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102088 SECONDARY

CURRICULUM 1A
HISTORY ASSESSMENT 1
LESSON PLANS
Renaissance Italy

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SID: 18004999 Name: Jerick Esmundo
`Lesson Plan 1: Introduction and Map activity

Topic area: Stage of Learner: Syllabus Pages:


Renaissance Italy: 4 70
Introduction
Date: 01/02/2017 Location Booked: A2.1.07 Lesson Number: 1/12

Time: 60 minutes Total Number of students 15 Printing/preparation


Print
Prepare slideshows, check the
textbook to help students find
information for task, print map
sheets

Outcomes Assessment Students learn about Students learn to


Syllabus outcomes Lesson The way of life in - explain why this
HT4-8 Locates, selects and assessment Renaissance Italy period is known as the
organizes information Background (social, cultural, Renaissance
from sources to knowledge on economic and political - identify on a map the
develop an historical Medieval Europe features) and the roles city-states of Italy
inquiry The main and relationships of during this period
HT4-9 Uses a range of assessment will different groups in
historical terms and be about if society (ACDSEH01
concepts when students are able
communicating an to use information
understanding of the to make short
past summaries and
arguments for
their respective
locations.
Cross Curriculum themes & General capabilities Explicit subject specific concepts and skills
Intercultural understanding and personal and Literacy and critical thinking, Geography
social capability mapping skills

Quality Teaching Elements (lesson focus) Highlight the appropriate areas: Cover at least one from
each group

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SID: 18004999 Name: Jerick Esmundo
Intellectual Quality 1.1 Deep 1.4 Higher-order
This refers to pedagogy focused on producing deep understanding knowledge thinking
of important, substantive concepts, skills and ideas. Such pedagogy 1.2 Deep 1.5 Metalanguage
treats knowledge as something that requires active construction and understanding 1.6 Substantive
requires students to engage in higher-order thinking and to 1.3 Problematic communication
communicate substantively about what they are learning. knowledge
Quality Learning Environment 2.1 Explicit quality 2.4 Social Support
This refers to pedagogy that creates classrooms where students and criteria 2.5 Students’ self
teachers work productively in an environment clearly focused on 2.2 Engagement regulation
learning. Such pedagogy sets high and explicit expectations and 2.3 High 2.6 Student direction
develops positive relationships between teacher and students and Expectations
among students.
Significance 3.1 Background 3.4 Inclusivity
This refers to pedagogy that helps make learning more meaningful knowledge 3.5 Connectedness
and important to students. Such pedagogy draws clear connections 3.2 Cultural 3.6 Narrative
with students’ prior knowledge and identities, with contexts outside knowledge
of the classroom, and with multiple ways of knowing all cultural 3.3 Knowledge
perspective. integration

Teaching Indicators of presence in the lesson


element
1.3 Students will label the map and find information to find why their place is important. The
problem solving will be evident on where the information is given and each group will
present their evidence and argue why their location is important/
2.2 Students will be involved in the activities, forming into groups to discuss about the locations
and then have a class discussion to identify which city is the most significant
The beginning of the lesson will draw from background knowledge from previous year,
3.1 particular with Medieval Europe as map out specific areas of life on what has changed
during the transition between the Medieval and Renaissance periods.

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SID: 18004999 Name: Jerick Esmundo
Time Teaching and learning actions Organisation Centred
T/S
0-5 Students come to the classroom and settle. Teacher: Teacher instructs Teacher
The teacher marks the roll students to sit down and get
their workbooks and
textbook
Student: Follows
instructions
Resources:
5-15 Assess background knowledge from last Teacher: Provides Teacher/Student
year history. instructions and prepare
Ask students if they remember from year 7 slideshow via computer,
history and aim the focus on their studies picks the students with their
medieval Europe. hands up and types what the
Students will put their hands up and allow students said on the
their answers to be typed in the slideshow slideshow. Repeats process
titled ‘Medieval Europe’, forming a list of for Renaissance Italy but
what students remembered. there will summaries and
The teacher will go through a selection of images to stimulate ideas
slides focus on art, clothing and
architecture. In each slide, the teacher Student: Think about what
needs to ask the difference between the comes into mind with the
two pictures, generating ideas and thoughts words, raises their hands
about appearance and style. and responds when the
The teacher will go to the final slide and teacher picks the students.
ask students what made the Renaissance
special and then the teacher explains that is Resources: Slideshow
was a period of change
15- Map activity Teacher: Gives Student
30 Teacher will split the class into 5 groups instructions, split the class
and pass out a map of Europe Italy into group and pass out
identifying key locations. If there are map, teacher directs which
students with disabilities, they can pair up group is allocated, teacher
with gifted students to manage the can assist groups to what
workload and contribute to the task information is needed
Students will have the textbook on pages
35-48 to find the answers about each Student: follow
location and will write in their workbooks instructions, find their
about the significance of the location. chosen location and the
Such topic can include information in the textbook.
- Population and geography Students write information
- Economic significance given from the textbook
- Religious significance about key points.
- Importance to society
- Significant Individual who lived Resources: Textbook,
here workbooks and map sheet
- How is this location important as of
today (this last question has no
information in the textbook but
students can analyse, with the
given information, its relevance to

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SID: 18004999 Name: Jerick Esmundo
the world)

The teacher will nominate each group with


a specific location; The five locations are
- Venice
- Florence
- Rome
- Naples
- Milan
30- Presentation and discussion Teacher: Teacher will Student
55 Each group will present the class about instruct each group to talk
their location while teacher instructs the about their location
other groups to listen during each group
discussion. After each group, students, Student: Each group will
individually have one minute to summarise nominate two or three
what each group summarised map. After members to discuss about
all groups are finished, the class have a the location. The rest of the
discussion which place was the capital class will listen to them.
city/significant during the period. Resources: Workbooks
55- Ask students in each group to hand the Teacher: Ask students for Teacher
60 notes about the maps so teacher can photo notes. Reminds students
copy and print for later lessons. MUST about homework, introduce
give their workbooks in next lesson. next topic
Pack up, remind students of homework, Student: Students write
introduce the next lesson about Venice and their homework readings
dismiss class for next lesson
Resources: Workbooks for
printing

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SID: 18004999 Name: Jerick Esmundo
Reflection
The aim of the lesson was to assess the background knowledge of the students, assuming that
they remember the content and skills from last year, particular with medieval Europe. Since
this was the first class of the year, I wanted to the lesson to be relaxed but stimulating to
allow students to learn while not filling overwhelmed with the expectation of knowledge and
assessment which was done through group work. The map activity was to develop an inquiry
about geographical place and the discussion on which city was important in Italy One thing
that needs improvement is school behaviour and engaging since behaviour strategies was not
mentioned nor the use of ICT

How am I measuring the outcomes of this lesson?

Learning Outcome Method of measurement and recording


HT4-8 The aim was to use the textbook to find the location
of the map to develop an idea the importance of the
place
HT4-9 Students gain an understanding of new concepts and
vocabulary through concept map activity.

Other considerations

Graduate Evidence within this lesson


Standards
1.5 If necessary, have groups where students with disabilities can work with
other students, particularly with gifted students. The aim is allow students to
contribute to the tasks
1.6 If necessary, have groups where students with disabilities can work with
other students, particularly with gifted students. The aim is allow students to
contribute to the tasks but does not mean that they need to be the
representative of their group
2.2 Sequence lesson where students have a basic understanding of Renaissance
Italy
3.2 The lessons are structured where students gradually learn about the locations

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SID: 18004999 Name: Jerick Esmundo
WHS
What are the key risk issues that may appear for and need to be reduced/eliminated in this
lesson? Using your syllabus and support documents as well as other WHS policy- Outline
the key WHS considerations that are to be applied in this lesson?
From standard 4, class management is not an issue that I have discussed as I believe
that this would not be a major issue. But since student behaviour can vary and as there
is group work activity, I have not implemented strategies and tools to manage
incidents if they occur. I feel like I do not want to waste learning time recapping
student behaviour and expectations where that time would be more useful in class
discussion. ICT is another issue as it may distract students from not engaging in the
task and therefore this activity will have minimal use expect for the first part. The
teacher needs to have control on what is typed on the slideshow as this will be
displayed on the whiteboard screen and all the students will see it.

References (In APA)


Renaissance Italy c 1500 [Image] (n.d). Retrieved July 31, 2017, from
http://historymaps.wikispaces.com/file/view/1500%20Renaissance%20Italy.gif/471540106
/1500%20Renaissance%20Italy.gif

Resources Attached:
You must list all the resources that you have created or found in this space.

Map:
http://historymaps.wikispaces.com/file/view/1500%20Renaissance%20Italy.gif/471540106
/1500%20Renaissance%20Italy.gif

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SID: 18004999 Name: Jerick Esmundo
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SID: 18004999 Name: Jerick Esmundo
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SID: 18004999 Name: Jerick Esmundo
Lesson Plan 2 Venice culture

Topic area: Stage of Learner: Syllabus Pages:


Renaissance Italy: Venice 4 70
and culture
Date: 08/02/2017 Location Booked: A2.1.07 Lesson Number: 2/12

Time: 60 minutes Total Number of students 15 Printing/preparation


Get video or game ready,
print pictures

Outcomes Assessment Students learn about Students learn to


Syllabus outcomes Lesson The way of life in Describe the everyday
HT4-3 assessment Renaissance Italy life of men, women and
HT4-5 Mark their (social, cultural, children in Renaissance
HT4-7 workbooks to see economic and political Italy
HT4-10 if they features) and the roles Describe key economic
understand on of and relationships of and political features of
the occupational different groups in Renaissance Italy
of everyday society
people in Venice. (ACDSEH010)
Cross Curriculum themes & General capabilities Explicit subject specific concepts and skills
Difference and diversity, work and enterprise, ICT skills and literacy
Intercultural understanding, civics and
citizenship

Quality Teaching Elements (lesson focus) Highlight the appropriate areas: Cover at least one
from each group
Intellectual Quality 1.1 Deep 1.4 Higher-order
This refers to pedagogy focused on producing deep understanding knowledge thinking
of important, substantive concepts, skills and ideas. Such pedagogy 1.2 Deep 1.5 Metalanguage
treats knowledge as something that requires active construction and understanding 1.6 Substantive
requires students to engage in higher-order thinking and to 1.3 Problematic communication
communicate substantively about what they are learning. knowledge
Quality Learning Environment 2.1 Explicit quality 2.4 Social Support
This refers to pedagogy that creates classrooms where students and criteria 2.5 Students’ self
teachers work productively in an environment clearly focused on 2.2 Engagement regulation
learning. Such pedagogy sets high and explicit expectations and 2.3 High 2.6 Student direction
develops positive relationships between teacher and students and Expectations
among students.
Significance 3.1 Background 3.4 Inclusivity
This refers to pedagogy that helps make learning more meaningful knowledge 3.5 Connectedness
and important to students. Such pedagogy draws clear connections 3.2 Cultural 3.6 Narrative
with students’ prior knowledge and identities, with contexts outside knowledge
of the classroom, and with multiple ways of knowing all cultural 3.3 Knowledge
perspective. integration

How the quality teaching elements you have identified are achieved within the lesson.

Teaching Indicators of presence in the lesson


element

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SID: 18004999 Name: Jerick Esmundo
1.2 Students will have a deep understanding about the culture and the lifestyle of
Renaissance Italy. Once the lesson is over, students should demonstrate meaningful
understanding about the central ideas and the relationships between citizens and their
roles in society.
The lesson will focus on productivity learning environment where it will be intense in
2.1 learning about everyday as of citizens. The information will be explicit and detailed
to where the lesson will be essential as a point of reference for development including
assessment work.
Students will have a clear idea about the everyday life of people and understand the
3.2 economic and political aspects that make this period unique including class, gender,
religion and sexuality.

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SID: 18004999 Name: Jerick Esmundo
Time Teaching and learning actions Organisation Centred
T/S
0-5 Roll and introduction to the lesson and tells students Teacher: Marks the Teacher
to get their books roll

Student: Students
respond to the teacher
and sit down, have
their books ready

Resources:
5-15 Plays video or gameplay of Assassins Creed 2. The Teacher: Plays the Teacher
level is set on Venice and the teacher plays the game game and focuses on
or shows footage, on the whiteboard screen via the the non-violent game
computer. If the teacher decides to play the game, they mechanics such as
can choose to bring a gaming console or use the trading money for
computer to play but the set up must be done before goods, climbing on
hand. If the teacher plays the game, the aim is not to the architecture to see
kill the characters or to complete missions but to details. Many play the
interact with other place, focus on the dialogue, map on Venice and
clothing and the interactions and suggests that video focus on the
games (while not beneficial as it is a secondary architecture and the
source) can be used to represent history. When non-playable
interacting with character either focus on a characters.
- Soldier
- Entertainer If the teacher does not
- woman/prostitute play the game, the
- trader teacher describes
- Religious figure/priest. what it happening on
the screen

If teacher does not have game due to lack of Student: Class watch
resources, time or cost, the video is another option and observe the
although teacher needs to watch the game and focus everyday life of the
on the non-violent elements. people. The aim is
Links: make them virtual
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1NFaIuz729o participants to see the
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SNAbRCRGGHA general context of
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J0frIeBhfw4 Renaissance Venice
Resources:
Workbook and
The aim is show the lifestyle, architecture, clothing, Assassins Creed 2,
economy and trade of the Renaissance in Venice by may need either
giving a general context about the area. computer or gaming
console to set up,
15- Split the class in groups of 3, students can choose to Teacher: Instructs Student/Teacher
30 have the same group from the previous lesson or have student and split the
new groups but have a mix of gifted and students with class into groups.
learning disabilities. Assist groups when
Groups will discuss the key elements of the lifestyle needed and hand
of Venice in reference with the video game and/or the students notes about

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SID: 18004999 Name: Jerick Esmundo
textbook. Then write each group one paragraph locations from
roleplaying one of the selected characters chosen from previous lessons
the teacher from the game and write down the main Student: Students
aspects including from the note from previous home split into groups,
work. select which character
to roleplay and
brainstorm main
aspects of that certain
person
Resources: Textbook
pg 40-70, workbooks
30- Discuss as a class what where the main features of the Teacher: Directs Teacher
35 everyday life in Renaissance Italy regarding to each each group to discuss
role. It will very informal where it will only be what they found out
question and answer time. about their character
and some elements of
Venice culture
Student: Students
will discuss and
respond to teacher
Resources:
35- Plays the game level that involves Leonardo da Vinci, Teacher: Teacher Teacher
55 focuses on the technology and inventions that he has plays the video level
made. If the teacher is just using, there are links about Da Vinci. If
provided. there is still time or
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ORGVc1Sg7e8 want to change
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ORGVc1Sg7e8 activity, then teacher
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aJUZlyBhG1E can pass images of
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d-Yuaz_9WzA inventions and have
class discussion
If not possible, or if there is still time, then give Student: Students
students images about De Vinci’s invention and then watch gameplay or
discuss in the same groups if they were made by him respond to teacher
or where fiction. Students can use textbook subtitled about the image. Go
“History of Inventions’. However the answer will not back to their groups
be given out as these ideas will be used for later used and discuss reasons
for their essay topic. why they need
inventions,
The latter activity is more about sources and practicality and usage.
contesting whether these images are fiction or were Can use textbook as
part of history. Contestability of sources reference

Resources: Assassins
Creed 2, images,
textbook
55- Pack up, remind students of homework and read their Teacher: Tells Teacher
60 textbooks for next lesson about Da Vinci essay and students about
dismiss the class. research about Da
Vinci Essay, no
textbook reading

Student: Dismisses

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SID: 18004999 Name: Jerick Esmundo
and has to prepare
homework notes for
essay.

Resources:

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SID: 18004999 Name: Jerick Esmundo
Reflection
ICT is an important element is learning but the teacher must be skilled with either the video
game or working with the internet and videos, which means extra time needs to considered
when using visual formats including video games (Taylor & Fahey, 2012, 279-281). For
their homework, students need to have an understanding about resources and research which
was not even mentioned at all. This means that students will only find their research and
understand about Da Vinci for their first assessment in the internet which can be bias source.
However the use of information communicated both visual and verbal forms, from the
videogame and textbook, engages students especially with the media aspects as that form of
medium is part of their everyday life.

How am I measuring the outcomes of this lesson?

Learning Outcome Method of measurement and recording


HT4-3 Describes and assess Students will observe about the interactions between
the motives and actions of different groups when the game character interacts with
past individuals and groups them. They also write a paragraph about one group or
in the context of past individual related to Venice lifestyle
societies
HT4-5 Identifies the Students will be engage to the video game while
meaning, purpose and having in-depth knowledge from their textbook to a
contexts of historical have visual understanding about Venice. Students will
sources be using their textbook and videogame to determine
which images are fact and fiction

HT4-7 Identifies and The game and textbook will provide details about the
describes different contexts, lifestyle and economic features of the Renaissance
perspectives and period
interpretations of the past
HT4-10- Selects and uses Having both a visual (pictures), digital (video game)
appropriate oral, written, and written (textbook) forms of information will
visual and digital forms to broaden student learning and engagement.
communicate about the past

Other considerations
Graduate Evidence within this lesson
Standards

2.1 Students understand that information can be gathered from different


strategies including the use of ICT and media related sources, books and
pictures and through group activity
2.6 The use of video games demonstrate that learning can expand beyond
readings and textbooks
3.4 Uses a variety of sources including video games, books and pictures to give
context to the overall topic of Venice
4.5 When playing the game, the teacher is explicit to what he/she does. Since
the game is MA15+ and most students are younger than the recommended
age, the teacher needs to confident not to show the mature rating
elements of the game including violence or sexual content

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SID: 18004999 Name: Jerick Esmundo
WHS
What are the key risk issues that may appear for and need to be reduced/eliminated in this
lesson? Using your syllabus and support documents as well as other WHS policy- Outline
the key WHS considerations that are to be applied in this lesson?
The main issue is the use of ICT, particular the video game Assassins Creed 2. The
teacher needs extra time to load the game and select the Venice Map; otherwise if not
done students will be watching the teacher load the level wasting learning and student
engaging. (The aim for this lesson is to be fun) (APST, 2011). Other WHS polices not
mentioned include class behaviour and management as there is some group work and
the teacher needs to split the class so all students can be focussed on the tasks. There
no clear indication for group work relation to learning abilities which may result in
uneven groups where there are those that will struggle with the task

References (In APA)

Yumiya89, (2009 November 27). Assassins Creed II: Testing Leonardo Da Vinci’s Flying
Machine [Video File], Retrieved from August 2 2017.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ORGVc1Sg7e8
NIKA17, (2011 March 31). Assassin’s Creed Brotherhood-Hell on Wheels [Video File],
Retrieved from August 2, 2017 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aJUZlyBhG1E
SpongyProdcutions, (2017 May 23). PS4 Assassins Creed II Venice Free Roam #1 [Video
File], Retrieved from August 2, 2017
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1NFaIuz729oc
SpongyProductions, (2013 March 2). Assassins Creed II Venice Free Roam [Video File],
Retrieved from August 2, 2017
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SNAbRCRGGHA
Assassins Creed Flying Machine [Image] (2012 December 20). Retrieved August 2, 2017
https://vignette1.wikia.nocookie.net/assassinscreed/images/4/4d/AC3_Connor_Flyin
g_Machine.png/revision/latest?cb=20130622220142
Canaletto [Image] (2009, May 19). Retrieved August 1, 2017) from
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e5/Canaletto_%28II%29_002.jp
g
Assassins Creed Brotherhood Tank Level [Image] (2011 January 11). Retrived August 1,
2017, from
https://vignette2.wikia.nocookie.net/assassinscreed/images/9/9c/Hell_on_Wheels_7.
png/revision/latest?cb=20120930155435
Leonardo Da Vinci printing press [Image] (2007 February 18). Retrieved July 21, 2017
http://payload128.cargocollective.com/1/10/333206/4873422/Ribauldequins_-
_Leonardo_da_Vinci_studies_1000.jpg

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SID: 18004999 Name: Jerick Esmundo
Resources Attached:
Copy of Assassins Creed 2
Projector, whiteboard,
Computer keyboard and mouse
Video game console (Xbox 360, PS3), controller from either Xbox or PlayStation or

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SID: 18004999 Name: Jerick Esmundo
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SID: 18004999 Name: Jerick Esmundo
Lesson Plan 3: Essay Writing

Topic area: Stage of Learner: Syllabus Pages:


Renaissance Italy: 4 70
Introduction
Date: 15/02/2017 Location Booked: A2.1.07 Lesson Number: 3/12

Time: 60 minutes Total Number of students 15 Printing/preparation


Print Essay Planning Sheets
Homer Simpson Essay guide

Outcomes Assessment Students learn about Students learn to


Syllabus outcomes Lesson The role and Investigate and assess
HT4-8 assessment achievements of the importance of
HT4-9 The main significant individuals significant individuals
HT4-3 assessment will (ACDSEH058) Use sources to identify
be about the Significant different perspectives
essay question, developments and/or on the chosen
although this cultural achievements individual
lesson will more that reflect the using a range of
about planning concentration of sources,
rather than wealth and power in
finishing the the city-states
whole task. (ACDSEH056)
Cross Curriculum themes & General capabilities Explicit subject specific concepts and skills
Intercultural understanding, capability, critical Literacy: creative thinking and ICT
and creative thinking, personal and social
capability, difference and diversity, civics and
citizenship

Quality Teaching Elements (lesson focus) Highlight the appropriate areas: Cover at least one
from each group

19
SID: 18004999 Name: Jerick Esmundo
Intellectual Quality 1.1 Deep 1.4 Higher-order
This refers to pedagogy focused on producing deep understanding knowledge thinking
of important, substantive concepts, skills and ideas. Such pedagogy 1.2 Deep 1.5 Metalanguage
treats knowledge as something that requires active construction and understanding 1.6 Substantive
requires students to engage in higher-order thinking and to 1.3 Problematic communication
communicate substantively about what they are learning. knowledge
Quality Learning Environment 2.1 Explicit quality 2.4 Social Support
This refers to pedagogy that creates classrooms where students and criteria 2.5 Students’ self
teachers work productively in an environment clearly focused on 2.2 Engagement regulation
learning. Such pedagogy sets high and explicit expectations and 2.3 High 2.6 Student direction
develops positive relationships between teacher and students and Expectations
among students.
Significance 3.1 Background 3.4 Inclusivity
This refers to pedagogy that helps make learning more meaningful knowledge 3.5 Connectedness
and important to students. Such pedagogy draws clear connections 3.2 Cultural 3.6 Narrative
with students’ prior knowledge and identities, with contexts outside knowledge
of the classroom, and with multiple ways of knowing all cultural 3.3 Knowledge
perspective. integration

How the quality teaching elements you have identified are achieved within the lesson.

Teaching Indicators of presence in the lesson


element
1.4 Students will need gather the information they have learnt to form ideas about
Leonardo da Vinci. They are tasked to organise, apply, synthesise and evaluate
knowledge gathered from previous lessons, reading and other sources to form and
write a short roleplaying essay about him and his time in Venice.
2.4 The teacher will be involved in scaffolding the information into paragraphs. Students
have the choice to either work individually or as a group but as long as students are
able to work in the task.
3.2 Students will use the information about different groups of class, race, gender and
sexuality to form their arguments.

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SID: 18004999 Name: Jerick Esmundo
Time Teaching and learning actions Organisation Centred
T/S
0-5 Roll call and introduce the lesson: Role Teacher: Teacher marks Teacher
Playing Essay on Leonardo da Vinci. After roll and passes essay
that the teacher will tell students about the planning sheets
lesson and how to write a basic essay plan.
Student: Get their
workbooks, textbooks and
any notes from their research
homework
Resources: Essay plan
sheets
5-15 Teacher gives mini-lesson about essay and Teacher: Teacher will teach Teacher
structure and what is expected. Teacher then students how write a basic
describes the lesson as an essay planning paragraph, introduction
task. The teacher will plan the first paragraph about Venice

The goal is use the information students and a Student: Student will follow
roleplay one of a Venetian citizen, preferably teacher, use information to
with a role that seen the second lesson with create an argument and find
the video game. points to show evidence
about their character
Students are to use their textbook, workbook,
notes from previous lessons and any research Resources: Essay plan
they did for homework about their chosen sheets, textbook, workbook,
character and form a short story where they notes from previous lessons
were friends or interacted with Leonardo da and any research
Vinci; this means that there should be some
reference/evidence of information about Da
Vinci.
15- Teacher will scaffold and use gradual release Teacher: Teacher will go Teacher
30 of responsibility each process in creating the
next paragraph in terms of
Teacher will assist students in writing the structure and form but all
topic sentences and main themes. Teacher answers will be different
may need to give examples from the
information given from the previous two Student: Students will use
lesson, such topics for their paragraphs. Some the information to form their
ideas about paragraph include statements and observe from
- Introduction paragraph: describe who the essay plan and paragraph
this character is sheet how to write a
- What does this person do in Venice argument
- Character’s relationship to other
citizens Resources: Essay plan
- Character relationship to Leonardo sheets, textbook, workbook,
Da Vinci notes from previous lessons
and any research
30- Students can work individual or in pairs to Teacher: Teacher assist Teacher/Student
55 find information and work on their essay student on their essay work

Student: Students will work


on their own, planning and
sequencing their essay.
Students can work together
to form ideas but they

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SID: 18004999 Name: Jerick Esmundo
cannot copy each other’s
work
Resources: Essay plan
sheets, textbook, workbook,
notes from previous lessons
and any research

Reflection
Strategies are an important element for maintaining student engagement while
focussing on unit outcomes and the standards. Using the gradual release method of
responsibility was a major factor that made essay planning and writing possible.
However this needs to coincide with English lessons, where that subjects aims to
work with grammar, sentence structure and other facets related to English; history is
focussed on grasping knowledge and spending time on essay writing, while important,
will not only waste time but also distracts from the content that needs to be taught.

How am I measuring the outcomes of this lesson?


Learning Outcome Method of measurement and recording
HT4-8 Locates, selects and Students use a range of sources from the current and
organizes previous lessons to form a historical inquiry about
information from Venice and Da Vinci. These sources include the
sources to develop textbook, workbook, notes from previous lessons and
an historical inquiry any research from homework.

HT4-9 Use a range of The teacher explain some historical concept and
historical terms and jargon for both their history work and literacy skills.
concept when Some information may vary but the students need to
communicating an use historical terms and information to back up their
understanding of arguments
the past

HT4-3 describes and The students use the information about their specific
assesses the motives character to form their story. Although the
and actions of past roleplaying character may vary, they all observe the
individuals and past actions of Venetians citizens and Da Vinci
groups in the
context of past
societies

Other considerations
Graduate Evidence within this lesson
Standards
1.5 During the session where students work on their writing tasks, teacher
can choose to assist students with their learning needs or select
students, particular gifted students, to help with their work
2.1 The teacher use previous lessons and the textbooks to teach about
some of the concepts and relates the tasks to what is required in the
syllabus
2.2 The teacher introduces the topic, scaffolding the writing tasks to have
an idea about the task and leaves the students to work on the tasks.

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Teachers can allow pairs to work together or can assist students to
generate ideas
2.5 Teacher engages both literacy skills for their writing. Meanwhile
numeracy skills vary according to the student’s roleplaying idea with
regards to timelines and dates to fit into the historical context. ICT
will also vary depending if the students use computers for typing
assignment and/or using online research.
3.3 Use gradual release model for essay writing and maybe think pair and
share strategy if students are working together for their writing tasks.

WHS
The main issue is behaviour as this lesson is reliant on teacher direction and timing is
an important factor for students to have the scaffolding for the essay tasks. ICT was
not referenced in the plan but can be an issue as students tend to bring laptops and
similar devices when working on essays and their research which can be a distraction
for other students.

References (In APA)


How to structure an essay (Image) (2015, September 12). Retrieved August 5, 2017
from http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_9dPtEKC0NW4/RoImt-
iYy2I/AAAAAAAAAEM/lCBZL1mTv6A/s1600/How+to+structure+an+essay.jpg

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SID: 18004999 Name: Jerick Esmundo
Resources Attached:

How to structure an essay (Image) (2015, September 12 ). Retrieved August 5, 2017


from
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_9dPtEKC0NW4/RoImt-
iYy2I/AAAAAAAAAEM/lCBZL1mTv6A/s1600/How+to+structure+an+essay.jpg

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SID: 18004999 Name: Jerick Esmundo
Rational

What am I teaching and why?

These lessons are aimed at focussing on Renaissance Italy and explore the culture and

lifestyles of citizens and individuals including Leonardo Da Vinci. McNeil, a

historian who made a massive impact on education and history, suggested that both

having an understanding on an aspect of European history in Western education is

important to understand the birth and reasoning of religion society and government

(Curthoys & Lake, 205, 26-8). Therefore these lesson were not only to introduce the

topic but have a clear understanding between Medieval and Renaissance culture and

its relationship with the modern world (Seixas, 2004)

How am I teaching it?

The main methods of teachings would go through sequencing so student not only can

improve their knowledge about the topic and the history but can scaffold those ideas

and concepts into easy and digestible tasks which can be beneficial for assessments.

(Curthoys & Lake, 205, 23). One of the reasons why the first lesson focused on

background knowledge was to test student’s knowledge on past history lesson

(Christian, 2003). The aim was to see if students have grasped the historical concepts

of cause and effect, use of evidence and continuity and change particular between the

transition from the medieval world and renaissance Italy (Brady & Kennedy, 2010,

58-60). While lesson one was more about the geographical aspects of Italy, lessons 2

and 3 had it outcomes based on learning the everyday life of individuals while mixing

into the world of Venice and interacting with Leonardo Da Vinci. (Clark, 2016, 1-3).

To further support these claims, student engagement was a vital factor in both

maintain a learning environment but making sure students are focussed in the task.

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SID: 18004999 Name: Jerick Esmundo
APST standard 1 and 2 (2011) aims for equity by giving every student a chance to

learn; this was done by integrating groups with mixed learning abilities meaning that

gifted students worked with student with disabilities and giving opportunities to

contribute to the task (Brady & Kennedy, 2010, 27-30). The NSW Quality

Framework (2003) gives outlines to maximum lessons where significance was an

important element. The group work activities was important to allow students to work

collaboratively, giving them the autonomy to develop what roles each member was

allocated and encourage personal and social learning environments. (Taylor, Fahley,

229). The aim was to have a student focussed lesson where they were the ones in

charge of the class while the teacher directs instructions and goals and occasion

mentor groups into the task at hand (Brady & Kennedy, 2010, 106-110).

Another idea was the use of teaching strategy to reduce the workload for students.

The gradual release model and the scaffolding method was useful in engaging

students with both critical analyse about the world of the renaissance and for their

writing tasks Taylor, Fahley, 209-10). The use of roleplaying when focussing on their

writing tasks supports the outcome of multiple perspectives as well as observing

certain individual, this is case the writing tasks fulfilled many student outcomes

including the cultural and everyday aspects of citizens and a case study of Da Vinci

(Board of Studies, 2012)

While not reference as ‘Think Pair and Share’, this and similar strategies involved

sophisticated and collaborative work among individuals and peers. These tasks were

to note trends and insight about historical aspects about locations while not

overwhelming the task as this seem more like a geography lesson rather than a

history; this is useful to gain a layout of Italy and see reasons why certain unfolded in

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SID: 18004999 Name: Jerick Esmundo
these areas (Clark, 2016). The work with the images was to focus on the contestability

of sources as most of the work revolved around secondary sources (Taylor, Fahey,

108). In all group time was given to have class discussion, this helps students gain

confidence in public speaking but also learn that vocal speaking brings a level of truth

to what they have read (Clark, 2016, 2).

ICT was a major element where learning can come from any form including oral,

visual, written and artistic forms of communication (APST, 2011). Since this lesson

plan is written for a private school, laptops and other similar devices with be present

meaning that ICT work can integrated with their workbooks and textbooks; however

this is was not even reference at all and in future lessons this needs to be done. The

same can be applied to research where there was no time to have lessons on research

as students will have a hard time to discern not only between primary and secondary

sources but where information can seem bias (Cohen, Rosenzweig, 2005,). In terms of

using other resources in relation to ICT, video games can offer general context and

have the effect of engagement more powerful than book or documentary as the

medium is engrained into the culture of a high schooler (Meyers, 2011). But it was

able address the cross curriculum themes that is present in the K-10 learning

outcomes (Brady, Kennedy, 2010 60-68). In relation to assessment, ICT aspects failed

to be addressed as the homework task from lesson 2 asked students to conduct

research where no training was used. Therefore ICT failed as a role with bridging

assessment tasks to concepts and idea which is explicit with Quality teaching in

regards to intellectual quality and significance (2003) and standards 3 from the

Australian Professional Standards for Teachers.

( Taylor, Fahey, 217-9).

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SID: 18004999 Name: Jerick Esmundo
One thing that needs to be addressed is behaviour where the importance pedagogy or

strategies to use was not mentioned. As stated before, I wrote these plans on the basis

of a private school where appropriate student behaviour was to be expected. However

APST standards 3 and 4 (2011) reassures the need to plan and implement effective

teaching and learning but also create and maintain supportive and safe learning

environments. While these lessons have made sure that students are connected and

understand the content, there were many elements that were not well integrated from

the Quality teaching framework specially metalanguage and higher-order thinking

(Quality teaching, 2003). Taylor and Fahley (2012, 191-201) summaries that these

concepts and terms are essentially to map students’ progression not only with

assessment but the historical content and making sure students are learning. It also

tells if the lessons plans are achieving its goals and whether or not the resources,

strategies and content need to change to either adapt to the student’s learning ability,

revaluate the teaching methods on engagement or even making it challenging.

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SID: 18004999 Name: Jerick Esmundo
Reference

Australian Professional Standards for Teacher, Australian Institute for Teaching and

School Leadership, (2011), Retrieved from

https://www.aitsl.edu.au/teach/standards

Brady, L., & Kennedy, K. (2010). Curriculum Construction. Frenchs, Forrest

Australia: Pearson Australia.

Board of Studies, Teaching and Educational Standards NSW. (2012). K-10 History

Syllabus. Sydney, Australia: Board of Studies, Teaching and Educational

Standards NSW.

Christian, D. (2003). World History in Context, Journal of World History, 14 (4)

http://historycooperative.org/

Cohen, D. J. & Rosenzweig, R. (2005) Digital History: A Guide to Gathering,

Preserving, and Presenting the Past on the Web.

http://chnm.gmu.edu/digitalhistory/ retrieved June 2009.

Clark, A. (2016) Private Lives, Public History: Navigating Historical Consciousness

in Australia. History Compass, 14: 1–8. doi: 10.1111/hic3.12296.

Curthoys, A. & Lake, M. (2006). Connected Worlds: History in Transnational

Perspective. http://epress.anu.edu.au/cw_citation.html

Meyers, Kate. (2011), Lessons from Assaisn Creed for Constrcuting Educational

Games. Retrieved July 27, 2017 from http://www.playthepast.org/?p=2077

Quality teaching in NSW public schools (2003), Retrieved

fromhttp://www.darcymoore.net/wp-

content/uploads/2012/02/qt_EPSColor.pdf

Seixas, P. (2004). Theorizing Historical Consciousness, Toronto: University of

Toronto Press.

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SID: 18004999 Name: Jerick Esmundo
Taylor, T. Fahey, C., Kriewaldt, J. & Boon, D. (2012) Place and Time Explorations

in Teaching Geography and History. Malaysia: Pearson.

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SID: 18004999 Name: Jerick Esmundo