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Jazz and Blues Bass Lines

A method for constructing and applying bass lines in a Jazz or Blues style

by
Bruce Arnold

Muse Eek Publishing Company


New York, New York
Copyright © 2003 by Muse Eek Publishing Company. All rights reserved

ISBN 1-890944-16-5

No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a


retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means,
electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise,
without the prior written permission of the publisher.

Printed in the United States

This publication can be purchased from your local bookstore or by contacting:


Muse Eek Publishing Company
P.O. Box 509
New York, NY 10276, USA
Phone: 212-473-7030
Fax: 212-473-4601
http://www.muse-eek.com
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Table Of Contents

Acknowledgements iii
About the Author iv
Foreword v
Introduction 1
Bass Line Construction 2
Chord Scales 3
Chords and Chord Scale Application 4
Chord progressions and reharmonization theory 14
Basic 12 Bar Blues chord progression 15
Basic Minor Blues chord progression 15
Basic Rhythm Changes chord progression 16
12 Bar Blues bass lines with reharmonization application 19
Minor Blues bass lines with reharmonization application 25
Rhythm Changes bass lines with reharmonization application 31
Acknowledgements

The author would like to thank Michal Shapiro for proof reading and sugges-
tions, and also the many students who, through their questions have helped me to
understand the kind of information they need most

iv
About the Author

Born in Sioux Falls South Dakota, Bruce began his music training
at the University of South Dakota. After three years of study he trans-
ferred to the Berklee College of Music where he received a Bachelor of
Music degree in Composition. While doing undergraduate work at
Berklee College of Music Bruce received the Harris Stanton award for
outstanding guitarist of the year. He continued with further study in
improvisational and compositional methods with Charlie Banacos and
Jerry Bergonzi. Bruce received the outstanding teacher of the year award
at Berklee in 1984 and went on to teach at the New England Conservatory
of Music, and Dartmouth College.

Upon moving to New York City, Bruce found himself preoccupied with
the possibilities of applying the twelve tone theoretical constructs of
Schoenberg and Berg to American improvised music. His first CD, Blue
Eleven contained the seeds of those ideas he was to develop further in his
following critically acclaimed works: “A Few Dozen” and “Give ‘Em
Some.” In this vein, his music is remarkably tonal, and the results give
proof that inventive improvisation is possible within this format.

Bruce currently plays with his own band, “The Bruce Arnold Trio” and
with “Spooky Actions” a jazz quartet that performs his transcriptions of
Webern. In addition, Bruce has performed with such diverse musicians as
Gary Burton, Joe Pass, Joe Lovano, Randy Brecker, Peter Erskine, Stuart
Hamm, Boston Symphony Orchestra, and The Absolute Ensemble under
the baton of Kristjan Järvi.

Bruce currently teaches at Princeton University, New York University and


the New School. Upon his arrival at NYU he set about to improve the
music education program, and instituted NYU’s first sight-reading pro-
gram for jazz guitarists. He started writing music education books to fill a
need he perceived in formal jazz education.

As an author, Bruce has written 42 books on music education. These


books cover many of the important aspects of mastering high performance
skills for both the advanced music student with professional goals, and the
dedicated beginner. To view the complete catalogue, please log on to his
publisher’s website at: http://www.muse-eek.com.

v
Foreword

I recommend this book for bass players and guitar players. This book presents a commonly
used method for constructing bass lines over Jazz and Blues progressions. The basic concepts of
building and reharmonizing bass lines is presented which will then enable the student to apply this
information to create there own bass lines based on the information presented.
Muse Eek Publishing has created a website with a FAQ forum for all my books. If you have
any questions about anything contained in this book feel free to contact me at FAQ@muse-eek.com
and I will happy to post an answer to your question. My goal is to educate and help you reach a
higher degree of musical ability.

Bruce Arnold
New York, New York

vi
Introduction

This book teaches a bass student one method of playing jazz bass lines for a traditional chord
progression. There are many possible ways to construct jazz bass lines. This book explores one of
those possible ways in-depth. This method is build upon the use of chord tones, approach notes and
basic reharmonization techniques. Three common forms to the jazz idiom are used to explore this
method, these are the Blues, Minor Blues and Rhythm Changes. Along with an explanation of how
to build bass lines a reharmonization theory section is included to explain how basic harmonic
reharmonization works so that a student can start to form their own reharmonization. A section on
the proper chord scale to use for each chord is also included.
Bass Line Construction
First lets take a look at how to build a bass lines. Each beat of the measure has a specific
type of note that should be used. The first beat of each measure should contain the root of the chord
(See Example 1). The 2nd quarter note of the measure should contain either a diatonic or chromatic
note that leads by step into beat 3 (See Example 2). The 3rd quarter note of the measure should be
either a chord tone (it's often the root) or a diatonic note of the chord (i.e. the root, 3rd, 5th, or 7th)
(See Example 3). The 4th quarter note of the measure should contain either a diatonic or chromatic
note that leads by step into the next chord (See Example 4).

Example 1

C7 F7 C7 F#7

? c œ œ œ bœ œ bœ œ bœ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ

Example 2

C7 F7 C7 F#7

?c œ bœ œ bœ œ bœ œ #œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ

Example 3

C7 F7 C7 F#7

? c œ œ œ bœ œ bœ œ bœ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ

Example 4

C7 F7 C7 F#7

? c œ œ œ bœ œ bœ œ bœ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ

2
Chord Scales
As you can see from the examples on page 2, notes that are diatonic to the chord are used
occasionally in a bass line. It is common to find bass lines that just use diatonic notes walking up
and down the scale. Although this book covers a technique different from that approach it is impor-
tant that you understand that “walking diatonically” over a repeating chord change is a common
method employed by a jazz bassist. As previously stated diatonic bass lines are commonly found on
vamps which use the same chord over and over. Example 5 show a diatonic bass line over a C
Major 7 chord. The scale which is appropriate for a C∆7 chord is a C Major scale which contains
the seven notes C,D,E,F,G,A,B. A bass player will commonly just walk up and down this scale
Example 5

C∆7
? c .. œ œ œ œ œ œ ..
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
It is important for a bassist to know all the appropriate scales for each chord type. This
knowledge will be useful in the aforementioned “diatonic bass lines” but also comes into play when
using the bass lines discussed on page 2. You will notice that examples 2 and 4 on page 2 require
either a chromatic or a diatonic note. Therefore it is important to list all chords and the diatonic
scales that are used with those chords. You will find those on page 4 through 13. It is also important
that a bassist understand what the chord tones are for each chord type. Examples 1 and 3 on page
two require a chord tone to be played. Therefore as each chord scale you will also be given the
chord tones.
Although beyond the scope of this book the available tensions for each chord type is also
given. Tensions in a jazz concept are non-chord tones that don’t have to resolve. Therefore they are
commonly added to chords to give them “color.” As you advance as a jazz bassist taking these
tensions into consideration will make your bass lines even more connected to the music.
Along with the chord tones and tensions many chords have what are called avoid notes. For
example a C∆7 has the chord tones C,E,G,B, and has the available tension of D, F# and A. The
chord scale for a C∆7 chord is a C major scale C,D,E,F,G,A,B which contains an F. This F is the
avoid note. Avoid notes are notes that can be played but are usually not stressed and feel like they
need to resolve. If you try to apply the F avoid note to a C∆7 chord you find that it totally changes
the character of the chord. (Not that the sound is bad it's just doesn't sound like a C∆7 chord.) Avoid
notes are always a half step above a chord tone and usually should be used sparingly especially on
beat one of a measure. But, if you are using the diatonic type bass line shown in example 5 an
occasional avoid note on one is fine (see measure 2)
I have limited the scales presented on pages 4 through 13 to the modes of major, jazz minor
(melodic minor ascending), the 3 symmetrical scales diminished, symmetrical diminished and whole
tone and two modes of Harmonic minor. The scales will be grouped into chord types to make all the
possibilities easy to see.
Grouping scales and chords into overall chord types allows you the greatest amount of
flexibility when building bass lines. Care must be taken because in some instances the original
chord in a song is the only chord desired. For example if you have a C7b5 chord and this is the only
chord sound desired, then you can only use notes from an Altered, Symmetrical Diminished or
Whole Tone scale as your diatonic passing notes.

3
Chords and Chord Scale Application

Major Chord
A Major chord has two scale possibilities: Major ( Ionian mode) and the Lydian mode.

C Major Scale
C major scale or Ionian mode is used for a C∆7 or C6 chord and has one avoid note which is F.

& œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ (œ )

C Lydian Scale
C Lydian scale is used for a C∆7#11 or C6#11 chord and has no avoid notes.

& œ #œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ

Chord Tones and Available Tensions


If we combine these two scales we have:
The chord tones for a C Major 7 chord are 1,3,5,7,*
The available tensions for a C Major 7 chord are 9,#11,13. The avoid note is 4.

#œ œ
13
œ
1 3 5 7 9 #11

& œ œ œ
œ

* The chord tones for a C∆7#11 are 1,3,#4,7. The tensions are 9 and 13. The 5th can also be used as
an available note to form chords.
4
Minor Chord
A Minor chord has three scale possibilities: Dorian, Phrygian and Aeolian modes.

C Dorian Scale
C Dorian scale is used for a C-7 or C-6 chord* and has no avoid notes.

& œ œ bœ œ
œ œ bœ œ

C Phrygian Scale
C Phrygian scale is used for a C-7 chord* and has two avoids notes which are Db and Ab.

& œ b œ) bœ œ
œ ( bœ) bœ œ (

C Aeolian Scale
C Aeolian scale is used for a C-7 chord* and has one avoid note which is Ab.

& œ bœ) bœ œ
œ œ bœ œ (

Chord Tones and Available Tensions


If we combine these three scales we have:
The chord tones for a C Minor chord are 1,b3,5,b7**
The available tensions for a C Minor 7 chord are 9,11,13. The avoid notes are b2 and b6

œ œ
œ
1 b3 5 b7 9 11 13

& œ œ bœ

* These scales can also be used for a C7sus4 chord see the dominant 7sus4 list on pages 8-9.
** The chord tones for a C-6 chord are 1,b3,5,6. The tensions are 9 and 11. The b7th can also be
used as an available note to form chords.
5
Dominant Chord
A Dominant chord has seven scale possibilities: Mixolydian, Lydian b7, Mixolydian b6, Altered,
Symmetrical Diminished, Whole Tone and Mixolydian b2,b6.

C Mixolydian Scale
C Mixolydian scale is used for a C7* and has one avoid note which is F.

& œ œ bœ œ
œ œ œ (œ )

C Lydian b7 Scale
C Lydian b7 scale is used for a C7#11 chord and no avoid notes.

& œ #œ œ œ bœ œ
œ œ

C Mixolydian b6 Scale
C Mixolydian b6 scale is used for a C7b13 chord* and has one avoid note which is F.

& œ œ bœ bœ œ
œ œ (œ )

C Altered Scale
C Altered scale is used for a C7b5 or C7#5 chord and has no avoid notes.

& bœ bœ bœ œ
œ bœ bœ nœ

* These scales can also be used for a C7sus4 chord see the dominant 7sus4 list on pages 8-9.
6
Dominant Chord continued...
C Symmetrical Diminished Scale
C Symmetrical Diminished scale is used for a C7 or C7b5 chord and has no avoid notes.

& œ œ bœ œ
œ bœ bœ nœ #œ

C Whole Tone Scale


C Whole Tone scale is used for a C7b5 or C7#5 chord and has no avoid notes.

& œ #œ #œ bœ œ
œ œ

C Mixolydian b2,b6 Scale


C Aeolian scale is used for a C7b13 chord* and has one avoid note which is F.

& œ œ bœ bœ œ
bœ œ (œ )

Chord Tones and Available Tensions


If we combine these seven scales we have:
The chord tones for a C Dominant 7 chord are 1,3,5,b7**
The available tensions for a C Dominant 7 chord are b9, 9,#9,#11,b13,13. The avoid note is 4.
#5
1 3 5 b7 b9 9 #9 #11 or 13

#œ #œ œ
b13

&œ œ bœ bœ nœ #œ
œ

* These scales can also be used for a C7sus4 chord. The dominant 7sus4 list is on pages 8-9.
** The chord tones for a C7b5 chord are 1,3,b5,b7. The tensions are 9 and b13. The chord tones for
a C7#5 chord are 1,3,#5,b7. The tensions are 9 and #11. The 5th should not be used if you what to
retain the characteristic sound of these chord
7
Dominant 7sus4 Chord
A Dominant 7sus4 chord has seven scale possibilities: Dorian, Phrygian, Mixolydian, Aeolian,
Dorian b2, Mixolydian b6, and Mixolydian b2,b6.

C Dorian Scale
C Dorian scale is used for a C7sus4*** and has no avoid notes.

& œ œ bœ œ
œ œ bœ œ

C Phrygian Scale
C Phrygian scale is used for a C7sus4 chord ***and no avoid notes**.

& œ bœ bœ œ
œ bœ bœ œ

C Mixolydian Scale
C Mixolydian scale is used for a C7sus4 chord*** and has no avoid notes**.

& œ œ bœ œ
œ œ œ œ

C Aeolian Scale
C Aeolian scale is used for a C7sus4 chord*** and has no avoid notes**.

& œ bœ bœ œ
œ œ bœ œ

**With other chord types these scales do have avoid notes.


***These scales are also used in other chord types.
8
Dominant 7sus4 Chord continued...
C Dorian b2 Scale
C Dorian b2 scale is used for a C7sus4 chord*** and has no avoid notes.**

& œ œ œ œ bœ œ
bœ bœ

C Mixolydian b6 Scale
C Mixolydian b6 scale is used for a C7sus4 chord*** and has no avoid notes.**

& œ œ œ bœ bœ œ
œ œ

C Mixolydian b2,b6 Scale


C Aeolian scale is used for a C7sus4 chord*** and has no avoid notes.**

& œ bœ bœ œ
œ bœ œ œ

Chord Tones and Available Tensions


If we combine these seven scales we have:
The chord tones for a C Dominant 7sus4 chord are 1,4,5,b7,
The available tensions for a C Dominant 7sus4 chord are b9, 9,#9,10,b13,13. There is no avoid note.

1
bœ nœ
4 5 b7 b9 9 #9 10 b13 13

bœ bœ nœ #œ œ
&œ œ œ

**With other chord types these scales do have avoid notes.


***These scales are also used in other chord types.
9
Minor 7b5 Chord
A Minor 7b5 chord has two scale possibilities: Locrian and Locrian natural 2.

C Locrian Scale
C Locrian scale is used for a C-7b5 chord and has one avoid note Db.

& bœ bœ bœ œ
œ ( bœ ) bœ œ

C Locrian natural 2 Scale

C Locrian natural scale is used for a C-7b5 chord and no avoid notes.

& bœ bœ bœ œ
œ œ bœ œ

Chord Tones and Available Tensions


If we combine these two scales we have:
The chord tones for a C Minor 7b5 chord are 1,b3,b5,b7,
The available tensions for a C Minor 7b5 chord are 9,11,b13. The avoid note is b9.


1 b13
œ
b3 5 b7 9 11

&œ bœ bœ œ

10
Diminished 7th Chord
A Diminished chord has one scale possibility which is Diminished.
C Diminished scale is used for a C°7 chord* and has no avoid notes
C Diminished Scale

& œ œ #œ #œ œ œ œ
œ bœ

Chord Tones and Available Tensions


The chord tones for a C Diminished 7 chord are 1,b3,b5,bb7,
The available tensions for a C Diminished 7 chord are 9,11,b13,b15. There is no avoid note

bœ bœ
1 b3 b5 bb7 9 11 b13 b15

∫œ œ œ
&œ bœ bœ
* A diminished scale is only used for a I and #IV diminished chords. All other diminished chords
are Passing Diminished and use Passing Diminished scales. Passing diminished scales are formed
by taking the chord tones of the diminished scale and combining them with the chord tones of the
chord the diminished chord is resolving to. For example a C#°7 chord resolving to D-7 would
contain the chord tones from C#°7 (C#, E, G, Bb) and the chord tones of D-7 (D, F, A, C) so the
passing diminished scale would be C#, D, E, F, G, A, Bb, C. Below is a list of all passing dimin-
ished scales.

#1 Diminished 1,b2,b3,3,#4,#5,6,7
#2 Diminished 1,b2,b3,3,#4,#5,6,7
b3 Diminished 1,2,b3,3,#4,#5,6,7
3 Diminished 1,b2,b3,4,#4,#5,6,b7
#4 Diminished 1,2,b3,4,#4,#5,6,7 same as regular diminished scale
#5 Diminsihed 1,b2,b3,3,#4,#5,6,7
#6 Diminished 1,#1,2,b3,3,#4,5,6,7

These scales can be thought of from the root of the diminished chord or from their relationship to
the key they are found in. For example:
#1 Diminished is 1,b2,b3,3,#4,#5,6,7 from the chord but would be 1,#1,2,3,4,5,6,b7 in the key.
Either way works I usually relate it to the key. The following is a list of the passing diminished
chords and their relationship to the key they are found.
#1 Diminished 1,b2,2,3,4,5,6,b7
#2 Diminished 1,2,b3,3,#4,5,6,7
b3 Diminished 1,2,b3,4,#4,5,6,7
3 Diminished 1,#1,2,3,4,5,6,b7
#4 Diminished 1,2,b3,4,#4,5,6,7 same as regular diminished scale
#5 Diminsihed 1,2,3,4,5,#5,6,7
#6 Diminished 1,#1,2,3,4,5,6,b7,7
11
Minor Major 7 Chord
A Minor Major 7 chord has two scale possibilities: Jazz Minor and Harmonic Minor.

C Jazz Minor Scale


C Jazz Minor scale is used for a C-∆7 chord and has no avoid notes.

& œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ bœ

C Harmonic Minor Scale

C Harmonic Minor scale is used for a C-∆7 chord and one avoid note Ab.

& œ bœ ) œ œ
œ œ bœ œ (

Chord Tones and Available Tensions


If we combine these two scales we have:
The chord tones for a C Minor Major 7 chord are 1,b3,5,7,
The available tensions for a C Minor Major 7 chord are 9,11,#11*,13. The avoid note is b6.
#11
or

œ #œ œ
1 b3 5 7 9 11 13

œ
b5

& œ œ
œ bœ
-∆7 chord is commonly substituted for a -7 chord. This is most commonly found when the -7 is the
one chord of the key.
* #11 is commonly added as an available tension even though it is not part of the jazz minor or the
harmonic minor scale.

12
Major 7#5 Chord
A Major 7#5 chord has one scale possibility which is Lydian #5

C Lydian #5 Scale
C Lydian #5 scale is used for a C∆7#5 chord* and has one avoid note which is A.

& #œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ #œ ( )

Chord Tones and Available Tensions

The chord tones for a C Major 7#5 chord are 1,3,#5,7,


The available tensions for a C Major 7 chord are 9,#11. The avoid note is 6.


1 3 #5 7 9 #11

œ œ
&œ œ #œ

∆7#5 is commonly substituted for a ∆7 chord. This is most commonly found where the ∆7 is the one
chord of the key.
13
Chord progressions and reharmonization theory
Another important aspect of build great bass lines is to understand first the overall structure of
a chord progression and second to reharmonize that chord progression in order to create interesting
new bass lines. The chord progressions found in the next section are very common in blues and jazz
music. The 12 bar blues, the minor 12 bar blues and rhythm changes (a common progression in jazz
music) are used to help a student learn to build bass lines to common jazz forms. 12
reharmonizations of a 12 bar blues, the minor 12 bar blues and rhythm changes are presented. This
will allow a bassist to see many possible ways are applying the reharmonization methods presented
here.
First lets examine the overall forms of a 12 bar blues, the minor 12 bar blues and rhythm
changes. The first, the blues and the minor blues are typically a 12 bar song forms where the IV
chord coming on the fifth bar. You will see as we add in our reharmonization techniques how
diverse these progression can become. Rhythm Changes is a common AABA jazz form: A=8bars,
A=8bars, B=8bars, A=8bars. The A sections in this book have been re-harmonized slightly to add
variety. Try to learn each example at the tempo marking and make sure your bass lines are legato.
The 12 bar blues, minor blues, and rhythm changes chord progressions all have a basic pro-
gression that is then embellished with more chords and/or tensions. Pages 15 and 16 show the
stripped down versions of the 12 Bar Blues, Minor Blues and Rhythm Changes. The 12 Bar Blues
and the Minor Blues (see page 15) are similar in that they go to the IV chord (IV in the Key of C) on
the fifth measure. You will notice that even when reharmonizations get very complex usually the IV
chord will still be there on the 5th measure. Rhythm changes (see page 16) as mentioned before have
an AABA form, therefore there are only two sections to the form; the A section consists of a diatonic
progression in C (C, A-, D-, G7) or I, VI, II, V, with a quick II-V-I to the IV chord G-7 C7 F which is
another II, V, I but in F major, then another I, VI, II, V, in C. This is followed by a bridge (B section)
which goes through dominant 7th chords cycle 5. E7 to A7 to D7 to G7.
With this basic information we can now talk about the reharmonization I have added to these
basic progressions. One method of reharmonization is to add and subtract tensions. By referring to
the chord tones and tensions on page 5 through 13 you can see what the available tensions are for
each chord . Although we will be taking available tensions into consideration in our bass lines at this
point. It is important to see how these tensions have been added from a reharmonization standpoint.
For example a C Major chord could be C69 because 6 and 9 are available tensions for a C chord.
Another method involves adding and subtracting chords to change the chord progression. Reharmo-
nization by adding and subtracting chords has certain rules which govern which chords are substi-
tuted. This reharmonization theory is derived from the fact that our ear wants certain types of chords
to resolve in certain ways and that some chords have an affinity with others because of their internal
structure. A chord's tendency to move in a particular way is called it's " resolution tendency" One
chord with a very strong resolution tendency is the dominant chord. Our ear wants to hear the domi-
nant chord resolve in one of 3 ways: up a 4th (G7 to C∆7), down a half step (Db7 to C∆7), or up a
whole step (Bb7 to C∆7). These resolution tendencies of the dominant are also listed in order of the
strongest resolution to the weakest. Therefore G7 to C∆7 is the strongest and Bb7 to C∆7 is the
weakest. With this information we can take a blues and put the corresponding dominant structure
before any chord. This dominant will then create a resolution to the chord that follows. The first
example of the 12 bar blues (page 17) does this in the 4th bar. You have an F#9 chord resolving
down a half step to F9 in the 5th bar, then in bar 6 you have Bb13 resolving up a whole step to C13.
Therefore a bassist can use this information to construct bass lines. Because of the openness of jazz
style you will find that you can build these progression and apply your bass lines even if the accom-
panying instrument doesn’t play the same progression you are constructing with your bass line.

14
The 12 Bar Blues

C
&c ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’
1

5 F C
&’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’
9 G F C
&’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

The Minor Blues

C-
&c ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’
1

5 F- C-
&’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’
9 A b7 G7 C-
&’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

15
Rhythm Changes

A C A- D- G7 C A- D- G7
&c ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’’’’
1

5 G- C7 F F- C A- D- G7
&’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’
A 9 C A- D- G7 C A- D- G7
&’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’
13 G- C7 F F- C A- D- G7
&’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’
B 17 E7 A7
&’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’
21 D7 G7
&’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’
A 25 C A- D- G7 C A- D- G7
&’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’
29 G- C7 F F- C A- D- G7
&’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

16
To review, we have 3 resolutions for a dominant chord, up a 4th, down a half step, or up
a whole step. Thinking of this another way if we have C∆7 we could put G7, Db7 or Bb7 in front of
it for three possible reharmonizations.
Another common substitution is to place the related II -7 in front of the 7th chord. For
example if you have G7 to C∆7 you can substitute D-7 to G7 to C∆7 or II-V-I. Using this idea we
can use the -7 in front of our other two resolutions of the dominant Ab-7 to Db7 to C∆7 and F-7 to
Bb7 to C∆7. Again these are listed in the order of strongest to weakest
An example of this can be seen on page 19 with the 12 Bar Blues progression in F (bottom
example). The D-7 in bar 8 resolves to the G7b13 in bar 9 which then resolves to the C13 in bar 10.
Check out the chord progressions to find more examples of this substitution. We can extend this
theory to get even more possibilities for substitution. If C∆7 can have 3 possible dominant chords:
G7, Db7 and Bb7. Then these three dominants can be freely substituted for each other. A
progression of G7 to C∆7 can just as well be Db7 to C∆7 or Bb7 to C∆7; you just have to keep in
mind that some dominant resolutions are stronger than others. If we continue with this idea all the
-7's that can precede the dominant 7'th can be freely substituted for each other. Below is a
list of all the possibilities starting from strongest to weakest.

D-7 G7 C∆7 Ab-7 Db7 C∆7 F-7 Bb7 C∆7 Strongest


D-7 Db7 C∆7 Ab-7 G7 C∆7 F-7 G7 C∆7
D-7 Bb7 C∆7 Ab-7 Bb7 C∆7 F-7 Db7 C∆7 Weakest

An example of this type of substitution can be found on page 19. The 12 Bar Blues progres-
sion in F (bottom example) has a C-7 resolving to B13 in the 4th measure. This B13 then resolves to
Bb13 in the 5th measure. You will find hundreds of examples of these substitutions throughout the
chord progression section of this book (see pages 19-42).
Chords are also substituted because their internal structure is very similar. The most com-
mon example of this is the substitutions that occur within the diatonic chords of a key. If we look at
the diatonic chords of C major we can see that C∆7, E-7 and A-7 all have many notes in common.
D-7 and F∆7 also have many notes in common as does G7 and B-7b5. Our ear picks up on this and
doesn't mind if we substitute these similar structures.

Diatonic 7th chords of C major

œœ œœœ œœœ œœœ


& œœœ œœœ œœ œœ œ œ
œ œ œœ œ
I II III IV V VI VII
C∆7 D-7 E-7 F∆7 G7 A-7 B-7b5

These three different groups of chords are commonly referred to as the tonic area (C∆7, E-7 and A-
7), the subdominant area (D-7 and F∆7) and the dominant area (G7 and B-7b5). You will find many
examples of this type of substitution in the rhythm changes progressions. For example on page 31
in the 3rd bar E-7 is substituted for C∆7.
17
If we extend this idea further we can find other chords that have a lot of notes in common
and use those for substitutions. For example the D#°7 chord in bar 10 of the Rhythm changes in C
(page 31) has the notes D#, F#, A, and C. If we look at the chord in the next measure (measure 11)
we see it is a E-7. We have learned that E-7 can be preceded by B7; the notes in B7 are B, D#, F#,
A. If we compare D#°7 and B7 we find that they differ only in one note, D#°7 contains a C, and B7
contains a B. C (the b9 of B7) is an available tension on a dominant, therefore, D#°7 works as a
substitution for B7. Another example of this type of substitution can be found on page 27. In
measure 7 of the Minor Blues in Db (bottom example) the usual chord would have been some type
of Db-. This Db- could include any of the available tensions for a minor chord (Db-7, Db-∆7,
Db-69, etc.). In place of the Db- we have a E∆7#5. If we compare the chord tones of E∆7#5 (E,
G#, C, and D#) with the chord tones of Db-∆9 (Db, E, Ab, C, Eb) we find that all the notes of E∆7#5
are contained in Db-∆9, therefore E∆7#5 can be substituted for Db-∆9.
The substitutions mentioned in this book are very common in all types of music. By taking
these reharmonization techniques and applying them to bass lines. A bassist will find many ways to
walk through a jazz progression.
Remember if you don't understand something in this book email us at info@muse-eek.com

always email
12 Bar Blues in C
Ú 80
#
C13 F9 C13 F9
? c œ bœ œ bœ œ œ #œ œ #œ œ
1

œ œ œ œ œ œ
b
F9 B 13 C13
? œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ bœ
5

bœ œ œ nœ œ bœ œ bœ

G9 F9 C13 F9 C13 G9
œ œ bœ œ
? œ
9

œ
œ œ œ bœ œ bœ
œ œ œ œ

12 Bar Blues in F
Ú 100
b
F9 B 13 F9 C-7 B13
? œ bœ œ œ
1
bœ bœ œ bœ œ bœ œ bœ œ œ œ œ
b b
B 13 E9 F9 D-7
? bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ
5

bœ bœ œ nœ œ œ bœ œ

G7b13 C13 F9 D-7 G-7 C7b13


? œ bœ œ
9

œ œ bœ nœ œ œ bœ nœ bœ œ b œ œ œ
19
12 Bar Blues in Bb
Ú 60
b b b b b b b
B 13 B 7b13 E 9 E 7b9 B -7 A7#11 A 13 D 9
?c
1

bœ bœ œ œ bœ bœ œ œ bœ œ œ œ bœ œ bœ œ
b b b b
E9 A 13 C-11 B7#11 B 13 C-7 D-7 D -7
? bœ
5

œ bœ bœ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ
b
C-7 F9 E9 E9 D-9 G13 C-11 B9
13
?œ œ œ œ
9

œ œ bœ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ

12 Bar Blues in Eb
Ú 160
b b
E9 E9 E9 A13
? bœ bœ bœ œ
1

œ œ œ œ bœ bœ œ bœ œ œ #œ œ
b b
A 13 D9 G-7 C7b9
? œ œ œ œ
5

bœ bœ nœ œ bœ bœ bœ bœ œ bœ bœ nœ
# b
F -7 B9 F-7 B9 B9 E9
? #œ œ #œ #œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ
9

œ #œ #œ œ

20
12 Bar Blues in Ab
Ú 100
b b b b
A 13 D9 F-7b5 B 7b13 E -9 D9#11
?c #œ
1

bœ bœ œ bœ bœ bœ œ bœ œ bœ œ bœ œ œ œ
b b
D9 D -9 D-7b5 G7b13 C7#9 B7#9
? bœ bœ
5

bœ œ bœ bœ bœ œ œ bœ œ bœ œ œ œ œ
b b b
B -11 A7#11 D9 D 7#9 G 13 G13
? bœ œ bœ œ
9

œ #œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ bœ œ nœ œ

12 Bar Blues in Db
Ú 60
b b b ˜ b b b
D 7#9 D 9 G 13 G7 A -11 G7#11 A -11 D 7b9
? bœ bœ œ
1

œ bœ œ nœ œ bœ bœ nœ œ bœ œ bœ œ
b b b b
G 7#11 B9 C9 G 13 F13 F7b13 B9 B 7b9
?
5

bœ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ bœ
b b b
A7#11 B 7#11 E 9 D9 D9 B9 A13 D7#9
?
9

œ œ bœ œ bœ bœ nœ œ bœ œ œ bœ œ bœ œ œ

21
12 Bar Blues in Gb
Ú 160
b b
G 13 F13 G 13 C9
?c œ œ œ œ
1

bœ bœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ bœ bœ bœ nœ
b b
B9 G13 G 13 E 7#9

5

bœ bœ œ bœ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ bœ bœ nœ
b b b
A -7 G13 G 13 E 7#9 D7#9 G13
?
9

œ bœ bœ
œ œ œ œ
bœ bœ bœ œ œ bœ œ œ

Ú 200 12 Bar Blues in B


B13 C13 B13 B7b13
?œ œ œ œ œ
1

#œ œ #œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ #œ
# #
E9 A13 G -7 C9
?
5

œ #œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ #œ #œ œ œ #œ #œ œ nœ
# # #
C -9 C7#9 B9 D9 C9 F 13
? #œ œ #œ œ
9

œ œ œ bœ œ #œ nœ œ #œ œ #œ #œ

22
12 Bar Blues in E
Ú 200
b
E7#9 E7b9 B-11 B 7#11
?c œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ
1

œ œ #œ nœ œ #œ œ œ
b
A13 E9 D-9 G7#9
?
5

bœ bœ œ œ
œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
#
C13 B13 E7#9 C 7#11 C13 B13
? œ œ œ bœ œ #œ #œ œ œ #œ nœ œ
9

œ œ #œ œ

12 Bar Blues in A
Ú 60
b b
A13 B 13 A13 E9
? bœ œ œ œ
1

œ œ #œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ
b #
D9 G13 A 13 A13 B-11 C -11 C-11
?œ œ œ
5

œ œ œ bœ œ œ #œ œ œ #œ œ nœ œ
b
B-11 F7#9 E7#9 B 13 A13 G13 F13 E7#9
? œ #œ nœ œ
9

œ œ bœ œ œ bœ œ bœ œ œ œ #œ
23
12 Bar Blues in D
Ú 60 b #˜ b
D7b9 D9 D7#9 A 13 G13 G 7 A-7 A 7b13
?c œ œ œ œ
1

œ œ bœ bœ œ œ bœ œ
œ œ #œ œ
b b
G13 A 13 G13 C9 D9 D 7#9 C13 B13
?
5

œ bœ œ #œ œ œ bœ bœ œ bœ nœ œ
œ œ bœ bœ
b b b
B 13 E7#9 A13 E 7b9#11 D9 B-11 B 7#11 A13b9
? bœ œ œ œ œ œ bœ bœ
9

œ œ œ œ œ bœ bœ nœ bœ

Ú 60 12 Bar Blues in G
# #7 b7
C -7b5 F b 9 B-7b5 E 7b 9 A-9 D 7b 9 D-9 D b9
1 œ add 9 œb13 œ add 9 b œb13 œ b13 b13
? œ #œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ bœ œ
b b b
C9 B 13 A13 A 13 G13 F13 E7#9 B 13
? œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ
5

œ œ bœ œ
œ œ bœ œ œ
b b b
A-76 E 7#9 D9 A 13 G13 E7##9 E9 D9
11 œ
? œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ
9

œ œ bœ œ bœ œ œ

24
C Minor Blues
Ú 80
C-7 F-7 C-7
? c œ bœ
1

œ œ œ bœ
œ œ œ œ bœ bœ bœ œ #œ œ

F-7 C-7
? œ œ œ bœ
5

œ œ œ œ bœ bœ nœ œ œ œ bœ œ
b
A 7#11 G7b13 C-7 G7#9
?
9

bœ œ œ #œ œ bœ bœ nœ œ œ bœ bœ œ œ bœ nœ

Ú 100 F Minor Blues


b
F-9 B -9 F-9 B7b9
13
? œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
1

œ œ bœ bœ bœ œ bœ bœ
b b
B -9 E9 F-9
? bœ œ bœ nœ œ
5

bœ bœ œ nœ œ bœ nœ œ
œ bœ bœ
b b
D9 C7#9 F-9 G9
? bœ
9

œ
œ bœ œ bœ bœ œ œ œ bœ œ bœ bœ œ œ

25
Bb Minor Blues
Ú 120
b b b b
B -7 E -11 B -7 B 13
6 6
? c bœ œ bœ œ bœ bœ œ œ
1

bœ bœ œ œ œ bœ œ œ

b b b
E -9 A 13 B -7 G7b13
6
? bœ bœ
5

bœ œ bœ bœ œ nœ bœ œ bœ #œ œ bœ bœ nœ
b
C7#9 B7#9 B -7 G-7b5 C-7b5 F7#9
?œ œ œ œ
9

œ #œ œ œ bœ bœ œ nœ œ bœ œ œ

Ú 100 Eb Minor Blues


b b b
E -∆ 7 A -7 E -∆ 7
6
? bœ
1

bœ œ œ bœ
bœ bœ œ bœ bœ bœ bœ œ bœ œ œ
b b
A -7 E -∆ 7
6
?
5

bœ bœ œ bœ bœ bœ bœ nœ bœ bœ œ œ bœ bœ œ nœ

b b
F9 E9 E -∆ 7 B 7b13
? œ bœ bœ nœ
9

œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ bœ œ bœ nœ
œ

26
Ab Minor Blues
Ú 80
b b b b
A -9 D -9 F-7b5 B 7b13 E -7b5 D7#9
?c œ œ bœ œ bœ œ œ œ
1

bœ bœ bœ nœ bœ œ œ bœ
b b b b
D -9 B -11 A7#11 A -9 G 13 C7#9 B9
? bœ bœ œ œ œ
5

bœ œ nœ bœ œ bœ bœ œ #œ œ œ
b b b b b
B 13 E7#9 E9 A13 A -7 G 13 B -11 A7#11
6
? bœ œ œ œ
9

bœ bœ œ bœ œ œ œ
œ bœ œ bœ œ

Ú 60 Db Minor Blues
b b b b
D -6 G -6 D -7b5 G 7b9 B-7b5 E7b9
9 9
? bœ bœ bœ
1

bœ bœ œ œ
bœ bœ œ bœ bœ œ œ œ #œ
b b
A∆7 #5 B13 #
E∆7 5 E -7 B13 B 13
?
5

œ œ œ #œ œ œ bœ œ
œ #œ œ œ œ œ bœ bœ
b b b
A13 A 13 G 13 G 7b13 B9 C9
?
9

œ œ œ œ bœ bœ œ œ bœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ

27
Gb Minor Blues
Ú 80
b b b b b
G -9 E9 E -7b5 A 7b9 D -7b5 G 7b9
?c b œ 11 œ œ b13 b 13 b13 b 13
1

œ œ œ bœ œ bœ œ bœ
bœ œ œ bœ bœ
b b
B-11 A13 A -7 D 7b9 C9 B9
? œ œ #œ œ
5

œ œ #œ œ bœ œ bœ œ œ bœ nœ #œ
b b b b b
E-7b5 A7b13 D-9 D 7#9 G -7 E -7b5 A -7b5 D 7#9
?œ 11 #œ 11
9

œ œ bœ œ bœ œ
œ œ œ bœ œ bœ œ bœ

Ú 100 B Minor Blues


b b b
B-11 A13 A 7sus4 D 9 G 7sus4 B7#9

1

#œ œ #œ œ œ #œ œ bœ bœ bœ œ bœ bœ œ œ
# b
E-9 D9 C 7sus4 C7#11 B7sus4 B 7b13
? 11
5

œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ #œ #œ nœ #œ œ #œ bœ œ
œ
A7sus4 D9 G7sus4 C9 B7sus4 D7sus4 G7sus4 C7sus4
?
9

œ #œ œ bœ œ œ œ bœ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ

28
E Minor Blues
Ú 100
# # b
E-11 F -11 G-11 F -11 E-11 E -11
?c #œ #œ
1

œ œ bœ bœ
œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ #œ
# b
A-7 B-7 F -7b5 B7b13 E-11 D-11 A 13 G13
?
5

œ œ
œ #œ œ œ #œ œ œ nœ œ œ bœ bœ nœ œ
#
C-11 D-11 E-11 F -11 E-11 D-11 C-11 B7#9
?œ œ #œ nœ
9

œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ
œ bœ nœ œ

A Minor Blues
Ú 80
b
A-7 D-11 A-7 E9
? 6 6
1

œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ bœ bœ bœ bœ œ
œ œ œ #œ

D-9 G13 A-7 G7sus4


11
?œ œ œ 6
5

œ œ œ œ #œ œ #œ œ #œ œ œ œ bœ

F13b9 E7#9 A-7 E7#9b13


? 6
9

œ
œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ #œ

29
Ú 100 D Minor Blues
b
D-69 G-67 A-11 A 7#11
?c œ
1

œ bœ bœ œ œ œ #œ œ #œ œ nœ bœ œ œ bœ

G-67 E-7b5 A7b9 D-69 C-7b5 F7b9


b13
?
5

œ bœ œ #œ œ œ œ bœ œ bœ
œ œ œ œ œ œ
b b b
F-9 B 13 E-7b5 E 9 D-69 C13 B 13 A7b13
?
9

œ bœ bœ œ œ œ œ bœ bœ nœ #œ
œ œ bœ œ œ

Ú 60 G Minor Blues
∆ 76 C- 6
G- 9 G-69 D-7b5 G7b9
9 b 1 3 #11
? œ
11 œ œ œ bœ
œ #œ œ œ bœ œ bœ œ #œ œ œ
C-9 F13 G-11 F13
?œ œ bœ œ
5

œ
œ œ bœ œ œ œ #œ œ œ bœ œ
b b 6 b b
E 7b9 A9 G- 7 F9 E 7b9 A 9
#11 13 13 b13 13
? bœ bœ œ 9
9


bœ bœ bœ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ bœ bœ

30
Rhythm Changes in C Major
C∆ 7 A-7 D-7 G13 E-7 A7b13 D-7 G13
?c œ
1

œ œ bœ œ bœ
œ
#œ œ œ
œ #œ œ bœ
œ #œ
b
G-7 C9 F∆ 7 F-7 E-7b5 A7b13 D-7 D9
? œ œ œ bœ
5

œ œ œ bœ œ œ bœ œ
œ œ œ #œ
#˜ b˜
C6 A7b9 D-7 D 7 E-7 E 7 D-11 G13
? œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ
9
9
œ œ #œ œ œ œ bœ œ

G-7 C13 F∆ 7 F-7 E-7 A7b13 D-7 G13


?œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
13
œ bœ œ bœ #œ
œ #œ œ
E9 A13
? œ œ #œ nœ
17

œ œ œ œ #œ œ
œ œ œ bœ œ œ
D9 G13
?œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
21

#œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ
b #˜
C∆ 7 A-11 A 7#11 G13 C6 C 7 D-9 G9

25
9 13
œ œ œ bœ bœ nœ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ
œ œ
b b b
G-11 G9 F∆ 7 B 9 E-7b5 A7b9 D-9 D 7#9
? œ œ
29
13 13 b13
œ bœ bœ œ #œ œ œ bœ œ
œ œ bœ œ œ
31
Rhythm Changes in F Major
b
F6 D7#11 G-9 C13 A-7b5 D7b13 D 13 C13
?c œ9 œ bœ œ
œ œ œ
1

bœ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ bœ

b b7 b b
7 7 G 7#9
5 C- F7#9 B ∆9 B- A-11 A 9#11 G-9
? 6 œ bœ œ œ
6 b 13
bœ œ œ bœ œ œ bœ œ œ œ bœ œ
b b b
F∆ 76 A 7b9 G-7b5 C7b9 F6 D-11 D 7#11 G 7b9
? œ9 bœ œ œ œ
9
# 11 13
œ œ œ œ
œ œ bœ bœ œ œ œ
b b
F9 B7b13 B ∆ 76 E9 A-7 D13 G-7 C13
?œ œ œ œ bœ œ bœ œ
13

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
b
E-11 A7b9 D13 A9
? œ bœ
17

œ œ œ œ b œ
œ œ œ #œ œ bœ œ #œ bœ
b b
G9 D 7b13 C13 G9
?œ œ œ œ
21

œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ bœ bœ œ œ
b
F6 D-11 G7b9 C13 A-11 D13 G-11 G 7#11
? 9 #œ œ œ bœ bœ
25

# œ œ bœ œ
œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ
b b b
7 F9 B ∆7#11 E 9 D7b9 G9
29C- A-7 G 7#9
? 6 œ œ œ 13 œ bœ œ œ œ
#b13 œ bœ œ
13
œ bœ œ œ œ
32
Rhythm Changes in Bb Major
b b b b
B 13 D 9 G 13 F13 E9 A13 D9 C9
? c œ œ bœ
1

bœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ bœ
b b
B-7 E9 B -11 E 9 D-9 G7b13 C-7 B13
?œ œ œ œ bœ œ bœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
5

b b b b
B 13 D 13 G9 F9 E7b9 A13 D -11 C7#11
?
9

bœ œ bœ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
bœ œ œ bœ

b b b
B-7 E7#9 B -7 E9 D-9 œ
G7b13
œ œ
C-9 D9
?œ œ œ œ bœ bœ bœ nœ bœ œ
13

œ bœ bœ

D7b9 G7b9
? œ #œ nœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
17

œ œ bœ nœ

C7b9 F7b9
? œ bœ œ bœ œ bœ œ bœ œ œ bœ œ
21

œ œ bœ nœ

# b b
F -7b5 B7b13 E-9 E9 D-9 D9 C9 B9
? #œ œ œ #œ œ œ bœ bœ
25

œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ

b b b
B 13 E9 B -7 E9 D-9 G7b13 C-9 B13
œ œ œ œ
29
? bœ œ œ œ œ œ bœ bœ œ œ œ œ
33
Rhythm Changes in Eb Major
b b b
E ∆7 #5 C-11 F7b9 B 7b9 G-911 C9#11 F-9 B 13
? c œ œ œ bœ
# 11
œ œ bœ b b13
œ œ œ œ œ bœ
1

bœ œ bœ
b7 b b
B- A13 A ∆7 #5 A -7 G-7b5 C7b9 F-9 E7#9
6 # 11 b 13
? bœ œ œ œ œ
5

b œ œ œ
bœ nœ œ bœ bœ nœ bœ œ
b b b # b b
E6 G9 B13 E9 E 6 11 D 9b13 G 9 B9
? bœ œ bœ œ
9 9
bœ bœ bœ œ b œ 13
9

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
b b b b b b
B -9 E 7#9 A ∆7 #5 A -7 D 7b9 C7b9 F7#9 B 7#9
b 13 6 b 13
? bœ œ bœ œ
13

œ bœ bœ bœ nœ bœ œ œ œ œ b œ
œ
b #
G7b9 D 7b9 C7b9 F 7b9
13 b13 13 13
? œ bœ œ œ #œ œ œ œ
17

bœ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ
b
F7b9 B7b9 B 7b9 E7b9
13 b13 13 13
? œ bœ œ œ
21

œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ #œ œ œ #œ œ
b b
A-7b5 D7#9 G-679 C7b9 F-7b5 B 7#9 A-9 A9
add 9 b 13 b13 b13 b 13 13
? #œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ bœ
25

œ œ œ bœ œ œ bœ œ
b b b
D 7#9 G 9 G -7 B9 C-9 F9 F-9 E7#9
b 13 13 13
? bœ œ bœ nœ œ
29

bœ bœ œ bœ œ œ #œ œ bœ œ œ
34
Rhythm Changes in Ab Major
b ˜ b b b b
A ∆7 A 7 B -7 E9 C-9 F13 B -11 E 9
?c œ œ œ œ
1

bœ œ nœ œ bœ œ bœ œ bœ bœ bœ nœ
b b b b
E -9 A 13 D ∆7 D -9 C-9 B9 E9 A13
? bœ bœ bœ bœ œ
5

œ bœ nœ #œ œ œ œ
œ bœ œ œ
b b b b
A ∆ 76 F-7 B -7b5 E 7#9 C-11 B7#11 B -11 A7#11
? œ œ
9

bœ bœ bœ œ bœ bœ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ
b b b b b
A 13 A 7b13 D 9 G 13 C-7 F7b13 B -11 A7#11
? œ bœ œ œ
13

bœ bœ œ œ bœ bœ œ œ bœ œ œ bœ

G-7b5 C7b9 C-7b5 F7b9


œ #œ œ nœ
?
# 11
bœ œ bœ œ œ bœ bœ nœ
b13
17

œ bœ bœ nœ
b b b
F-7b5 B 7b9 B -7b5 E 7b9
b13 # 11
? œ bœ bœ œ bœ bœ bœ bœ
21

bœ œ nœ bœ bœ œ œ œ

D-7b5 G7b13 C-7b5 F7b13 b b


B -11 E 7#9 A-7 D9
œ bœ œ œ
25 b13 b13

bœ œ œ bœ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ
b b b b b
29 E -9 A 13 D ∆7 G 13 C-7b5 F7b13 B -11 A7#11
? bœ bœ bœ œ bœ nœ œ bœ œ œ
bœ œ bœ œ œ œ
35
b b 7Rhythmb Changes in DbbMajor b b
D ∆7#11 B - 6 E -9 D7b9 B 7sus4 E7#9 E -9 A 7b13
? c bœ œ bœ œ bœ bœ nœ œ
1

bœ bœ nœ œ bœ bœ bœ

b7 b b b b b
A- D 7b9 G ∆7 E7b9 B -7 E9 E -9 D9
6
? œ bœ œ œ bœ œ #œ œ
5

b œ b œ œ bœ œ bœ bœ

7b b b ˜ b
D ∆ 9 B 7sus4 E -11 E 7 F-11 E7b9 E -11 D7b9
? bœ œ bœ nœ œ bœ nœ œ
9

bœ œ nœ œ bœ bœ œ œ

b b ˜ b b
D9 G7b13 G ∆7 G 7 F-7 E7#11 E 7sus4 D 9
? bœ
13

bœ œ bœ œ
bœ œ œ bœ bœ nœ œ œ bœ nœ œ
b
C-7b5 F7b9 F-6 B9
? œ bœ œ bœ œ œ bœ œ œ
17

œ bœ nœ œ œ bœ nœ
b b b
B -11 E9 D9 A 7#11
? bœ œ œ œ #œ œ œ bœ
21

bœ œ bœ nœ œ bœ bœ bœ
b b D9 b #9
25 G-7b5
G 13 F-7 E9 E -11 13 E -11 D7 # 11
? b œ bœ œ œ bœ nœ œ bœ bœ nœ nœ bœ bœ nœ œ
œ
b b
b G7#9
6
G ∆7 b E7b9 9 D7b9
E - 11
D9 b 13 9 G -7 F-7 # 11 # 11
? bœ œ œ œ bœ bœ œ œ
29
œ bœ nœ œ bœ œ œ œ

36
Rhythm Changes in Gb Major
b A9
b b ∆7 b b
G ∆7 D9 D 7#9 G 6 G°7 add A -7b5 D 7#9
13 9
?c
1

œ œ bœ œ bœ œ
bœ bœ nœ #œ œ bœ œ nœ œ bœ
b b b b b
D -7 G 7b13 B∆7 B-7 B -11 E 9 A -11 G7#11
? bœ bœ bœ bœ œ #œ œ nœ bœ œ bœ
5

bœ bœ bœ nœ œ
b ˜ b ∆7 b b b b
G ∆7
6 G 7 A -7 A°7 add B -7 E 7#9 A -7 D 7b9
? bœ bœ œ
9

bœ œ nœ œ bœ œ nœ œ bœ œ bœ œ bœ
b 7 b b
G 13 C7#9 B∆ 9 E7b9 B -11 A7b9 A -11 G7b9
? bœ œ œ œ # 11 b13 b13
13

œ #œ œ œ bœ bœ nœ œ bœ bœ nœ œ
b b b b
B 13 B 7b13 E9 E 7b9
? œ bœ œ bœ
17

bœ œ œ bœ bœ bœ œ bœ bœ bœ œ œ
b b b
E -7 A 7#11 A -11 G7#11
? bœ bœ œ
21

bœ bœ bœ œ œ bœ bœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ
b b b b b7 b
G ∆7 E 7sus4 B∆7 B-7 B -7 E 7#9 A- D9
?
6 6
œ bœ œ bœ bœ œ bœ
6
bœ bœ œ #œ œ œ œ
25

bœ bœ
b b13 b b
29 D -9 C9 B6 C°7 add B -7 A13 A -9 G7#11
9
? bœ bœ nœ bœ bœ œ œ
bœ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ
37
Rhythm Changes in B Major
# # ˜ # #
B∆7 #5 G -7 E-9 A13 D -7 D 7 C -11 F 13
?c #œ #œ œ
1

œ #œ #œ #œ œ œ œ #œ œ nœ œ #œ
œ
# b # #
F 7sus4B7sus4 E∆7 A7sus4 A 7sus4 C 9 C -9 C7#9
? #œ œ œ #œ
5

œ œ bœ #œ #œ #œ œ nœ bœ
œ œ bœ
7#11 G # # # #
B∆ -11 B-7 E9 D -9 G 7b13 C -7b5 C7#9
#œ #œ #œ
9
?
œ œ œ #œ œ #œ œ
#œ œ #œ œ nœ bœ
b b # # #
B9 B 7#11 B -7 A13 G -7 C9 C -9 D9
?
13

œ œ bœ bœ bœ œ œ œ #œ #œ œ #œ #œ #œ nœ œ
# #
D9 A13 G 7sus4 D9
? #œ œ #œ #œ #œ #œ #œ
17

# œ œ œ œ œ
œ #œ #œ œ
# #
C9
13 G7 # 9
# 11 C -7 C13
? #œ
21

œ #œ #œ œ œ
œ œ #œ #œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ
# #
F-7b5 E7 # 9
# 11 D -7b5 D7b9
# 11 C -11 A13 D7b9 G13
? œ bœ œ nœ œ #œ œ nœ
25

#œ #œ nœ nœ #œ œ œ œ
# # # # # #
F 7sus4 B9 G -7 C 7#9 C 7sus4 D7#9 C -9 F 13
#œ #œ #œ œ
29
? #œ #œ #œ #œ œ #œ œ œ œ
œ œ #œ
38
Rhythm Changes in E Major
# # # #
E∆7 #5 C -11 A-7 D7#9 G -7b5 C 7b9 F -7 B9
? c œ #œ #œ #œ œ œ #œ œ #œ œ
#œ œ #œ œ
1

œ œ
b 7 # # #
B-11 B 7b13 A∆ 6 D9 C 7b9 F 13 F -7 B9
? #œ #œ
#œ œ #œ
5

œ œ bœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ

7 # b # #
E∆ 9 C -11 B -7b5 A7 G -7 G13 F -7 F13
? œ #œ #œ #œ œ œ bœ
9

œ bœ bœ nœ œ #œ #œ œ œ
b # # #
E7#9 B 13 A∆7#11 A-7 G -7b5 C 7#9 F -7 B7#9

13

œ #œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ
#œ nœ #œ
# # # #
G 7sus4 G 13 C 7sus4 C 7b9
?
17

#œ nœ #œ #œ œ #œ nœ
#œ #œ #œ #œ œ #œ #œ œ nœ
# #
F 7sus4 F 13 B7sus4 B7#11
? #œ œ œ #œ œ #œ #œ
21

#œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ #œ œ
b b # #
25
B 7b13 B 7#11 A-7 D9 C -7 F 13 B9 F13
? œ #œ œ nœ #œ œ #œ nœ #œ nœ œ
bœ bœ œ nœ œ
b # # #
29 B9 E7#9 A-7 A-6 G -7 C9 F -7 B7#9
? œ œ #œ #œ œ #œ #œ
bœ #œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ #œ
39
Rhythm Changes in A Major
#˜ ˜ # #
A∆7 A 7 B-7 C 7 C -7b5 F 7b9 B-7 E9
?c
1

œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ #œ nœ œ œ œ œ
# #
E-7 A13 D∆7 G13 C -7 F 13 B-7 E9
?œ œ #œ
5

œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ #œ #œ #œ #œ œ œ
# # # b
F9 C -7 F 9
9 A∆7
? œ #œ #œ œ
F -7
œ bœ nœ œ
E9
# œ #œ œ œ b œB 13
B-7

#œ œ

#
A∆7 A13 D∆7 D-9 C -7 C9 B-7 E9
? œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ
13

œ #œ œ nœ #œ œ nœ œ
# # # #
G -9 C 13 C -7 F9
? #œ #œ #œ #œ #œ #œ œ #œ #œ œ #œ œ
17

#œ œ œ œ
#
F -11 B13 B-7 E9
? #œ œ #œ #œ œ #œ œ #œ
21

œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ

b #˜
25 A∆7 C13 B13 B 13 A∆7 A 7 B-7 E9
?
œ œ œ œ #œ œ bœ bœ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ
b D6 # #
29 A13 E9 9 D-9 C -7b5 F 7b9 B-7 E9
? #œ œ #œ nœ
œ œ bœ bœ œ #œ œ nœ œ œ œ œ

40
Rhythm Changes in D Major
b b
D6 B 7b9 A9 # B9 b
9 B-11 b13 13 F -7b5 F9b13 13 E 9
? c œ #œ œ #œ œ nœ œ bœ œ bœ bœ
1

œ bœ œ œ œ
b # b b
D9 A 13 G∆7 G-7 F -7 F13 B 13 E 7#9
?œ bœ œ bœ bœ
5

œ bœ bœ œ œ bœ œ #œ #œ œ œ
b A9 b b
D69#11 B-11 E9 13 B-9 E9 B -7 E9
?œ œ œ
9

œ œ œ bœ bœ œ #œ œ œ œ œ bœ b œ

G6
# b
A-7 D9 G-9 F -11 F9 E-9 E9
? œ œ #œ œ
9
œ #œ œ nœ #œ œ nœ bœ œ œ bœ œ
13

# #
F 13 F 7b13 B9 B7b13
? #œ #œ œ #œ nœ
17

#œ #œ ‹œ #œ œ #œ nœ œ #œ #œ œ
b
E7#9 B 7b13 E-9 A7b13

21

œ œ œ bœ
#œ œ œ bœ œ œ #œ œ œ #œ œ

D6 F9 b b b
9 C9 13 B 13 C-7 F9 B -7 E9
? œ #œ nœ œ œ œ bœ nœ œ bœ œ œ bœ œ bœ œ
25

b D6 b
29 A-7 A 13 G13 C9 9 B-7 E-9 E9
? œ #œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ
œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ #œ
41
Rhythm Changes in G Major
#˜ #˜ b˜
G∆7 G 7 A-7 A 7 B-7 B 7 A-7 D9
?c
1

œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ
œ œ #œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ
b C6
b
D-7 D9 F13 B-7 E9 A-7 A 13
? œ œ bœ bœ
9
#œ œ #œ œ œ bœ œ
œ œ œ œ
5

œ
b˜ b˜ b b
G∆7 B 7 A-7 B 7 B-7 E9 E9 A 13
?
9

œ œ bœ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ bœ bœ
bœ bœ

G∆7 G13 C∆7 F13 B-7b5 E7b9 A-7 D9


? œ œ œ œ
13

œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
B9 B7b9
13 13 E9 E7b9
?
17

œ œ œ #œ #œ œ nœ #œ œ œ #œ nœ œ œ #œ œ
A9 A7b9 D9 D7b9
#œ œ œ œ
13 13
?
21
œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ #œ œ œ œ #œ
#˜ b˜
G∆7 G 7 A-7 D9 B-7 B 7 A-7 D9
? œ œ #œ œ
25
œ œ #œ
œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ
b
G13 G7b13 C69 C-9 B-7 B 13 A13 D9
?œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
29

œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ
42
Books Available From
Muse Eek Publishing Company

The Bruce Arnold series of instruction books for guitar are the result of 20 years of
teaching. Mr. Arnold, who teaches at New York University and Princeton University
has listened to the questions and problems of his students, and written forty books
addressing the needs of the beginning to advanced student. Written in a direct,
friendly and practical manner, each book is structured in such as way as to enable a
student to understand, retain and apply musical information. In short, these books
teach.

1st Steps for a Beginning Guitarist


Spiral Bound ISBN 1890944-90-4 Perfect Bound ISBN 1890944-93-9

“1st Steps for a Beginning Guitarist” is a comprehensive method for guitar students
who have no prior musical training. Whether you are playing acoustic, electric or
twelve-string guitar, this book will give you the information you need, and trouble
shoot the various pitfalls that can hinder the self-taught musician. Includes pic-
tures, videos and audio in the form of midifiles and mp3's.

Chord Workbook for Guitar Volume 1 (2nd edition)


Spiral Bound ISBN 0-9648632-1-9 Perfect Bound ISBN 1890944-50-5

A consistent seller, this book addresses the needs of the beginning through inter-
mediate student. The beginning student will learn chords on the guitar, and a sec-
tion is also included to help learn the basics of music theory. Progressions are
provided to help the student apply these chords to common sequences. The more
advanced student will find the reharmonization section to be an invaluable resource
of harmonic choices. Information is given through musical notation as well as
tablature.

Chord Workbook for Guitar Volume 2 (2nd edition)


Spiral Bound ISBN 0-9648632-3-5 Perfect Bound ISBN 1890944-51-3

This book is the Rosetta Stone of pop/jazz chords, and is geared to the intermedi-
ate to advanced student. These are the chords that any serious student bent on a
musical career must know. Unlike other books which simply give examples of iso-
lated chords, this unique book provides a comprehensive series of progressions and
chord combinations which are immediately applicable to both composition and
performance.

Music Theory Workbook for Guitar Series

The world’s most popular instrument, the guitar, is not taught in our public schools.
In addition, it is one of the hardest on which to learn the basics of music. As a
result, it is frequently difficult for the serious guitarist to get a firm foundation in
theory.

Theory Workbook for Guitar Volume 1


Spiral Bound ISBN 0-9648632-4-3 Perfect Bound ISBN 1890944-52-1

This book provides real hands-on application of intervals and chords. A theory
section written in concise and easy to understand language prepares the student for
all exercises. Worksheets are given that quiz a student about intervals and chord
construction using staff notation and guitar tablature. Answers are supplied in the
back of the book enabling a student to work without a teacher.
Theory Workbook for Guitar Volume 2
Spiral Bound ISBN 0-9648632-5-1 Perfect Bound ISBN 1890944-53-X

This book provides real hands-on application for 22 different scale types. A
theory section written in concise and easy to understand language prepares the
student for all exercises. Worksheets are given that quiz a student about scale
construction using staff notation and guitar tablature. Answers are supplied in
the back of the book enabling a student to work without a teacher. Audio files
are also available on the muse-eek.com website to facilitate practice and improvi-
sation with all the scales presented.

Rhythm Book Series

These books are a breakthrough in music instruction, using the internet as a


teaching tool! Audio files of all the exercises are easily downloaded from the
internet.

Rhythm Primer
Spiral Bound ISBN 0-890944-03-3 Perfect Bound ISBN 1890944-59-9

This 61 page book concentrates on all basic rhythms using four rhythmic levels.
All examples use one pitch, allowing the student to focus completely on time and
rhythm. All exercises can be downloaded from the internet to facilitate learning.
See http://www.muse-eek.com for details

Rhythms Volume 1
Spiral Bound ISBN 0-9648632-7-8 Perfect Bound ISBN 1890944-55-6

This 120 page book concentrates on eighth note rhythms and is a thesaurus of
rhythmic patterns. All examples use one pitch, allowing the student to focus
completely on time and rhythm. All exercises can be downloaded from the
internet to facilitate learning. See http://www.muse-eek.com for details.

Rhythms Volume 2
Spiral Bound ISBN 0-9648632-8-6 Perfect Bound ISBN 1890944-56-4

This volume concentrates on sixteenth note rhythms, and is a 108 page thesau-
rus of rhythmic patterns. All examples use one pitch, allowing the student to
focus completely on time and rhythm. All exercises can be downloaded from the
internet to facilitate learning. See http://www.muse-eek.com for details.

Rhythms Volume 3
Spiral Bound ISBN 0-890944-04-1 Perfect Bound ISBN 1890944-57-2

This volume concentrates on thirty second note rhythms, and is a 102 page
thesaurus of rhythmic patterns. All examples use one pitch, allowing the student
to focus completely on time and rhythm. All exercises can be downloaded from
the internet to facilitate learning. See http://www.muse-eek.com for details.

Odd Meters Volume 1


Spiral Bound ISBN 0-9648632-9-4 Perfect Bound ISBN 1890944-58-0

This book applies both eighth and sixteenth note rhythms to odd meter combina-
tions. All examples use one pitch, allowing the student to focus completely on
time and rhythm. Exercises can be downloaded from the internet to facilitate
learning. This 100 page book is an essential sight reading tool.
See http://www.muse-eek.com for details.
Contemporary Rhythms Volume 1
Spiral Bound ISBN 1-890944-27-0 Perfect Bound ISBN 1890944-84-X

This volume concentrates on eight note rhythms and is a thesaurus of rhythmic pat-
terns. Each exercise uses one pitch which allows the student to focus completely on
time and rhythm. Exercises use modern innovations common to twentieth century
notation, thereby familiarizing the student with the most sophisticated systems likely
to be encountered in the course of a musical career. All exercises can be downloaded
from the internet to facilitate learning. See http://www.muse-eek.com for details.

Contemporary Rhythms Volume 2


Spiral Bound ISBN 1-890944-28-9 Perfect Bound ISBN 1890944-85-8

This volume concentrates on sixteenth note rhythms and is a thesaurus of rhythmic


patterns. Each exercise uses one pitch which allows the student to focus completely
on time and rhythm. Exercise use modern innovations common to twentieth century
notation, thereby familiarizing the student with the most sophisticated systems likely
to be encountered in the course of a musical career. All exercises can be downloaded
from the internet to facilitate learning. See http://www.muse-eek.com for details.

Independence Volume 1
Spiral Bound ISBN 1-890944-00-9 Perfect Bound ISBN 1890944-83-1

This 51 page book is designed for pianists, stick and touchstyle guitarists, percussion-
ists and anyone who wishes to develop the rhythmic independence of their hands. This
volume concentrates on quarter, eighth and sixteenth note rhythms and is a thesaurus
of rhythmic patterns. The exercises in this book gradually incorporate more and more
complex rhythmic patterns making it an excellent tool for both the beginning and the
advanced student.

Other Guitar Study Aids

Right Hand Technique for Guitar Volume 1


Spiral Bound ISBN 0-9648632-6-X Perfect Bound ISBN 1890944-54-8

Here’s a breakthrough in music instruction, using the internet as a teaching tool! This
book gives a concise method for developing right hand technique on the guitar, one of
the most overlooked and under-addressed aspects of learning the instrument. The
simplest, most basic movements are used to build fatigue-free technique. Exercises
can be downloaded from the internet to facilitate learning. See http://www.muse-
eek.com for details.

Single String Studies Volume One


Spiral Bound ISBN 1-890944-01-7 Perfect Bound ISBN 1890944-62-9

This book is an excellent learning tool for both the beginner who has no experience
reading music on the guitar, and the advanced student looking to improve their ledger
line reading and general knowledge of each string of the guitar. Each exercise concen-
trates the students attention on one string at a time. This allows a familiarity to form
between the written pitch and where it can be found on the guitar along with improv-
ing one’s “feel” for jumping linearly across the fretboard. Exercises can be downloaded
from the internet to facilitate learning. See http://www.muse-eek.com for details.
Single String Studies Volume Two
Spiral Bound ISBN 1-890944-05-X Perfect Bound ISBN 1890944-64-5

This book is a continuation of Volume One, but using non-diatonic notes. Volume
Two helps the intermediate and advanced student improve their ledger line reading
and general knowledge of each string of the guitar. Each exercise concentrates the
students attention on one string at a time. This allows a familiarity to form between
the written pitch and where it can be found on the guitar along with improving one’s
“feel” for jumping linearly across the fretboard. Exercises can be downloaded from
the internet to facilitate learning. See http://www.muse-eek.com for details.

Single String Studies Volume One (Bass Clef)


Spiral Bound ISBN 1-890944-02-5 Perfect Bound ISBN 1890944-63-7

This book is an excellent learning tool for both the beginner who has no experience
reading music on the bass guitar, and the advanced student looking to improve their
ledger line reading and general knowledge of each string of the bass. Each exercise
concentrates a students attention of one string at a time. This allows a familiarity to
form between the written pitch and where it can be found on the bass along with
improving one’s “feel” for jumping linearly across the fretboard. Exercises can be
downloaded from the internet to facilitate learning. See http://www.muse-eek.com
for details.

Single String Studies Volume Two (Bass Clef)


Spiral Bound ISBN 1-890944-06-8 Perfect Bound ISBN 1890944-65-3

This book is a continuation of Volume One, but using non-diatonic notes. Volume
Two helps the intermediate and advanced student improve their ledger line reading
and general knowledge of each string of the bass. Each exercise concentrates the
students attention on one string at a time. This allows a familiarity to form between
the written pitch and where it can be found on the bass along with improving one’s
“feel” for jumping linearly across the fretboard. Exercises can be downloaded from
the internet to facilitate learning. See http://www.muse-eek.com for details.

Guitar Clinic
Spiral Bound ISBN 1-890944-45-9 Perfect Bound ISBN 1890944-86-6

Guitar Clinic” contains techniques and exercises Mr. Arnold uses in the clinics and
workshops he teaches around the U.S.. Much of the material in this book is culled
from Mr. Arnold’s educational series, over thirty books in all. The student wishing to
expand on his or her studies will find suggestions within the text as to which of Mr.
Arnold’s books will best serve their specific needs. Topics covered include: how to
read music, sight reading, reading rhythms, music theory, chord and scale construc-
tion, modal sequencing, approach notes, reharmonization, bass and chord comping,
and hexatonic scales.

The Essentials: Chord Charts, Scales, and Lead Patterns for the Guitar
Saddle Stitched (Stapled) ISBN 1-890944-94-7

T his book is truly essential to the aspiring guitarist. It includes the most commonly
played chords on the guitar in all keys, plus a bonus of the most commonly used
scales and lead patterns. You can quickly learn all the chords, scales and lead pat-
terns you need to know to play your favorite songs-and solo over them, too! “The
Essentials” doesn’t stop there, though. It also includes chord progressions to help
you learn how to chord songs in folk, country, rock, blues and other popular styles.
The books contain loads of easy to understand diagrams of chords, scales and lead
patterns so you will be up and running in no time!
Sight Singing and Ear Training Series

The world is full of ear training and sight reading books, so why do we need more?
This sight singing and ear training series uses a different method of teaching relative
pitch sight singing and ear training. The success of this method has been remark-
able. Along with a new method of ear training these books also use CDs and the
internet as a teaching tool! Audio files of all the exercises are easily downloaded
from the internet at www.muse-eek.com By combining interactive audio files with a
new approach to ear training a student’s progress is limited only by their willingness
to practice!

A Fanatic’s Guide to Ear Training and Sight Singing


Spiral Bound ISBN 1-890944-19-X Perfect Bound ISBN 1890944-75-0

This book and CD present a method for developing good pitch recognition through
sight singing. This method differs from the myriad of other sight singing books in
that it develops the ability to identify and name all twelve pitches within a key cen-
ter. Through this method a student gains the ability to identify sound based on it’s
relationship to a key and not the relationship of one note to another (i.e. interval
training as commonly taught in many texts). All note groupings from one to six
notes are presented giving the student a thesaurus of basic note combinations
which develops sight singing and note recognition to a level unattainable before this
Guide’s existence.

Key Note Recognition


Spiral Bound ISBN 1-890944-30-3 Perfect Bound ISBN 1890944-77-7

This book and CD present a method for developing the ability to recognize the
function of any note against a key. This method is a must for anyone who wishes to
sound one note on an instrument or voice and instantly know what key a song is in.
Through this method a student gains the ability to identify a sound based on its
relationship to a key and not the relationship of one note to another (i.e. interval
training as commonly taught in many texts). Key Center Recognition is a definite
requirement before proceeding to two note ear training.

LINES Volume One: Sight Reading and Sight Singing Exercises


Spiral Bound ISBN 1-890944-09-2 Perfect Bound ISBN 1890944-76-9

This book can be used for many applications. It is an excellent source for easy half
note melodies that a beginner can use to learn how to read music or for sight singing
slightly chromatic lines. An intermediate or advanced student will find exercises for
multi-voice reading. These exercises can also be used for multi-voice ear training.
The book has the added benefit in that all exercises can be heard by downloading the
audio files for each example. See http://www.muse-eek.com for details.

Ear Training ONE NOTE: Beginning Level


Spiral Bound ISBN 1-890944-12-2 Perfect Bound ISBN 1890944-66-1

This Book and Audio CD presents a new and exciting method for developing relative
pitch ear training. It has been used with great success and is now finally available on
CD. There are three levels available depending on the student’s ability. This begin-
ning level is recommended for students who have little or no music training.
Ear Training ONE NOTE: Intermediate Level
Spiral Bound ISBN 1-890944-13-0 Perfect Bound ISBN 1890944-67-X

This Audio CD and booklet presents a new and exciting method of developing
relative pitch ear training. It has been used with great success and is now
finally available on CD. This intermediate level is recommended for students
who have had some music training but still find their skills need more devel-
opment.

Ear Training ONE NOTE: Advanced Level


Spiral Bound ISBN 1-890944-14-9 Perfect Bound ISBN 1890944-68-8

This Audio CD and booklet presents a new and exciting method of developing
relative pitch ear training. It has been used with great success and is now
finally available on CD. There are three levels available depending on the
student’s ability. This advanced level is recommended for students who have
worked with the intermediate level and now wish to perfect their skills.

Ear Training TWO NOTE: Beginning Level Volume One


Spiral Bound ISBN 1-890944-31-9 Perfect Bound ISBN 1890944-69-6

This Book and Audio CD continues the method of developing relative pitch
ear training as set forth in the “Ear Training, One Note” series. There are six
volumes in the beginning level series. Through practice, the student eventu-
ally gains the ability to recognize the key and the names of any two notes
played simultaneously. Volume One concentrates on 5ths. Prerequisite: a
strong grasp of the One Note method.

Ear Training TWO NOTE: Beginning Level Volume Two


Spiral Bound ISBN 1-890944-32-7 Perfect Bound ISBN 1890944-70-X

This Book and Audio CD continues the method of developing relative pitch
ear training as set forth in the “Ear Training, One Note” series. There are six
volumes in the beginning level series. Through practice, the student eventu-
ally gains the ability to recognize the key and the names of any two notes
played simultaneously. Volume Two concentrates on 3rds. Prerequisite: a
strong grasp of the One Note method.

Ear Training TWO NOTE: Beginning Level Volume Three


Spiral Bound ISBN 1-890944-33-5 Perfect Bound ISBN 1890944-71-8

This Book and Audio CD continues the method of developing relative pitch
ear training as set forth in the “Ear Training, One Note” series. There are six
volumes in the beginning level series. Through practice, the student eventu-
ally gains the ability to recognize the key and the names of any two notes
played simultaneously. Volume Three concentrates on 6ths. Prerequisite: a
strong grasp of the One Note method.

Ear Training TWO NOTE: Beginning Level Volume Four


Spiral Bound ISBN 1-890944-34-3 Perfect Bound ISBN 1890944-72-6

This Book and Audio CD continues the method of developing relative pitch
ear training as set forth in the “Ear Training, One Note” series. There are six
volumes in the beginning level series. Through practice, the student eventu-
ally gains the ability to recognize the key and the names of any two notes
played simultaneously. Volume Four concentrates on 4ths. Prerequisite: a
strong grasp of the One Note method.
Ear Training TWO NOTE: Beginning Level Volume Five
Spiral Bound ISBN 1-890944-35-1 Perfect Bound ISBN 1890944-73-4

This Book and Audio CD continues the method of developing relative pitch ear
training as set forth in the “Ear Training, One Note” series. There are six vol-
umes in the beginning level series. Through practice, the student eventually
gains the ability to recognize the key and the names of any two notes played
simultaneously. Volume Five concentrates on 2nds. Prerequisite: a strong
grasp of the One Note method.

Ear Training TWO NOTE: Beginning Level Volume Six


Spiral Bound ISBN 1-890944-36-X Perfect Bound ISBN 1890944-74-2

This Book and Audio CD continues the method of developing relative pitch ear
training as set forth in the “Ear Training, One Note” series. There are six vol-
umes in the beginning level series. Through practice, the student eventually
gains the ability to recognize the key and the names of any two notes played
simultaneously. Volume Six concentrates on 7ths. Prerequisite: a strong grasp
of the One Note method.

Comping Styles Series

This series is built on the progressions found in Chord Workbook Volume One.
Each book covers a specific style of music and presents exercises to help a
guitarist, bassist or drummer master that style. Audio CDs are also available
so a student can play along with each example and really get “into the
groove."

Comping Styles for the Guitar Volume Two FUNK


Spiral Bound ISBN 1-890944-07-6 Perfect Bound ISBN 1890944-60-2

This volume teaches a student how to play guitar or piano in a funk style. 36
Progressions are presented: 12 keys of a Major and Minor Blues plus 12 keys of
Rhythm Changes A different groove is presented for each exercise giving the
student a wide range of funk rhythms to master. An Audio CD is also included
so a student can play along with each example and really get “into the
groove.” The audio CD contains “trio” versions of each exercise with Guitar,
Bass and Drums.

Comping Styles for the Bass Volume Two FUNK


Spiral Bound ISBN 1-890944-08-4 Perfect Bound ISBN 1890944-61-0

This volume teaches a student how to play bass in a funk style. 36 Progres-
sions are presented: 12 keys of a Major and Minor Blues plus 12 keys of
Rhythm Changes A different groove is presented for each exercise giving the
student a wide range of funk rhythms to master. An Audio CD is also included
so a student can play along with each example and really get “into the
groove.” The audio CD contains “trio” versions of each exercise with Guitar,
Bass and Drums.
Jazz and Blues Bass Line
Spiral Bound ISBN 1-890944-15-7 Perfect Bound ISBN 1890944-16-5

This book covers the basics of bass line construction. A theoretical guide to
building bass lines is presented along with 36 chord progressions utilizing the
twelve keys of a Major and Minor Blues, plus twelve keys of Rhythm Changes.
A reharmonization section is also provided which demonstrates how to
reharmonize a chord progression on the spot.

Time Series

The Doing Time series presents a method for contacting, developing and
relying on your internal time sense: This series is an excellent source for any
musician who is serious about developing strong internal sense of time. This is
particularly useful in any kind of music where the rhythms and time signatures
may be very complex or free, and there is no conductor.

THE BIG METRONOME


Spiral Bound ISBN 1-890944-37-8 Perfect Bound ISBN 1890944-82-3

The Big Metronome is designed to help you develop a better internal sense of
time. This is accomplished by requiring you to “feel time” rather than having
you rely on the steady click of a metronome. The idea is to slowly wean
yourself away from an external device and rely on your internal/natural sense
of time. The exercises presented work in conjunction with the three CDs that
accompany this book. CD 1 presents the first 13 settings from a traditional
metronome 40-66; the second CD contains metronome markings 69-116, and
the third CD contains metronome markings 120-208. The first CD gives you a
2 bar count off and a click every measure, the second CD gives you a 2 bar
count off and a click every 2 measures, the 3rd CD gives you a 2 bar count off
and a click every 4 measures. By presenting all common metronome markings
a student can use these 3 CDs as a replacement for a traditional metronome.

Doing Time with the Blues Volume One:


Spiral Bound ISBN 1-890944-17-3 Perfect Bound ISBN 1890944-78-5

The book and CD presents a method for gaining an internal sense of time
thereby eliminating dependence on a metronome. The book presents the basic
concept for developing good time and also includes exercises that can be
practiced with the CD. The CD provides eight 8 minute tracks at different
tempos in which the time is delineated every 2 bars, and with an extra hit
every 12 bars to outline the blues form. The student may then use the exer-
cises presented in the book to gain control of their execution or improvise to
gain control of their ideas using this bare minimum of time delineation.

Doing Time with the Blues Volume Two:


Spiral Bound ISBN 1-890944-18-1 Perfect Bound ISBN 1890944-79-3

This is the 2nd volume of a four volume series which presents a method for
developing a musician’s internal sense of time, thereby eliminating dependence
on a metronome. This 2nd volume presents different exercises which further
the development of this time sense. This 2nd volume begins to test even a
professional level player’s ability. The CD provides eight 8 minute tracks at
different tempos in which the time is delineated every 4 bars with an extra hit
every 12 bars to outline the blues form. New exercises are also included that
can be practiced with the CD. This series is an excellent source for any musi-
cian who is serious about developing an internal sense of time.
Doing Time with 32 bars Volume One:
Spiral Bound ISBN 1-890944-22-X Perfect Bound ISBN Spiral Bound ISBN
1890944-80-7

The book and CD presents a method for gaining an internal sense of time
thereby eliminating dependence on a metronome. The book presents the basic
concept for developing good time and also includes exercises that can be
practiced with the CD. The CD provides eight 8 minute tracks at different
tempos in which the time is delineated every 2 bars, with an extra hit every 32
to outline the 32 bar form. The student may then use the exercises presented
in the book to gain control of their execution or improvise to gain control of
their ideas using this bare minimum of time delineation.

Doing Time with 32 bars Volume Two:


Spiral Bound ISBN 1-890944-23-8 Perfect Bound ISBN Spiral Bound ISBN
1890944-81-5

This is the 2nd volume of a four volume series which presents a method for
developing a musician’s internal sense of time, thereby eliminating dependence
on a metronome.. This 2nd volume presents different exercises which further
the development of this time sense. This 2nd volume begins to test even a
professional level player’s ability. The CD provides eight 8 minute tracks at
different tempos in which the time is delineated every 4 bars with an extra hit
every 32 bars to outline the 32 bar form. New exercises are also included
that can be practiced with the CD. This series is an excellent source for any
musician who is serious about developing an internal sense of time.

Other Workbooks

Music Theory Workbook for All Instruments, Volume 1: Interval


and Chord Construction
Spiral Bound ISBN 1890944-92-0 Perfect Bound ISBN 1890944-46-7

This book provides real hands-on application of intervals and chords. A theory
section written in concise and easy to understand language prepares the
student for all exercises. Worksheets are given that quiz a student about
intervals and chord construction using staff notation. Answers are supplied in
the back of the book enabling a student to work without a teacher.
E-Books

The Bruce Arnold series of instructional E-books is for the student who wishes to
target specific areas of study that are of particular interest. Many of these books
are excerpted from other larger texts. The excerpted source is listed for each
book. These books are available on-line at www.muse-eek.com as well as at many
e-tailers throughout the internet. These books can also be purchased in the tradi-
tional book binding format. (See the ISBN number for proper format)

Chord Velocity: Volume One, Learning to switch between chords


quickly
E-book ISBN 1-890944-88-2 Traditional Book Binding ISBN 1-890944-97-1

The first hurdle a beginning guitarist encounters is difficulty in switching between


chords quickly enough to make a chord progression sound like music. This book
provides exercises that help a student gradually increase the speed with which they
change chords. Special free audio files are also available on the muse-eek.com
website to make practice more productive and fun. With a few weeks, remarkable
improvement by can be achieved using this method. This book is excerpted from
"1st Steps for a Beginning Guitarist Volume One."

Guitar Technique: Volume One, Learning the basics to fast, clean,


accurate and fluid performance skills.
E-book ISBN 1-890944-91-2 Traditional Book Binding ISBN 1-890944-99-8

This book is for both the beginning guitarist or the more experienced guitarist who
wishes to improve their technique. All aspects of the physical act of playing the
guitar are covered, from how to hold a guitar to the specific way each hand is
involved in the playing process. Pictures and videos are provided to help clarify
each technique. These pictures and videos are either contained in the book or can
be downloaded at www.muse-eek.com This book is excerpted from "1st Steps for
a Beginning Guitarist Volume One."

Accompaniment: Volume One, Learning to Play Bass and Chords Si-


multaneously
E-book ISBN 1-890944-87-4 Traditional Book Binding ISBN 1-890944-96-3

The techniques found within this book are an excellent resource for creating and
understanding how to play bass and chords simultaneously in a jazz or blues style.
Special attention is paid to understanding how this technique is created, thereby
enabling the student to recreate this style with other pieces of music. This book is
excerpted from the book "Guitar Clinic."

Beginning Rhythm Studies: Volume One, Learning the basics of read-


ing rhythm and playing in time.
E-book ISBN 1-890944-89-0 Traditional Book Binding 1-890944-98-X

This book covers the basics for anyone wishing to understand or improve their
rhythmic abilities. Simple language is used to show the student how to read and
play rhythm. Exercises are presented which can accelerate the learning process.
Audio examples in the form of midifiles are available on the muse-eek.com website
to facilitate learning the correct rhythm in time. This book is excerpted from the
book "Rhythm Primer."