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This is an incomplete list of DIN standards.

The "STATUS" column gives the latest known status of the standard.
This is an incomplete list of DIN standards.

The "STATUS" column gives the latest known status of the standard.
If a standard has been withdrawn and no replacement specification is
listed, either the specification was withdrawn without replacement or a replacement
specification could not be identified.
DIN stands for "Deutsches Institut f�r Normung", meaning "German institute for
standardisation". DIN standards that begin with "DIN V" ("Vornorm", meaning "pre-
issue") are the result of standardization work, but because of certain reservations
on the content or because of the divergent compared to a standard installation
procedure of DIN, they are not yet published standards.

Contents

1 DIN 1 to DIN 999


1.1 DIN 1 to DIN 99
1.2 DIN 100 to DIN 199
1.3 DIN 200 to DIN 299
1.4 DIN 300 to DIN 399
1.5 DIN 400 to DIN 499
1.6 DIN 500 to DIN 599
1.7 DIN 600 to DIN 699
1.8 DIN 700 to DIN 799
1.9 DIN 800 to DIN 899
1.10 DIN 900 to DIN 999
2 DIN 1000 to DIN 9999
2.1 DIN 1000 to DIN 1999
2.2 DIN 2000 to DIN 2999
2.3 DIN 3000 to DIN 3999
2.4 DIN 4000 to DIN 4999
2.5 DIN 5000 to DIN 5999
2.6 DIN 6000 to DIN 6999
2.7 DIN 7000 to DIN 7999
2.8 DIN 8000 to DIN 8999
2.9 DIN 9000 to DIN 9999
3 DIN 10000 to DIN 19999

This is an incomplete list of DIN standards.

The "STATUS" column gives the latest known status of the standard.
If a standard has been withdrawn and no replacement specification is
listed, either the specification was withdrawn without replacement or a replacement
specification could not be identified.
DIN stands for "Deutsches Institut f�r Normung", meaning "German institute for
standardisation". DIN standards that begin with "DIN V" ("Vornorm", meaning "pre-
issue") are the result of standardization work, but because of certain reservations
on the content or because of the divergent compared to a standard installation
procedure of DIN, they are not yet published standards.

Contents

1 DIN 1 to DIN 999


1.1 DIN 1 to DIN 99
1.2 DIN 100 to DIN 199
1.3 DIN 200 to DIN 299
1.4 DIN 300 to DIN 399
1.5 DIN 400 to DIN 499
1.6 DIN 500 to DIN 599
1.7 DIN 600 to DIN 699
1.8 DIN 700 to DIN 799
1.9 DIN 800 to DIN 899
1.10 DIN 900 to DIN 999
2 DIN 1000 to DIN 9999
2.1 DIN 1000 to DIN 1999
2.2 DIN 2000 to DIN 2999
2.3 DIN 3000 to DIN 3999
2.4 DIN 4000 to DIN 4999
2.5 DIN 5000 to DIN 5999
2.6 DIN 6000 to DIN 6999
2.7 DIN 7000 to DIN 7999
2.8 DIN 8000 to DIN 8999
2.9 DIN 9000 to DIN 9999
3 DIN 10000 to DIN 19999
3.1 DIN 10000 to DIN 10999
3.2 DIN 11000 to DIN 11999
3.3 DIN 12000 to DIN 12999
3.4 DIN 13000 to DIN 13999
3.5 DIN 14000 to DIN 14999
3.6 DIN 15000 to DIN 15999
3.7 DIN 16000 to DIN 16999
3.8 DIN 17000 to DIN 17999
3.9 DIN 18000 to DIN 18999
3.10 DIN 19000 to DIN 19999
4 DIN 20000 to DIN 29999
3.1 DIN 10000 to DIN 10999
3.2 DIN 11000 to DIN 11999
3.3 DIN 12000 to DIN 12999
3.4 DIN 13000 to DIN 13999
3.5 DIN 14000 to DIN 14999
3.6 DIN 15000 to DIN 15999
3.7 DIN 16000 to DIN 16999
3.8 DIN 17000 to DIN 17999
3.9 DIN 18000 to DIN 18999
3.10 DIN 19000 to DIN 19999
4 DIN 20000 to DIN 29999
If a standard has been withdrawn and no replacement specification is
listed, either the specification was withdrawn without replacement or a replacement
specification could not be identified.
DIN stands for "Deutsches Institut f�r Normung", meaning "German institute for
standardisation". DIN standards that begin with "DIN V" ("Vornorm", meaning "pre-
issue") are the result of standardization work, but because of certain reservations
on the content or because of the divergent compared to a standard installation
procedure of DIN, they are not yet published standards.

Contents

1 DIN 1 to DIN 999


1.1 DIN 1 to DIN 99
1.2 DIN 100 to DIN 199
1.3 DIN 200 to DIN 299
1.4 DIN 300 to DIN 399
1.5 DIN 400 to DIN 499
1.6 DIN 500 to DIN 599
1.7 DIN 600 to DIN 699
1.8 DIN 700 to DIN 799
1.9 DIN 800 to DIN 899
1.10 DIN 900 to DIN 999
2 DIN 1000 to DIN 9999
2.1 DIN 1000 to DIN 1999
2.2 DIN 2000 to DIN 2999
2.3 DIN 3000 to DIN 3999
2.4 DIN 4000 to DIN 4999
2.5 DIN 5000 to DIN 5999
2.6 DIN 6000 to DIN 6999
2.7 DIN 7000 to DIN 7999
2.8 DIN 8000 to DIN 8999
2.9 DIN 9000 to DIN 9999
3 DIN 10000 to DIN 19999
3.1 DIN 10000 to DIN 10999
3.2 DIN 11000 to DIN 11999
3.3 DIN 12000 to DIN 12999
3.4 DIN 13000 to DIN 13999
3.5 DIN 14000 to DIN 14999
3.6 DIN 15000 to DIN 15999
3.7 DIN 16000 to DIN 16999
3.8 DIN 17000 to DIN 17999
3.9 DIN 18000 to DIN 18999
3.10 DIN 19000 to DIN 19999
4 DIN 20000 to DIN 29999
4.1 DIN 24000 to DIN 24999
4.2 DIN 28000 to DIN 28999
5 DIN 30000 to DIN 39999

1. LAP Joint Typ-02, Sub type ???

2. SW fittings Dimension std?? NF E 29-600 unable to find..

3. Bw elbo 2D, 3D, 5D as per EN-10253-3, should we consider ASME B 16.9??

4. EN iso 17292 does not have f2f dim for Ball valves, wr to refer

5.

A gasket is a mechanical seal which fills the space between two or more mating
surfaces, generally to prevent leakage from or into the joined objects while under
compression.

Gaskets allow for "less-than-perfect" mating surfaces on machine parts where they
can fill irregularities. Gaskets are commonly produced by cutting from sheet
materials.

Gaskets for specific applications, such as high pressure steam systems, may contain
asbestos. However, due to health hazards associated with asbestos exposure, non-
asbestos gasket materials are used when practical.[1]

It is usually desirable that the gasket be made from a material that is to some
degree yielding such that it is able to deform and tightly fill the space it is
designed for, including any slight irregularities. A few gaskets require an
application of sealant directly to the gasket surface to function properly.
Some (piping) gaskets are made entirely of metal and rely on a seating surface to
accomplish the seal; the metal's own spring characteristics are utilized (up to but
not passing sy, the material's yield strength). This is typical of some "ring
joints" (RTJ) or some other metal gasket systems. These joints are known as R-con
and E-con compressive type joints.[2]

Properties
Compressed fiber gasket

Gaskets are normally made from a flat material, a sheet such as paper, rubber,
silicone, metal, cork, felt, neoprene, nitrile rubber, fiberglass,
polytetrafluoroethylene (otherwise known as PTFE or Teflon) or a plastic polymer
(such as polychlorotrifluoroethylene).

One of the more desirable properties of an effective gasket in industrial


applications for compressed fiber gasket material is the ability to withstand high
compressive loads. Most industrial gasket applications involve bolts exerting
compression well into the 14 MPa (2000 psi) range or higher. Generally speaking,
there are several truisms that allow for better gasket performance. One of the more
tried and tested is: "The more compressive load exerted on the gasket, the longer
it will last".

There are several ways to measure a gasket material's ability to withstand


compressive loading. The "hot compression test" is probably the most accepted of
these tests. Most manufacturers of gasket materials will provide or publish the
results of these tests.
Gasket design

Gaskets come in many different designs based on industrial usage, budget, chemical
contact and physical parameters:
Sheet gaskets

When a sheet of material has the gasket shape "punched out" of it, it is a sheet
gasket. This can lead to a crude, fast and cheap gasket. In previous times the
material was compressed asbestos, but in modern times a fibrous material or matted
graphite is used. These gaskets can fill various different chemical requirements
based on the inertness of the material used. Non-asbestos gasket sheet is durable,
of multiple materials, and thick in nature. Material examples are mineral, carbon
or nitrile synthetic rubber. Applications using sheet gaskets involve acids,
corrosive chemicals, steam or mild caustics. Flexibility and good recovery prevent
breakage during installation of a sheet gasket.[3]
Solid material gaskets

The idea behind solid material is to use metals which cannot be punched out of
sheets but are still cheap to produce. These gaskets generally have a much higher
level of quality control than sheet gaskets and generally can withstand much higher
temperatures and pressures. The key downside is that a solid metal must be greatly
compressed in order to become flush with the flange head and prevent leakage. The
material choice is more difficult; because metals are primarily used, process
contamination and oxidation are risks. An additional downside is that the metal
used must be softer than the flange � in order to ensure that the flange does not
warp and thereby prevent sealing with future gaskets. Even so, these gaskets have
found a niche in industry.
Spiral-wound gaskets

Spiral-wound gaskets comprise a mix of metallic and filler material.[4] Generally,


the gasket has a metal (normally carbon rich or stainless steel) wound outwards in
a circular spiral (other shapes are possible) with the filler material (generally a
flexible graphite) wound in the same manner but starting from the opposing side.
This results in alternating layers of filler and metal. The filler material in
these gaskets acts as the sealing element, with the metal providing structural
support.

These gaskets have proven to be reliable in most applications, and allow lower
clamping forces than solid gaskets, albeit with a higher cost. [1]
Constant seating stress gaskets

The constant seating stress gasket consists of two components; a solid carrier ring
of a suitable material, such as stainless steel, and two sealing elements of some
compressible material installed within two opposing channels, one channel on either
side of the carrier ring. The sealing elements are typically made from a material
(expanded graphite, expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), vermiculite, etc.)
suitable to the process fluid and application.

Constant seating stress gaskets derive their name from the fact that the carrier
ring profile takes flange rotation (deflection under bolt preload) into
consideration. With all other conventional gaskets, as the flange fasteners are
tightened, the flange deflects radially under load, resulting in the greatest
gasket compression, and highest gasket stress, at the outer gasket edge.

Since the carrier ring used in constant seating stress gaskets take this deflection
into account when creating the carrier ring for a given flange size, pressure
class, and material, the carrier ring profile can be adjusted to enable the gasket
seating stress to be radially uniform across the entire sealing area. Further,
because the sealing elements are fully confined by the flange faces in opposing
channels on the carrier ring, any in-service compressive forces acting on the
gasket are transmitted through the carrier ring and avoid any further compression
of the sealing elements, thus maintaining a 'constant' gasket seating stress while
in-service. Thus, the gasket is immune to common gasket failure modes that include
creep relaxation, high system vibration, or system thermal cycles.

The fundamental concept underlying the improved sealability for constant seating
stress gaskets are that (i) if the flange sealing surfaces are capable of attaining
a seal, (ii) the sealing elements are compatible with the process fluid and
application, and (iii) the sufficient gasket seating stress is achieved on
installation necessary to affect a seal, then the possibility of the gasket leaking
in-service is greatly reduced or eliminated altogether.
Double-jacketed gaskets

Double-jacketed gaskets are another combination of filler material and metallic


materials. In this application, a tube with ends that resemble a "C" is made of the
metal with an additional piece made to fit inside of the "C" making the tube
thickest at the meeting points. The filler is pumped between the shell and piece.
When in use, the compressed gasket has a larger amount of metal at the two tips
where contact is made (due to the shell/piece interaction) and these two places
bear the burden of sealing the process. Since all that is needed is a shell and
piece, these gaskets can be made from almost any material that can be made into a
sheet and a filler can then be inserted.[5]
Kammprofile gaskets

Kammprofile gaskets are used in many older seals since they have both a flexible
nature and reliable performance. Kammprofiles work by having a solid corrugated
core with a flexible covering layer. This arrangement allows for very high
compression and an extremely tight seal along the ridges of the gasket. Since
generally the graphite will fail instead of the metal core, Kammprofile can be
repaired during later inactivity. Kammprofile has a high capital cost for most
applications but this is countered by long life and increased reliability.
Fishbone Gaskets
Fishbone Gaskets are direct replacements for Kammprofile and Spiralwound gaskets.
They are fully CNC machine manufactured from similar materials but the design of
the gaskets has eliminated inherent short comings. Fishbone gaskets do not unwind
in storage or in the plant. The rounded edges do not cause flange damage. The added
"Stop Step" prevents the Fishbone gaskets from being over compressed/crushed, often
caused by hot torque techniques on plant start up. The bones of the gasket remain
ductile and adjust to thermal cycling and system pressure spikes resulting is a
durable and reliable flange seal that out performs all other gaskets of this nature
significantly.