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Unit 4 Grammar

4.2. Adjective

Adjectives identify or describe nouns in more detail. They are placed before the noun in attributive
position (nice weather) or in predicative position (The weather is nice.) and they do not change their form
except for comparison. Adjectives can express qualities, origin, place, frequency, degree, necessity,
degrees of certainty, opinion, attitude etc.

4.2.1. Qualitative adjectives

Qualitative adjectives identify a quality that someone or something has such as: sad, pretty, small,
healthy, wise etc. The usual way in which you can indicate the amount of quantity is by using sub
modifiers like very and rather. Another way in which you can indicate the amount of quality is by using
comparatives and superlatives. A list of qualitative adjectives is given below:

active effective lovely silly


angry efficient low simple
anxious expensive lucky slow
appropriate fair narrow small
attractive familiar nervous soft
bad famous new special
beautiful fast nice steady
big fat obvious strange
brief fine odd strong
bright firm old stupid
broad flat pale successful
busy frank patient suitable
calm free plain sure
careful fresh pleasant surprised
cheap friendly poor sweet
clean frightened popular tall
clear funny powerful terrible
close good pretty thick
cold great proud thin
comfortable happy quick tight
common hard quiet tiny
complex heavy rare tired
cool high reasonable typical
curious hot rich understanding
dangerous important rough useful
dark interesting sad violent
dear kind safe warm
deep large sensible weak
determined late serious wet
different light sharp wide
difficult likely shocked wild
dirty long short worried
dry loose sick young
easy loud significant
4.2.2. Classifying adjectives

Classifying adjectives are those used to identify the particular class that something belongs to e.g.
daily shower, equal partnership etc. They do not have comparatives and superlatives and are not
normally used with sub modifiers. A list of classifying adjectives is given below:

absolute double industrial official rural


active due inevitable open scientific
actual east intellectual original separate
agricultural eastern internal personal sexual
alternative economic international physical single
annual educational legal political social
apparent electric local positive solid
available empty magic possible south
basic external male potential southern
central female medical private standard
chemical financial mental professional straight
civil foreign military proper sufficient
commercial free modern public theoretical
communist full moral raw traditional
conservative general national ready urban
cultural golden natural real west
daily historical negative religious western
democratic human north revolutionary wooden
direct ideal northern right wrong
domestic independent nuclear royal

Adjectives, which indicate nationality or origin, are also classifying, and start with capital letters
because they are related to names of countries: British Classification Society, American citizen,
Australian cities etc.

Some adjectives can be either qualitative or classifying according to the meaning that you want to
convey: an emotional person (qualitative), the emotional needs of people (classifying). Some adjectives
used both as qualitative and classifying are: academic, conscious, dry, educational, effective,
emotional, extreme, late, modern, moral, objective, ordinary, regular, religious, revolutionary,
rural, scientific, secret, similar.

4.2.3. Colour adjectives

They are used to identify a colour: black, blue, brown, cream, green, gray, orange, pink, purple,
red, scarlet, violet, white, yellow. If you want to specify a colour more precisely, you can use a sub
modifier like: light, dark, pale, deep, and bright. If we want to talk about an indefinite colour we can
use the suffix –ish:
He’s got light brown hair.
The cabin has greenish furniture.

4.2.4. Adjectives in -ing and -ed, participial adjectives


Adjectives in -ing express what something is like, the effect it has on us. For example a book can be:
amusing, interesting, boring etc. Adjectives in –ed express how we feel about something. For example
the reader can be: amused, interested, bored etc.
Some pairs of adjectives that can be used according to the meaning with -ing or –ed are:

alarming/alarmed exciting/excited
amusing/amused fascinating/fascinated
annoying/annoyed puzzling/puzzled
confusing/confused relaxing/relaxed
depressing/depressed surprising/surprised
disappointing/disappointed tiring/tired

4.2.5. Compound adjectives

Compound adjectives are made up of two or more words, usually written with hyphens between them.
The most common patterns for forming compound adjectives are:
 Adjective or numeral + ‘ed’: grey-haired;
 Adjective or adverb + past participle: low-paid;
 Adjective, adverb or noun + present participle: long-lasting.
There are some other patterns that are less common and more restrictive:
 Noun + past participle: wind-blown;
 Noun + adjective: trouble-free;
 Adjective + noun: deep-sea;
 Past participle + adverb: run-down;
 Number + singular countable noun: four-door.

Here is a list of some compound qualitative adjectives used in marine engineering: clear-cut, labour
saving, long-lasting, low-cut, one sided, stuck-up, thick-skinned, trouble-free, two-edged, two-faced,
well-balanced etc.

Here is a list of some compound classifying adjectives used in marine engineering:

air-conditioned full-blown one-way


brand-new full-length open-ended
broken-down full-scale record-breaking
built-up long-distance remote-controlled
bullet-proof long-range right-angled
burnt-out made-up see-through
deep-sea north-east silver-plated
double-barreled north-west worn-out
drip-dry nuclear-free

4.2.6. The order of adjectives

When two or more adjectives come before a noun, there is usually a fixed order: opinion (nice,
awful); size (large, short); quality (clear, famous); age (old, new); shape (narrow, thin); colour (red,
white); participle forms (covered, broken, running); origin (British, Romanian); material (iron, brick);
type (chemical, electronic); purpose [alarm (panel), walking (boots)]:
two small round brown discs,
a new improved formula,
increasing financial difficulties,
cheap clean energy source.

In general, the adjective closest to the noun has the closest link in meaning with the noun and
expresses what is most permanent about it. When two adjectives have similar meanings, the shorter one
often comes first: a soft, comfortable chair etc. We use and when the adjectives refer to different parts of
something: a black and white cap, and we use but when the adjectives refer to two qualities in contrast:
a cheap but effective solution etc.

4.3. Adverbs

Adverbs are words that modify a word, a phrase or a whole sentence. Some adverbs have their own
form which is not related to other words: always, soon, very etc. Many adverbs are formed from
adjectives by adding –ly e.g. quick – quickly etc. There are some spelling rules for adverbs formed with
–ly:
 y is changed into i: easy – easily;
 le after consonant is changed into ly: probable – probably;
 ally must be added after -ic: automatic – automatically.

Some adverbs have the same form as adjectives: fast, long, early etc.
I had an early night. (adjective)
I went to bed early. (adverb)

Sometimes the adverb can appear with or without –ly, and the most common adverbs of this type are:
cheap/cheaply, loud/loudly, quick/quickly, slow/slowly, direct/directly, tight/tightly, fair/fairly.
However the form without –ly is more informal.
Do you have to talk so loud/loudly?

There are some pairs of adverbs with different meanings: hard – hardly, near – nearly, late – lately,
high – highly, deep – deeply, free – freely, most – mostly.
You’ve worked hard. I’ve got hardly any money (almost no).
I wake up late. I haven’t heard from him lately (recently).
There is a bank near. We’ve nearly finished (almost).
Submarines can go very deep. He was deeply offended (serious).
If you win, you can travel free. Animals can’t move freely on board (uncontrolled).
The plane flew high. The theory is highly controversial (very).
This leg hurts the most. We mostly stay in the engine room (usually).

Some time adverbs are related to nouns and they can be both adjectives and adverbs: day – daily,
hour – hourly, week – weekly, year – yearly:
It’s a monthly magazine (adjective).
It comes out monthly (adverb).
There are several types of adverbs: adverbs of time, adverbs of frequency, adverbs of place, adverbs of
manner, adverbs of degree, linking adverbs, sentence adverbs, negative adverbs.

4.3.1. Adverbs of manner


Adverbs of manner give more information about the way in which an event or action takes place. They
modify verbs and most of them are formed from adjectives. They are usually placed after the verb or after
the object.
He speaks English fluently.
He smelled the fuel suspiciously.
Here is a list of the most common adverbs describing the way in which something is done.

abruptly economically peacefully steadily


accurately effectively peculiarly steeply
awkwardly efficiently perfectly stiffly
badly evenly plainly strangely
beautifully explicitly pleasantly subtly
brightly faintly politely superbly
brilliantly faithfully poorly swiftly
briskly fiercely professionally systematically
carefully finely properly tenderly
carelessly firmly quietly thickly
casually fluently rapidly thinly
cheaply formally readily thoroughly
clearly frankly richly thoughtfully
closely freely rigidly tightly
clumsily gently roughly truthfully
comfortably gracefully ruthlessly uncomfortably
consistently hastily securely urgently
conveniently heavily sensibly vaguely
correctly honestly sharply vigorously
dangerously hurriedly silently violently
delicately intently simply vividly
differently meticulously smoothly voluntarily
discreetly neatly softly warmly
distinctly nicely solidly widely
dramatically oddly specifically willingly
easily patiently splendidly wonderfully

4.3.2. Adverbs of degree

Adverbs of degree are used when we want to give more information about the extent of an action or
the degree to which an action is performed. They can modify an adjective, an adverb or a verb. They are
usually placed before the word they modify:
I had almost forgotten about maintenance.
A change of one word can radically alter the meaning of the statement.
I’m so tired.
I saw him quite recently.

Enough follows the adjective or adverb:


He didn’t work quickly enough.

Some common adverbs of degree are:


 full degree: completely, totally, absolutely, entirely, quite;
 large degree: very, extremely, really, awfully, terribly;
 medium degree: rather, fairly, quite, pretty, somewhat;
 small degree: a little, a bit, slightly;
 negative: hardly, scarcely;
 others: so, as, too, more, most, less, least.

We use so and such for emphasis. So is used with adjectives and adverbs. Such a is used with
adjective + singular noun. Such/so many/so few are used with plural nouns. Such/so much/so little are
used with uncountable nouns:
The meeting finished so quickly.
It was such a quick meeting.
You have so many friendly colleagues.
It was such good advice.

4.3.3. Adverbs of place

Adverbs of place give information about place, position, destination and direction. They can be placed
after the verb e.g. He lives abroad; after an object e.g. I looked for it everywhere; at the beginning of the
sentence e.g. Here it comes.
Here is a list of words that are used as adverbs to indicate position.

abroad downstream inland out of doors underwater


ahead downtown midway overhead upstairs
aloft downwind nearby overseas upstream
ashore eastward next door southward uptown
away halfway northward there upwind
close to here offshore underfoot westward
downstairs indoors outdoors underground

Some adverbs indicate destination or direction in relation to a particular position of the person or thing
you are talking about: ahead, along, back, backward, forward, left, on, right, sideways etc.
Other adverbs can indicate movement:
 in different directions: back and forth, backwards and forwards, from side to side, in and
out, round and round, to and fro, up and down;
 away from someone or something: aside, away, off, out, outward;
 across or past something: across, by, over, overhead, past, round, through.

4.3.4. Adverbs of time

Adverbs of time give information about the duration or the moment an action takes place. The most
common adverbs of time are: afterwards, before, eventually, immediately, lately, now, recently, since,
soon, then, today, tomorrow, yet. They can be placed either in end position or initial position.
The office is closed for two weeks.
Yesterday the main generator failed.

Still is placed after the verb be but before other verbs:


He is still in the engine room.
He still doesn’t understand.
Most adverbs of time are used with certain verb tenses and they are going to be mentioned when
discussing about tenses.
4.3.5. Adverbs of frequency

Adverbs of frequency indicate approximately how many times something happens. Their position in
the sentence is different according to the adverb and the meaning; however they can be placed in mid
position, at the beginning or at the end.
She never goes abroad.
Normally I tip taxi-drivers.
I go on long trips sometimes.

Here is a list of adverbs and adverbial expressions:

again and again ever never regularly


a lot frequently normally repeatedly
all the time from time to time occasionally seldom
always hardly ever often sometimes
constantly infrequently once sporadically
continually intermittently periodically twice
continuously much rarely usually

Adverbs like: hardly ever, rarely, scarcely ever can be placed at the beginning of a sentence, but
inversion of the following main verb then becomes necessary:
Hardly ever did they manage to meet unobserved.

4.3.6. Sentence adverbs

Sentence adverbs (truth or comment adverbs) modify the whole sentence/clause and normally express
the speaker’s opinion. Some sentence adverbs express degrees of certainty: actually, apparently,
certainly, clearly, definitely, evidently, obviously, perhaps, possibly, presumably, probably, surely,
undoubtedly. They can be placed after be, before simple tenses of the other verbs, after the first auxiliary
in a compound verb, at the beginning or at the end of a sentence.
He is obviously intelligent.
They certainly work hard.
Surely you could pay $ 2,000?

Other sentence adverbs are: admittedly, fortunately, frankly, honestly, luckily, naturally, officially,
unfortunately, unluckily etc. They are usually placed in initial position though the end position is also
possible. They are normally separated from the rest of the sentence by a comma. Many of them can also
be adverbs of manner:
Honestly, he didn’t get the money.

4.3.7. Linking adverbs

A linking adverb relates to the previous clause or sentence. Most often it goes in front position but it
can go in mid or end position. The linking adverbs are: also, as a result, as well, consequently,
furthermore, however, instead, in addition, likewise, nevertheless, on the other hand, otherwise,
therefore, too:
He was forced to work to support himself. However, he still found time to review for his exams.

4.4. Comparison
Both adjectives and adverbs have degrees of comparison, but not all of them. To express the fact that
things are equal we use the pattern as + adj./adv. + as. In negative statements we can use either so or as.
We use as with the second item in the comparison.
A gas turbine is as powerful as a steam turbine.
I don’t drink as/so much coffee as you do.
Copper isn’t as valuable as gold.
To compare two things that are not equal we can use two patterns:
a. to express inferiority: less + adj./adv. + than; the + least + adj./adv.:
Some ships are less comfortable than others.
This is the least interesting book I’ve ever read.

b. to express superiority there are two structures according to the length of the adjective or adverb.
 Adverbs made of one syllable or two syllables ending in –y, -ow, -er form the comparative by
adding –er, and the superlative by adding -est: softer, the softest; wider, the wisest; nicer, the
nicest; prettier, the prettiest; narrower, the narrowest; simpler, the simplest, higher, the highest;
quicker, the quickest; bigger, the biggest etc:
Which is the biggest ship in the world?
Traditional fuel is cheaper than nuclear fuel.
 Adverbs made of more than two syllables and the rest of two syllables adjectives and adverbs
form the comparative with more and the superlative with the most: more useful, the most
useful; more afraid, the most afraid, more expensive, the most expensive etc:
Passenger liners are the most expensive of all ships.
Automation is more useful than mechanization.

There are some adjectives and adverbs with irregular forms of comparison:

Positive Comparative Superlative


good/well better the best
bad worse the worst
far further/farther the furthest/farthest
little less the least
much/many more the most
old older/elder the oldest/eldest
near nearer the nearest/next
late later the latest/last

Special patterns with comparative and superlative


 Comparative + and + comparative expresses a continuing increase:
The problem is becoming worse and worse.
Ships are made bigger and bigger.

 the + comparative…the + comparative expresses that a change in one thing goes with a change
in another:
The longer the journey (is), the more expensive the ticket (is).
The further you travel, the more you pay.
The older you get, the more difficult it becomes to find a job.
4.6. Grammar Practice

4.6.1. Grammar Practice Adjective


Exercise 1. There are twelve adjectives in this story. Underline them.
I went for a long walk in the countryside yesterday. It was a hot day, and soon I was tired and thirsty.
There was a small house by the side of the road, and I decided to ask for a glass of cold water. I rang the
bell and an old lady opened the big, wooden door. She looked kind and she offered me a glass of fresh
juice. It tasted great!

Exercise II. Choose from the following adjectives to fill in the sentences below: hungry, new, terrible,
expensive, sad, wonderful, Italian, fresh, difficult.
1. Gold rings are normally expensive.
2. This food smells.................! I love fish and chips.
3. It was a ................exam. I’m sure I haven’t passed.
4. I’ve just bought a ...............sports car.
5. I met my wife in Rome, but she isn’t................
6. He looks................. I don’t think he likes his job.
7. Are you....................? Shall I buy some sandwiches?
8. This orange juice tastes..................Is it....................?

Exercise III. Look at these sentences. If you think the adjectives are in the wrong order, change the order.
If you think the order is correct, put a tick (√).
1. She lost a gold, small ring at the disco yesterday night.
2. I have an old, Italian painting in my living room.
3. I’m looking for my cotton, green shirt and my brown, leather shoes.
4. George has a Spanish, modern villa near the sea. He goes there every summer.
5. I live in an old, white house near the river. I’ve got a black, large dog!
6. I had an interesting talk with a Polish, young student last week.
7. We are having lunch in a big, Japanese, new restaurant in the centre of town.
8. I left my books in a red, plastic bag on the bus. I was so stupid!

Exercise IV. Write the comparative form of these adjectives: cold, big, careful, expensive, good, fat,
famous, new, modern, young, cheap, delicious, rich, long, hungry, nice, happy, difficult, old, beautiful,
friendly, hot, bad, small, sad.

Exercise V. Put the words in brackets ( ) in the right order to make sentences.
1. (the world – Antarctica – coldest – is – place – the – in)
2. (city – the – Manchester – in England – is – friendliest)
3. (in New York – expensive – restaurant – The Manhattan – the – is – most)
4. (is – river – the world – the – The Nile – longest – in)
5. (town – most – in Spain – Granada – beautiful – is – the)
6. (painting – The Mona Lisa – the – famous – in – is – most – the world)
7. (the – Europe – mountain – in – highest – Mont Blanc – is)

Exercise VI. Use the words in brackets ( ) to write sentences. Use the + superlative, and the Present
Perfect + ever.
1. (It’s/ cold/ place/ I/ visit) – It’s the coldest place I’ve ever visited.
2. (It’s/ big/ shop / I/ see)
3. (He’s/ rich/ man/ I/ meet)
4. (It’s/ difficult/ exam/ I/ do)
5. (It’s/ sad/ film/ I/ see)
6. (She’s/ happy/ person/ I/ meet)
7. (It’s/ modern/ flat/ I/ see)
8. (It’s/ hot/ country/ I/ visit)
9. (It’s/ small/ dog/ I/ see).

Exercise VII. Complete the sentences using the comparative form of the adjectives in brackets and than.
1. I think that golf is more interesting than (interesting) tennis.
2. This question is...................... (easy) the last one.
3. I’m a good player, but Eric is........................ (good) me.
4. The group’s first record was......................... (successful) their second record.
5. We both played well, but he was..................... (lucky) me.
6. Your car is...................... (powerful) mine.
7. This computer is.................... (useful) that one.

Exercise VIII. Complete the sentences using the superlative form of the adjective in brackets.
1. Anna is the youngest (young) person in her class.
2. We stayed in...................... (bad) hotel in the whole city.
3. People say that it is............... (funny) film of the year.
4. What is........................ (tall) building in the world?
5. Her teachers say that she is.................... (good) student in the school.
6. This is........................ (expensive) camera in the shop.
7. Many people say that Venice is.................. (beautiful) city in the world.

Exercise IX. Complete each sentence so that it means the same as the one above it. Use as +
adjective/adverb + as.
1. Sweden is bigger than Britain.
Britain isn’t as big as Sweden.
2. The other students learn more quickly than me.
I don’t learn....................................the other students.
3. You’re very angry and I’m angry also.
I’m........................................you.
4. The seats at the front are more expensive than the seats at the back.
The seats at the back aren’t.................................the seats at the front.
5. Central Park in New York is bigger than Hyde Park in London.
Hyde Park in London isn’t........................Central Park in New York.
6. Her last film was very good and her new film is also very good.
Her new film is.......................her last film.
7. The other students work harder than him.
He doesn’t work........................the other students.
Exercise X. Join each pair of sentences in brackets ( ), using as much......as, or as many......as.
1. (I’ve got 50 books. Jack’s got about 100.)
I haven’t got as many books as Jack.
2. (You’ve done a lot of work. I’ve done a lot of work also.)
I’ve done ............................you.
3. (Alan earns a lot of money. Sheila only earns a little.)
Sheila doesn’t earn...........................Alan.
4. (George has been to five countries. I’ve also been to five countries.)
I’ve been to...............................George.
5. (You’ve had five jobs. I’ve only had two.)
I haven’t had...........................you.
6. (Tom has a lot of luggage. Jane has a lot of luggage too.)
Lane has............................Tom.
7. (Mary answered most of the questions. I only answered about half.)
I didn’t answer.............................Mary.
8. (Ruth spent $50.I also spent $50.)
I spent...........................Ruth.

Exercise XI. Choose the correct adjective in brackets ( ) to put in the gaps.
1. It was a terrible play and I was bored (bored/ boring) from start to finish.
2. I’m very.................. (excited/ exciting) because I’m going to New York tomorrow.
3. Are you................ (surprised/ surprising) or were you expecting this news?
4. I’m reading a very................. (interested/ interesting) book at the moment.
5. I’ve had a very.............. (tired/ tiring) day at work today and I want to go to bed.
6. Most people were................... (surprised/ surprising) that he won the championship.
7. I’m....................... (bored/ boring). Let’s go out for a cup of coffee somewhere.
8. Visit our................... (excited/ exciting) new shop!
9. His speech was very long and very................... (bored/ boring).

Exercise XII. Complete the sentences using too or enough and the words in brackets ( ).

1. I can’t eat this soup because it’s too hot (hot).


2. We couldn’t buy the tickets because we didn’t have enough money (money).
3. We didn’t buy the car because it wasn’t big enough (big).
4. I couldn’t see her because it was................... (dark).
5. I can’t decide what to do because I haven’t got.................. (information).
6. You can’t change the situation now. It’s.................. (late).
7. Have you had.................. (food), or would you like some more?
8. He did badly in the exam because he was.................... (nervous).
9. Slow down! You’re driving................... (fast).
10. He shouldn’t play in the team because he isn’t................. (good).
11. I haven’t got................ (clothes). I must buy some more.
l2. Robert didn’t go to work because he didn’t feel................. (well).
13. I couldn’t lift the suitcase because I wasn’t................... (strong).
14. We didn’t go swimming because the water was................ (cold).
15. Mary couldn’t post all the letters because she didn’t have.............. (stamps).

Exercise XIII. An estate agent is describing a house to a client. Are the adjectives in the right order?
Write Yes, or rewrite the sentences, using the correct order. Add and if necessary.
1. It’s an old lovely 18th century house. __________
2. It was built by an English famous architect. __________
3. It’s at the end of a narrow country long lane. __________
4. It’s near to a little pretty village. _________
5. It’s got a lovely large garden. _________
6. And there are two beautiful old stables. _________
7. The kitchen is modern, well equipped. __________
8. The bedrooms are painted green white. ___________
9. There’s an old stone interesting fireplace in the living room. __________
10. The house is solid, well-maintained and reasonably priced. __________

4.6.2. Grammar Practice Adverb

Exercise 1. Rewrite these sentences using an adverb instead of an adjective.


1. Peter is a bad tennis player. Peter plays tennis badly.
2. He’s a dangerous driver. He drives.....................
3. She’s a fast swimmer. She swims...................
4. Martin is a good cook. ...................................
5. I’m a slow writer. ...................................
6. She’s a wonderful dancer ...................................
7. Sheila is a hard worker. ....................................
8. They aren’t quick learners. ....................................

Exercise II. Complete the sentences. Put in the adverb form of the adjective in brackets
( ).
1. She read the message quickly (quick).
2. Read the instructions ............... (careful).
3. He looked at her..................... (angry), but he didn’t say anything.
4. She passed all her exams.................... (easy).
5. Iran as .................... (fast) as I could.
6. He thinks that he did the test................. (bad) and that he’ll fail.
7. I’ve been studying very.................. (hard) recently.
8. She was working................. (busy) when I arrived.
9. She sang the song.................. (beautiful)
10. He was playing................ (happy) when I came into the room.
11. He was concentrating............... (hard) on his work.
12. Have I filled this form in ................ (correct)?
13. I wasn’t in a hurry, so I walked................... (slow) through the park.
14. I closed the door................ (quiet) when left.

Exercise III. Complete the dialogues by putting a suitable adverb into the gaps. Use an adjective from the
following ones: slow, fast, hard, good (x2), easy, bad.
1. A: Were the questions difficult?
B: No, I answered them easily.
2. A: Does she speak English.....................?
B: No, she only knows a few words of English.
3. A: Hurry up! I’m waiting!
B: Just a minute. I’m coming as .....................as I can.
4. A: Did you lose at tennis again?
B: Yes, I played.......................and I lost.
5. A: Have you been working.................today?
B: No, I’ve done nothing all day!
6. A: Have you finished that book yet?
B: No, I always read very...................It takes me a long time to finish a book.
7. A: Is he a bad student?
B: No, he does all his work very......................
Exercise IV. Put in the comparative adverb form of the adjective in brackets.
1. You must do your work more carefully (careful) in future.
2. He has run the 100 metres...................... (fast) than any other athlete in the world this year.
3. Everyone else did the test.................... (good) than me.
4 You can travel...................... (cheap) at certain times of the year.
5. He plays................. (confident) than he did in the past.
6. I’m sorry I’ve made so many mistakes. I’ll try............... (hard) in future.
7. You will be able to sit................... (comfortable) in this chair.

Exercise V. Complete these sentences using really or quite.


1. The film was really good. I enjoyed it a lot.
2. Its....................cold outside, but not very cold.
3. It isn’t a wonderful book, but it’s..................good.
4. The tickets were...............expensive – they cost much more than I expected.
5. The programme is................popular in my country; millions of people watch it.
6. He’s..............good at his job, but sometimes makes bad mistakes.
7. The meal was..............nice, but it wasn’t very good.
8. It’s.............dangerous to drive fast in such terrible weather conditions.
9. I’m not a very good tennis player, but I am.................good.
10. They’re all..............intelligent students, and they will all pass their exams easily.
11. The company that I work for is.................big, but it’s not enormous.
Exercise VI. Put the words in brackets ( ) in the right place in these sentences
1. I work late at the office.
(often) I often work late at the office.
2. You must lock the front door when you leave.
(always)...............................
3. Steve and Jill play golf.
(twice a month)...................
4. I eat a sandwich for lunch.
(usually).............................
5. I go to jazz concerts at the weekend.
(sometimes)....................
6. My teacher gives me a lot of homework.
(every day)..........................
7. We see our Mexican friends.
(hardly ever).......................
8. They go to Morroco for their holidays.
(often).................................
9. Bill and Marie go to the theatre.
(four times a year)...............
10. They are at home in the evening.
(rarely).................................

Exercise VII. Complete the sentences by choosing an ending from the following ones:
- the road carefully,
- their homework well,
- the piano badly,
- his car fast,
- her breakfast slowly,
- Arabic perfectly,
- an hour late

1. He drives.................................
2. She plays.................................
3. Maria ate.................................
4. They speak..............................
5. You must always cross...........
6. They all did.............................
7. The plane arrived....................

4.6.3. Grammar Practice Adjective + Adverb Miscellaneous

Exercise I. In these dialogues underline the adjectives and circle the adverbs
1. A: I think he’s a good worker. What do you think?
B: I’m not sure. He works carefully, but he makes some bad mistakes.
2. A: He’s a wonderful skier. He skis quickly and beautifully.
B: In my opinion, he skis dangerously. He’s a stupid skier.
3. A: He’s a rich and powerful man. He lives expensively.
B: Yes, but he spends money carefully. He buys valuable objects.
4. A: Paul, Jane, Diana and Mark live in a big, old house in Scotland. They live happily together.
B: I know they are happy, but the house is expensive and so they live cheaply
5. A: This bread tastes awful. Did you cook it correctly?
B: If you think it’s horrible, why are you eating it so hungrily?
6. A: She’s very young, but she sings and dances beautifully.
B: She’s a wonderful singer, but she dances badly in my opinion.

Exercise II. Put in the adjective or adverb in brackets ( ).


1. The train was very slow (slow/slowly) and I arrived late.
2. The journey took a long time because the train went very............... (slow/slowly).
3. Mrs. Green went.................. (quick/quickly) back to her office.
4. I’m afraid I can’t give you an ................(immediate/immediately) answer; I need to think about it first.
5. The work that the builders did for us was very................. (bad/badly).
6. The builders did the work for us very.................... (bad/badly)
7. She organized the party............... (good/well), and everybody enjoyed it.
8. Everybody said that the party was very................ (good/well).
9. She wrote a.............. (polite/politely) letter asking the company to give her the money back.
10. She wrote the company and asked them.............. (polite/politely) to give her the money back.