker

Biocompatible Lanthanide fluoride magnetic/luminescent nano-ar-


chitectures as versatile multimodal contrast agents for low to ul-
trahigh field MRI and optical imaging

Silvanose Biju, Tatjana N. Parac-Vogt

Laboratory of Bioinorganic Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, KU Leuven, Ce-


lestijnenlaan 200F, 3001 Leuven, Belgium. E-mail: biju.silvanose@kuleuven.be;
Fax: +32 (0)16327992; Tel: +32 (0)465692094

A current trend in MR biomedical imaging technology involves the application of high-


er magnetic fields to obtain better signal-to-noise ratios.1 Approved MRI instruments in the
clinics range between 0.5 and 3.0 T, while 7.0 T instruments have been validated both in Eu-
rope and US. Preclinically, fields as high as 21T are already used in research involving small
animal models which require the highest possible resolutions. However, the use of presently
available CAs in these ultrahigh field MRI machines is hampered by the fact that Gd3+-che-
lates (T1-CAs) and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles (T2-CAs) give their
optimum performance only below 1.5 T.1, 2 On the other hand, paramagnetic lanthanide ions,
especially Dy3+ and Ho3+ have short electronic relaxation times and at high magnetic fields,
they relax protons via a mechanism known as Curie-spin relaxation that primarily affects T2.3
Thus there is a growing interest for developing MRI CAs containing Dy3+ and Ho3+ and lately
also to develop bimodal MRI/OI CAs based on nanoparticles containing Dy3+ and Ho3+. In this
context we have developed a new class of nanoparticles with efficient upconversion lumines-
cence and high T2 relaxivites by selective doping of different Ln3+ ions in separate layers of
an active-core/active-shell nanoparticles having b-NaGdF4 structure.4 The detailed strategies
adopted for design, synthesis and latest results obtained in our laboratory from magnetic, op-
tical and cytotoxic studies of upconversion nanoparticles will be discussed.

References

1). J. T. Rosenberg et al., Magn. Reson. Med., (64) 2010, 871-882.


2). G. K. Das et al., J. Phys. Chem. Let., (3) 2012, 524-529.
3). M. Gueron et al., (19) 1975, 58-66.
4). S. Biju et. al., RSC Adv., (6) 2016, 61443-61448.

Acknowledgements

Authors acknowledge the European Commission for Marie Sklodowska-Curie Individual


Fellowship (H2020-MSCA-IF-2015, MCNANO-703584).

– 56 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 027
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Regular Speaker

Phospholipid stabilized gold nanorods: Towards improved colloi-


dal stability and biocompatibility

Poornima Budime Santhosha, Neethu Thomasa, Swathi Sudhakara, Anju Chadhab,c*,


Ethayaraja Mania*

a
Polymer Engineering and Colloid Science Laboratory, Department of Chemi-
calEngineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai-600036, India
E-mail: ethaya@iitm.ac.in
b
Laboratory of Bioorganic Chemistry, Department of Biotechnology, Indian Insti-
tute of Technology Madras, Chennai-600036, India
c
National Center for Catalysis Research, Indian Institute of Technology Madras,
Chennai-600036, India
E-mail: anjuc@iitm.ac.in

Biocompatible and colloidally stable gold nanorods (GNRs) of well-defined plasmonic


properties are essential for biomedical and theranostic applications. The as-synthesized GNRs
in the seed-mediated method are stabilized by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)
surfactant, which is known for its cytotoxicity in many cell lines. Biocompatible GNRs syn-
thesized from known protocols exhibit some extent of cytotoxicity and colloidal instability
because of incomplete removal of CTAB. We report a facile method for the efficient removal
of CTAB molecules with 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) phospholip-
ids, which are naturally present in cell membranes. The ligand exchange kinetics is studied
using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and corroborated with matrix assisted laser
desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. From colloidal stability studies using dy-
namic light scattering (DLS) and UV-Vis spectroscopy, the optimal lipid concentration and
duration required for successful ligand exchange of CTAB by DMPC are reported. Using
thermogravimetric analysis, the surface concentration of DMPC on colloidally stable GNRs is
found to be approximately 9 molecules per nm2. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiozol-2-yl)-2,5-diphe-
nyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays show that the sur-
face modified DMPC-GNRs have significantly better biocompatibility compared to CTAB-
GNRs. Studies on ligand exchange, colloidal stability and biocompatibility of DMPC-GNRs
of aspect ratios in the range of 2.2 - 4.2 demonstrate the robustness of the proposed method.
The results provide insight on the important factors to be considered to design biocompatible
GNRs suitable for applications in nanomedicine.

References

1) Matthews et al., Langmuir 31 (2015) 9893–9900.


2) Orendorff et al., ACS Nano 3 (2009) 971–983.

– 57 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 028
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

From MAX to MXene - From 3D to 2D

Michel W. Barsoum

Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Drexel University,


Philadelphia, PA 19104
E-mail: barsoumw@drexel.edu

By now it is well-established that the layered, hexagonal carbides and nitrides with the
general formula, Mn+1AXn, (MAX) where n = 1 to 3, M is an early transition metal, A is an
A-group (mostly IIIA and IVA) element and X is either C and/or N – sometimes referred to as
polycrystalline nanolaminates because every basal plane is a potential deformation or delami-
nation plane - combine some of the best attributes of metals and ceramics. They are excellent
conductors of heat and electricity, damage and thermal shock tolerant and fracture toughness
values as high as 15 MPa√m. Some are lightweight, stiff and have good creep and outstanding
oxidation resistance. In 2011 we showed that by simply immersing MAX phase powders, at
room temperature, in HF the A-layers are selectively etched to produce 2D materials that
we labeled MXenes to emphasize the loss of the A-group element and their similarities to
graphene. Currently there are over 20 new compositions with new ones discovered regularly.
Unlike hydrophobic graphene, MXenes are hydrophilic and behave as “conductive clays”, a
hitherto unknown combination. MXenes such as Ti2C, V2C, Nb2C and Ti3C2 can be used as
electrode materials in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and supercapacitors (SC) as well as trans-
parent conductive electrodes, with performances that are quite impressive. The potential of
using MXenes in energy storage, as transparent conductive electrodes, EMI shielding among
other applications will be highlighted.

– 58 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 029
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Colloidal nanocrystals with reduced symmetry

P. Davide Cozzolia,b

a
Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento,
Campus Ecotekne, via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce, Italy
b
CNR NANOTEC - Institute of Nanotechnology, c/o Campus Ecotekne,
via Monteroni, 73100 Lecce, Italy
E-mail: davide.cozzoli@unisalento.it

Colloidal inorganic nanocrystals (NCs), solution free-standing crystalline nanostructures


entirely grown in liquid phase, have rapidly emerged over other classes of nanomaterials ow-
ing to the precision with which their properties can be controlled through engineering of their
structural and geometric features in the synthesis stage and the flexibility with which they can
be manipulated and exploited in disparate technological fields.
A challenging paradigm to diversify and enrich the physical-chemical prerogatives of
single-material NCs, beyond those achievable by conventional shape control and heterostru-
cturing, relies on designing and constructing unconventional architectures, in which diverse
geometric and topological motifs are integrated across multiple structure and dimensionality
levels constrained within reduced-symmetry frameworks. However, due to current limitations
in synthetic capabilities and related mechanistic knowledge, low-symmetry nanostructures
are still under-represented in the realm of inorganic of colloidal nanomaterials, remaining
in fact limited to NCs of with broken circular or spherical symmetry, and, more rarely, with
chiral habits. In this talk I will report on recent progress made by us in the controlled growth
and characterization of single-crystalline NCs of oxide, magnetic and plasmonic semiconduc-
tor materials, which can be forged into monodisperse asymmetric shapes integrating 1D-2D
dimensionality with 2D-3D connectivity and/or anisotropic curvature. The technological po-
tential offered by such brand-new NCs will be highlighted.

– 59 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 030
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Functional nanomaterials from the bottom-up assembly of solu-


tion-processed nanoparticles

Maria Ibáñez and Maksym V. Kovalenko

Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences,


ETH Zürich, CH-8093, Switzerland
Empa - Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology,
Dübendorf, CH-8600, Switzerland
E-mail: ibanez@inorg.chem.ethz.ch

Nanocrystals can be envisioned as artificial atoms to build-up materials from. Colloidal


synthetic routes are capable to yield nanocrystals with precise control of size, shape, crystal-
line phase and composition, thus allowing to accurately engineer such artificial atoms. There-
fore, a new generation of complex materials with nanoscale control can be created in which
components and functionalities can be defined in a predictable manner. Beyond nanocrystal
design, another key player on the building-up process is the nanocrystal surface. Most synthe-
tic strategies developed render nanocrystal with organic molecules coordinated at their surfa-
ces (ligands). By locally controlling surface energy and charge is possible to exchange native
ligands by other organic or inorganic molecules that may incorporate foreign atom/ions at
each surface site. The possibility to modify nanocrystal surface chemistry opens a new degree
of freedom to tune final nanomaterial properties, defining the surface ligand as a building
block on its own. Last but not least, the functional properties are as well determined by the
nanocrystals organization, interconnection, packing density and relative crystal orientation in
the final nanomaterial. Herein, we will focus on the synthesis of nanoparticles with precisely
engineered composition and surface chemistry, and their combination and consolidation into
nanostructured materials to target the needs of thermoelectricity.

– 60 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 031
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Fundamental study on photocatalysis: How does photocata-


lyst-particle size give influence on the kinetics?
Bunsho Ohtani
Institute for Catalysis, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0021, Japan
E-mail: ohtani@cat.hokudai.ac.jp
Heterogeneous photocatalysis occurring on photoirradiated solid surfaces is one of the potent
chemical processes applicable to water splitting, i.e., artificial photosynthesis, and green chemistry
for production of chemicals and for environmental problems. Although extensive studies have been
performed for at least 40 years since the discovery of photoelectrochemical water splitting on a tita-
nia single-crystal electrode in 1972, there still remain several issues to be clarified, e.g., how charge
carriers work and why multielectron/hole reactions such as molecular oxygen liberation proceed. As
a result, we have to recognize the fact that there is still no guiding principle for the design of photo-
catalyst materials of higher efficiency. One of the possible reasons for such problem is that we have
been trying to understand the photocatalysis using only the band-structure model; photoexcited
electrons at the bottom of conduction band (CB) and positive holes at the top of valence band (VB)
react with surface adsorbed electron acceptors and donors, respectively, otherwise they recombine
to give no chemical reaction. The thermodynamics, i.e., whether electron/hole transfers can pro-
ceed or not, can be predicted by comparison of CB bottom and VB top positions with the standard
electrode potential of acceptors and donors, respectively, but the band-structure model does not tell
us the rate of electron/hole transfers and their recombination. An approach for understanding het-
erogeneous photocatalysis through energy-resolved density of electron traps has been proposed as a
novel concept on the characterization and identification of particulate materials [1].
Another problem in the field of heterogeneous photocatalysis is that the above-mentioned
band-structure model does not include a parameters (parameters) related to size of photocatalyst
particles, and thereby the ordinary reported kinetics on photocatalysis could not explain the par-
ticle-size dependence, though there have frequently been reported the rate, i.e., photocatalytic ac-
tivity of particles, depending on their size. In the studies on photocatalytic liberation of molecular
oxygen (O2) from aqueous solutions of electron acceptors, e.g., iodate (IO3–) or iron(III) ions, we
have found high-order, second or fourth-order, light-intensity dependence of the photocatalytic re-
action rate of O2 liberation from aqueous suspensions of commercial titania particles irradiated with
highly intense UV-LEDs (maximum intensity ca. 400 mW cm-2). The kinetic analysis revealed that
positive-hole accumulation within a photocatalyst particle is needed for such multielectron pro-
cesses and suggested that the larger the particle size is, the higher becomes the probability of multi-
hole (electron) accumulation to results in the high-order light-intensity dependence [2]. Similar
particle size-dependent reaction kinetics was also observed in the photocatalytic reaction system in
which O2 undergoes two-electron reduction by certain kind of metal-oxide photocatalysts, e.g., bare
bismuth tungstate (Bi2WO6) [3] or platinized tungsten oxide (WO3) [4]. Thus, different from the
general understanding for the influence of particle size on the photocatalytic activities, photocatalyt-
ic-reaction rate is controlled by the particles size in those multielectron (hole) processes.

References
1) A. Nitta, M. Takase, M. Takashima, N. Murakami and B. Ohtani, Chem. Commun. 52 (2016)
12096–12099.
2) S. Takeuchi, M. Takase, M. Takashima and B. Ohtani, to be submitted.
3) (a) H. Hori, M. Takashima, M. Takase and B. Ohtani, Chem. Lett. in press. (b) H. Hori, M. Ta-
kashima, M. Takase, M. Kitamura, F. Amano and B. Ohtani, Catal. Today submitted.
4) (a) R. Abe, H. Takami, N. Murakami and B. Ohtani, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 130 (2008) 7780-7781.
(b) C. Yamada, S. Takeuchi, M. Takashima and B. Ohtani, to be submitted.

– 61 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 032
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Hybridization and mesostructuring as tools towards functional


photocatalysts

Dominik Eder

Institut für Materialchemie, Technische Universität Wien, Vienna, Austria


dominik.eder@tuwien.ac.at

In this lecture I will discuss the main challenges in heterogeneous photocatalysis and pre-
sent two materials design strategies.
What are nanocarbon-inorganic hybrids? Hybridising nanocarbon materials, i.e. CNTs
and graphene, with active inorganic nanomaterials constitutes a powerful strategy towards
designing new-generation functional materials for many applications where efficient charge
separation and extraction is required, including photovoltaics, photocatalysis, batteries, super-
capacitors and biosensors. In contrast to nanocomposites, which merely combine the intrinsic
properties of both compounds, nanocarbon hybrids additionally provide access to both a large
internal active surface area required for gas/liquid-solid interactions and an extended interfa-
ce, through which charge and energy transfer processes create synergistic effects that result in
unique properties and superior performances.
How can they be improved? I will demonstrate that the performance of these hybrids can
be further enhanced through purposefully engineering interfaces and morphology, e.g. fewer
grain boundaries alleviate electron transport within the catalyst and the formation of an Ohmic
junction facilitates charge transfer and charge separation at the interface with the nanocarbon.
How do they function? I will present a model system that allows for measuring and tuning
of interfacial charge and energy transfer processes and for revealing the nature of catalytically
active sites in nanocarbon hybrids.
How do go on from here? The next aim is to design hybrids with 3D-accessible ordered me-
soporous architectures and large pores to eliminate kinetic restrictions imposed by pore diffusion
and allow ready gas and liquid access to all active sites. I will show some preliminary results
using tailor-made triblock-terpolymers as structure-directing agents and sacrificial templates.

Fig: a) Working princliple of nanocarbon-inorganic hybrid photocatalyst; b) model system with


dielectric barrier layer (Al2O3) between a photoactive ZnO shell and CNT inner core; b) ordered me-
soporous carbon with gyroid architecture.

– 62 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 033
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Nb3O7(OH) – a promising candidate for photocatalyst: synthesis,


nanostructure and functionality

Sophia B. Betzlera, and Christina Scheub


a
Department of Chemistry, Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich, Germany
b
Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Düsseldorf, Germany
E-mail: c.scheu@mpie.de

Hydrogen production via photochemical routes is an important way to create fuel for en-
vironmentally friendly energy sources such as fuel cells. One promising photocatalyst is the
n-type semiconductor Nb3O7(OH), which can be fabricated as 3D nanoarray using a hydro-
thermal synthesis approach [1]. The nanostructures have been studied in depth using advanced
transmission electron microscopy including electron energy loss spectroscopy and electron
tomography. The 3D nanoarrays consist of nanowires with a width of few tens of nanometers
and a µm length and are arranged perpendicular to each other. The occurring defects are main-
ly stacking faults which form to compensate a non-stoichiometric composition.
The functional properties of the Nb3O7(OH) arrays can be improved by the incorporation
of Ti within the orthorhombic crystal structure which leads to a higher hydrogen production
rate in light driven water splitting experiments [2]. Up to 12 at.% Ti can be homogenously in-
corporated in the crystal lattice. The Ti is not only reducing surface defects but also leads to a
change in the nanowire morphology and a larger surface area. Another approach to modify the
functional properties is the thermally induced phase transformation to Nb2O5 [3]. The initial
cubic 3D morphology is extremely stable up to 850°C without collapse of the open structure.
In-situ transmission electron microscopy experiments reveal that the stacking faults play an
important role for the phase transition [3].

References

1) S. B. Betzler, A. Wisnet, B. Breitbach, C. Mitterbauer, J. Weickert, L. Schmidt-Mende,


and C. Scheu, J. Mater. Chem. A 2 (2014) 12005 -
2) S. B. Betzler, F. Podjaski, K. Bader, M. Beetz, K. Hengge, A. Wisnet, M. Handloser, A.
Hartschuh, B. V. Lotsch, C. Scheu, Chemistry of Materials 28 (2016) 7666 -
3) S. B. Betzler, T. Harzer, J. Ciston, U. Dahmen, G. Dehm, C. Scheu, Crystal Growth &
Design 16 (8) (2016) 4309 -
4) The author would like to thank the colleagues and co-workers who contributed to this
work and the German Research Foundation (DFG) for financial support.

– 63 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 034
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Regular Speaker

Ozone-assisted visible-light photocatalysis with C3N4 nanosheet to-


wards superior yield of •OH radicals for water decontamination

Jiadong Xiaoa,b, Jabor Rabeaha, Yongbing Xieb, Hongbin Caob and Angelika Brück-
nera
a
Leibniz-Institut für Katalyse e. V., an der Universität Rostock, Albert-Ein-
stein-Straße 29a, D-18059 Rostock, Germany
b
Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100190 Beijing, China
E-mail: Jiadong.Xiao@catalysis.de

Since carbon nitride (C3N4) was reported as a metal-free visible-light-responsive photocatalyst


in 2009,1 the utilization of sunlight based on C3N4 for environmental decontamination has become
a hot topic. Despite enormous efforts devoted to C3N4 modification, the overall photocatalytic
efficiency of converting organic pollutants into CO2 and H2O is still limited and far from the
requirement of practical application mainly due to insufficient yield of hydroxyl radical (•OH).
Herein, a nanosheet-struc-
(a) (c)
H O
HO 
2 (d) 1 x 10 Vis/O /NS C N 7tured C3N4 (NS C3N4, Fig. 1a)
3 3 4
O
was synthesized based on the
2 2 2
O −
Vis/O /bulk C N
Relative OH yield

2 3 3 4
H O OH
2

CB
O e O
2

3

exfoliation of bulk C3N4 (Fig.
HO 
1b) using a simple thermal oxi-
3
O 3
(b) OH O
dation etching method. We
2

coupled a low dosage of ozone


H O 2
Vis/O /NS C N 2 3 4
h +
Vis/O /bulk C N 2 3 4
VB OH + H +
0.0 8.0x10 1.6x10 (O3, 2.1 mol% in O2) into visi-
6

-
7

Relative amount of trapped CB-e


ble-light photocatalysis over
bulk C3N4 and NS C3N4, which
increased oxalic acid (an ozone-refractory pollutant commonly used as a •OH probe2) mineraliza-
tion rate constants by 84 and 41 times, respectively. In-situ electron paramagnetic resonance
(EPR) spectroscopy coupled with an online spin-trapping technique was utilized to semi-quanti-
tatively visualize the conduction band electron (CB-e−) photoexcitation, further trapping by dis-
solved O2 and O3, and reactive species evolution under practical aqueous condition. A dual role of
O3 is confirmed in boosting the CB-e−-to-•OH conversion over C3N4 under visible light: (i) an inlet
O3 (2.1 mol%)-O2 (97.9 mol%) gas can trap about up to thrice more CB-e− over aqueous C3N4
suspension than pure O2, and further produce •OH through a robust •O3−-mediated pathway (red
route in Fig. 1c); (ii) O3 can readily take CB-e− back from •O2− to form •O3−, thus blocking the in-
efficient H2O2-mediated route (blue route in Fig. 1c) but further strengthening the •O3−-mediated
one. As a result, in the presence of O3 the •OH yield increased by 17 and 5 times over bulk C3N4
and NS C3N4, respectively (Fig. 1d). This work inspires another direction to boost •OH yield over
photocatalyst by combining with other techniques or fields, and may advance in-situ tracking of
electron excitation and transfer during photocatalytic reactions under real working condition.

References
1). Wang, X.; Maeda, K.; Thomas, A.; Takanabe, K.; Xin, G.; Carlsson, J. M.; Domen, K.;
Antonietti, M. Nature Mater. 8 (2009) 76-80.
2). Xiao, J. D.; Xie, Y. B.; Nawaz, F.; Jin, S.; Duan, F.; Li, M. J.; Cao, H. B. Appl. Catal. B:
Environ. 181 (2016) 420-428.

– 64 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 035
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Hydrogen-derived electron centers in semiconducting oxides –


properties and function

Juan M. Jiménez,a Augusto Márquez,a Jesús Idígoras,b and Thomas Bergera

a
Department of Chemistry and Physics of Materials, University of Salzburg,
Austria.
b
Division of Physical Chemistry, University Pablo de Olavide, Seville, Spain.
E-mail: Thomas.Berger@sbg.ac.at

Semiconductor oxides such as ZnO, WO3 and TiO2 show typically n-type conductivity due
to a stoichiometric imbalance resulting from oxygen deficiency in the material. Furthermore,
n-type doping may result from the presence of shallow donor impurities such as hydrogen
[1,2]. Importantly, hydrogen sources are ubiquitous not only in applications, but also during
material synthesis and characterization. A thorough knowledge on the interaction of hydrogen
with (and its action in) semiconductor oxides is therefore needed in order to optimize their
functional properties in applications such as synthetic chemistry [3], fuel cells [4], photoca-
talysis [5,6] or photovoltaics [6].

We study chemical, photochemical and electrochemical hydrogen-doping strategies for


nanostructured TiO2 and WO3 materials in different environments (i.e. gas phase and aque-
ous media) [7,8]. Transient charge accumulation (electrons and protons) in nanoparticle elec-
trodes significantly improves the activity of the material when used e.g. as a photocatalyst
in the water photooxidation reaction. Using a combined spectroscopic and electrochemical
approach we aim at elucidating the microscopic details of doping-related changes of physico-
chemical material properties and pay special attention to the impact of electrode morphology
(particle/particle interfaces, crystallite size) and process parameters.

References

1) Panayotov, D. A.; Burrows, S. P.; Yates, J. T.; Morris, J. R. J. Phys. Chem. C 2011, 115,
22400.
2) Noei, H.; Qiu, H.; Wang, Y.; Muhler, M.; Wöll, C. ChemPhysChem 2010, 11, 3604.
3) Schrauben, J. N.; Hayoun, R.; Valdez, C. N.; Braten, M.; Fridley, L.; Mayer, J. M. Sci-
ence 2012, 336, 1298.
4) Chan, W. K.; Borghols, W.J.H.; Mulder, F. M. Chem. Commun. 2008, 6342.
5) Meekins, B. H.; Kamat, P. V. ACS Nano 2009, 3, 3437.
6) Idígoras, J.; Berger, T.; Anta, J. A. J. Phys. Chem. C 2013, 117, 1561.
7) Márquez, A.; Rodríguez-Pérez, M.J.; Anta, J.A.; Rodríguez-Gattorno, G.; Bourret, G.R.;
Oskam, G.; Berger, T. ChemElectroChem 2016, 3, 658.
8) Jiménez, J. M.; Bourret, G. R.; Berger, T.; McKenna, K. P. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2016, 138,
15956.

– 65 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 036
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Efficient strategies to improve charge separation and light absorp-


tion of polymer photocatalysts

Junwang (John) Tang

Director of UCL Materials Hub, Professor of Materials Chemistry and Engineering


and FRSC
Department of Chemical Engineering, University College London, UK
E-mail: junwang.tang@ucl.ac.uk

As the most abundant renewable energy source available on the Earth, solar energy has the
potential to meet the increasing global energy demands. Therefore solar energy conversion
and storage, via water splitting has been attracting substantial interest over the last ten years,
which can provide renewable H2 fuel with a strong potential to replace fossil fuel.

The key in these technologies is an efficient photocatalyst which can convert a photon to
a pair of charge carriers and then utilise them to drive the expected chemical reactions.1 The
current low efficiency in these processes is contributed to fast charge recombination in an in-
organic semiconductor.2 Stimulated by our recent research outcomes on the charge dynamics
in inorganic semiconductor photocatalysts,2 we developed novel materials strategies for solar
driven fuel synthesis by polymer photocatalysts. One is to mitigate the charge recombination
by improving the degree of polymerization of a polymer e.g. C3N4. With respect to it, one
successful example of pure water splitting in a suspensions solution under visible light has
been demonstrated for the first time.3,4 The other strategy is to narrow the bandgap of carbon
nitrides by bandgap engineering. The material prepared via an oxygen rich organic precursor
has a dark color, resulting into an efficient H2 production from water by UV and visible, even
IR light with a quantum yield (QY) of 10% at 420 nm, which is the first example of a polymer
photocatalyst working in such long wavelength for H2 fuel production.5 The charge dynamics
in these polymer photocatalysts will also be presented.6

References

1) C. Jiang, S. J.A. Moniz, A. Wang, T. Zhang, J. Tang, Chem Soc Rev, (2017) DOI: 10.1039/
c6cs00306k
2) J. Tang, J. R. Durrant and D. R Klug, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 130(42) (2008) 13885-13891.
3) D.J. Martin, P.J.T. Reardon, S.J.A Moniz, J. Tang. J. Am. Chem. Soc., 136 (2014) 12568-
12571.
4) D.J. Martin, K. Qiu, S.A. Shevlin, A.D. Handoko, X. Chen, Z. Guo, and J. Tang. An-
gewandte Chemie International Edition,  53 (2014) 9240-9245.
5) Y. Wang, M.K. Bayazit, S.J Moniz, Q. Ruan, C. Lau, N. Martsinovich, J. Tang, Energy
Environ Sci, (2017) DOI: 10.1039/C7EE01109A
6) R. Godin, Y., Wang, M. A., Zwijnenburg, J. Tang, J. R. Durrant, J. Am. Chem. Soc.
139 (14) (2017) 5216–5224.

– 66 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 037
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Regular Speaker

Hydrogenated MoS2 QDs-TiO2 (001) heterojunction mediated effi-


cient solar hydrogen production

Arka Sahaa, Asit Baran Pandaa, Apurba Sinhamahapatrab

a
Central Salt and Marine Chemicals Research Institute (CSIR-CSMCRI) and
CSMCRI- AcSIR, G. B. Marg, Bhavnagar-364002, Gujarat, India.
b
Department of Energy Systems Engineering, DGIST, Daegu, 42988, Republic of
Korea.
E-mail: arkasahacsmcri.edu@gmail.com

We report the development of hydrogenated MoS2 QDs-(001) faceted TiO2 (HMT) hete-
rojunction as an efficient photocatalytic system via one-pot hydrothermal reaction followed
by hydrogenation. Synthetic strategy facilitates the formation of MoS2 QDs with enhanced
band gap and its proper heterojunction with TiO2, which accelerates the fast charge transfer
and separation. Hydrogenation leads to oxygen vacancies in TiO2, enhancing the visible light
absorption capacity through narrowing its band gap, and sulfur vacancies in MoS2, which
enhance active sites for hydrogen absorption. Due to the band gap reduction of hydrogenated
TiO2 and band gap enhancement of MoS2 QD, the energy gap between CB of T-H2 and VB of
MoS2 QDs reduced reasonably and enabled the recombination of corresponding photogene-
rated electrons and holes, keeping separated free holes at MoS2 QDs VB and free electrons
at T-H2 CB.
The MoS2-TiO2 nano composite showed stable, efficient and exceptionally high noble me-
tal free sunlight-induced hydrogen production with a maximum rate of 3.1 mmolg-1h-1. The
developed synthetic strategy also provides flexibility towards shape of MoS2, e.g., QDs /
single or few layers, on TiO2 and offers the opportunity to design novel visible light active
photocatalyst for different applications [1].

References

1) X. Liu, Z. Xing, H. Zhang, W. Wang, Y. Zhang, Z. Li, X. Wu, X. Yu and W. Zhou, Chem-
SusChem., (9)2016, 1118-1125.

– 67 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 038
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

The principle on the full use of sulfur and lithium metal in advan-
ced Li-S batteries

Qiang Zhang

Department of Chemical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China


E-mail: zhang-qiang@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn

Among various promising candidates with high energy densities, lithium-sulfur (Li-S) bat-
teries with a high theoretical capacity and energy density are highly attractive;1-2 while the
commercial application of Li-S batteries still faces some persistent obstacles, such as the low
electrical conductivity of sulfur and lithium sulfide and the dissolution of polysulfides. The
introduction of 3D graphene into the field of Li-S batteries sheds a light on the efficient uti-
lization of sulfur by improving the conductivity of the composites and restraining the shuttle
of polysulfides. In this presentation, the concept for the rational design of 3D graphene is
explained. The advances in the use of 3D graphene in the cathode, separator, and anode is
explained.3-14 New insights on the relationship between the 3D graphene structure and the
electrochemical performance are presented.

References

1) Peng HJ, Cheng XB, Huang JQ, Zhang Q. Adv Energy Mater 2017, 7, 1700260.
2) Huang JQ, Zhang Q, Wei F. Energy Storage Mater 2015, 1, 127
3) Zhao MQ, Zhang Q, et al. Nature Commun 2014, 5, 3410.
4) Tang C, Zhang Q, et al. Adv Mater 2014. 26, 6100.
5) Zhao MQ, Peng HJ, Tian GL, Zhang Q, et al. Adv Mater 2014, 26, 7051
6) Yuan Z, Peng HJ, Huang JQ, Liu XY, Wang DW, Cheng XB, Zhang Q, Adv Funct Mater
2014, 24, 6105.
7) Zhao MQ, Liu XF, Zhang Q, et al. ACS Nano 2012, 6, 10759.
8) Cheng XB, Peng HJ, Huang JQ, Zhang R, Zhao CZ, Zhang Q. ACS Nano 2015, 9, 6373.
9) Huang JQ, Zhuang TZ, Zhang Q, et al. ACS Nano 2015, 9, 1506.
10) Peng HJ, Zhang Q. Angew Chem Int Ed 2015, 54, 11018.
11) Peng HJ, Zhang G, Chen X, Zhang ZW, Xu WT, Huang JQ, Zhang Q. Angew Chem Int Ed
2016, 55, 12990
12) Peng HJ, Zhang ZW, Huang JQ, Zhang G, Xie J, Xu WT, Shi JL, Chen X, Cheng XB,
Zhang Q. Adv. Mater. 2016, 28, 9551
13) Cheng XB, Yan C, Chen X, Guan C, Huang JQ, Peng HJ, Zhang R, Yang ST, Zhang Q.
Chem 2017, 2, 258.
14) Zhang XQ, Cheng XB, Chen X, Yan C, Zhang Q. Adv Funct Mater 2017, 27, 1605989.

– 68 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 039
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Electrode architectures for enhanced Na-ion battery performance

Rudi Maçaa, Iván Jimenezb, Daniel Cintoraa, and Vinodkumar Etacheria*

a
IMDEA Materials Institute, C/ Eric Kandel 2, Getafe, Madrid 28906, Madrid,
Spain
b
Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Calle Tulipán, 28933 Móstoles, Madrid, Spain
E-mail: Vinodkumar.etacheri@imdea.edu

Development of safer and environmental friendly high energy density rechargeable batte-
ries capable of fast charging and long-term cycling stability is one of the key challenges for
modern electrochemistry.1-2 During the last two decades, Li-ion battery technology attracted
extensive attention due to their widespread application in portable electronics, medical im-
plants, grid-level energy storage and electric vehicles. Recently, secondary Na-ion batteries
emerged as a promising alternative candidate for large scale energy storage.3-4
This technology attracted immense interest due to low-cost and abundance of resources
compared to limited lithium supply. Despite of the several advantages of Na-ion batteries,
their energy and power densities are not sufficient to compete with Li-ion battery technology.
This mainly resulted from the bigger ionic radius of Na-ions (1.02 Å) compared to Li-ions
(0.76 Å), which result in the sluggish ion diffusion. Pseudocapacitive charge storage is lately
demonstrated as a method to improve the power-density of Li-ion batteries.5-6 However this
method is difficult to achieve in case of Na-ion batteries and transition metal oxide electrodes
due to their low ionic and electronic conductivity.
Tailored designing of these electrode materials are therefore required to induce pseudo-
capacitive Na ion storage. Herein, we have demonstrated pseudocapacitance assisted Na-ion
storage in biphasic TiO2 nanosheets, ultrathin Co3O4 nanosheets, and hierarchical Co3O4 nano-
rods. TiO2 nanosheets composed of 70% bronze and 30% anatase exhibited a maximum spe-
cific capacity of 300 mAh/g at 25 mA/g current density, and 100 mAh/g even at a high current
density of 1A/g. Interestingly these values are 2-fold higher than those of TiO2-B nanosheet
electrodes under similar experimental conditions. In the case of Co3O4 nanosheets containing
(001) and (111) facet exposed nanodomains exhibited a maximum Na-ion storage capacity
of 625 mAh/g at 25 mA/g current density and 160 mAh/g even at a high current density of
1A/g. Hierarchical Co3O4 nanorods exhibited specific capacities of 750 and 150 mAh/g at
current densities of 25 mA/g and 1A/g respectively. These Na-ion storage performances are
significantly better than those of Co3O4 nanoparticle based electrodes and previous reports.
Excellent specific capacity, rate performance and cycling stability are attributed to pseudoca-
pacitive contribution resulting from tailored interfaces between anatse-bronze polymorphs of
TiO2 and (001)/(111) facet exposed nanodomains of Co3O4 nanosheets and nanorods.

References
1). Etacheri et al., Energy Environ. Sci. 4 (2011) 3243−3262
2). Armand et al., Nature 451 (2008) 652−657
3). Komaba et al. Adv. Funct. Mater. 21 (2011) 3859–3867
4). Slater et al. Adv. Funct. Mater. 23 (2013) 947–958
5). Augustyn et al. Nature Materials 12 (2013) 518-522
6). Lukatskaya et al. Nature Energy 2 (2017) 17105-17111

– 69 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 040
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Transparent electrode technology for organic solar cells and perov-


skite solar cells

Han-Ki Kim

Department of Advanced Materials Engineering for Information and Electronics,


Kyung Hee University, 1 Seocheon-dong, Yongin, Gyeonggi-do 446-701,
Republic of Korea
E-mail: imdlhkkim@khu.ac.kr

We fabricated solution-processed flexible inverted organic solar cell (IOSC) modules (10 cm×
10 cm) on roll-to-roll (RTR) sputtered ITO/Ag/ITO multilayer cathodes. By using a pilot-scale RTR
sputtering system equipped with mid-range frequency power for dual ITO targets and direct current
power for the Ag target, we were able to continuously deposit a high-quality ITO/Ag/ITO multilayer
on PET substrate with a width of 700 mm and length of 20,000 mm as a function of Ag thickness.
To optimize the electrical and optical properties of the ITO/Ag/ITO multilayer, the thickness of Ag
layer were varied by controlling of the DC power applied on Ag targets during the RTR sputtering
process. At the Ag thickness of 12 nm, the ITO/Ag/ITO multilayer had a very low sheet resistance
of 3.03 Ohm/square and high transmittance of 88.17%, which are better values than those of amor-
phous ITO film. Various bending test results showed that the high failure strain of the Ag inter layer
led to good flexibility of the multilayer films. A strip-type ITO/Ag/ITO cathode was successfully
patterned using a RTR wet etching process. Successful operation of flexible IOSC modules on RTR
sputtered ITO/Ag/ITO cathodes indicate that the RTR sputtering technique is a promising coating
process for fabrication of high-quality transparent and flexible cathodes and can advance the com-
mercialization of cost-efficient flexible IOSCs. In addition, we fabricated high-performance flexible
CH3NH3PbI3 (MAPbI3) perovskite solar cells with a power conversion efficiency of 16.8% on
transparent and flexible ITO electrode prepared by specially designed ion plating system. The ion
plated ITO films on PET substrate showed a lower sheet resistance and higher optical transmittance
than conventional sputtered ITO films because the high energy input into a growing ITO film led
to densification of the growing film during ion plating process. At optimal coating condition, the
ion-plated ITO film with a thickness of 100 nm showed a sheet resistance of 15.75 Ohm/square and
an optical transmittance of 84%, which are better than those of sputtered ITO film. Outer and inner
bending tests demonstrated that the mechanical flexibility of the ion plated ITO film was superior to
that of the conventional sputtered ITO film due to better adhesion between ion plated ITO and PET
substrate. Flexible perovskite solar cells with the structure of Au/PTAA/MAPbI3/ZnO/ITO/PET
showed a higher power conversion efficiency of 16.8% than sputtered ITO-based flexible perovskite
solar cells (15.4%) due to lower sheet resistance and higher optical transmittance. Finally, we in-
troduced a linear facing target sputtering technique to realize transparent perovskite solar cells. By
effective confinement of high density plasma between ITO targets, we can deposit plasma damage
free ITO electrode on organic layer. This indicates that linear facing target sputtering is a promising
plasma damage free sputtering technique to deposit transparent electrode on perovskite active layer
for high efficient perovskite solar cells.

References
1) Han-Ki Kim et al, Organic Electronics 30 (2016) 112-121.
2) Han-Ki Kim et al, Scientific Reports 6 (2016) 33868.
3) Han-Ki Kim et al., Journal of Power Sources 341 (2017)340-347.

– 70 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 041
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Integration of functionalized graphene into hybrid solar cells for


significant performance enhancement

Alfian F. Madsuhaa,c, Chuyen van Phama, Michael Ecka , Michael Kruegerb

a
Institute of Microsystems Technology (IMTEK), University of Freiburg, D-79110
Freiburg, Germany
b
Institute of Physics, Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg, D-26129 Olden-
burg, Germany
c
Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Universitas Indonesia,
16424 Depok, Indonesia

E-mail: michael.krueger@uni-oldenburg.de

Graphene has attracted a lot of attention due to its outstanding optical, electrical and me-
chanical properties and is therefore highly promising for various optoelectronic applications
[1]. Also, semiconducting CdSe quantum dots (QDs) with easily tunable optical and elec-
trical properties, demonstrated their potential already in optoelectronic application such as
photovoltaics [2]. In this work, the optoelectrical properties of CdSe QDs, as well as the
transparency and high carrier mobility of graphene are combined and utilized in hybrid bulk
heterojunction (BHJ) nanocrystal / polymer solar cells for achieving significant performance
enhancement. Functionalized graphene can be integrated by different approaches into hybrid
photovotaic devices.
In the first approach CdSe QDs-reduced graphene oxide hybrid material is formed by dedi-
cated thiol-functionalization of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) followed by a direct chemical
attachment of QDs [3]. These hybrid nanocomposites have been successfully integrated in
the photoactive layer of hybrid photovoltaic devices exhibiting power conversion efficiencies
(PCEs) exceeding 4% [4]. Furtermore it has been demonstrated that the integration of nano-
carbon-hybrid materials into the photoactive layer improves the long-term stability of hybrid
solar cell devices [5].
In a second approach rGO has been integrated as hole transport and electron blocking layer
in hybrid solar cells. An improved hole extraction was observed, leading to an overall impro-
vement of the PCEs by 30% compared to devices without this layer [6]. By tuning the work
function of functionalized rGO, it is now possible to further optimize their use as buffer layers
or electrodes in various optoelectronic devices, showing the great potential of functionalized
rGO for future (opto)electronic applications.

References
1) Chuyen V. Pham et al., Synthetic Metals, 219, 33-43 (2016).
2) Y. Zhou et al., Energy Environ. Sci., 3, 1851-1864 (2010).
3) Chuyen V. Pham et al., Chem. Eng. J., 231, 146-154 (2013).
4) Michael Eck et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 16, 12251-12260 (2014).
5) Alfian F. Madsuha et al, Synthetic Metals 222, 34-41 (2016).
6) Alfian F. Madsuha, Michael Krueger, unpublished, –to be submitted-

– 71 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 042
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Regular Speaker

A new perspective on the electronic structure of layered oxides and


structurally-related materials – a soft-XAS study
K. Kleinera, M. Pianaa, M. Merzb, S. Schupplerb, P. Nagelb, H. A. Gasteigera
a
Technical University of Munich, Chair of Technical Electrochemistry,
Chemistry Department,
Garching, Germany;
b
Institute of Solid State Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology,
Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany
E-Mail: Karin.kleiner@tum.de

The present study aims to explain the relationship between the electronic structure of Li-
rich NCM (Li[Li0.2Ni0.2Co0.1Mn0.5]O2), NCA (LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2) and NCM 111
(LiNi0.33Co0.33Mn0.33O2), their performance as cathodes in lithium-ion batteries (decre-
asing energy density but increasing power density from Li-rich NCM to NCM 111) as well
as their cycling stability (increasing from Li-rich NCM towards NCM 111).1 Therefore the
complex electronic configuration of the materials is investigated with soft X-ray absorption
spectroscopy (XAS), resulting in a fundamental new perspective on the redox behaviour of
layered oxides.

The changes in the oxidation states of the individual transition metals (TM) upon discharge
is quantified with TM L-edge XAS and correlated to the overall capacity of the materials.
Moreover, with O K-edge XAS it is shown, that more than 80% of the amount of exchanged
charges is compensated by a reversible oxygen oxidation/reduction. The oxygen redox re-
action is always related to the redox reaction of the TMs in the structure due to the covalent
character of the TM-oxygen bonds.2

The differences in the oxidation/reduction of lithium rich NCM, NCA and NCM 111 are
pointed out and the unique cycling behavior of Li-rich NCM is discussed in more detail. With
its relatively high gravimetric capacity and operation voltage, Li-rich NCM would fulfill the
requirements of the automobile industry.1 However, the material shows a poor cycling stabi-
lity that limits its application as cathode material in commercial Li-ion batteries.3 The present
study shows, that lithium-rich NCM operates at much higher Ni2+-contents compared to the
conventional layered oxides (NCA, NCM 111) which probably explains its poor cycling sta-
bility.

References

1). D. Andre et al., J. Mater. Chem. A, 2015, 3, 6709.


2). F. de Groot, A. Kotani, Core Level Spectroscopy, CRC Press 2008. 3). P. Rozier et al, J.
Electrochem. Soc. 2015, 162/14, A2490.

– 72 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 043
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Potential-dependent local structure and dynamics of electric


double layer at ionic liquid / electrode interfaces analyzed by elec-
trochemical FM-AFM and MD calculation
Ken-ichi Fukui
Department of Materials Engineering Science, Graduate School of Engineering
a

Science, Osaka University, Machikaneyama 1-3, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531, Japan


E-mail: kfukui@chem.es.osaka-u.ac.jp
Ionic liquids (ILs) are promising electrolytes for electrochemical devices such as secondary
battery, capacitor, electric double layer (EDL)-FET, due to their high chemical stability with neg-
ligible vaporization. Structuring, dynamics, and electric double layer formation of the interfacial
IL faced to a graphite electrode or organic semiconductor surfaces were analyzed by electrochem-
ical frequency modulation AFM (EC-FM-AFM) and molecular dynamics (MD) calculations.
MD calculations showed that layered structure of IL (BMI-TFSI) with more preference of
cation to the surface was formed even at a neutral graphite, instead, the same IL formed greatly
softened interface with higher mobility of ions on organic semiconductor crystal such as rubrene,
which qualitatively explained our previous report on the interface evaluations using EC-FM-
AFM (Fig. 1).1-3) The origin of the interfacial structure will be discussed based on the analyses of
the local density, orientation, interaction of each ions at the interfaces including the result on a C60
crystal surface. Negatively charged graphite surfaces resulted in higher concentration of cations
faced to the graphite and the effect of the structure was extended to a few nm range. In contrast,
preference of anion at positively charged graphite surfaces was not so apparent. It indicates the
interface structure does not symmetrically respond against the applied voltage.
Local structure and
mobility of the interfa-
cial IL used for organic
semiconductor based
EDL-FET provide dras-
tic influence on the de-
vice performance such
as interfacial career mo-
bility and stability.4) In-
terfacial analyses using
EC-FM-AFM, MD, and
electro-chemical impedance spectroscopy will be shown for molecular scale understanding of
the interface.

References
1) Y. Yokota, T. Harada, K. Fukui, Chem. Commun. 46, 8627 (2010).
2) Y. Yokota, H. Hara, T. Harada, A. Imanishi, T. Uemura, J. Takeya, K. Fukui, Chem. Com-
mun. 49, 10596 (2013).
3) K. Fukui, Y. Yokota, A. Imanishi, Chem. Rec. 14, 964 (2014).
4) Y. Yokota, H. Hara, Y. Morino, K. Bando, A. Imanishi, T. Uemura, J. Takeya, K. Fukui,
Appl. Phys. Lett. 104, 263102 (2014); Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 17, 6794 (2015); Appl.
Phys. Lett. 108, 083113 (2016).

– 73 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 044
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Graphene supercapacitor with both high power and energy density

Wu Lu

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University,


Columbus, OH 43210, USA
E-mail: lu.173@osu.edu

Supercapacitors, based on fast ion transportation, are specialized to provide high power,
long stability, and efficient energy storage using highly porous electrode materials. How-
ever, their low energy density excludes them from many potential applications that require
both high energy density and high power density performances. Using a scalable nanoporous
graphene synthesis method involving an annealing process for reduction, here we show super-
capacitors with highly porous graphene electrodes capable of achieving not only a high power
density of 41 kW/kg and a Coulombic efficiency of 97.5%, but also a high energy density
of 148.75 Wh/kg. A high specific gravimetric and volumetric capacitance (306.03 F/g and
64.27 F/cm3) are demonstrated. The devices can retain almost 100% capacitance after 7,000
charging/discharging cycles at a current density of 8A/g. The superior performance of super-
capacitors is attributed to their ideal pore size, pore uniformity, and good ion accessibility of
the synthesized graphene.

References

1). Hao Yang et al 2017 Nanotechnology in press https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6528/aa8948.


2). Hao Yang et al. Journal of Power Sources, vol. 284, 146-153 (2015).

– 74 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 045
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Regular Speaker

Lithium-ion conductors based on porous MIL-121 metal


organic frameworks
R. Zettl, S. Lunghammer, V. Pregartner, M. Wilkening, I. Hanzu
Institute for Chemistry and Technology of Materials,
and Christian Doppler Laboratory for Lithium
Batteries, Graz University of Technology, Stremayrgasse 9, 8010 Graz, Austria
E-mail: zettl@tugraz.at
There are many examples for lithium (Li) ion conductors for solid state electrolytes but the problem
of low ionic conductivity limiting the power density of the battery is still not fully solved. New Li ion
conductors could be based on metal organic frameworks (MOFs).1,2 An enormous variety of different
MOFs can be synthesized with functional and structural tunability. Together with the properties of ther-
mal stability and porosity MOFs are a promising material for solid-state Li-ion conductors.3
Here, the metal organic framework MIL-121, on which this study is based, was prepared4 by hy-
drothermal synthesis and subsequently modified in two different ways in order to make it conductive for
Li ions. The post synthetic modifications (PSM) were lithiation with lithium acetate (LiAc) and lithium
hydroxide (LiOH) as well as esterification of the carboxylic groups of MIL-121 with methanol (MeOH),
ethanol (EtOH) and isopropanol. After PSM the porous samples were soaked with different liquids, i.e.,
common liquid electrolytes, which leads to a decrease in activation energy for the Li ion jumps in the
crystal lattice, i.e., an increase in Li ion conductivity. Esterified MIL-121 were soaked with ionic liquids
bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide (LiTFSI) to introduce Li ions.
Preliminary examination of the samples, obtained after PSM, included 1H magic angle spinning (MAS)
nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to confirm esterification and 7Li NMR spectroscopy to con-
firm the lithiation process. Both reactions turned out to be successful. The samples were further investigated
by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) to observe structure maintenance after PSM and by impedance spectros-
copy to measure ionic conductivities. XRD revealed that samples lithiated via LiAc and those esterified with
EtOH showed the best maintenance in terms of structure when compared to the starting material. In contrast,
structural changes were clearly observable for the samples modified differently. Our conductivity measure-
ments revealed that the better the structure of the modified samples matches that of the original MIL-121 the
better the conductivity. Nevertheless, only samples soaked with an ionic liquid showed conductivities in the
order of 10−4 to 10−6 S cm−1. A low Li ion conductivity was found in one of the samples without ionic liquid
(isopropanol esterification modified MIL-121 soaked with 20 wt% of dimethyl carbonate). The conductivity
isotherm of this sample showed a plateau at very low frequencies that is characterized by only 2 · 10−12 S cm−1.
Acknowledgement
We thank B. Bitschnau for the XRD measurements. The work was financed within the project SOLABAT
funded by the Klima- und Energiefonds of FFG (Österreichische Forschungsförderungsgesellschaft.

References
1) Ameloot, R. et al. Ionic conductivity in the metal-organic framework UiO-66 by dehydration and
insertion of lithium tert-butoxide. Chem. - A Eur. J. 19, 5533–5536 (2013).
2) Wiers, B. M., Foo, M. L., Balsara, N. P. & Long, J. R. A solid lithium electrolyte via addition of
lithium isopropoxide to a metal-organic framework with open metal sites. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 133,
14522–14525 (2011).
3) Lee, J. et al. Metal–organic framework materials as catalysts. Chem. Soc. Rev. 38, 1450–1459
(2009).
4) Volkringer, C. et al. High-throughput aided synthesis of the porous metal-organic framework-type
aluminum pyromellitate, MIL-121, with extra carboxylic acid functionalization. Inorg. Chem. 49,
9852–9862 (2010).

– 75 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 046
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Regular Speaker

NiF2 Hollow spheres fabricated for the first time and applied as
cathode materials in Lithium Ion Batteries
Hameed Ullaha, Shah Nawaza, Pierre Bonnetb, Muhammad Irfana
a
Department of Chemistry, Hazara University, Mansehra-21300, Pakistan
b
Institut de Chimie de Clermont-Ferrand, University Clermont Auvergne, Cler-
mont-Ferrand, France
Email: hameedwazir@yahoo.co.uk
Lithium ion batteries (LIBs) have the potential to meet the challenges of the highly mobile
society of today. However, the requirements in terms of capacity, efficiency and operational
life are large enough for the future that the present day commercial LIBs are unable to meet
the challenges. These LIBs possess irremediable intrinsic limitations, for example, low ca-
pacity of 140 – 170 mAhg-1 [1], which is already achieved [2, 3]. In fact, the low capacity is
corresponded to the least number of transferable Li+ (0.5 – 1.0) per redox site. To enhance the
capacity, involvement of large number (≥2.0) of Li+ per redox site is highly desirable. This
could be achieved by using conversion-based cathode materials which involve a reversible
reaction of transition metal compounds (Eq. 1).

MaXb + (b.n) Li ↔ aM+bLin X (1)

As a conversion based cathode materials, transition metal fluorides (TMFs) have a huge
edge over the others due to high specific capacity and potential. However, TMFs are limited
by poor rate capability and reversibility. It has been proposed that the limitations of cathode
materials could be positively overcome by shortening the Li+ diffusion path length, minimi-
zing volume-change-induced internal strain, and increasing surface area. These characteris-
tics could be found in hollow spherical architectures [4] of TMFs though not explored and/
investigated to date, chiefly due to the difficulties in their fabrications. The purpose here was
to fabricate, for the first time, nickel fluoride (NiF2) hollow spheres which have the ability
to coup positively with the limitations of TMFs as conversion based cathode materials. NiF2
hollow spheres were prepared using a two step indigenously designed synthesis protocol. In
first step, Ni(OH)2 was pasted over an optimized size SiO2 spheres by hydrothermal method.
In second step, SiO2 core was removed, and simultaneously, Ni(OH)2 was converted to NiF2
by online fluorination at moderate temperatures (Eq. 2).

Ni(OH)2@SiO2 + nF2 → NiF2 + SiF4↑ (2)

XRD reveals that the core (SiO2) is amorphous while the shell, composed of Ni(OH)2, is
crystalline of the core-shell structures. However, upon fluorination, the core no longer exists
while the shells of the hollow structures are comprised of crystalline NiF2 (Fig. 1).

– 76 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 046
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Regular Speaker

Morphological investigations show that the shells of Ni(OH)2@SiO2 core-shell structures,


and thus the obtained from, hollow spheres are formed of tiny nanoparticles. The textures
of the shells depend upon the temperature and time of hydrothermal processing. The com-
position, crystal structure and crystallinity of NiF2 hollow spheres of all the samples after
fluorination are the same, but the shells thickness and texture correspond to that of the precur-
sors. Galvanostatic measurements were performed over the fabricated NiF2 hollow spheres to
establish their charge/discharge profiles.

References
1) Julien et al., Inorganics 2 (2014), 132 – 154.
2) Whittingham M S, Chem. Rev. 104 (2004) 4271 – 4302.
3) Ellis et al., Chem. Mater. 22 (2010) 691 – 714.
4) Lou et al., Adv. Mater. 20 (2008) 3987 – 4019.

– 77 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 047
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Regular Speaker

Highly stretchable and transparent Ag Nanowire/PEDOT:PSS hy-


brid electrodes prepared by simple brush painting
Ji-Eun Lim, Sang-Mok Lee and Han-Ki Kim*

Department of Advanced Materials Engineering for Information and Electronics,


Kyung Hee University, Deogyeong-daero 1732, Republic of Korea
E-mail: imdlhkkim@khu.ac.kr

Highly transparent and stretchable Ag nanowire (NW)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythio-


phene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) hybrid electrodes were prepared on stretchable
polyurethane (PU) substrates by using simple and cost-effective brush painting technique. We
can obtain writable and paintable electrodes with a low sheet resistance, high optical transmit-
tance and outstanding flexibility on stretchable substrate or special-shaped surface by a brush
painting of Ag NW and PEDOT:PSS mixed ink. It was found that shear stress of the paint-
brush led to an effective lateral alignment of the Ag NWs into the PEDOT:PSS matrix during
brush painting process. Sheet resistance and optical transmittance of the brush painted Ag NW/
PEDOT:PSS hybrid electrodes was critically affected by ratio of Ag NW and PEDOT:PSS
content in the mixed ink and brush painting speed. The optimized Ag NW/PEDOT:PSS hy-
brid electrode showed a sheet resistance of 19.7 Ohm/square and a high optical transmittance
of 88.64% comparable to conventional ITO electrode. Effective embedment of the Ag NW
into the PEDOT:PSS matrix led to metallic conductivity and outstanding stretchability of the
brush painted Ag NW/PEDOT:PSS hybrid electrode. In addition, we investigated mechanical
properties of the brush painted Ag NW/PEDOT:PSS hybrid electrode using specially designed
inner/outer bending test, stretching tests, twisting test and rolling test in detail. The optimized
brush painted Ag NW/PEDOT:PSS electrode showed a higher strain (~30%) than brush paint-
ed Ag NW or sputtered ITO electrode. Furthermore, we demonstrated the outstanding stretch-
ability of brush painted Ag NW/PEDOT:PSS hybrid electrode in two applications: stretchable
interconnectors and stretchable electrodes for stretchable and wearable thin film heaters. The
typical LEDs connected by brush painted Ag NW/PEDOT:PSS interconnectors were operated
until the interconnector was stretched to 100 %. The thin film heaters fabricated on brush paint-
ed Ag NW/PEDOT:PSS electrode were successfully operated even the sample was stretched
to 30%. These results provide clear evidence for its potential and widespread applications in
next-generation, stretchable displays, solar cells, and electronic devices.

References

1). J.-W. Lim et al., Sol. Energy Mater. Sol. Cells. 107 (2012) 348-354.
2). J.-H. Lee et al., Sol. Energy Mater. Sol. Cells. 114 (2013) 15-23.
3). R. Chen et al., Adv. Funct. Mater. 23 (2013) 150-5158.
4). J.-W. Lee et al., J. Power Sources. 339 (2017) 33-40.

– 78 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 048
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Colloidal synthesis approach for energy materials

Yan Lu

a
Soft Matter and Functional Materials, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien
und Energie, 14109 Berlin, Germany
b
Institute of Chemistry, University of Potsdam, 14467 Potsdam, Germany
Email: yan.lu@helmholtz-berlin.de

Colloidal route is one of the favored ways toward cost-effective large scale production of
various nanostructures [1]. In our study, different types of nanoparticles have been designed
and synthesized via colloidal approach, which can be applied for photocatalysis, energy
storage, and other energy-type applications. For example, dispersible mesoporous nitrogen-
doped hollow carbon nanoplates have been made by using gibbsite nanoplates as templates
[2]. The resulted hollow carbon nanoplates bear uniform hexagonal morphology with specific
surface area of 460 m2·g−1 and fairly accessible small mesopores (~ 3.8 nm). The obtained 2D
hollow carbon nanoplates can be successfully applied as electrode materials for symmetric
supercapacitors.
Recently, we have successfully synthesized multifunctional Ti4O7 particles with
interconnected-pores structure by using porous PS-P2VP particles as soft template [3].
Moreover, in order to improve the conductivity of the electrode, a thin layer of carbon has
been coated on the Ti4O7 surface without destroying its porous structure. The porous Ti4O7
particles as well as carbon-coated Ti4O7 particles show significantly improved electrochemical
performances as cathode material for Li-S batteries as compared with that of TiO2 particles.
In addition, thermosensitive core-shell microgels consisting of a core of polystyrene
whereas the shell is made up of crosslinked poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPA) can act
as active carriers for the nanoparticles. More recently, we have developed a facile and novel
method for the fabrication of Cu2O@PNIPA core-shell nanoreactors using Cu2O nanocubes
as the core [4]. The PNIPA shell not only effectively protects the Cu2O nanocubes from
oxidation, but also improves the colloidal stability of the system. The Cu2O@PNIPA core-
shell microgels can work efficiently as photocatalyst for the decomposition of methyl orange
under visible light. A significant enhancement in the catalytic activity has been observed for
the core-shell microgels compared with the pure Cu2O nanocubes.

References:

1) W. Li, G. Zheng, Y. Yang, Z.W. Seh, N. Liu, Y. Cui, PNAS 2013, 110, 7148.
2) J. Cao, C. Jafta, J. Gong, Q. Ran, X. Lin, R. Félix, R. Wilks, M. Bär, J. Yuan, M. Ballauff,
Y. Lu, ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces 2016, 8, 29628.
3) S. Mei, C. J. Jafta, I. Lauermann, Q. Ran, M. Kärgell, M. Ballauff, Y. Lu, Adv. Funct.
Mater. 2017, DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201701176R1.
4) H. Jia, R. Roa, S. Angioletti-Uberti, K. Henzler, A. Ott, X. Lin, J. Möser, Z. Kochovski, A.
Schnegg, J. Dzubiella, M. Ballauff, Y. Lu, J. Mater. Chem. A 2016, 4, 9677.

– 79 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 049
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Regular Speaker

Block copolymer template-directed synthesis of composite particles


with complex nanostructures
Shilin. Mei,a Charl. J. Jafta,a Yan Lua,b
a
Soft Matter and Functional Materials, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien
und Energie GmbH, 14109 Berlin, Germany
b
Institute of Chemistry, University of Potsdam, 14476 Potsdam, Germany
E-mail: shilin.mei@helmholtz-berlin.de
Nanoparticles with highly ordered or porous structures are of great interest in a broad range of
applications, such as catalysis and energy storage materials. Creating such particles with great com-
plexity through templating strategy is a promising but challenging proposition, due to the trade-off
between creating well-defined template and preserving the designed structure during the removal
of the template. A significant strategy has been developed to utilize block copolymers as temples,
which have the ability to self-assemble into highly ordered nanostructures and can be removed
simply by dissolving or calcination.
In our study, PS-P2VP is used as the model polymer to direct the spatial assembly of both Au
and Pd nanoparticles onto the BCP nanospheres with ordered distribution (Fig. 1a.) [2]. The com-
posite particles can work efficiently as catalyst by using the reduction of 4-nitrophenol as the mod-
el reaction. Moreover, a selective swelling process will induce porous structures of the PS-P2VP
nanospheres [3]. Porous Ti4O7 particles with interconnected pore structures have been developed by
using porous PS-P2VP particles as template, which can be applied as a new type of sulfur-host ma-
terial for lithium-sulfur batteries [4]. In order to improve the conductivity of the obtained particles, a
thin layer of carbon has been coated on the surface as shown in Fig. 1b. The thin carbon layer induc-
es better contact between the Ti4O7 particles and the carbon black of the slurry without disturbing
the chemical confinement of polysulfides by Ti4O7. Enhanced capacity with better cycling stability
has been observed for the carbon-coated Ti4O7 particles-based cathode materials.

Figure 1. (a) Pd@PS-P2VP@DT-Au composite particles


(b) Ti4O7 and carbon-coated Ti4O7 porous nanoparticles.
References
1) D. Wu, F. Xu, B. Sun, R. Fu, H. He, K. Matyjaszewski, Chem. Rev. 2012, 112, 3959–4015.
2) S. Mei, J. Cao, Y. Lu, J. Mater. Chem. A, 2015, 3, 3382–3389.
3) S. Mei, Z. Jin, Small, 2013, 9, 322–329
4) S. Mei, C. J. Jafta, I. Lauermann, Q. Ran, M. Kärgell, M. Ballauff, Y. Lu, Adv. Funct. Mater.
2017, 27, 1701176

– 80 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 050
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Regular Speaker

Plasma assisted synthesis strategies applied to nanostructured materials,


surface engineering and devices

C. Côté 1, F. Ambriz-Vargas2, G.R. Bigras 3, K. Dridi4, R. Nouar1, R. Porter1, S.


Wolfe1, M. Ionescu5, A. Nojeh4, D. Mantovani 6, A. Ruediger2, L. Stafford3,
A. Sarkissian1
1
Plasmionique Inc, Varennes, QC, Canada,
2
INRS-EMT,Varennes, QC, Canada,
3
University of Montreal, QC, Canada,
4
University of British Columbia, BC, Canada,
5
National Research Council, London, ON, Canada,
6
Laval University, QC, Canada
sarkissian@plasmionique.com

The unique characteristics of materials in nanoscale places them among the most promis-
ing molecular building blocks in nanotechnology. Nanostructured materials have drawn con-
siderable attention from various industrial fields, due to their potential applications stemmed
from their outstanding electrical, mechanical, chemical and optical properties. Example of
applications in nanoelectromechanical system (NEMS), flexible electronics, advanced energy
production and storage devices, engineered biomaterial surfaces, as well as gas and chemical
sensors, to name a few, are driving the global interest. However, various applications require
structures with different building blocks; therefore, it is necessary to develop specific strat-
egies for selective growth or synthesis, with excellent control over the size, electrical, me-
chanical and optical characteristics, in order to fully exploit their potentials. Moreover, some
device-related applications could require doping of these molecular structures with various
dopants in order to modify their electrical properties.
There are variety of techniques used for fabrication of various nanostructured materials or
surfaces. Plasma- and vacuum assisted synthesis techniques have been used as a strategy to
assist the synthesis of some nanomaterials, like various allotropes of carbon, at lower tem-
peratures, since plasma-assisted dissociation of precursors used for synthesis, facilitate the
nanomaterial growth at low temperatures. Plasma techniques have also been used to dope
nanomaterials. For example, graphene and CNT could be doped with nitrogen, an important
step for nanoelectronic applications, and Ag doping of DLC film creates excellent antibacte-
rial surfaces.
In this presentation we will discuss various plasma assisted synthesis strategies and their
specific advantages with various examples applied to surface engineering of biomaterials,
nanoelectroncis, forestry products and energy conversion.

– 81 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 051
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Regular Speaker

Fully stretchable and highly durable triboelectric nanogenerators


based on gold nanosheet electrodes for self-powered human motion
detection
Guh-Hwan Lim, Sung Soo Kwak, Sang-Woo Kim, and Byungkwon Lim*

School of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University


(SKKU),
Suwon 16419, Korea
E-mail:gunanwow@skku.edu (G.-H. Lim), blim@skku.edu (B. Lim)
Recent interest in wearable electronic devices has raised concerns about high quality flexibility
and stretchability, which are of interest to next generation applications such as flexible displays,
flexible and/or stretchable circuits, artificial electronic skins and various form-type sensors. In any
case, the need to replace or charge the battery must be removed from such electronic devices. Other-
wise, a heavier, separate power supply will remain a technological hurdle to wear comfortably over
a long period of time. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a new type of power generation devices.
Recently, a new type of power generation devices called a triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) has
been developed based on the coupling mechanism between triboelectric charging and electrostatic
induction using a mechanical energy, which is one of the most common energy sources. In TENGs,
electric charges are generated at the contact interface through periodic and repetitive physical con-
tact between two materials having different polarities in terms of triboelectric series. In the TENGs,
electricity is generated by periodic and repetitive physical contact, so that the components of the
device should be robust and capable of generating a stable electrical output.
To achieve 100% human-wearable devices, all components that make up the device must be flex-
ible and stretchy. Particularly, the electrode portion, which serves to transfer the carrier to the exter-
nal circuit to drive the device, must have excellent flexibility and stretchability. Most of the TENGs
reported so far have lack of flexibility or stretchability because non-stretchable metal films such as
Au, Al or Cu were used as the conducting electrodes of TENGs. The development of a stretchable
electrode which is mechanically robust, electrically stable, and reliable for repetitive external strain
must be preceded In order to produce a fully stretchable TENG.
In this study, we developed fully stretchable and durable TENG using Au nanosheet (NS) insert-
ed electrodes. The Au NS film was built into two layers: the opposite side of the patterned PDMS for
top electrode and the friction layer (if it also served as the bottom electrode). We also confirmed the
operating mechanism of the Au NS-TENG in pushing and stretching mode using COMSOL soft-
ware. Designed here, the new electrode dramatically improves mechanical flexibility and stretch-
ability, demonstrating TENG’s outstanding output stability over 10,000 cycles of repetitive pushing
and stretching tests. Thus, our Au NS-TENG can be successfully applied to the hand joints that can
be used as self-powered human motion detection for wearable applications.

References
1). G.-H. Lim, N.-E. Lee, B. Lim, J. Mater. Chem. C 4 (2016) 5642−5647.
2). H. Kang, H. Kim, S. Kim, H. J. Shin, S. Cheon, J.-H. Huh, D. Y. Lee, S. Lee, S.-W. Kim, J. H.
Cho, Adv. Funct. Mater. 26 (2016) 7717–7724.
3). F. R. Fan, L. Lin, G. Zhu, W. Wu, R. Zhang, Z. L. Wang, Nano Lett. 12 (2012) 3109–3114.
4) J. H. Lee, R. Hinchet, T. Y. Kim, H. Ryu, W. Seung, H. J. Yoon, S. W. Kim, Adv. Mater. 27
(2015) 27, 5553–5558.

– 82 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 052
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Regular Speaker

Nanoparticle systems developed for plant nutrition: their composi-


tion, structure and effects on cucumber plants
Zoltán Klencsára, Viktória Kovács Kisa, Sándor Stichleutnera, Zoltán Mayb, Zoltán
Sándorb, Ervin Gy. Szabób, Eszter Bódisb, László Szabób, Krisztina Kovácsc, Ernő
Kuzmannc, Zoltán Homonnayc, Fruzsina Pankaczid, Zsuzsanna Farkasd, Ádám Solt-
id, Ferenc Fodord, Gyula Tolnaie
a
Centre for Energy Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences,
1121 Budapest, Hungary
b
Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences,
1117 Budapest, Hungary
c
Institute of Chemistry, ELTE Eötvös Loránd University, 1117 Budapest, Hungary
d
Institute of Biology, ELTE Eötvös Loránd University, 1117 Budapest, Hungary
e
1116 Budapest, Fehérvári út 168., Hungary
E-mail: klencsar.zoltan@energia.mta.hu
Micronutrients such as Fe, Mn and Zn are essential for the proper physiological function and
healthy development of plants. Their deficiency caused, e.g., by limited availability due to unfa-
vorable soil quality conditions, such as high soil pH, can lead to diminished quantity and quality
of plant biomass, and corresponding drop in agricultural crop production [1]. In particular, due
to the not readily available iron content of the soils, approximately 30% of the world’s arable
agricultural lands are iron limited, and constraints related to Mn and Zn are also regarded as se-
rious nutritional problems for plants grown on calcareous and alkaline soils. As plants represent
the major iron source in human nutrition, iron deficiency or disturbed iron homeostasis of plants
also entails one of the most prevalent nutritional challenges for the world’s human population
[2]. As a possible way to alleviate shortage of availability of micronutrients to plants, application
of nanoparticle-based fertilizers may be considered as a viable and possibly superior alternative
to traditionally applied chemicals. Namely, nanoparticles may form stable colloid suspensions
in pore waters of soils, thereby having direct enough access to plant roots for their ingredients
becoming utilized by the plant. But at the same time, due to their particulate nature, nanoparti-
cles can be expected to be less prone to become subject to wash-out from the soil than ordinary
(non-particulate) chemicals. On the other hand, nanoparticles have a high-enough surface area
to be sufficiently reactive in chemical interactions with plant root secretions, while their interior
volume can still retain an extra reservoir of micronutrients, and thereby ensure an extended time
period in which the corresponding fertilizer is effective.
In the present work we report about the preparation and characterization of (Mn,Zn)-ferrite and
ferric-oxide-hydroxide / hematite nanoparticle based systems, as well as about their application as
micronutrient source for cucumber plants grown in hydroponics.
Acknowledgement. Financial support from the National Research, Development and Innova-
tion Office - NKFIH/OTKA (K115913 and K115784) is gratefully acknowledged.

References
1). Abadía J, Vázquez S, Rellán-Álvarez R, El-Jendoubi H, Abadía A, Álvarez-Fernández A,
López-Millán AF, Plant. Phys. Biochem. 49 (2011) 471-482.
2). J. Jeong, M.L. Guerinot, Trends in Plant Science 14 (2009) 280-285.

– 83 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 053
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Interfacing microtubular NEMS with single cells and biomolecules

Oliver G. Schmidt

Institute for Integrative Nanosciences, Leibniz IFW Dresden, Germany


E-mail: o.schmidt@ifw-dresden.de

Microtubular MEMS with outstanding properties are self-assembled into fully multi-func-
tional and integrative microtubular architectures. This makes them attractive for a broad range
of applications and scientific research fields ranging from novel hybrid heterostructure devices
to 3D microsystems both on and off the chip. Microtubular MEMS are exploited to construct
ultra-compact and ultra-sensitive advanced electronic circuitry, sensors and optofluidic com-
ponents around fluidic channels towards the implementation of a lab-in-a-tube system. They
are also useful to study basic mechanisms of single cancer and stem cell migration, growth
and mitosis in realistic 3D confined environments. Off-chip applications include biomimetic
microelectronics for regenerative cuff implants and the development of hybrid microbioro-
botic motors for paradigm shifting reproduction technologies.

– 84 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 054
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

3D nanochannel electroporation for high-throughput cell transfec-


tion with high uniformity and dosage control

Wu Lu

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University,


Columbus, OH 43210, USA
E-mail: lu.173@osu.edu

Of great interest to modern medicine and biomedical research is the ability to inject in-
dividual target cells with desired genes or drug molecules. Some advances in cell electro-
poration allow for high throughput, high cell viability, or excellent dosage control, yet no
platform is available for the combination of all three. In an effort to solve this problem, here
we show a “3D nano-channel electroporation (NEP) chip” on a silicon platform designed
to meet these three criteria. This NEP chip can simultaneously deliver desired molecules
into a large number of cells on the top surface of the device. Each nanopore aligns to a cell
and can be used to deliver extremely small biological elements to very large plasmids (> 10
kbp). When compared to conventional bulk electroporation (BEP), the NEP chip shows a 20
fold improvement in dosage control and uniformity, while still maintaining high cell viability
(>90%) even in cells such as cardiac cells which are characteristically difficulty to transfect.
This high-throughput 3D NEP system provides an innovative and medically valuable plat-
form with uniform and reliable cellular transfection, allowing for a steady supply of healthy,
engineered cells.

References

1). Daniel Gallego-Perez et al, Nature Nanotechnology (2017) doi:10.1038/nnano.2017.134.


2). Lingqian Chang et al, Micro-/nanoscale electroporation, Lab on a Chip, vol. 16, 4047-
4062, (2016).
3). Lingqian Chang et al, Small, vol. 12, 5971-5980 (2016).
4). Lingqian Chang et al, Nanoscale, vol. 8, 243-252 (2016).
5). Daniel Gallego-Perez et al, Nano Letters, vol. 16, pp. 5326 – 5332 (2016).

– 85 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 055
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Real-time tracking and bioimaging of cancer cells through multi-


functional nanoscale probes

Xuemei Wang
State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics (Chien-Shiung Wu Laboratory),
Southeast University, Nanjing 210096, China
E-mail: xuewang@seu.edu.cn

The early efficient diagnosis of some important disease like cancers is still a hot topic in
the relative fields involving in patient care and treatments. In this study, we have explored
the possibility of the application of new supramolecular probes combining with nano-scaled
materials in real-time biomolecular recognition and early diagnosis of cancers. Especially, we
have developed a new strategy for the highly sensitive detection of the target biomolecules
and cancer cells by combining the supramolecular probe like carborane derivatives and func-
tionalized nano-interface. Our observations demonstrate that the self-assembly of the specific
nanocomposites with the new nanoscale molecular probes could provide a multifunctional
interface / biosensors for the rapid and high-sensitive identification of cancer cells, with a
broad detection range and low detection limit. It is evident that different types of cancer cells
or bacteria could be readily distinguished on the relevant nano-interface, which have the pro-
mising application to be adopted as a significant way to detect and identify various kinds of
mutant cells and advance the clinic diagnosis and monitoring the treatment of target disease
like cancers. Moreover, some ultrasensitive and intelligently multi-functional nanoprobes ba-
sed on the in vivo bio-synthesized nanoclusters for multimodality imaging of cancer cells /
and tumors has been also explored for the real-time monitoring and dynamic analysis of some
disease related biomolecules/cells/tissues.

Acknowledgment
This work is supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (81325011) and
National High Technology Research & Development Program of China (2015AA020502).

– 86 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 056
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Super-resolution microscopy in material science:


Highlighing perovskite material photophysics
Aboma Merdasaa, Yuxi Tianb, Rafael Camachoc, Alexander Dobrovolskyd,
Johan Hofkensc, Ivan Scheblykind, Eva L. Ungera,d

Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialen und Energie GmbH,


a

Kekulestraße 5, 12489 Berlin, Germany


b
School of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University,
22 Hankou Rd, 210023 Nanjing, China
c
Department of Chemistry, KU Leuven, Celestijenlaan 200F, B-3001 Leuven, Belgium
d
Department of Chemical Physics, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, 22100 Lund, Sweden
E-mail: aboma.merdasa@helmholtz-berlin.de

Super-resolution microscopy has become a pillar within the life sciences over the last decade.
It has enabled researchers to study intra-cellular live process leading to a deeper understanding
of mechanisms that have otherwise been hidden due to the light diffraction limit.1 By labelling
structures of interest using small dyes around 1 nm in diameter and then localizing their emission
allows the method to create an image of the structure with nanometre resolution. Super-resolution
microscopy is finding its way into material science2,3 but there are difficulties arising from the fact
that the objects of interest are themselves often emitting strongly and can be of widely ranging sizes.
This has required some tweaking of the already established methods such that spatial information
can still be extracted.
In material science it is indeed of interest to characterize the spatial dimensions and to image the
structure of a sample, although this can easily be accomplished using electron microscopy. What is
perhaps of more interest is understanding how a functional material behaves when externally influ-
enced by light or an electric field for example. To extract such information one typically employs
one of many spectroscopic methods where the spatial information is often lost.
We here present a method called SuperLuMS (Super-resolution Luminescence Micro-Spectros-
copy) where we are able to extract spectroscopic information with a spatial resolution down to a
few nanometers. The method can readily study individual objects such as nanorods, crystals ranging
in size from a few nanometer up to a few micrometer, and also local regions within a larger film.4-6
At the same time SuperLuMS developed, Perovskite semiconductor materials saw a rapid boom
in development to be used not only as a light absorber in solar cells, but also in light emitting de-
vices.7,8 We found Perovskites to be a great model system for showcasing what type of information
SuperLuMS can extract. In this talk, we will present a few recent results that demonstrate how
super-resolution optical microscopy can be employed with functional materials in order to extract
information about not only their structure, but also the optical properties related to a particular
structure.

References
1). Bo et al., Appl. Spetrosc. 65 (2011) 967−980.
2). Habuchi et al., Chem. Commun. (2009) 4868−4870.
3). Wang et al., Nano Lett. 13 (2013) 5233−5241.
4). Merdasa et al., J. Phys. Chem. C 120 (2016) 10711−10719.
5). Tian et al., J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 6 (2015) 4171−4177.
6). Merdasa et al., ACS Nano 11 (2017) 5391−5404.
7). Saliba et al., Science 354 (2016) 206-209.
8). Deschler et al., J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 5 (2014) 1421−1426.

– 87 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 057
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Regular Speaker

An intracellular temperature nanoprobe based on biosynthesized


fluorescent copper nanoclusters
Xiawei Dong, Jing Ye, and Xuemei Wang*
State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics (Chien-Shiung Wu Lab), School of Biological
Science and Medical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096, China.
E-mail: xuewang@seu.edu.cn
Temperature variation is related to a series of biological reactions and abnormal medical processes
of living cells. The real-time monitoring of temperature in vivo may provide detailed information
about target cells for biomedical diagnosis and therapy, since a variety of abnormal physiological
phenomena are associated with inflammation or tumor growth, which is usually accompanied by a
temperature change. Nevertheless, the accurate, fast and real-time measurement of intracellular tem-
perature is still facing a big challenge.
Presently, a series of fluorescent materials, such as quantum dots, lanthanoid-based nanomaterials,
upconverting nanoparticles and GFP-based thermosensors, have been reported to act as nanothermo-
meters in living systems. Nanoclusters (NCs) including Au NCs have also been explored as sensitive
nanoprobes to detect the physiological temperature range in living cells. Compared to the extensively
investigated Au NCs and Ag NCs, only a few research studies have focussed on Cu based materials.
Since small-dimensional Cu based materials like Cu nanoclusters (NCs) were found to have weak
stability and slight toxicity, various kinds of synthesis strategies have been exploited to reduce the
possible cytotoxicity and improve the stability of CuNCs during the relevant process. Therefore, to
overcome these problems, there is an urgent need to establish a simple method for the synthesis of
CuNCs with excellent performances.
In this study, we have established a facile, efficient and green strategy for the preparation of an intra-
cellular temperature nanoprobe specifically by in situ biosynthesized fluorescent copper nanoclusters
(CuNCs). Our observations demonstrate that the fluorescent CuNCs could specifically be biosynthe-
sized spontaneously in MDA-MB-231 cancer cells through a particular molecular process, but not
in normal cells (i.e., L02 cells). The resultant CuNCs, with an average diameter of 2.4±0.4 nm, were
found to exhibit red fluorescence emission (λem = 610 nm) and could further efficiently accumulate
for bioimaging in target cancer cells. More importantly, the fluorescence signal of the biosynthesized
CuNCs is sensitively thermo-responsive over the physiological temperature range in MDA-MB-231
cells (relative sensitivity: -3.18% per Celsius). This provides an efficient nanothermometer based on
the in situ biosynthesized CuNCs for cellular fluorescence imaging and other biomedical applications.

Acknowledgements
This work was supported by the National High Technology Research & Development Program of
China (2015AA020502), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (81325011, 21327902,
21675023, and 21175020), and the Major Science & Technology Project of Suzhou (ZXY2012028).

References
1) S. Biswas, J. T. Miller, Y. H. Li, K. Nandakumar and C. Kumar, Small, 2012, 8, 688-698.
2) S. Basu, S. Majumder, S. Chatterjee, A. Ganguly, T. Efferth and S. K. Choudhuri, In Vivo, 2009,
23, 401-408.
3) E. J. McLaurin, L. R. Bradshaw and D. R. Gamelin, Chem. Mater., 2013, 25, 1283-1292.
4) X. D. Wang, O. S. Wolfbeis and R. J. Meier, Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013, 42, 7834-7869.
5) J. Ye, J. Wang, Q. Li and X. Dong, Biomater. Sci., 2016, 4, 652-660.
6) S. P. Wang, S. Westcott and W. Chen, J. Phys. Chem. B, 2002, 106, 11203-11209.
7) A. G. Joly, W. Chen, J. Roark and J. Z. Zhang, J. Nanosci. Nanotechnol., 2001, 1, 295-301.
8) S. Yang, S. Sun, C. Zhou, G. Hao, J. Liu, S. Ramezani, M. Yu, X. Sun and J. Zheng, Bioconjugate
Chem., 2015, 26, 511-519.
9) A. E. Albers, E. M. Chan, P. M. McBride, C. M. Ajo-Franklin, B. E. Cohen and B. A. Helms, J.
Am. Chem. Soc., 2012, 134, 9565-9568.

– 88 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 058
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Regular Speaker

Dendrimer Mediated Approach for the Improved Stability and Ef-


ficacy of a Mustine Drug: Evidences in Leukemic THP-1 cells and
EAT Solid Tumor in Balb/c Mice

Avinash Gothwal and U.Gupta*

Department of Pharmacy, School of Chemical Sciences and Pharmacy,


Central University of Rajasthan, NH-8 Ajmer Jaipur Expressway,
Bandarsindri, Ajmer, Rajasthan 305817, India
E-mail: avgothwal20@gmail.com; umeshgupta@curaj.ac.in

Successful delivery of chemotherapeutic agent like bendamustine still remains a challenge


in the clinical conditions like Chronic lymphatic leukemia (CLL), Non-Hodgkin lymphoma
(NHL) and multiple myeloma. We have conjugated bendamustine to Polyamidoamine (PA-
MAM) dendrimers through N-hydroxyethylmaleimide (spacer) ester bond and Michael addi-
tion. The conjugation resulted in almost 23% conjugation of drug to dendrimers. The particle
size of PAMAM-bendamustine conjugate was 49.8±2.5 nm. In vitro drug release resulted in
sustained release with improved solution stability of drug up to 72 hours. In 24-hour cyto-
toxicity study by MTT assay against human monoblastic leukemia cells (THP-1), the IC50
value for PAMAM-bendamustine was 32.1±4.8 µM compared to 50.42±3.4 µM for benda-
mustine alone. Significantly higher cell uptake and apoptosis were observed in THP-1 cells
by PAMAM-bendamustine a conjugate which was confirmed by flow cytometry and confocal
laser scanning microscopy. Preliminary in vivo studies undertaken included- pharmacoki-
netics studies, organ distribution studies, and tumor inhibition studies. In healthy Wistar rat
model (1CBM IV push model), the pharmacokinetic studies revealed that bioavailability and
t1/2 increased significantly, i.e. almost 8.5 (193.8±1.116 vs. 22.8±0.158 µg mL-1/h) and 5.1
folds (0.75±0.005 vs. 3.85±0.015 h), respectively, for PAMAM-bendamustine compared to
pure bendamustine (p<0.05), however, clearance and volume of distribution was found to be
decreased compared to free drug. The study suggests that PAMAM-bendamustine conjugate
was not only stable for the longer period but also least toxic and highly uptaken by THP-1
cells to exert an anticancer effect at the reduced dose. Tumor Inhibition and Bio-distribution
studies in tumor-bearing BALB/c mice revealed that PAMAM-Bendamustine conjugate was
more effective than the pure drug and showed higher accumulation in the tumor.

References

1). Scutaru A. M., Wenzel M., Scheffler H, Wolber G. Bioconjugate Chem. 21 (2010) 1728–
1743.
2). Hoy M. Adis Drug Evaluation. 72 (2012) 1929-1950.

– 89 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 059
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Fluorescent upconversion nanoparticles for bioimaging and


phototherapy

Akshaya Bansala, Zhang Yonga,b

Department of Biomedical Engineering, National University of Singapore,


a

4 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117583


b
NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering, Centre for Life Sciences
(CeLS), National University of Singapore, 05-01 28 Medical Drive, 117456 Singapore.
E-mail: bieab@nus.edu.sg

Fluorescent nanoparticles have become increasingly popular in biomedical research with


applications spanning from tracking of biomolecules, imaging cellular compartments to diag-
nostics and phototherapy. The increasing repertoire of fluorescent materials has revolutionised
the manner in which biological processes are investigated. However, traditional fluorophores
are mainly based on downconversion fluorescence and have several drawbacks such as pho-
tobleaching, high background noise from autofluorescence, and considerable photodamage to
biological materials. In addition, need for UV/visible excitation light limits their therapeutic
potential owing to the poor tissue penetration capability of light at these wavelengths. Upcon-
verting fluorescent nanoparticles emit detectable photons of higher energy in the near-infrared
(NIR) or visible range upon irradiation with an NIR light in a process termed ‘upconversion.’
They are resistant to photoblinking and highly photostable with little or no background noise,
thus, making them an ideal fluorescent label for biological applications. In addition, the deep
tissue penetrating and biologically friendly NIR excitation makes these particles well suited
for phototherapy applications such as photodynamic therapy, photocontrolled drug/gene de-
livery and optogenetics.

– 90 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 060
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Regular Speaker

Artificially fabricated nanomachines based on the quantum nano-


particles for photodynamic cancer therapy

Alexandre Loukanov

Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, Saitama City,


Japan
E-mail: loukanov@mail.saitama-u.ac.jp

The design, fabrication and principle of working of nanomachine based on quantum na-
noparticles is reported. It is consisted from non toxic semiconductive inorganic core made
of hematite (Fe2O3) and capping organic shell made from carbon nanodots (C-dots). This
structure is known also as a nanoconverter because it converts the lower energy near infrared
irradiation (700 ~ 800 nm) to higher blue energy irradiation (460 nm), which is enough powe-
rful to eject electrons from the semiconductive hematite quantum dots (Qdots). The emitted
electrons generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), which possess inhibitory effect on B16F10
breast cancer cells. Thus, the nanocoverter destroyed effectively the cancer cells but it still
possesses comparatively low selectivity toward the normal cells. The selectivity was achieved
by modification of the nanoconverter with oligonucleotide aptamers, which have capability
to react as a bio-recognition agent (or artificial antibody) with the expressed proteins on the
wall surface of cancer cells. In addition, due to the specific photoluminescence properties of
the reported nanomachines their practical use can be monitored both in vitro or in vivo by
microscopical techniques as well as magnetic resonance imaging MRI. In conclusion, the
reported nanomachines demonstrated promising potential to be used in the nanomedicine for
photodynamic cancer therapy.

– 91 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 061
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Regular Speaker

Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles in Candida parapsilosis ATCC


7330: Mechanistic studies
Saravanan Krishnana*, Deepthy Jayakumara and Anju Chadhaa, b, c

Laboratory of Bioorganic Chemistry, Department of Biotechnology,


a

b
National Center for Catalysis Research &
c
Center for NEMS and Nanophotonics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras,
India, Chennai – 600036
*E-mail: sara.krish87@gmail.com

Numerous microbial methods are reported to biosynthesize metallic nanoparticles but the me-
chanism of the reduction and stabilization events remain unclear.[1] Fungal systems are known for
their advantages towards the synthesis of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs).[3] Few reports implicate
cellular enzymes in the reduction of metal precursors.[2]This study reports that the reduction of
gold precursor is not necessarily enzymatic in the cell free extract of Candida parapsilosis ATCC
7330, since both, cell free extracts (CFE) and heat denatured extracts (HTCFE) show reduction
of gold (III) chloride. Gold aggregates (93 nm) were formed with heat denatured extracts in
48% yield as compared to nanoparticles produced using cell free extracts (43 nm, 50% yield).
Similarly, bovine serum albumin [BSA] produced gold nanoparticles even under heat denatured
conditions. Thus, the loss of native conformation of BSA does not seem to affect the reduction
reactions in the formation of gold nanoparticles. Significantly, aggregation of gold nanoparticles
is influenced by pH. The yield of the gold nanoparticles formed depends on temperature as the
increase in reaction temperature from 25-45 0C increases the isolated yields of the gold nanopar-
ticles (39 to 66%). Excess of protein concentration is found to limit the yield of gold nanoparticles
formed. Investigations on the kinetic studies of Au NPs formation with CFE and HTCFE show
that the conformation of native proteins plays a significant role in stabilization of the reduced
gold particles. Furthermore, experiments using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, glutathione
and tryptophan revealed that the reduction of AuIII to Au0 occurs via redox mediated intermolecu-
lar electron transfer. Among the amino acids, cysteine (thiol containing amino acid) is one of the
co-ordinating ligands in proteins with a high affinity for gold.[4] Reaction with thiol modified cel-
lular extracts under native and denatured conditions confirms that cysteine is directly involved in
the formation of gold nanoparticles. Thus the formation of gold nanoparticles in this yeast occurs
non-enzymatically while the stabilization in large part is due to biomacromolecules.

References
1) a) M. Kitching et al., Microb Biotechnol 8 (2015) 904-917; b) N. Durán et al., Appl Micro-
biol Biotechnol 90 (2011) 1609-1624.
2) a) P. Singh, et al., Trends biotechnol. 34 (2016) 588-599; b) B. K. Salunke et al., World J
Microbiol Biotechnol 32 (2016) 88; c) K. S. Siddiqi, A. Husen, Nanoscale Res. Lett 11
(2016) 98.
3) S. Krishnan et al., AMB Expr. 6 (2016), 92.
4) a) Y. N. Tan et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc 132 (2010) 5677-5686; b) M. Stillman, Angew. Chem.
Int. Ed. 46 (2007) 8741-8742.

– 92 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 062
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Towards multifunctional materials: from design to energy and en-


vironmental applications
Camille Petit
Barrer Centre, Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London,
South Kensington Campus, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ, UK
E-mail: camille.petit@imperial.ac.uk

Access to clean water along with sustainable energy and the protection of the environ-
ment are probably the greatest challenges of our society but also a formidable opportunity
to reshape our technology landscape. To this end, researchers must propose transformative
approaches to energy production and environmental remediation. In that endeavour, multi-
functional materials have a key role to play. Indeed, relying on the increasing complexity and
sophistication of materials, we are now able to design materials that can perform multiple
functions (hence multifunctional materials) as a way to integrate multiple processes (e.g. car-
bon capture and conversion).

This presentation will provide two examples of our research activities in that direction. In
particular, I will discuss our work on the design of multifunctional materials for application
as both adsorbent and photocatalyst for the combined capture and conversion of CO2. I will
also present our work on the development of porous boron nitride material as promising
catalyst support. Overall, our approach encompasses not only materials synthesis but also
characterisation and testing, thereby enabling us to have a global perspective on materials
structure-property relationships and to envision avenues for the design of next-generation
materials in key sustainability focus areas.

– 93 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 063
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Architecture of nanocomposite materials for


heterogeneous catalysis
Hua Chun Zeng*
Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering,
Faculty of Engineering
National University of Singapore, Singapore 119260
E-mail: chezhc@nus.edu.sg

Integrated nanocatalysts (INCs) with multicomponent and hierarchically complex structu-


res have recently drawn extensive research attention in terms of their fundamental sciences
and industrial applications, and many innovative strategies have been established. In this pre-
sentation, we will highlight the state-of-the-art of INCs with different porous materials for ca-
talyst technology and heterogeneous catalysis. We will briefly introduce catalytic active com-
ponents (namely, metal, metal oxide, and hybrid nanoparticles) that are commonly used in
INCs. Combining such active components with various porous materials provides us a huge
array of architectural designs for INCs that can be used in chemical reactions. In choosing
host materials for INCs, in particular, we will focus on the mesoporous siliceous materials
(e.g., silica and metal silicates) and microporous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), since
they represent the two important classes of porous materials known today. Recent develop-
ments of INCs which comprise these mesoporous and microporous solids will be presented
with special emphasis on their roles as supports, encapsulating shells and metal sources, and
future research directions of this field will also be discussed.

– 94 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 064
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Recent advances in photo-driven catalytic processes at nanostruc-


tured metal oxides

Renata Solarska

Centre of New Technologies, University of Warsaw, Banacha 2c, 02-097 Warsaw,


Poland
E-mail: rsolarska@cent.uw.edu.pl

Solar driven processes such as photoelectrochemical water splitting, activation of CO2


molecule or photosynthetic and biocatalytic reactions require long-term stability in line with
their high solar to energy conversion efficiency. These two conditions are the critical issues
that determine use of metal oxides in photo-electrochemical devices. This is the reason why
choice of the active matrix is actually restricted to a few metal oxides. Among those materials
can be found iron oxide, titanium oxide or tungsten oxide, but none of them does not offer
unassisted photocatalysis because of the position of the band energetics. However, efforts
including development of new molecular catalysts, incorporation of plasmonic metal nano-
structures or creation of low level sub- stoichiometry through implementation of small ionic
molecules into photoactive layers are continuously undertaken to minimise the required bias
voltage and improve light capture or charge collection, respectively.

Recent advances regarding tungsten and titanium oxides based photoanodes consist of
combination of enhanced intrinsic activity reached by a moderate doping of WO3 with sodi-
um ions and identification of new molecular oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalyst, able to
drive the process in highly corrosive acidic media [1]. These two approaches, allowed to en-
hance visible light absorption of the working electrodes and consequently, their photocurrent
conversion efficiency. Stable and reproducible water splitting photocurrents reached 4.5 mA
cm-2 at the WO3 photoanodes and were attained at standard conditions. In this scenario, in-
corporated in small amount polyoxometalates act as highly effective molecular OER catalysts
leading to very large enhancement of water oxidation photocurrents. When, dissolved in the
electrolyte, the POMs are transparent to visible light and can easily penetrate in-depth over
extended internal photo-active surface area, thus are particularly well suited for application
with nanoporous photo-anodes.

References

1). M. Sarnowska, K. Bienkowski, P. J. Barczuk, R. Solarska, J. Augustynski, Adv. Energy


Mater. (2016), 1600526.

– 95 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 065
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Regular Speaker

Dry coating process for high activity Co/Al2O3


Fischer-Tropsch catalysts
Xuemei LIU1, Nouria FATAH1*, Matthieu TOUZIN2

1
Unité de Catalyse et Chimie du Solide, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de
Lille, 59650 Villeneuve d’Ascq, France.
2
Univ.Lille, CNRS, INRA, ENSCL, UMR 8207,UMET, Unité Matériaux et Transfor-
mations, F 59 000 Lille, France.
E-mail: nouria.fatah@centralelille.fr

Keywords: High shear mixer, Mechanical coating, Nano Materials, Catalysts


Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis has been widely used for producing ultra-clean hydrocarbon
fuels from syngas generated from fossil resources or biomass. Dry coating process provides a pro-
mising approach instead of conventional chemical methods to prepare heterogeneous alumina su-
pported cobalt catalysts (Co/Al2O3) for FT synthesis [1]. In this process, shearing and/or impacting
forces are applied to adhere active nano-sized Co3O4 on the surface of relatively larger alumina
support without using any solvents. This solvent-free coating process does not need any drying or
post-heating steps, thus meeting the requirements of environmental friendliness and energy-saving
nowadays. In this study, Co/Al2O3 catalysts were synthesized via dry coating process. The operating
conditions and cobalt crystal size were optimized to improve the catalytic activity in FT synthesis.
In this work, nano Co3O4 (dp=0.1 µm, crystal size 66 nm) and mesoporous spherical γ-Al2O3 (dp=77
µm) were mixed in a high shear mixer “Picomix” (Hosokawa Micron) to prepare 15 wt.% Co/Al2O3
catalysts. Effects of rotation speeds (1500-5000 rpm) and working times (5-30 min) were investigated.
A planetary ball miller mode 100 made by RETSCH was applied for mechanical milling of Co3O4
powders (named milled-Co3O4) at 600 rpm for 40 hours, in order to decrease the crystal size of Co3O4
before conducting the dry coating process. Morphological analysis of the prepared catalysts was re-
alized by scanning electron microscopy (Philips 505) and electron microprobe (Camera SX-100).
Structure and element composition were evaluated by temperature program reduction (AutoChem
II 2920 V3 0.2), X-ray diffraction (Siemens D5000) and inductively coupled plasma-optic emission
spectroscopy (720-ES, Agilent). Textural properties and Vickers micro-hardness were measured using
Helium pycnometer (AccuPyc 1330), N2 adsorption-desorption (TriStar II Plus) and micro-inden-
tation tester (CSM instruments) respectively. Attrition resistance of the catalysts was monitored in
a fluidized bed (1.0 cm in inner diameter) for 22 h at room temperature and pressure. FT synthesis
activity was evaluated in a milli-fixed bed under 20 bars and 220 °C with 90% syngas (H2/CO=2 v./v.)
and 10% N2 as the feed gas. CO conversion and gaseous hydrocarbons were measured using a TCD
detector (CTR-a column) and a FID detector (Rt-Q PLOT column). A counterpart 15 wt.% Co/Al2O3
catalyst was synthesized by the conventional chemical impregnation method.
High adhesion and uniformity of Co3O4 coating was obtained at 5000 rpm and 5 min, due to effi-
cient de-agglomeration of Co3O4 and coarse surface of γ-Al2O3. This catalyst possesses a uniform Co3O4
coating (1-3 µm in layer thickness, 10 wt.% Co) on the surface of γ-Al2O3 with only 0.1 wt.% particle
attrition. Mechanical milling decreased effectively the crystal size of Co3O4 from 66 to 12 nm. The
optimal Co/Al2O3 catalyst was prepared by dry coating milled-Co3O4 on γ-Al2O3 at 5000 rpm for 5 min,
and exhibits better catalytic activity in FT synthesis with comparable CO conversion (22 %), lower CH4
selectivity (4 %) and much higher C5+ selectivity (93 %) when compared to the impregnated catalyst.

Reference:
1) M. Lu, N. Fatah, A.Y. Khodakov, Journal of Materials Chemistry A, 5 (2017) 9148-9155.

– 96 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 066
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Regular Speaker

Construction of multi-component heterostructures with


assistance of supercritical CO2

Yumei Ren, Qun Xu*

College of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhengzhou University,


Zhengzhou 450052 (China)
E-mail: 1069708083@qq.com, *qunxu@zzu.edu.cn

ABSTRACT: Numerous works have been conducted to integrate the 2D layered transition-
-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) together and fabricate new heterostructures with exciting
properties. Van der Waals heterostructures, including vertical (stacking layer-by-layer) and
in-plane (stitching together seamlessly) heterojunctions, have brought about unprecedented
opportunities for fundamental scientific studies and device engineering. Nevertheless, fabri-
cation of such 2D/2D desirable heterostructures with un-contaminated surface, controlled
stacking-orientation and massive production is still challenging. Herein, for the first time, we
demonstrate that supercritical carbon dioxide (SC CO2) can facilitate the sequence-stacking
of 2D WS2-WO3•H2O/1T-2H MoS2 heterostructures by building an unique adjustable solvent
system that can selective assemble hydrophilic structure and hydrophobic structure, respecti-
vely. Our experimental results indicated that the as-prepared multi-component advantageous
heterostructures have an enhanced photoelectrochemical activity towared hydrogen evolution.
Keywords: 2D layered transition-metal dichalcogenides, supercritical carbon dioxide, multi-
-component heterostructures, photoelectrochemical activity.

– 97 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 067
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Nanometric building blocks for robust multifunctional


molecular junctions

Scott R. Smitha, Akhtar Bayata, David Jamesa, J-C Lacroixb, Richard McCreerya

a.
Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, 11421 Saskatchewan Drive
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2M9
b
University of Paris, Diderot, 15, rue Jean Antoine de Baïf, 75013 Paris
mccreery@ualberta.ca

Much of the motivation for developing molecular electronic devices is the prospect of achieving
novel electronic functions by varying molecular structure. We describe a “building block” appro-
ach for molecular junctions resulting in one, two or three nanometer-thick molecular layers in a
commercially proven junction design. A single layer of anthraquinone between carbon electrodes
provides a tunnel device with applications in electronic music, and a second layer of a thiophene
derivative yields a molecular rectifier with quite different audio characteristics. A third layer of
lithium benzoate produces a redox-active device analogous to a 16- nm thick battery with possible
applications in non-volatile memory devices or on-chip energy storage. The building block appro-
ach forms a basis for “rational design” of electronic functions, in which layers of varying structure
produce distinct and desirable electronic behaviours.

1) Morteza Najarian, A.; Szeto, B.; Tefashe, U. M.; McCreery, R. L., Robust All-Carbon Molecular
Junctions on Flexible or Semi-Transparent Substrates Using “Process-Friendly” Fabrication.
ACS Nano 2016, 10 (9), 8918-8928.
2) Bergren, A. J.; Zeer-Wanklyn, L.; Semple, M.; Pekas, N.; Szeto, B.; McCreery, R. L., Musical
molecules: the molecular junction as an active component in audio distortion circuits. J. Phys.:
Condens. Matter 2016, 28 (9), 094011.
3) Bayat, A.; Lacroix, J.-C.; McCreery, R. L., Control of Electronic Symmetry and Rectification
through Energy Level Variations in Bilayer Molecular Junctions. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2016, 138
(37), 12287-12296.

– 98 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 068
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Tailoring the properties of two-dimensional materials with


molecular systems

S. Bertolazzi, M. Gobbi and P. Samorì


University of Strasbourg, CNRS, ISIS UMR 7006, 8 allée Gaspard Monge, F-67000
Strasbourg, France
E-mail: bertolazzi@unistra.fr
Two-dimensional (2D) crystals, such as graphene and monolayers of transition metal
dichalcogenides (TMDs), offer extraordinary electronic, optical and mechanical properties
that could enable a host of new device applications spanning from energy harvesting to (opto- )
electronics and wearable sensors. A critical requirement for developing practical and reliable
technologies based on graphene and TMDs consists in achieving a systematic control over their
optical emission/adsorption, charge-carrier polarity and electronic doping. Inconveniently, such a
challenging task cannot be accomplished by means of conventional doping techniques (e.g. ion
implantation and diffusion), which unavoidably damage the 2D crystals resulting in degraded
device performances. In this context, a number of alternative strategies are being investigated,
including chemical approaches that exploit the coupling between functional molecular systems and
2D materials via covalent or non-covalent interactions.1 Noticeably, such chemical methods make
it possible to impart to graphene and TMDs a multifunctional nature that is suitable for advanced
logic, memory and sensing applications.
Here, I will provide various examples of (supra-) molecular chemistry approaches for tailoring
the properties of 2D crystals, among which the use of highly-ordered self-assembled monolayers
(SAMs) of electroactive molecules,2-3 as well photoswitchable molecular systems lying at
the interface with the 2D materials.4 Moreover, I will show that 2D TMDs can be chemically
functionalized with small organic molecules carrying advanced functionalities. For instance,
monolayers of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) can be combined with photo- and electrochemically-
responsive molecules containing thiol headgroups. The latter were shown to bind at defect sites,
such as sulfur vacancies, which can be conveniently generated in the basal plane of MoS2 by means
of low-energy ion irradiation.5
Finally, I will discuss the potential of such chemical approaches for the development of novel
hybrid multifunctional materials that bridge together the world of 2D materials with the world of
molecular systems, whose properties can be tailored ad hoc thanks to the virtually infinite degrees
of freedom of chemical synthesis.

References
1) P. Samorì, V. Palermo, X. Feng, Advanced Materials 2016, 28, 6027
2) M. Gobbi, S. Bonacchi, J. X. Lian, Y. Liu, X.-Y. Wang, M.-A. Stoeckel, M. A. Squillaci, G.
D’Avino, A. Narita, K. Müllen, X. Feng, Y. Olivier, D. Beljonne, P. Samorì, E. Orgiu, Nature
Communications 2017, 8, 14767.
3) Z. Xia, F. Leonardi, M. Gobbi, Y. Liu, V. Bellani, A. Liscio, A. Kovtun, R. Li, X. Feng, E. Orgiu,
P. Samorì, E. Treossi, V. Palermo, ACS Nano 2016, 10, 7125
4) M. Döbbelin, A. Ciesielski, S. Haar, S. Osella, M. Bruna, A. Minoia, L. Grisanti, T. Mosciatti, F.
Richard, E. A. Prasetyanto, L. De Cola, V. Palermo, R. Mazzaro, V. Morandi, R. Lazzaroni, A.
C. Ferrari, D. Beljonne, P. Samorì, Nature Communications 2016, 7, 11090.
5) S. Bertolazzi, S. Bonacchi, G. Nan, A. Pershin, D. Beljonne, P. Samorì, Advanced Materials
2017, 29, 1606760.

– 99 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 069
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Interactions of excitons in heterostructure nanocrystal


quantum dots

Doh C. Lee

Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute


of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon, Korea
E-mail: dclee@kaist.edu

Semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots represent an important class of chemically pro-


cessible nanomaterials. Their use in photocatalytic energy conversion and light-emitting ap-
plications has garnered attention, as their moderate synthesis temperature and solution-pro-
cessibility offer opportunities to address constraints on alternative technologies such as
scalability. Additionally, by tuning the size, shape, and composition of colloidal nanocrystals,
we can exploit quantum confinement effects, e.g., the size-tunable energy gap and discrete
energy states. In this presentation, I will discuss new developments that enable (i) spatial sep-
aration of electrons and holes in heterostructure semiconductor nanocrystals for more efficient
photocatalysis and (ii) the study of correlation between structures and visible light emission
in core/shell quantum dots.

Examples of studied photocatalysts include PbSe/CdSe/CdS core/shell/shell nanocrystals


with varying morphologies, e.g., pyramid and tetrapod. By growing metal tips at corners of
the structures, we prepared semiconductor/metal nanojunction and used the nanomaterials as
photocatalysts for reduction of various dyes and water-splitting reaction. Interestingly, the
morphology change leads to drastic differences in photocatalysis. For light-emitting devic-
es, we designed CdSe/CdS core/shell quantum dots and examined their electroluminescence
properties as a function of core/shell dimensions. Our systematic investigation revealed that
the shell thickness plays an important role in overall device performance. For light-emitting
devices, we designed CdSe/CdS core/shell quantum dots and examined their electrolumines-
cence properties as a function of core/shell dimensions. Our systematic investigation revealed
that the shell thickness plays an important role in overall device performance. This discussion
will include the synthesis, characterization, and self-assembly of anisotropic nanomaterials,
e.g., nanorods or nanoplatelets, and the implications in polarized emission.

– 100 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 070
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

New pathways in the synthesis of new 2-dimensional materials


Suela Kellici
Advanced Materials Research Centre, School of Engineering, 103 Borough Road,
London SE1 0AA, UK
E-mail: kellicis@lsbu.ac.uk, website:www.nano2dlab.ac.uk

Two-dimensional (2D) class of materials has attracted tremendous interest from both academia
and industry due to their wealth of remarkable properties occurring as a result of their atomic thick-
ness and infinite lateral dimensions. However, these 2D materials alone do not possess the proper-
ties that are required in a range of technological applications. By simply decorating 2D materials
with nanoparticles opens other possibilities for new and unexpected phenomena.
Our approach for making 2D based nanocom-
posites uses a clean, rapid technology. It potentially
enables new advanced 2D inorganic nanocomposite
functional materials designed and engineered in a
more unique manner by using superheated water
with unusual properties. It utilises a green, rapid and
Continuous Hydrothermal Flow Synthesis (CHFS)
route for synthesis of 2D-inorganic nanocomposites
with superior properties to those currently avail-
able.1-6 This will afford advanced functional mate-
rials with minimal structural and electronic defects.
The CHFS process involves mixing a flow of
supercritical water with a flow of water-soluble pre- Fig. 1 Transmission Electron Microscopy images of a
cursor(s) (generally metal salt/s) to give rapid syn- range of nanomaterials synthesised via CHFS (a)
thesis and controlled growth of nanomaterials in a graphene sheet, (b) graphene quantum dot (inset)
graphene quantum dot solution under UV light
continuous manner. Furthermore, the use of CHFS source (c) Ag-Graphene and (d) Metallic Ag.
represents a highly tunable medium, where compos-
ites can be engineered via process parameters, e.g. with temperature and pressure.

This single step synthetic approach not only enables control over oxidation state of materials
(e.g. graphene), but also offers an optimal route for homogeneously producing and depositing high-
ly crystalline nanostructures into 2D-materials.
References
1) Vaughn, J. Ball, D. Morgan, T. Heil, G. Lampronti. C. Raston, N. Power, S. Kellici (2017)
Chemistry A European Journal, 23 (34), pp. 8128-8133. Frontispiece.
2) S. Kellici, J. Acord, J. Ball, N. P. Power, D. Morgan, P. Coppo, T. Heil, B. Saha (2017), RSC
Adv., 7, pp.14716-14720.
3) S. Kellici, J. Acord, A. Vaughn, N. Power, D. Morgan, T. Heil, S. Facq, G. Lampronti (2016),
ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, 8(29), pp. 19038–19046.
4) R. Saada, S. Kellici, D. Morgan, T. Heil, B. Saha, (2015), Applied Catalysis B: Environmental,
168–169, pp.353-362.
5) V. Middelkoop, C. Tighe, S. Kellici, P. Barnes, J. A. Darr (2014), Journal of Supercritical Fluids,
87, pp. 118-128. Editor’s-in-chief feature article
6) S. Kellici, J. Acord, J. Ball, H. Reehal, D. Morgan, B. Saha (2014) RSC Advances, 4, pp. 14858-
14861.

– 101 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 071
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Regular Speaker

Study of the bismuth oxalates thermal decomposition and the low


melting behavior of resulting bismuth nanoparticles

Pierre Roumanillea,b, Valérie Baco-Carlesb, Corine Bonningueb, Michel Gougeonb,


Benjamin Duployerb, Philippe Monfraixa, Hoa Le Tronga, Philippe Tailhadesb,
a
Institut de Recherche Technologique (IRT) Saint Exupéry, Toulouse, France
b
Institut Carnot Chimie Balard Cirimat, UMR CNRS 5085, Université de Toulouse,
Toulouse, France
E-mail: pierre.roumanille@irt-saintexupery.com

Due to environmental and health concerns, the electronics industry has shifted towards a
limited use of lead. Soldering materials (made of tin, silver, copper, bismuth...) are the subject
of many developments to comply with regulatory and technical requirements. Novel prop-
erties of nanomaterials are promising to offer answers to soldering technology challenges.
Previous work has shown the potential of metal oxalates as precursors of low-temperature
assembly metallic materials for electronics1,2, based on the fact that the melting and sintering
temperatures of nanomaterials decrease with particle size3,4. The thermal decomposition of
metal oxalates under controlled atmosphere leads to the production of metal nanoparticles
with increased reactivity compared to micron-sized materials. This makes it possible to con-
sider low temperature joining processes.

In the development of a new lead-free joining method for electronics, the properties of bis-
muth oxalates and the metal product resulting from their thermal decomposition were studied.
Different varieties of bismuth oxalates were prepared, depending on the chemical precipi-
tation conditions. The temperature behavior of two different compounds was investigated
using thermal analyses, temperature-dependent X-Ray diffraction, scanning and transmission
electron microscopy. In oxygen-poor atmospheres, the thermal decomposition of bismuth ox-
alates leads to nanosized metallic bismuth. The bismuth nanoparticles ability to sinter and
coalesce depends on the residual oxygen content in the heat treatment atmosphere. A partial
oxidation of the metal was noticed in nitrogen while pure bismuth was obtained in hydrogen.
The lowered bismuth melting behavior proved to be strongly related to the particle size. The
bismuth is found to be molten from the beginning of precursor decomposition (around 230°C)
while the melting point of bulk bismuth is 271°C.

References
1) Kiryukhina, K. et al. Silver oxalate-based solders: New materials for high thermal con-
ductivity microjoining. Scr. Mater. 68, 623–626 (2013).
2) Kiryukhina, K. et al. Silver oxalate: towards a new solder material for highly dissipative
electronic assemblies. Int. Symp. Microelectron. 2013, 000836–000841 (2013).
3) Allen, G. L., Bayles, R. A., Gile, W. W. & Jesser, W. A. Small particle melting of pure
metals. Thin Solid Films 144, 297–308 (1986).
4) Olson, E. A., Efremov, M. Y., Zhang, M., Zhang, Z. & Allen, L. H. Size-dependent melt-
ing of Bi nanoparticles. J. Appl. Phys. 97, 034304 (2005).

– 102 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 072
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Regular Speaker

Structural engineering and modification of carbon-based electro-


catalysts for efficient energy conversion

Jianan Zhang, Shiyu Guo, Ying Guo, Xiaoli Zheng, Qun Xu


College of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou
450001, P. R. China
Email: zjn@zzu.edu.cn

Heteroatom doped carbon materials are regarded as most promising substitute for Pt-based
catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). However, understanding and optimizing the
active sites (such as position, species, and contents) in heteroatom doped carbon materials for
ORR is critical but still challenging for developing efficient sustainable energy conversion
devices. Herein, we put forward a novel route involving atomic dispersed trace Co and P on
N co-decorated porous CNT@carbon core@shell interconnected nano-networks architecture
as the obtained electrocatalyst, exhibiting superior ORR electrocatalytic activity both in alka-
line and acidic solutions. In 0.1 M KOH aqueous solution, Co-P,N-CNT displays a distinctly
more positive onset potential (0.916 V) and the half-wave potential of Co-P,N-CNT is 15 mV
more positive than that of Pt/C. Surprisingly, in 0.1 M HClO4 aqueous solution, Co-N,P-CNT
shows a more positive cathodic reduction peak at 0.826 V and onset potential at 0.981 V than
that of Pt/C. The Co-N,P-CNT also show higher current density and better tolerance to metha-
nol and superior durability in both alkaline and acid solution. This work will offer a new route
to design excellent carbon-based catalysts for energy storage and conversion technologies.

Figure a) Schematic illustration of the preparation of Co-P,N-CNT.


b) Atomic scaled Co active sites on Co-P,N-CNT.

– 103 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 073
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Regular Speaker

New cubic phase nanocrystal stability in the IV-VI


monochalcogenide system across known surfaces

Elad Segev1, Uri Argaman2, Ran E. Abutbul1,2, Yuval Golan1,2 and Guy Makov1,2

1
Ilse Katz Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Ben-Gurion University
of the Negev, Beer Sheva 84105, Israel
2
Department of Materials Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev,
BeerSheva 84105, Israel
E-mail: eladsege@post.bgu.ac.il

A new cubic binary phase was recently discovered in the IV-VI monochalcogenides: tin
monosulfide and tin monoselenide. Here, we explored the possible materials nanocrystal
stability across groups IVVI. The structure and properties of this new phase, the π phase,
including mechanical and thermodynamic stability and band gap width in different surfaces,
were studied using density functional theory across the monochalcogenide systems. The band
gaps and surface energies of the new phase in different surfaces (100) and (111) were were
calculated and demonstrated properties which may be attractive for a variety of photovoltaic
and photosensing applications.

– 104 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 074
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Hybrid organic-inorganic materials as precursors for


water splitting electrocatalysts

Rui Zhanga, Patrícia A. Russoa, Nicola Pinnaa

a
Institut für Chemie and IRIS Adlershof, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Brook-
Taylor-Str. 2, 12489 Berlin, Germany
E-mail: nicola.pinna@hu-berlin.de

Efficient water oxidation catalysts are required for the development of water splitting techno-
logies. Herein, we report the synthesis of layered hybrid transition metal phosphonate compounds
from metal acetylacetonate precursors and various phosphonic acid in benzyl alcohol. The hybrid
particles are formed by inorganic layers of divalent transition metals (e.g. Fe, Co, Ni) in distorted
octahedra environments separated by bilayers of the organic group.
These hybrid materials are used as precursors for water splitting electrocatalysts in two ways.
On the one hand, their direct use as anode materials, so as oxygen evolution catalyst, involves
their gradual transformation to hydroxide nanosheets during operation. It is found that the hybrid
particles template the formation in situ of transition metal hydroxide nanosheets of sizes between
5 and 25 nm and thicknesses between 3 and 10 nm.[1]
X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements suggest that the hybrid acts also as a template
for the local structure of the metal sites in the active catalyst, which remain distorted after the
transformation. Optimum electrocatalytic activity is achieved with the hybrid compound with a
Fe content of 16 %. The combination of the synergistic effect between Ni and Fe with the struc-
tural properties of the hybrid results in an efficient catalyst that generates a current density of 10
mA cm-2 at an overpotential of 240 mV, and also in a stable catalyst that operates continuously at
low overpotentials for 160 h.
On the other hand, we report that nickel phosphides can be synthesized through thermal tre-
atment of layered nickel phenyl- (NiPh) or methyl-phosphonates (NiMe) that act as single-source
precursors. Ni12P5, Ni12P5-Ni2P and Ni2P nanoparticles with sizes of ca. 15-45 nm coated with a
thin shell of carbonaceous material were produced.[2] Thermogravimetric analysis coupled with
mass spectrometry (TG-MS) showed that H2, H2O, P2 and –C6H5 are the main compounds formed
during the transformation of the precursor under argon, while no hazard phosphorous-containing
compounds are created, making this a simple and relatively safe route for fabricating nanostructu-
red transition metal phosphides. The H2 most likely reacts with the –PO3 groups of the precursor
to form H2O and P2, and the latter subsequently reacts with the metal to produce the phosphide.
The nickel phosphides nanoparticles efficiently catalyze the hydrogen evolution reaction, with
Ni2P showing the best performance and generating a current density of 10 mA cm-2 at an over-
potential of 87 mV and exhibiting long-term stability. Co2P and CoP NPs were also synthesized
following this method.
All in all, these approaches may be utilized to explore the rich metal-phosphonate chemistry
for fabricating a large variety of nanostructured materials for electrochemical energy conversion
and storage applications.

References
1). R. Zhang et al., Adv. Funct. Mater., 2017, 1703158
2). R. Zhang et al., ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces, 2017, 9 (16), 14013–14022

– 105 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 075
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Continuous catalytic conversion of CO2 to chemical energy carriers

Atsushi Urakawa

Institute of Chemical Research of Catalonia (ICIQ), The Barcelona Institute of Sci-


ence and Technology, Av. Països Catalans 16, 43007 Tarragona, Spain

E-mail: aurakawa@iciq.es

In parallel with the great advances in CO2 capture and sequestration technologies, CO2
utilization and particularly artificial “carbon-recycling” have gained considerable attention
to close the carbon cycle which has presently an open end due to the slowness of converting
CO2 into fossil fuels by natural processes. One of the most promising paths to covert a large
amount of captured CO2 is its catalytic conversion to useful and especially largely demanded
chemicals like fuels. In this presentation, two unique approaches we have chosen for efficient
continuous catalytic conversion of CO2 to chemical fuels will be presented together with
spectroscopic investigation of the catalyst materials under working “operando” conditions.
In the first part, high-pressure approach (up to 500 bar) to synthesize methanol by means
of CO2 hydrogenation to benefit from both kinetics and thermodynamics will be described,
yielding outstanding catalytic performance of >95% CO2 conversion with >98% methanol
selectivity with the highest methanol weight time yield reported to date [1,2]. Also, our at-
tempts to learn about the electronic state of active metal (Cu) by X-ray spectroscopy under
operando, high-pressure and high-temperature, conditions will be described. Furthermore,
operando visual inspection of catalyst and deactivation mechanism will be presented during
the high-pressure synthesis of another CO2 conversion reaction, dimethyl carbonate (DMC)
synthesized from CO2 and methanol over CeO2 using an organic dehydrating agent [3,4]. The
work clearly shows that seeing (visually) is worth more than a number of catalytic tests to
understand and optimize the catalytic process.
In the second part, our recent attempts to combine CO2 capture and reduction processes by
means of unsteady-state operation will be described, targeting at the synthesis of pure syngas
from diluted CO2 (flue gas) [5]. Catalytically active sites and species in the reaction were
elucidated by operando space- and time-resolved DRIFTS, XAFS, and XRD to gain holistic
views on the catalyst nanomaterials and also chemical gradients along the catalyst bed [6].

References
1) A. Bansode, A. Urakawa, J. Catal. (2014) 309, 66-70
2) R. Gaikwad, A. Bansode, A. Urakawa, J. Catal. (2016) 343, 127-132
3) A. Bansode, A. Urakawa, ACS Catal. (2014) 4, 3877-3880
4) D. Stoian, A. Bansode, F. Medina, A. Urakawa, Catal. Today (2017) 283, 2-10
5) L. F. Bobadilla, J. M. Riesco-García, G. Penelás-Pérez, A. Urakawa, J CO2 Util. (2016)
14, 106-111
6) T. Hyakutake, W. van Beek, A. Urakawa, J. Mater. Chem. A (2016) 4, 6878-6885

– 106 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 076
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

N-doped brookite-rutile photocatalysts grown on graphene for wa-


ter remediation under LED visible radiation

Lütfiye Yıldız Ozer, Habeebllah Oladipo, Oluwadamilola Pikuda, Giovanni Palmisano*

Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, Abu Dhabi, PO box 54224,


United Arab Emirates
*Corresponding author: gpalmisano@masdar.ac.ae
This study deals with new composites based on TiO2, the most used photocatalyst due to its efficiency,
harmlessness, low cost and stability, and it aims to tackle (i) low absorbance of visible radiation and (ii)
high recombination of holes and electrons, limiting the effective reactive events for each light photon.
Simultaneous (i) doping with nitrogen, and (ii) coupling with graphene is the approach proposed for the
improvement of the efficiency of TiO2. Brookite/rutile mixed crystals of TiO2 have been prepared, since
they have been recently proved to be efficient catalysts under visible irradiation for water pollutants
treatment. These catalysts were prepared by a sol-gel method in the presence of reduced graphene oxide
(rGO) (obtained by a slight modification of the Hummer’s method). The influence of rGO % (in the 0.1-
2% range) has been studied to check the effects on photocatalyst structure and morphology.
1. Scope
Photocatalysis is a promising technique to alleviate pollution and environmental issues that facilitates
the degradation of organic species in water without the consumption of aggressive oxidizing chemicals.1
The usage of TiO2 has been constrained by the requirement of ultraviolet irradiation for photocatalytic
activation, giving rise to a very low energy efficiency in utilizing solar light. Consequently, modifica-
tion of its electronic structure with nitrogen has been demonstrated as one of the best way to improve
its absorbance of visible radiation, which is the 45% of solar spectrum. Anatase, the most used crystal
phase of TiO2 (band gap: 3.2 eV), is very active in the UV region, while rutile has a narrower band gap
(3.0 eV) than anatase and, coupled with brookite, it can boost charge separation and be active in the
visible light, especially upon nitrogen doping.2 Nitrogen atoms can be incorporated either interstitially
or substitutionally, serving as attraction centers for holes.3 They promote the formation of oxygen vacan-
cies thus enhancing absorption of visible light and reactivity. To the extent of our knowledge, there are
only limited attempts revealed the fabrication of N-doped TiO2 with rGO by a sol-gel route, resulting in
anatase crystalline phase that was not performed for water remediation purposes. In this work, a novel
composite, N-doped brookite-rutile nanoparticles grown in graphene, was synthesized through sol-gel
route to be used for the purpose of water remediation.
2. Results and discussion
XRD diffraction allowed to verify
the successful oxidation of graphite to
graphite oxide by modified Hummer’s
method and graphene oxide (GO) after
exfoliation, and also the reduction of GO
to rGO. In XRD diffractograms of N-TiO2
and N-TiO2/graphene, all the characteris-
tic peaks of brookite and rutile were ob-
served (25.4º, 30.8º, 48.1º for brookite,
and 27.4º, 41.2º, 54.3º, 56.6º, 69.0º for
rutile). In addition, the diffraction peak of
the crystal plane (215) of anatase (75.1o)
was never present in any of the samples. Figure 1. Photoreactivity of N-TiO2/graphene (G) at different-1.
graphene loadings. 4-nitrophenol initial concentration: 5 mg L

– 107 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 077
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Graphene cannot be detected in the XRD of the composite materials, since its percentage is far below
the detection limit of XRD.
In Raman spectra of the composite materials, brookite signals at ca. 149 (A1g), 247 (A1g), 321 (B1g),
366 (B2g), 405 (A1g), 448 (B2g), and 636 (A1g) cm-1, and rutile signals corresponding to A1g, Eg and B1g,
at 127, 440 and 612 cm-1, were all observed. A broad band around 1600 cm-1 highlighter the presence
of graphene in the composite semiconductors; however, the bands around 1350 cm-1 and 2700 cm-1
were not visible, indicating that rGO was reduced to graphene during the sol-gel preparation of the
composite material.
All the composite samples gave a type IV hysteresis in BET hisotherms with a mesoporous features
(ranging from 2.9 to 30 nm), highlighting capillary condensation inside pores. The specific surface
area was similar for all samples (50-57 m2/g), with the lowest end values characterizing the composite
samples, which had wider pores compared to N-TiO2.
The morphology and microstructure of the samples were investigated by TEM. The nanoparticles
were found to grow on graphene islands with dimensions ranging from ca. 100 to 1000 nm, and a good
contact among rutile, brookite and graphene allowed for an efficient charge transfer and separation of
electrons and holes.
The photoluminescence emission spectra of the composite catalysts were charactgerized by one
peak at ca. 420 nm, which was attributed to the band-to-band transition of electrons from CB to
VB. The photoluminescence emission intensities decreased with the contemporaneous N-doping and
introduction of graphene, indicating that the recombination of charge carriers on the surface of the
catalysts was inhibited compared to bare TiO2 and N-TiO2.4
The optical properties of the composites were characterized by UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spec-
troscopy: coupling N-TiO2 with graphene slightly fostered the ability of samples to absorb visible
radiation.
In terms of activity in the removal of 4-nitrophenol from water, the study showed that 1% loading
of graphene enhanced the efficiency of degradation of 4-nitrophenol. However, a further increase
leads to the loss of some activity owing to agglomeration, which diminishes the exposed catalytic sites
and the chemical interaction between 4-nitrophenol and the nanoparticles, also creating recombina-
tion centers for electrons and holes. As control experiments, Evonik P25 and mixtures of commercial
rutile and brookite were used for the same runs and there was no reactivity given the low energy of
the use LED radiation (λ>425nm).
3. Conclusions
This study demonstrates that the contemporary N-doping and growth of brookite-rutile on 1%
graphene can give rise to high efficiency in the removal of a model pollutant (4-nitrophenol) from
water through adsorption and photodegradation under UV-free visible radiation. The two-dimension-
al graphene in the composite material (1) extends the light absorption threshold and (2) subdues the
charge recombination. π-conjugation of graphene can play a major role in this, pointing to the suitabil-
ity of this modified semiconductor for water remediation.
Acknowledgements
Abu Dhabi Education Council is gratefully acknowledged for 2015 Award for Research Excellence
(EX2016-000005).
References
1. G. Palmisano, M. Addamo, V. Augugliaro, T. Caronna, A. Di Paola, E. G. López, V. Loddo, G.
Marcì, L. Palmisano, M. Schiavello, Catal. Today 2007, 122, 118–127.
2. O. Diwald, T. L. Thompson, T. Zubkov, S. D. Walck, J. T. Yates, J. Phys. Chem. B 2004, 108,
6004–6008.
3. O. Pikuda, C. Garlisi, G. Scandura, G. Palmisano, J. Catal 2017, 346, 109–116.
4. M. Aliofkhazraei, N. Ali, W. I. (William I.) Milne, C. S. Ozkan, S. Mitura, J. L. Gervasoni,
Graphene Science Handbook. Fabrication Methods,CRC Press, 2016.

– 108 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 033
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Regular Speaker

Investigation of the electronic and structural properties of g-C3N4-


based photocatalysts for enhanced H2 generation

Elton M Dias,a Konstantinos C. Christoforidisa and Camille Petita,*


a
Barrer Centre, Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London,
South
Kensington Campus, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ, UK
E-mail: camille.petit@imperial.ac.uk

The progressive depletion of fossil fuels and the negative environmental impact caused
by their use, dictate the development of technologies suitable to provide clean and renewable
energy. In this regard, photocatalytic processes, using semiconductors for the production
of H2 from water splitting, could be a sustainable alternative approach to meet the future
energy demands. Among the different catalysts developed, graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4)
has emerged as a promising material owing to its inherent properties, such as chemical and
thermal stability, metal-free nature, and visible-light catalytic activity. The polymeric nature
of g-C3N4 makes it an ideal platform for structural and chemical modifications, morphology
control and electronic properties tuning. This aspect is critical for the design of a photocatalyst
with enhanced performance for a given application.
In this work, we have investigated the effect of a post-synthesis thermal treatment on the
structural, electronic and photocatalytic properties of g-C3N4. The materials were tested as
photocatalysts for H2 production from water splitting under UV-Vis as well as pure visible
light irradiation. Their performance was compared to that of the untreated material. The
materials were characterized using an extensive array of characterization techniques, as a way
to understand the enhancement enabled by the thermal treatment. It was found that proper
control of the synthesis process and particularly the thermal treatment allows tuning of the
textural and most importantly the electronic properties of the material. In turn, those features
influence light absorption and charge separation, thereby enhancing the overall H2 evolution
reaction. The improved stability of the photogenerated charges seems to be the parameter that
controls photoactivity.

– 109 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 078
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Regular Speaker

Nanostructures as highly active electrocatalysts for electrochemi-


cal water splitting

Jooyoung Lee and Byungkwon Lim*

School of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University


(SKKU), Suwon 16419, Republic of Korea
E-mail:ljy5424@skku.edu and blim@skku.edu

Hydrogen is green and renewable energy resource with specific energy density that can re-
place the role of fossil fuel energy. Electrochemical water splitting, which is the general term
of a chemical reaction in which water is separated into oxygen and hydrogen, is an efficient
way to make high purity hydrogen. It is composed of two half reactions which are hydrogen
and oxygen evolution reaction (HER and OER). Development of efficient catalysts for the
HER and OER is important in enhancing electrochemical water splitting activity.
In this study, we synthesized nickel hydroxide [Ni(OH)2] nanosheets on the surface of
the Ni foam by corroding Ni foam in an aqueous solution. When corroded in an aqueous
solution in the presence of ruthenium chloride (RuCl3), the nanostructured surface composed
of Ni(OH)2 nanosheets decorated with ultrasmall ruthenium oxide (RuO2) nanoparticles was
obtained. We have enabled the preparation of Ni(OH)2-based, nanostructured surfaces that
exhibit higher performance as electrocatalysts for water splitting than Pt catalysts.1)
We also describes a simple, aqueous-phase route to the synthesis of hydrous RuO2 nanopar-
ticles and their conversion into crystalline RuO2 nanoparticles via an annealing process. We
exhibited that hydrous RuO2 nanoparticles have the highest activity for HER and crystalline
RuO2 nanoparticles have the highest activity for OER among the synthesized nanomaterials.
The combination of hydrous and crystalline RuO2 nanoparticles enabled to achieve highly
efficient overall water splitting.2)

References

1). J. Lee, G.-H. Lim, B. Lim, Chem. Phys. Lett. 644 (2016) 51–55.
2) . J. Lee, S. A. S. Shah, P. J. Yoo, B. Lim, Chem. Phys. Lett. 673 (2017) 89–92.

– 110 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 079
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

3D GaN nanoarchitectures: from vertical electronics


to multi-sensor platforms
Hutomo Suryo Wasisto1,2,*, Jan Gülink1,2,3, Steffen Bornemann1,2,3, Shinta Mariana1,2, Nur-
sidik Yulianto1,2,4, Feng Yu1,2, Klaas Strempel1,2,3, Muhammad Fahlesa Fatahilah1,2, Tony
Granz1,2, Nicolai Markiewicz1,2,6, Gregor Scholz1,2, Iqbal Syamsu1,2,5, Daria Bezshlyakh1,2,
Wenze Wu1,2, Jana Hartmann1,2,3, Hao Zhou1,2, Joan Daniel Prades6, Andreas Waag1,2,3
1
Institute of Semiconductor Technology (IHT), Technische Universität Braunschweig,
Braunschweig, Germany
2
Laboratory of Emerging Nanometrology (LENA), Technische Universität Braunschweig,
Braunschweig, Germany
3
Epitaxy Competence Center (ec2), Technische Universität Braunschweig, Braunschweig,
Germany
4
Research Center for Physics, Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI), Tangerang Selatan,
Indonesia
5
Research Center for Electronics and Telecommunication, Indonesian Institute of Sciences
(LIPI), Bandung, Indonesia
6
MIND-IN2UB, Department of Engineering - Electronics, University of Barcelona, Barcelo-
na, Spain
* E-mail: h.wasisto@tu-braunschweig.de; Phone: +49 531 391 3167

3D GaN nanostructures with vertical architecture, well-controlled geometry, and high aspect ratio
have been becoming more attractive nowadays because they are expected to be an exciting new route
towards extending the freedom for device design in GaN technology. Such building blocks offer large
surfaces, defect free high-quality material, non-polar surface orientations, and the option to use very
large area foreign substrates without implementing large area strain. All these aspects are difficult to
be obtained in planar thin film approaches. To fabricate vertical 3D GaN nanoarrays, both bottom-up
and top-down methods involving different nanolithography techniques can be employed offering good
homogeneity [1-4]. Additionally, 3D processing needs to be developed to integrate them into nanode-
vices for various optoelectronic sensing and electronics applications (e.g., biomedical/chemical sensors
and vertical transistors). By adjusting the orientations, width and pitch of the hole/line openings, and
the growth/etching parameters, different structural qualities can be evolved. In terms of the geometry,
nanofins potentially offer more advantages than vertical nanowires as they can reduce edge effects,
have a higher gain in effective area and be much easier accessible for material analysis [4]. The MOC-
VD growth and hybrid etching results for both nanofin and nanowire structures will be compared, 3D
processing will be described, and experimental results of the developed nanodevices will be presented.

References
1) F. Yu, S. Yao, F. Römer, B. Witzigmann, T. Schimpke, M. Strassburg, A. Bakin, H.W. Schumacher,
E. Peiner, H.S. Wasisto, A. Waag, GaN nanowire arrays with nonpolar sidewalls for vertically
integrated field-effect transistors. Nanotechnology 28(9) (2017) 095206.
2) T. Granz, S. Mariana, G. Hamdana, F. Yu, M.F. Fatahilah, I.M. Clavero, P. Puranto, Z. Li, U. Brand,
J.P. Prades, E. Peiner, A. Waag, H.S. Wasisto, Nanofabrication of vertically aligned 3D GaN na-
nowire arrays with sub-50 nm feature sizes using nanosphere lift-off lithography. Multidisciplinary
Digital Publishing Institute Proceedings 1(4) (2017) 309.
3) J. Hartmann, X. Wang, H. Schuhmann, W. Dziony, L. Caccamo, J. Ledig, M.S. Mohajerani, T.
Schimpke, M. Bähr, G. Lilienkamp, W. Daum, M. Seibt, M. Straßburg, H.-H. Wehmann, A. Waag,
Growth mechanisms of GaN microrods for 3D core–shell LEDs: The influence of silane flow. Phy-
sica Status Solidi (a) 212(12) (2015) 2830-2836.
4) J. Hartmann, F. Steib, H. Zhou, J. Ledig, L. Nicolai, S. Fündling, T. Schimpke, A. Avramescu, T.
Varghese, A. Trampert, M. Straßburg, H.-J. Lugauer, H.-H. Wehmann, A. Waag, Study of 3D-growth
conditions for selective area MOVPE of high aspect ratio GaN fins with non-polar vertical sidewalls.
Journal of Crystal Growth 476 (2017) 90-98.

– 111 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 080
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Regular Speaker

Size selective optical and photocatalytical properties of silicon car-


bide nanoparticles

David Bekea, Tibor Z. Jánosib, Klaudia Horvátha, János Erostyákb,


Katalin Kamarása, Adam Galia,

a
Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics,
Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary
b
University of Pécs, Institute of Physics, Pécs, Hungary
E-mail: beke.david@winger.mta.hu

Silicon carbide (SiC) is a stable, chemically inert wide band gap indirect semiconductor, and a
promising new material for bioimaging, targeted drug delivery, nanosensing, optoelectronic and
for heterogeneous photocatalysis as well, especially in nano size. Biocompatibility of bulk SiC
and SiC nanoparticles (NPs) has been proven by several research teams and the aqueous solutions
of SiC nanocrystals are exceedingly promising candidates to realize bioinert nonperturbative fluo-
rescent nanoparticles for in vivo bioimaging[1], thus the identification of their luminescent centres
is of immediate interest. SiC NPs also has intermittently been investigated as a photocatalytic
material candidate to generate organic fuels from CO2, to promote photoreduction, to produce
hydrogen from water, or to decompose organic pollutants.
Such a huge variety in promising applications is seeking the needs of the complex understand-
ing of SiC nanosystems. We synthesized SiC-NPs with different size close to the exciton Bohr ra-
dius to study how size affects optical and photocatalytic activity exactly when energy levels trans-
form from continuous to discrete states[2] and we found remarkable changes in both behaviours.
Small, molecular-sized particles own surface related, size independent optical properties have
been identified by applying time resolved emission spectroscopy. To achieve that, a new method
is developed to find spectrally overlapping emission species by studying surface engineered sili-
con carbide (SiC) colloids. We showed that decay associated spectra can be reconstructed even for
such complex systems and resolution of emission centres with emission wavelength differences
less than 20 nm is feasible[3]. With this method, two emission centres were identified: surface
groups involving carbon–oxygen bonds and a defect related localized emission centre from sili-
con–oxygen bonds.
Molecular sized SiC NPs luminesce, while larger particles have bulk-like band structures with
small emission probability, however not only the emission properties are changing with size. SiC NPs
with size below the exciton Bohr radius show negligible photocatalytic activity, while larger particles
become active, stating the importance of the NPs size relative to the exciton Bohr radius. Interestingly
the combination of smaller and larger particles shows enhanced photochemical efficiency.
Our results highlight the importance of the size of SiC NPs below 10 nm and demonstrate that
fine tuning of the size and the surface can make such particles applicable in very different areas.

References:
1) D. Beke, Z. Szekrényes, D. Pálfi, G. Róna, I. Balogh, P. A. Maák, G. Katona, Z. Czigány, K. Ka-
marás, B. Rózsa, et al., J. Mater. Res. 2013, 28, 205–209.
2) D. Beke, Z. Szekrényes, Z. Czigány, K. Kamarás, Á. Gali, Nanoscale 2015, 7, 10982–10988.
3) D. Beke, T. Z. Jánosi, B. Somogyi, D. Á. Major, Z. Szekrényes, J. Erostyák, K. Kamarás, A. Gali,
J. Phys. Chem. C 2016, 120, 685–691.

– 112 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 081
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Hybrid Si nanowires for optoelectronic applications


Muhammad Y. Bashouti

Jacob Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research, Sede Boqer Campus, Environmental
Physical and Solar Energy department, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev,
8499000 Sede Boqer, Israel
Email: Bashouti@bgu.ac.il

Abstract
Nanowires (NWs) are a promising candidate for the realization of highly integrated electronic,
photonic and optoelectronic devices as well as for fundamental studies in natural sciences.
The lecture will be divided into three parts: (i) Realizing semiconducting NWs, in particular,
we will show bottom-up vapor–liquid solid growth as well as a top-down approach by wet
and dry etching, (ii) Chemical surface functionalization and optoelectronic characterization,
and (iii) NWs integration into device prototypes. Remarkably, as the dimensions are scaled
down, the surface and interface area of NWs become more critical – to the level that they
might control the whole NW opto-electronic properties. It is therefore essential to understand
the surface properties and charge exchange between the NW surfaces and their bulk on a
microscopic level. In particular, we show molecular approach to modify the NW surfaces
through covalent bonds related electronics. The main analytical tool adopted in our research
towards this goal is photoelectron spectroscopy and kelvin probe. Band diagrams will be
extracted from based on this analysis and correlated with electrical and material properties
of the NWs. Along this route, we have developed a new surface doping technique in contrast
to the conventional doping approach (doping via Boron or Phosphorus to obtain p and n type
respectively). Our technique based on a combination of work function engineering and phys/
chem adsorption of appropriate dopant molecules (organometallic complexes) at the surface.
The perspectives of our results for NW based devices, specifically with respect to efficiency
enhancement of field effect transistors and hybrid solar-cells will be discussed.

– 113 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 082
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Regular Speaker

Anodic aluminum oxide pattern-dependent surface antireflec-


tion nanostructures for light extraction efficiency enhancement of
LEDs
Tangyou Suna, Pedro Alpuima,b, Paulo Peixeiro Freitasa,
a
INL – International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, 4715-330, Braga, Portugal
b
CFUM – Centre of Physics of the University of Minho, 4710-057, Braga, Portugal
Email: Tangyou.sun@inl.int

Self-organized anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) nanostructure has attracted extensive atten-
tions due to size tunable (20-500 nm), large area uniformity (> 2 inch) and simple electro-
chemical anodizing fabrication processes1). In our previous work, we introduced a 2-inch
AAO template to pattern the surface of a GaN based LED and obtained 11.4% enhancement
of light extraction efficiency2). Here we use finite difference time domain (FDTD) method to
study more detailed about the structure dependent enhancement from AAO transferred pat-
tern. Surface nanostructures present much higher antireflection (AR) performance compared
to conventional AR coating because of the angle-independent property of nano-arrays, as
shown from the simulation results of figure (a). Usually, the self-organized AAO nanostruc-
ture has a non-regular pore distribution. In order to study the influence of such non-regularity,
we simulated the enhancements from regular and non-regular nano-arrays as shown in figure
(b), the results revealed that the regularity is not crucial for the application of AAO nanostruc-
tures. Furthermore, by controlling the parameters during dry etching, it´s possible to change
the sidewall profile of transferred nanostructures. Thus, we also studied the relationship be-
tween enhancement and nanostructure sidewall profile and drew conclusions for optimization.
We are planning to apply above results for quantum dots based thin film LED, till now we
have had a working QDLED (figure (c)) waiting for further enhancement study.

References
1). H. Masuda, K. Fukuda, Science 268 (1995) 1466-1468.
2). T. Y. Sun, Z. M. Xu, H. F. Xu, et al., J. Lightwave Technol. 32 (2014) 326-332.

– 114 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 083
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Regular Speaker

Structural modification and improved electron emission in few


layers of graphene using ion induced irradiation
Himani Sharmaa, A. K. Shuklab, D. K. Avasthic, V. D. Vankarb
Department of Physics, SoPS Doon University, Dehradun-248001,
a

Thin Film Laboratory, Department of Physics, IITD, Hauz Khas, New


b

Delhi-110016,
c
Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067,
India
E-mail: hsharma.ph@doonuniversity.ac.in

The advent of carbon nanostructures created the huge interest in the scientific world. The
carbon nanostructures are molecular-scale materials of graphitic carbon with stupendous stru-
ctural, electrical, optical and mechanical properties.1 The recently discovered graphene, is the
monolayer of carbon atoms that are tightly packed into a two-dimensional (2D) honeycomb
lattice and is projected as the mother of all carbon allotropes. Few and multilayered-layered
graphene, which are composed of several individual graphene layers, are now also under in-
tensive investigation and are found to be a good electron emitter. The sharp edges of graphene
can emit electrons by the application of an external electric field2. The electron emission pro-
perty of graphene can be improved by various post treatments such as metal or metal oxide
doping etc. One of the means to modify the structure of graphene and hence its electron emis-
sion properties is ion irradiation. In the present study, we have grown few graphitic layers by
MPECVD system. The high energy irradiation was carried out using 100 MeV silver (Ag) ion
beam at IUAC Pelletron accelerator. These studies were carried out at five different fluences
varied 1 x 1011 ions/cm2 to 2 x 1014 ions/cm2. The structural studies of graphene were carried
out using high resolution transmission electron microscope. The number of graphene layers
in the structure was confirmed by ID/IG and I2D/IG ratio taken using micro Raman spectroscopy
with an excitation source of 514.5 nm. The electron emission studies were carried out using
diode set up, with the anode and cathode distance of 300 µm. It is found that the turn on (Eon)
value for as deposited sample is 2.5 V/µm, which improves on irradiation for 1 x 1011 ions/
cm2 and 1 x 1012 ions/cm2 fluences (2.0 and 2.2 V/µm), respectively. The improved emission
properties can be related to modified localized density of states due to irradiation, thereby
affecting the local work function of graphene layers. However, these values increases for
high dose of irradiation (2 x 1014 ions/cm2) to 3.4 and 3.7 V/µm, confirming damage in the
graphene layers.

References

1). Chau, et al. Nat. Mater. 5 (2017) 810-812.


2). Sharma, et al. J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 46 (2013) 315301-315308.

– 115 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 084
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Surface modified hematite and silicon for photoelectrochemical


water splitting

Shaohua Shen*

International Research Center for Renewable Energy (IRCRE), State Key Labora-
tory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering (MFPE), Xi’an Jiaotong University
(XJTU), 28 West Xianning Road, Xi’an 710049, People’s Republic of China
E-mail: shshen_xjtu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

Solar hydrogen conversion via photoelectrochemical water splitting is an important tech-


nology for energy and environment sustainability. Since the pioneering work of Fujishima and
Honda in 1972, tremendous research on semiconductor-based photoelectrochemical water
splitting has yielded better understanding of the processes as well as encouraging develop-
ment of high efficiency photoelectrodes for solar hydrogen generation. In this talk, some re-
cent progresses in heterostructures of α-Fe2O3 and p-Si for photoelectrochemical solar water
splitting in our group will be introduced.
Given the narrow band gap enabling excellent optical absorption, increased charge carrier
density and accelerated surface oxidation reaction kinetics become the key points for im-
proved photoelectrochemical performances for water splitting over α-Fe2O3 photoanodes. By
engineering the surface structures of α-Fe2O3 nanorods with AgxFe2-xO3, TiO2 and HfO2
overlayers, the surface charge recombination was greatly inhibited and the surface water ox-
idation kinetics were efficiently accelerated, resulting in remarkable enhancement in PEC
water splitting performances.
p-Si has captured intensive attentions for solar hydrogen conversion due to its high natural
abundance and narrow band gap (~1.1 eV). However, the slow charge-transfer kinetics at the
p-Si/electrolyte interface lead to large overpotentials for hydrogen evolution and electrocata-
lysts are always necessary. Recently, we successfully engineered the surface energetics of p-Si
with n-WO3 overlayer and Ni molecular complexes, which gave rise to a great anodic shift of
up to 300 mV in onset potential for photocathodic water reduction.

– 116 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 085
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Boosting photocatalysis for energy applications:


A materials point of view

Fernando Fresno, Patricia Reñones, Laura Collado, Mariam Barawi,


Ignacio J. Villar-García, Víctor A. de la Peña O´Shea.

Photoactivated Processes Unit, IMDEA Energy Institute, Avda. Ramón de la Sagra


3, Móstoles Technology Park, 28935 Móstoles (Madrid), Spain
E-mail: fernando.fresno@imdea.org

The scientific relevance of energy-related photocatalytic processes, namely hydrogen production and
CO2 reduction, has significantly grown in recent years, although the current state-of-the-art efficiencies
are still far from those required for a practical application [1]. Photocatalyst materials, able to absorb
light, manage photo-generated charge carriers and transfer them to substrate molecules, play the central
role in the reasearch aimed at increasing these efficiencies [2]. Thus, different synthetic strategies or
modifications of photocatalytic materials have been developed in the last years, including band structure
engineering, metal and non-metal doping and deposition of metal nanoparticles, with the aim of modify-
ing their textural, structural, charge management and optoelectronic properties. Metal nanoparticles can
act as co-catalysts by promoting bond formation in products, facilitating the charge transfer to reactants
and even changing the selectivity of the reaction. In addition, enhanced light harvesting can be attained
if the surface plasmon resonance effect is taken advantage of. Another approach is the use of heterojunc-
tions, which can boost photoactivity through different pathways. Provided that their relative band posi-
tions are adequate, the combination of different semiconductors can lead to a physical separation of the
photogenerated charge carriers, increasing their lifetime and facilitating their transfer to adsorbed mol-
ecules. Furthermore, an extension of the activity of UV-absorbing oxides towards the visible is possible
via the so-called inorganic sensitisation. In addition, surface modifcations induced by the incoporation
of a second oxide can enhance the adsorptive properties of the system.
In this work, we will summarise the activities developed at the Photoactivated Processes Unit of
the IMDEA Energy Institute on the use of single- and bi-component systems, composed of inorganic
semiconductor oxides and metal nanoparticles, as photocatalysts for hydrogen production and CO2 con-
version. For that purpose, a bottom-up approach from simpler to more complex photocatalytic systems
will be employed. TiO2 is chosen as the base material to build the hybrid systems. In addition, alternative
photocatalysts like ZnO, NaNbO3, NaTaO3 and modifications of them, obtained by either solid-state of
hydrothermal syntheses, have been explored [3, 4]. The incorporation of metal nanoparticles (Pt, Au,
Ag) to these oxides results in enhanced activity or selectivity, depending on the nature of the materials
and the target reaction [5]. Besides, TiO2/oxide heterojunctions based on La2O3 and In2O3 have been ex-
plored resulting in modified selectivities and/or enhanced overall activities compared to bare titania [6].
These modifications offer promising pathways to advance in artificial photosynthetic systems.

References
1). G. A. Ozin, Adv. Mater. 27 (2015) 1957−1963.
2). J. Su, L. Vayssieres, ACS Energy Lett. 1 (2016) 121−135.
3). J. Núñez, F. Fresno, A. E. Platero-Prats, P. Jana, J. L. G. Fierro, J. M. Coronado, D. P. Serrano, V.
A. de la Peña O’Shea, ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces 8 (2016) 23729−23738.
4). F. Fresno, P. Jana, P. Reñones, J. M. Coronado, D. P. Serrano, V. A. de la Peña O’Shea, Photochem.
Photobiol. Sci. 16 (2017) 17–23.
5) L. Collado, A. Reynal, J.M. Coronado, D.P. Serrano, J.R. Durrant, V. A. de la Peña O‘Shea, Appl.
Catal. B: Environ. 178 (2015) 177.
6) P. Reñones, F. Fresno, J. L. G. Fierro, V. A. de la Peña O‘Shea, Top. Catal. (2017), DOI: 10.1007/
s11244-017-0797-x

– 117 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 086
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited Speaker

Catalyst and reactor design for PEM-based water electrolysis


and electrolysis-assisted hydrogenation

Atsushi Urakawa

Institute of Chemical Research of Catalonia (ICIQ), The Barcelona Institute of Sci-


ence and Technology, Av. Països Catalans 16, 43007 Tarragona, Spain

E-mail: aurakawa@iciq.es

Hydrogen production by water electrolysis is expected to play central roles in sustainable future
development path of mankind by catalyzing the installation of low-carbon technologies (e.g. synthesis
of hydrogen from renewable sources and its reaction with CO2) and as a mean to store intermittent
electricity derived from natural sources in the form of chemical energy. Still there are several techno-
logical challenges and among them the use of highly precious metals as electrode catalysts has been
widely pointed out.
In the first part of the presentation, our recent efforts in finding alternative electrode materials
and greatly reducing the amount of precious metal are presented. In the quest for alternative cathode
materials, a popular hydro-treating catalyst, molybdenum disulphide (MoS2), has been found to be
promising for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) [1]. Two types of MoS2-carbon composites, (i)
physical mixture of MoS2 and carbon black (Vulcan) and (ii) MoS2 supported on reduced graphene
oxide (RGO), were examined. Among the MoS2-based materials tested, 47 wt% MoS2/Vulcan gave
the best performance in terms of current density at an encouraging level for practical application. Fur-
thermore, we have found that Co3O4 is also a promising HER catalyst and its dynamic redox behavior
was studied by operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy [2]. Also, a unique anode material, highly
dispersed IrO2 nanomaterials in the matrix of Al2O3, prepared by solution combustion synthesis will
be presented [3].
In the second part, our recent attempts to utilize the unique catalytic interface of cathode for hydroge-
nation reaction is presented taking water denitrification as an example. Last years, nitrate (NO3-) removal
from waste water has attracted considerable attention because intake of the anion could cause human
health problems. Several physical-chemical denitrification strategies have been employed including re-
verse osmosis, ion exchange, and biological denitrification among others, but with practical issues. Cata-
lytic hydrogenation has been considered as one of the most effective methods for the reduction of nitrate
to nitrogen. The major problem of the approach is the usage, storage, and infrastructure needed for hy-
drogen gas that is dissolved in the aqueous solution containing nitrate ion, besides poor N2 selectivity in
some cases. In the light of these backgrounds, electrochemical and electrolysis-assisted nitrate reduction
is a promising approach due to possible process simplicity and the generation of H2 or H+ used for nitrate
reduction in situ by electrolysis of water. We demonstrate, for the first time, electrolysis-assisted nitrate
reduction operated in a continuous-flow mode, using metallic and bimetallic nanoparticles supported
on tin oxide as cathode catalysts and its promising performance. Furthermore, the electrolysis-assisted
reaction mode was combined with photocatalytic process to improve the product selectivity to N2 [4].

References
1) T. Corrales-Sánchez, J. Ampurdanés, A. Urakawa, Int. J. Hydrogen Energ. (2014) 39, 20837
2) J. Ampurdanés, M. G. Chourashiya, A. Urakawa, in preparation
3) M. G. Chourashiya, A. Urakawa, J. Mater. Chem. A (2017) 5, 4774
4) J. Ampurdanés, A. Urakawa, in preparation

– 118 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 087
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Invited / On behalf of

Light induced H2 evolution


on metal oxide nanosheet

Takayoshi Oshimaa, b, Kazuhiko Maedaa,

a
Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-
1-NE-2, Ookayama Meguro-ku, Tokyo, Japan
b
Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Kojimachi Business Center Building,
5-3-1 Kojimachi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, Japan
E-mail: maedak@chem.titech.ac.jp

Water splitting driven by light energy over photocatalyst produces clean energy carrier of
hydrogen, which is regarded as one of ultimate solutions for energy crisis and environmental
problems caused by our huge consumption of fossil fuels. Metal oxide nanosheet, which is
produced by exfoliation of layered metal oxide has drawn attention as photocatalyst because
of its high efficiency for hydrogen evolution in the presence of sacrificial reagents1). However,
water splitting has remained challenging for nanosheet materials. One of the reasons is the
lack of an appropriate method to deposit cocatalyst, which promotes surface redox reaction
at the surface of photocatalysts. In this work, we developed a new method to prepare metal
nano–cluster in the interlayer space of restacked nanosheets and it was applied to water split-
ting reaction.
Pt was deposited on KCa2Nb3O10 restacked nanosheets based on electrostatic interaction
between negatively charged nanosheets and a cationic Pt precursor. An aqueous solution
containing an appropriate amount of [Pt(NH3)4]Cl2 was added dropwise to a suspension of
Ca2Nb3O10– nanosheets stabilized by tetra(n–butyl)ammonium cation (TBA+), followed by
stirring one day to allow Pt precursor to adsorb on nanosheet. The resulting nanosheets were
restacked by adding KOH aqueous solution and the produced restacked nanosheets were died,
heated at 473 K under H2 atmosphere to convert Pt precursor to active Pt species.
XRD measurement demonstrated that the diffraction peaks assignable to 002 plane, which
is stacking direction, were shifted to lower two theta direction as the amount of Pt was in-
creased from 0 to 5 wt%. The peak shift indicated an expansion of 002 plane distance ac-
cording to Bragg’s law, suggesting that Pt species were deposited in the interlayer space of
KCa2Nb3O10 restacked nanosheets. The size of deposited Pt was observed by transmission
electron microscopy. Highly dispersed and very fine Pt species were observed, the size of
which is mostly less than 1 nm. In the present method, Pt precursor was presumed to be con-
fined in the interlayer space. Such a sterically restricted environment was likely to inhibited Pt
precursor from aggregating, resulting in the formation of very small Pt species. Water splitting
reaction was carried out and simultaneous evolution of H2 and O2 was observed with almost
stoichiometric ratio (H2/O2 ≈ 2). To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest activity of
water splitting among nanosheet-based photocatalysts, presumably because well dispersed
and small sized Pt particles.

References
1). Maeda K. et al., Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 53 (2014) 13164–13168

– 119 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 088
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Regular Speaker

Metal oxide and metal carbides thin films for photo/electrochemi-


cal water splitting studies

S. Emin

Materials Research Labortaory, University of Nova Gorica, Slovenia


E-mail: saim.emin@ung.si

We used wet-chemistry techniques to prepare colloidal tungsten (W) nanoparticles (NPs).


The synthesis of W NPs was conducted using the so called hot-matrix method in 1-octadecene
[1]. The sizes of obtained W NPs are in the order of 2 - 5 nm. These W NPs are coated with
hydrophobic molecules which allow their dispersion in organic solvents like choloroform
(CHCl3). It was found that the colloidal stability of the dispersions is exceptionally high ex-
ceeding several years. The stability of W NPs which prevents coagulation allows the prepara-
tion of thin films with uniform thicknesses by spin-coating, inkjet-printing and spray coating.
We have prepared both tungsten trioxide (WO3) and tungsten carbide (W2C, WC) thin
films. The preparation of WO3 thin films was achieved by spin-coating of W NPs on fluorine
doped tin oxide (FTO) glass substrates and following thermal treatment in air at 500°C. The
preparation of W2C and WC were done after spin-coating of W NPs on graphite substrate and
following heat treatment under Ar atmosphere at 1000 and 1450°C.
The obtained WO3 and W2C (e.g WC) films were used both in photo/electrochemical water
splitting studies. In conclusion, we have developed a procedure for the synthesis of W NPs
which can be used for the preparation of different class of materials for water splitting studies.

References

1) S. Emin*, M. de Respinis, M. Fanetti, W. Smith, M. Valant, B. Dam, Appl. Catal. B: En-


vironment 166-167 (2015) 406-412.

– 120 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 089
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Poster

WO3/g-C3N4 composites: One-pot preparation and enhanced pho-


tocatalytic H2 production under visible-light irradiation

Jinwen Shi*, Cheng Cheng, Liejin Guo

International Research Center for Renewable Energy (IRCRE), State Key Labora-
tory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering (MFPE), Xi’an Jiaotong University
(XJTU), 28 West Xianning Road, Xi’an 710049, People’s Republic of China
E-mail: jinwen_shi@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

Photocatalytic water splitting under solar irradiation to produce clean and renewable H2
energy has been considered to be one of the most promising strategies to solve the deepening
global problems of energy crisis and environmental pollution. Development of the desired
photocatalyst is recognized as the key factor in the above solar-to-hydrogen conversion pro-
cess and graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) is considered to be one of the most promising
candidates. However, the photocatalytic activity of pristine g-C3N4 was usually limited by the
high recombination rate of photogenerated electron−hole pairs. Construction of WO3/g-C3N4
composites was reported to be an effective strategy to improve the photocatalytic activity of
g-C3N4 for H2 evolution. However, almost all the reported WO3/g-C3N4 composite photocata-
lysts were prepared by complex and multi-step methods to the best of our knowledge.
Herein, a facile one-pot pyrolysis method was developed to prepare WO3/g-C3N4 compos-
ites, which showed notably enhanced visible-light-driven photocatalytic H2-evolution activ-
ities, with the highest rate 15.0 times of that for pristine g-C3N4. During the one-pot pyroly-
sis process, accompanied by the pyrolysis of melamine to form g-C3N4, (NH4)2WS4 played
bifunctional roles, i.e., W precursor and pore-forming agent, to form WO3 on g-C3N4 and to
change the textural properties of g-C3N4. The enhancement of photocatalytic activities was
mainly attributed to the optimized Z-scheme system constructed by WO3 and g-C3N4 and the
favorable textural properties (increased surface area and pore volume) of g-C3N4. This work
presented an effective route to simultaneously optimize the phase compositions and textural
structures of photocatalysts for enhanced H2 evolution.

References

1). Shi et al., Nanotechnology 28 (2017) 164002.

– 121 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 090
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Poster

Effect of pH on the complex formation of SiC nanoparticle and


BSA molecule

Dániel Áron Major 1, Gabriella Dravecz 2, David Beke 1,2, Katalin Kamarás 2,
Ádám Gali 2,3

1
Faculty of Chemical Technology and Biotechnology, Budapest University of Tech-
nology and Economics, Műegyetem rakpart 3., H-1111 Budapest, Hungary
2
Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics,
Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest, Hungary
3
Department of Atomic Physics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics,
Budafoki út 8., H-1111 Budapest, Hungary
E-mail: major.daniel.1991@gmail.com

The chemical resistance and the high biocompatibility of Silicon Carbide (SiC) nanocrystal
makes it one of the most promising fluorescent biomarkers,1, 2 however, the interaction of SiC
and biomolecules has not yet been studied in detail. Cellular uptake, inflammation, accumu-
lation, degradation and clearance of the nanoparticles can be influenced by the interaction of
SiC with proteins which is the basis of the bio-reactivity of a nanoparticle. Furthermore, the
surface of the SiC can also affect the overall bio-reactivity of the nanoparticle through induc-
ing conformational changes in adsorbed protein molecules.
To generate bio-compatible nanomaterials for in-vivo application, the understanding of
such interactions is essential. If the size of the nanoparticle is comparable to the most abun-
dant proteins (larger than 10 nm in diameter) then the nanoparticle-protein interaction will
lead most likely to the formation of a dynamic nanoparticle-protein corona. Luminescent SiC
nanoparticles under 4 nm propose different interaction mechanism as they will have better
access to the reactive sites of the proteins. Strong, well-defined interactions between nanopar-
ticles and proteins can influence labeling reactions but the optimal condition should be iden-
tified for the successful binding.
Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) is an extensively studied protein and well-used model sys-
tem for investigating the biocompatibility of different biomarkers. Interactions between SiC
and BSA were studied through the emission properties of their liquid samples with different
PHs and constant ionic strength.
We found clear evidence of static interaction between SiC nanoparticles and tryptophan
residues of BSA. The strength of this interaction strongly depends on the pH of the environ-
ment so the chemical reactions between proteins and SiC nanoparticles can be controlled and
selective labeling is possible.

References

1). Beke et al., J. of Mat. Res. 28 (2013) 205-209.


2). Beke et al. J. Phys. Chem. C 120 (2016) 685–691.
3). Li et al. Spectrochim. Acta - Part A Mol. Biomol. Spectrosc. 83 (2011) 598–608.

– 122 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 091
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Poster

Blue laser welding of slot died coated Ag nanowire network elec-


trodes for flexible thin film heater and organic solar cells

Jin-Yeong Parka, Seung-Pyo Hongb,Jin-Jangb, Han-Ki Kima*

aDepartment of Advanced Materials Engineering for Information and


Electronics, Kyung Hee University, Deogyeong-daero 1732, Republic of Ko-
rea
bDepartment of Information and Display, Kyung Hee University, Kyun-
ghee-daero 26, Republic of Korea
E-mail:imdlhkkim@khu.ac.kr
We report on a blue laser annealing process to improve slot die-coated Ag nanowire (NW)
network electrodes. The electrical, optical, and morphological properties of blue laser irra-
diated Ag NW network electrodes were investigated detaily as a function of scan speed of
the blue laser. By slot die coating of Ag NWs on PET substrate followed by direct blue laser
irradiation, we fabricated solution-processed Ag NW network electrode with a sheet resis-
tance of 26.55 Ohm/square and optical transmittance of 87.8% at room temperature. Due to
effective welding of the physically contacted region between Ag NWs and complte removal
of the polyvinylpyrrolidone(pvp) on the surface Ag NW by a blue laser irradiation, the Ag
NW network electrode showed abruptly decreased sheet resistance without change of optical
transmittance. The sheet resistance of a blue laser irradiated Ag NW network electrode was
critically affected by scan speed of blue laser. We correlated the scan speed of the blue laser
and sheet resistance of slot-die coated Ag NWs by using a FESEM examination in detail. In
addition, we investigated the microstructure of the Ag NWs before and after blue laser irra-
diation at optimized scan speed to show a welding mechanism of the Ag NWs. To show the
feasibility of blue laser irradiation, we fabricated flexible thin film heater (TFHs) and flexible
organic solar cells (OSCs) on the as-coated Ag NW and blue laser irradiated Ag NW network
electrodes, respectively. Compared to flexible TFHs with as-coated Ag NW, the flexible TFHs
with blue-laser irradiated Ag NWs electrode showed a higher saturation temperature at lower
input voltage, due to lower sheet resistance of a blue laser irradiated Ag NW electrodes.
Furthermore, the power conversion efficiency of the flexible OSCs with a blue laser irra-
diated Ag NWsnetwork electrode is higher than that of the flexible OSCs with as-coated Ag
NW electrode. The better performance of flexible TFHs and flexible OSCs fabricated on a
blue laser-annealed Ag nanowire electrodeindicated that blue laser annealing is a simple and
promising technology to improve the electrical properties of the solution processed Ag NW
network electrodes.

References

1). H.-I. Shin and H.-K Kim, Ceramics International 42 (2016) 13983-13989
2). M. Lim and H.-K Kim, J. Alloys Compd. 688(2016)198-025

– 123 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 092
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Poster

Evolution of the structural, adsorption and photocatalytic


properties of nanostructured ZnO in the process of mechanical
high-energy grinding

N.D. Yakushovaa, B.V. Donkovab, I.A. Pronina, I.A. Averina, M.M. Sachevc, V.A.
Moshnikovd,

Department of Nano- and Microelectronics, Penza State University, Penza,


a

440026, Russia
b
Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry and Pharmacy, Sofia
University, str. J. Bourchier 1, Sofia 1126, Bulgaria
c
Department of Theoretical Foundations of Materials, Saint-Petersburg State Tech-
nological Institute, St. Petersburg, 190013, Russia
d
Department of Micro-and Nanoelectronics, Saint-Petersburg Electrotechnical Uni-
versity “LETI”, St. Petersburg, 197376, Russia
E-mail: bdonkova@inorg.chem.uni-sofia.bg

The mechanoactivation is a successful route for modification of the ZnO properties becau-
se it affects the structural defects, thus changing the nature and number of surface active sites
which play an important role for the ZnO photocatalytic activity.
In the present study the effect of mechanical high-energy grinding on the structural,
adsorption and photocatalytic properties of commercial ZnO powder was investigated. The
samples activated for 1, 3 and 5 hours were characterized by XRD, SEM, XPS, UV-Vis and
N2 adsorption-desorption. The concentration of acidic and basic surface sites was determined
by adsorption of acid/base indicators. The photocatalytic activity of the samples was tested in
the reaction of methyl orange degradation under UV- and Vis-light irradiation.
The results show that mechanoactivation leads up to two fold increasing of the specific
surface area and microstress, and up to two fold decreasing of the average particle size and
size of the coherent scattering regions. The existence of predominantly two types of surface
centers (with pKa of −4.4 and 14.2) with identical concentrations is established for the com-
mercial ZnO. The former are Lewis base sites (represents the surface lattice oxygen), the latter
are Lewis acid sites (surface Zn2+). After mechanical grinding the concentration of the centers
with pKa= −4.4 decreases gradually up to 15 times, while that of the centers with pKa=14.2
varies nonmonotonically depending on the milling duration. The concentration of third type
of centers with pKa = −0.3 (these centers is determined by the surface oxygen atoms with a
minimal deficit of neighbors), increases by more than 7 times after mechanoactivation. The
best photocatalytic performance under UV irradiation is established for ZnO sample, activat-
ed for an hour, while under visible light the highest apparent rate constant is estimated for
the non activated ZnO. The results will be interpreted based on the observed changes in the
structural and adsorption properties of zinc oxide.

– 124 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 093
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Poster

Enhancing stimulus performance of multi-electrode array with iri-


dium oxide-electrodeposited nanoporous gold

Yong Hee Kim, Jongkil Park, Sang-Don Jung

Electronics & Telecomunications Research Institute, Synapse Devices Creative Re-


search Section, Daejeon 34129, Korea
E-mail: josephinkiml@etri.re.kr

A Multi-electrode array (MEA) was fabricated with electrodes consisting of iridium ox-
ide (IrOx) electrochemically deposited on nanoporous gold (NPG) to improve the moderate
charge injection limit (ca. 1 mC Cm-2) of NPG MEA. IrOx was electrodeposited by perform-
ing cyclic voltammetry with an IrOx deposition solution.
The IrOx was electrodeposited on Au (EIROF/Au) and on NPG (EIROF/NPG) MEA, and
the samples were analyzed in terms of the charge injection limit, charge storage capacity
(CSC), and electrochemical impedance. The charge injection limit of the EIROF(100-cycled)/
NPG MEA was estimated to be 2.3 mC Cm-2 by measuring the voltage transient, and this value
is sufficiently greater than the neural damage threshold (ca. 1 mC Cm-2) and is also compa-
rable to that of sputtered IrOx films. Considering the low charge injection limit (< 0.1 mC
Cm-2) for the EIROF(100-cycled)/Au MEA, the high charge injection limit for the EIROF/
NPG MEA was explained to be a result of synergetic combination of the inherently large sur-
face area of the NPG and electrically active EIROF. The EIROF(100-cycled)/NPG exhibited
an impedance of 9.7 ± 0.45 kΩ at 1 kHz and a CSC of 8 mC/ Cm-2 respectively obtained via
electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and integration of the cathodic current in a cyclic
voltammogram.
Scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy are
used to conduct an elemental mapping analysis of the cross-sectional structure of the EIROF/
NPG revealed that the EIROF had been uniformly deposited on the surface of the intercon-
nected Au.
The efficacy of the improvement in the charge injection limit of the EIROF/NPG MEA
was evaluated with rat hippocampal slices. The EIROF/NPG electrodes exhibited a steeper
increase in the negative peak amplitude of the field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEP-
SPs), even with an electrical stimulation of a lower amplitude (1V - 4V), prolonged negative
fEPSPs wave after peak response, and decreased serial reduction of fEPSPs compared to NPG
MEA, all of which strongly indicate an improved charge injection for the EIROF/NPG MEA
over NPG MEA.

References

1). Kim et al., J. Neural Eng. 12(2015) 066029.

– 125 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 094
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Poster

Flexible, stretchable, and hydrophobic Ag nanowire network elec-


trode passivated by sputtered PTFE layer
Ji-Eun Lim, Sang-Mok Lee and Han-Ki Kima*

Department of Advanced Materials Engineering for Information and Electronics,


Kyung Hee University, Deogyeong-daero 1732, Republic of Korea
E-mail: imdlhkkim@khu.ac.kr

We fabricated highly flexible, stretchable, and hydrophobic silver nanowire (Ag NW)
network electrode passivated by poly(tetrafluoroethylene)(PTFE) layer using middle frequen-
cy (MF) sputtering at rom temperature. After slot die coating of Ag NW film on transparent
polyurethane (TPU) substrate, the Ag NW surface was passivated by PTFE layer to protect
Ag NWs and form a hydrophobic Ag NWs. Electrical, optical, morphological and mechanical
properties of the slot-die coated Ag NW electrodes passivated by PTFE were investigated
as a function of the PTFE thickness. At optimzied PTFE thickness of 100 nm, the Ag NW/
PTFE electrode showed a sheet resistance of 32.09 Ohm/square and a high transmittance of
87.9% at 550 nm wavelength, as well as high contact angle of 101°. X-ray photoelectron
spectroscopy (XPS) examination results showed that PTFE layer covering Ag NW network
consisted of CF3 and CF2 groups, which is responsible for the hydrophobic behavior of the
PTFE coated Ag NW network electrode. Based on specially designed inner and outer bending
tests, we investigated the mechancial flexiblity and stretchabililty of the PTFE/Ag NW/TPU
samples. Unlike bare Ag NW/PU sample, the PTFE coated Ag NW electrode showed good
stretchability up to 20 % without notable resistance changes. Furthermore, there is no chan-
ge of contact angle after stretching the electrode. Due to reinforce effect of sputtered PTFE
layer, the PTFE/Ag NW/PU samples showed a better stretchability than Ag NW/PU sample.
In addition, we demonstrated hydrophobic and stretchable thin film heaters(TFHs) using a
PTFE/Ag NW/TPU sample. The time-dependent temperature profile and heat distribution of
the PTFE/Ag NW-based TFHs showed that the PTFE/Ag NW film is a promising transparent
and stretchable electrode for high performance TFHs. Furthermore, we demonstrated the out-
standing hydrophobic and stretchability PTFE/Ag NW electrode in stretchable and wearable
thin film heaters and medicated patch to enhance drug delivery to show a feasibility of PTFE/
Ag NW/TPU samples.

References

1). Mei Wang et al., New Diamond Front. Carbon Technol. 15 (2005) 29-35.
2). D.-Y. Wi et al., Fibers Polym. 10 (2009) 98-101.
3). Martin Drabik et al., Plasma Processes Polym. 7 (2010) 544-551.
4). Dhananjay S. Bodas et al., Appl. Surf. Sci. 245 (2005) 202-207.

– 126 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 095
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Poster

Behaviour of polymeric nanoparticles at various interfaces model-


ling cell membrane

Ágnes Ábraháma, Gergő Gyulaia, György Kaszab, Béla Ivánb, Éva Kissa

Laboratory of Interfaces and Nanostructures, Institute of Chemistry, Eötvös


a

Loránd University Budapest 112, PO Box 32, H-1518, Budapest, Hungary


b
Polymer Chemistry Research Group, Institute of Materials and Environmental
Chemistry, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences,
Magyar tudósok körútja 2, H-1117, Budapest, Hungary
E-mail: abraham.agnes84@gmail.com

Adsorption and localization of nanoparticles (NPs) at fluid interfaces are key factors in pro-
cesses like transport through biological membranes or emulsion stabilization. Adsorption of the
biodegradable poly(lactic/glycolic acid) (PLGA) NPs were studied at three different fluid interfaces
and model cell membrane. The influence of NPs’ surface properties on the interfacial interactions
was evaluated comparing various amphiphilic block copolymers (Pluronics) as well as amphiphilic
monoalkyl hyperbranched polyglycerol (C18-HbPG).
Interfacial accumulation of PLGA NPs was followed by surface tension measurements [1]. Par-
ticle layers at the air/water interface were further studied using the Langmuir balance technique by
recording the surface pressure – area isotherms. The effect of surface modification of NPs on the
surface/interfacial activity and adsorption kinetics has been analyzed. The structure of the forming
particle films was investigated using model calculations, interfacial rheological measurements and
by imaging technique. Interfacial adsorption and its kinetics were explained by the diffusion con-
trolled adsorption theory and taking into consideration the energy barrier of particle transport to the
interface. Surface activity of PLGA-Pluronic particles could be described by the contributions of
both the PLGA NPs and the effective portion of their Pluronic shell. The results shed light on the
mechanism of NP adsorption and the importance of wettability and particle interface interactions
on the surface activity.
The interactions between the NPs and model cell membrane were studied using quartz crystal
microbalance (QCM) technique [2]. The Pluronic- and C18-HbPG coated NPs were applied to solid
supported lipid bilayers. Degree and type of adhesion PLGA NPs were determined by QCM mea-
surements in combination with the visual analysis of the surfaces using atomic force microscopy
(AFM). Different Pluronic surface coatings (103, 105, 108) were compared obtaining that the length
of the PEO chains of the Pluronic molecules have marked effect on the stability of the NPs and their
interactions with lipid systems. The most hydrophobic Pluronic103 coating induces surface aggre-
gation and the structural rearrangement of the lipid bilayer while the highly hydrophilic Pluronic108
reduces interactions due to strong steric repulsion. Stabilization of NPs by C18-HbPG resulted
in the highest membrane affinity which is an initial requirement for cellular uptake, followed by
Pluronic105 with medium polarity within the Pluronic series. The gained results could be employed
in the rational design of drug carrier systems with enhanced performance.

References
1) Gyulai G., Kiss É., J. Colloid Interface Sci. 500 (2017) 9-19
2) Ábrahám Á., Katona M., Kasza Gy.Kiss É., Eur. Polym. J. 93 (2017) 212-221

This work was supported by the National Science Foundation: OTKA 104928, OTKA NK 105898
and Hungarian Academy of Sciences Postdoctoral Research Program.

– 127 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017 Abstract ID: 096
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary Poster

Tungsten carbide thin films for electrochemical water splitting


studies

S. Emin1, C. Altinkaya2, A. Semerci2, M. Valant1,3, H. Okuyucu2, A. Yildiz2

Materials Research Labortaory, University of Nova Gorica, Slovenia


1

2
Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Ankara Yildirim Beyazit
University, Ankara, Turkey
3
Institute of Fundamental and Frontier Sciences, University of Electronic Science
and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, China
E-mail: saim.emin@ung.si

We used wet-chemistry techniques to prepare colloidal tungsten (W) nanoparticles (NPs).


The synthesis of W NPs was conducted using the so called hot-matrix method in 1-octadecene
[1]. The sizes of obtained W NPs are in the order of 2 - 5 nm. These W NPs are coated with
hydrophobic molecules which allow their dispersion in organic solvents like choloroform
(CHCl3). It was found that the colloidal stability of the dispersions is exceptionally high ex-
ceeding several years. The stability of W NPs which prevents coagulation allows the prepara-
tion of thin films with uniform thicknesses by spin-coating, inkjet-printing and spray coating.

We have prepared tungsten carbide (W2C, WC) thin films. The preparation of W2C and WC
was achieved by spin-coating of pre-synthesized W NPs on graphite substrate and following
heat treatment under Ar atmosphere at 1000 and 1450°C.

The obtained W2C and WC films were used both in electrochemical water splitting stud-
ies. We also made a composite W2C-Pt films where we used only 5 at.% of Pt. The W2C-Pt
composite has shown similar performance as pure Pt-C for hydrogen (H2) evolution. In con-
clusion, we have developed a procedure for the synthesis of W NPs which can be applied for
the preparation of tungsten carbides films and their use for electrochemical water splitting.

References
1) S. Emin*, M. de Respinis, M. Fanetti, W. Smith, M. Valant, B. Dam, Appl. Catal. B: En-
vironment 166-167 (2015) 406-412.

– 128 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary

– 129 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary

Authors Index

Ágnes, A. – p. 7, 127 Krüger, M. – p. 5, 10, 12, 20


Bansal, A. – p. 13, 26, 90 Kumar, P. – p. 35
Barsoum, M. W. – p. 5, 14, 58 Lee, D. C. – p. 5, 14, 20, 100
Bashouti, M. Y. – p. 14, 28, 113 Lee, J. – p. 15, 75, 78, 110
Beke, D. – p. 112, 114, 122 Li, Y. – p. 37
Berger, T. – p. 9, 15, 24, 65 Lim, G.-H. – p. 14, 82, 110
Bertolazzi, S. – p. 14, 26, 99 Lim, J. – p. 11, 78, 110, 126
Brinek, M. – p. 12, 45 Loukanov, A. – p. 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 91
Chieh, J-J. – p. 5, 13, 22, 48 Lu, W. – p. 5, 10, 12, 13, 29, 74, 85
Choy, W. C.H. – p. 5, 12, 25, 38 Lu, Y. – p. 5, 14, 23, 79, 80
Cozzoli, P. D. – p. 14, 24, 59 Major, D. A. – p. 11, 122
Dias, E. – p. 15, 109 McCreery, R. L. – p. 5, 14, 22, 98
Donkova, B. V. – p. 11, 124 Mei, S. – p. 14, 79, 80
Dwivedi, C. – p. 15 Merdasa, A. – p. 13, 22, 87
Eder, D. – p. 15, 28, 62 Moshkin, Y. – p. 13, 27, 54
Emin, S. – p. 5, 7, 11, 14, 120, 128 Ohtani, B. – p. 5, 9, 15, 18, 61
Etacheri, V. – p. 5, 10, 12, 17, 69 Oshima, T. – p. 15, 27, 119
Etgar, E. – p. 5, 7, 9, 12, 17, 36 Palmisano, G. – p. 5, 15, 107, 108,
Falk, M. – p. 13, 26, 51 181
Fan, H. – p. 5, 12, 19, 42 Park, J.-Y. – p. 11, 12, 39, 123
Fatah, N. – p. 15, 96 Petit, C. – p. 10, 15, 25, 93, 109
Fixler, D. – p. 5, 7, 9, 13, 17, 46 Piana, M. – p. 12, 72
Fresno, F. – p. 10, 15, 26, 117 Pinna, N. – p. 5, 15, 17, 105
Gothwal, A. – p. 13, 89 Prinz, C. – p. 5, 13, 47, 181
Hahn, S. K. – p. 5, 13, 22, 53 Ren, Y. – p. 15, 97
Hiebl, C. – p. 12, 43 Roumanille, P. – p. 102, 141
Hirtz, M. – p. 13, 25, 50 Ryu, S. Y. – p. 44, 141
Kaji, N. – p. 5, 9, 13, 23 ,49 Sabaté, M. I. – p. 60
Kellici, S. – p. 14, 28, 101 Saha, A. – p. 67, 101
Kim, H.-K. – p. 5, 12, 27, 39, 70, 78, Santhosh, P. B. – p. 13, 57
123, 126 Sarkissian, A. – p. 14, 81
Kim, Y. H. – p. 11, 125 Scheu, C. – p. 5, 15, 24, 63
Klencsar, Z. – p. 83 Schmidt, O. G. – p. 5, 10, 13, 24, 84
Kokkinopoulou, M. – p. 13, 55 Segev, E. – p. 14, 104
Krishnan, S. – p. 13, 92 Sharma, H. – p. 14, 115

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International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary

Shen, S. – p. 5, 15, 21, 116


Shi, J. – p. 11, 121
Silvanose, B. – p. 13, 56
Singh, M. – p. 14
Solarska, R. – p. 10, 15, 25, 95
Sudhakar, S. – p. 13, 57
Sun, T. – p. 14, 114
Sunkara, M. – p. 5, 9, 12 ,15 ,19, 35
Tang, J. – p. 5, 7, 9, 15, 23, 66
Urakawa, A. – p. 5, 10, 15, 21, 106, 118
Velencoso, M. M. – p. 13, 52
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Wasisto, H. S. – p. 14, 28, 111
Wazir, H. U. – p. 12
Wei, B. – p. 5, 12, 20, 33
Wilkening, M. – p. 5, 9, 12, 19, 34, 43, 45, 75
Xiao, J. – p. 15, 64
Xiawei, D. – p. 13, 88
Xu, Q. – p. 5, 12, 21, 40, 97, 103
Zeng, H. C. – p. 5, 15, 20, 94
Zettl, R. – p. 12, 75
Zhang, J. – p. 15, 103
Zhang, Q. – p. 5, 12, 19, 33, 68
Zheng, X. – p. 103

– 131 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary

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– 132 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary

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– 133 –
International Conference on Functional Nanomaterials and Nanodevices 2017
24.-27 September 2017, Budapest, Hungary

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– 134 –
ISBN 978-954-2987-31-4

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