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Introduction to BIM

INSTRUCTOR MANUAL
2015

academy.autodesk.com
INSTRUCTOR MANUAL

Table of Contents

Project Overview.......................................................................... 3 Academic Standards..................................................................... 43

Design Brief....................................................................... 3 National Architectural Accreditation Board

Prerequisites...................................................................... 3 Levels of achievement........................................................ 43

Learning Objectives. ........................................................... 3 Appendix..................................................................................... 44

Key Terms.................................................................................... 4 Appendix A

Project Concepts.......................................................................... 6 Revit keyboard shortcut listing.. .......................................... 44

Module 01 - Modeling Building Elements ........................... 6

Module 02 - Building Envelope .......................................... 9

Module 03 - Curtain Systems ............................................. 13

Module 04 - Interiors and Circulation ................................. 17

Module 05 - Fixtures, Fittings, and Furniture . ..................... 21

Module 06 - Views and Visualization ................................. 25

Module 07 - Materials, Lighting, and Rendering ................. 31

Module 08 - Cloud Rendering ............................................ 34

Project Resources......................................................................... 37

Module 01 - Modeling Building Elements ........................... 37

Module 02 - Building Envelope .......................................... 37

Module 03 - Curtain Systems ............................................. 38

Module 04 - Interiors and Circulation ................................. 39

Module 05 - Fixtures, Fittings, and Furniture. ...................... 40

Module 06 - Views and Visualization ................................. 41

Module 07 - Materials, Lighting, and Rendering ................. 42

Module 08 - Cloud Rendering ............................................ 42

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INSTRUCTOR MANUAL

Project Overview
PROJECT BRIEF
Introduction to Building Information Modeling (BIM)

Building Information Modeling (BIM) is an intelligent model-based process that provides insight for creating and managing building projects
faster, more economically, and with less environmental impact. Learn basic techniques for creating building information models, including:
building elements, building envelope, curtain systems, interiors and circulation, and creating families.

Autodesk® Revit ® building design software is specifically built for Building Information Modeling (BIM), including features for architectural
design, MEP and structural engineering, and construction. This unit presents many of the fundamental concepts of creating BIM models
through the application of the tools in Revit. The features presented are a small subset of the full range available in the Autodesk® Revit
platform, specifically focusing on creating new models and displaying them in ways suitable for various applications.

SOFTWARE LEARNING OBJECTIVES


Autodesk® Revit ® 2015 and higher

TIME
6 - 10 HOURS
01 Understand the key underpinnings of Building Information Modeling and
parametric modeling relationships.

LEVEL
Beginner
02 Create 3D models of Architectural structures using Building Information
Modeling elements that are virtual representations of the real-world.

PREREQUISITE
To build up your software skills for
this project refer to the following
How-To video series for Revit:
03 Describe the different Revit family components, creation methods, and
where they are located.

04
• User Interface Learn effective modeling and visualization techniques for presenting your
• File Management designs.
and more

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
Fundamentals of Architecture

Module 03 - Wall layout, design,


and editing

Module 04 - Door and Window


layout and design

Module 05 - Roof layout, design,


and editing

Module 07 - Stairs and railings

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INSTRUCTOR MANUAL

Key Terms - Master Listing


BOUNDARY LINES The outer limits or edges of many building OBJECT STYLE Settings that determine how elements that belong to
elements, such as stairs, floors, or roofs. a model category are displayed if the materials are not assigned
through the element’s type or instance properties.

CURTAIN WALL A system of panels, grids, and mullions, typically


architectural and non–load bearing, used to separate spaces. PANELS Individual curtain wall sections, often made of glass, but a
wide variety of materials can be used.

ELEVATION VIEW Interior or exterior vertical views with a line of site


parallel to the ground. Elevation views typically present external PARAMETER A detail that can be changed or adjusted―includes
projections of building elements. dimensions, materials, and offsets.

FAMILY A group of components with different settings for the same PARAMETRIC COMPONENT A component―such as a piece of
parameters. Each type is based on the same initial model but usually furniture, a door, or a window―that is composed of adjustable
has different dimensions. parameters used to create variation within our model.

GRIDS Horizontal and vertical divisions that subdivide the wall into PLAN VIEW A horizontal view looking directly down toward a level
panels. from a viewpoint above.

HEAD HEIGHT The measurement from the floor to the top of the PROJECT VIEWS Different views of the model, such as plan, eleva-
rough opening or head of a door or window. tion, section, and 3D views.

INSTANCE PROPERTY Properties that apply to individual instances REFLECTED CEILING PLAN VIEW A horizontal view looking direct up
(elements) of a family type in the project. Instance properties tend to toward a level from a viewpoint below.
vary with the location of an element in a building or project. An
instance property affects only one selected element, or the element
that you are about to place. RENDERING The process of creating realistic images of a model by
replacing the shaded appearances of materials assigned to the visible
elements with images of actual materials.
LIGHTING SCHEME A setting that specifies the sources of light that
should be considered when rendering a view.
REVEAL A decorative cutout in a wall.

MODEL CATEGORY A grouping that includes similar model elements.


For example, tables, chairs, and beds are all members of the REVOLVE Solid geometry that turns (revolves) around an axis. For
Furniture model category. Materials can be changed by editing an example, you can use the Revolve tool to design a dome roof, a
object category’s style. column, or door knobs.

MULLIONS Members that frame the panels and provide support for RISERS Solid geometry that turns (revolves) around an axis. For
the weight of the panels as well as resistance to wind and other example, you can use the Revolve tool to design a dome roof, a
lateral loads. column, or door knobs.

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Key Terms - Master Listing


SECTION VIEW A vertical view that slices through a building to
displays the relationships between the cut elements.

SILL HEIGHT The measurement from the floor up to the bottom of


the rough opening or sill of a door or window.

SLOPE DEFINING Characteristic referring to a roof edge’s role in


defining the roof slope.

STACKED WALL A wall that has two or more horizontal layers, each
consisting of different materials and surfaces.

STRINGERS The supports for the treads and risers, which can be
located at the sides of the stair or in the center (underneath the
treads and risers).

TREADS The horizontal surfaces of the stair that you step on.

TYPE PROPERTIES Properties are common to many elements in a


family. A type property affects all instances (individual elements) of
that family in the project and any future instances that you place in
the project.

WALL SWEEP A horizontal or vertical projection from a wall, often


decorative in nature. Examples of wall sweeps include baseboards
and crown molding.

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Project Concepts
MODULE ONE: MODELING BUILDING ELEMENTS

SOFTWARE COVERED:

Autodesk® Revit® 2015 and higher.

MODULE ONE LEARNING OBJECTIVES:


• Create a basic building model containing essential elements,
such as walls, doors, windows, and roofs.

• Understand how to place walls and choose wall types.

• Place wall-hosted elements, such as doors and windows, and


set their height and other properties.

• Appreciate how to create floor and roof elements by sketching


their boundaries and choosing their types. EXERCISE 1 FINISHED

EXERCISE 1: MODELING EXTERIOR AND INTERIOR WALLS

Estimated time 10-15 minutes

PROJECT STEPS IN EXERCISE ONE:

• Create walls by picking their location line and sketching them in


a plan view

• Change the orientation of walls that have been placed

EXERCISE 2: ADD DOORS AND WINDOWS TO WALLS

Estimated time 15 -20 minutes

PROJECT STEPS IN EXERCISE TWO:

• Add doors and windows to a building model by choosing their


type and placing components in host walls

• C hange door and window placement EXERCISE 2 FINISHED

• Change door and window height properties

EXERCISE 3: CREATING FLOORS AND ROOFS

Estimated time 10-15 minutes

PROJECT STEPS IN EXERCISE THREE:

• Create roofs based on the building footprint

• S ketch a roof boundary and selecting the slope-defining edges

• Set the roof level and slope instance properties

EXERCISE 3 FINISHED
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Project Concepts
MODULE ONE: MODELING BUILDING ELEMENTS
CONT’D

LESSON OVERVIEW outside of Revit project files and are loaded into projects when
needed and have a *.RFA suffix. The Load Family command located
In this lesson, students explore basics techniques for using the
in the Insert tab > Load from Library panel provides the ability to
Autodesk® Revit® Architecture software to create a building
import library components into any project.
information model of a simple structure—a one story residence.
They will learn how to: CREATING FLOORS AND ROOFS
• Model exterior and interior walls In Autodesk® Revit® software, the Roof by Footprint tool enables
you to use a simple strategy of either sketching lines or picking walls
• Add doors and windows to the walls
that indicate the boundaries of the roof and specifying which edges
• Create simple floor and roof elements should create sloped roof planes. The characteristics of the roof
created— including the materials and structure, as well as the
• View the completed building model
slope—are determined by the properties of the roof type that you
MODELING EXTERIOR AND INTERIOR WALLS have selected.
In Autodesk® Revit® software, you create walls by using the Wall The steps for creating floor elements in Revit is very similar to
tool to sketch lines that indicate where walls should be placed. As creating roofs. You open the Floor tool and then sketch lines or pick
you sketch these lines, 3D wall elements are created in the model walls to indicate the boundaries of the floor. The primary difference
and appear in other model views. is that most floors are not sloped (although they can be if that is
appropriate for the model). The materials and structure of a floor are
The characteristics of the walls created are determined by the
determined by choosing the floor type.
properties of the wall type that you have selected. You can specify
the materials and structure of the walls being placed, as well as wall Floors and Roofs are a type of system family that are predefined and
height and many other physical properties. live inside Revit project files (*.RVT) or project templates (*.RTE). The
Transfer Project Standards command located in the Manage tab >
As you place or reposition walls in the building model, Revit
Settings panel provides the ability to copy floor and roof types from
software automatically joins the walls that intersect.
one project to another.
Walls are a type of system family that are predefined and live inside
Revit project files (*.RVT) or project templates (*.RTE). The Transfer
Project Standards command located in the Manage tab > Settings ASSESSMENT GUIDELINES:
panel provides the ability to copy wall types from one project to
another. MODELING WALLS AND COLUMNS

• If a wall is connected to other walls, how will moving one affect


ADDING DOORS AND WINDOWS
the others?
In Autodesk® Revit® software, doors are hosted by wall elements.
Moving a wall will typically affect other walls to which it is
You create a door by using the Door tool to choose a door compo-
joined. The other walls will stretch or shrink to try to maintain
nent and then place it in a wall that has already been modeled.
the connection.
Similarly, windows are also hosted by wall elements. So the
If two walls have been constrained using a locked dimension,
procedure for placing window components is similar to doors. You
then movements to one wall will be mirrored in the second
use the Window tool to choose a window component and then place
wall to maintain the distance specified in the constraint.
it in a wall element.
• W hat methods can you use to resize a wall?
The characteristics of the doors and windows placed are determined
by the properties of the door and windows types that you have You can select a wall and then drag on the blue dots that
selected. You can specify the features, sizes, and materials by appear at its ends to stretch or reduce the length a wall. You
selecting different types as you place them. You can also easily can also enter a new value into the temporary dimension that
change the properties of a door or window by selecting it and appears when a wall is selected.
choosing a new type.

Doors and Windows are a type of loadable family that are created
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Project Concepts
MODULE ONE: MODELING BUILDING ELEMENTS
CONT’D

If you want to extend a wall to meet another wall, the trim tool • What determines the roof slope?
offers an easy way to quickly and precisely join two walls.
The primary considerations for roof slopes are functional, such
ADDING DOORS AND WINDOWS as drainage or snow removal. Once those requirements are
met, adding slope is purely a matter of architectural style.
• What do the temporary dimensions for a door or window
element typically show? Flat roofs are rarely completely flat, but typically have a slope
of 1”/12” (4.76 degrees) to provide needed drainage. For
By default, the temporary dimensions show the distance
example, ranch houses and prairie school houses typically
between the center of the door or window to the nearest
feature very low slopes: 3” or 4” in 12” (14.04 or 18.43
adjacent wall or the nearest door or window. You can change
degrees). For taller roof styles, such as Tudor houses, roofs can
the temporary dimension preferences for a project to show the
be 6”–9” in 12” (26.57 to 36.87 degrees). Finally, A-frames are
distance to the edges of the door or window (rather than the
even greater than 12” in 12” (45 degrees).
center).

• How can you indicate the hinge side and the flip of a door as
you are placing it? After it has been placed? KEY TERMS USED IN THIS LESSON
As you place new doors, you can indicate the direction that the TYPE PROPERTIES Properties are common to many elements in a
door will swing into by hovering the cursor near the face of the family. A type property affects all instances (individual elements) of
wall on the interior side of the door. The hinge side of a door that family in the project and any future instances that you place in
can be changed by pressing the space bar. the project.
After a door is placed, you can select a door and small blue
arrows appear that enable you to quickly change the flip
orientation and hinge side. INSTANCE PROPERTY Properties that apply to individual instances
(elements) of a family type in the project. Instance properties tend to
• When you place doors or windows in 3D views, how is the level
vary with the location of an element in a building or project. An
associated with them determined?
instance property affects only one selected element, or the element
When you place doors or windows in 3D views, Revit tries to that you are about to place.
determine the appropriate level based on the closest level
below the sill of the door or window. Often, this is a good
assumption, but sometimes, it yields unexpected results. PROJECT VIEWS Different views of the model, such as plan, eleva-
CREATING FLOORS AND ROOFS tion, section, and 3D views.

• When you create a roof by footprint, how is the shape of each


of the roof surfaces determined?
BOUNDARY LINES The outer limits or edges of many building
The shape of footprint roofs is determined by the intersection elements, such as stairs, floors, or roofs.
of the sloping planes that are created for each of the slope-de-
fining edges specified.

The location and angle of the hip or valley intersections SILL HEIGHT The measurement from the floor up to the bottom of
between the planes is determined by the relative angles of the rough opening or sill of a door or window.
each plane. When two planes of equal slope intersect, the
boundary between the planes typically creates a 45-degree
angle with the roof edge. When planes of unequal slope HEAD HEIGHT The measurement from the floor to the top of the
intersect, the angle varies to resolve the difference. rough opening or head of a door or window.
The location of the roof ridge lines are determined by the
distance from the roof edges and the slope of each surface.

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Project Concepts
MODULE TWO: BUILDING ENVELOPE

SOFTWARE COVERED: properties.

Autodesk® Revit® 2015 and higher. • Modify a roof footprint and slope-defining edges to fine-tune
the shape and create various roof shapes and forms.
MODULE TWO LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
• Create a custom roof form by extruding a roof surface from a
• Understand the methods for changing wall types and for
creating new wall types with specific structures and design sketched profile
features.
• Appreciate the techniques of placing doors and windows both
in regular patterns and with appropriate height properties.
• Explore methods for creating simple and complex roof elements
modeling a variety of roof shapes and forms.

EXERCISE 1: MODELING WALL TYPES, STRUCTURES, AND


DESIGN FEATURES

Estimated time 15-20 minutes

PROJECT STEPS IN EXERCISE ONE:

• Edit a wall’s constraints and instance properties EXERCISE 1 FINISHED


• Define a wall’s structure and adjust the material wrapping
settings

• Add design features to a wall, such as sweeps and reveals

• Use and modify stacked wall types

• Edit wall boundaries to create custom shapes

EXERCISE 2: ADDING DOORS, WINDOWS, AND WALL OPENINGS

Estimated time 15-20 minutes

PROJECT STEPS IN EXERCISE TWO:

• Place windows and doors and change their location using


temporary dimensions EXERCISE 2 FINISHED
• Use arrays to quickly place groups of regularly spaced windows

• Use the Group and Associate array option

• Edit door and window instance properties

• Create new window and door types

• Create wall openings

EXERCISE 3: CREATING ROOF SHAPES

Estimated time 15 - 20 minutes

PROJECT STEPS IN EXERCISE THREE:

• Create roofs by specifying their footprint and adjusting their EXERCISE 3 FINISHED
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Project Concepts
MODULE TWO: BUILDING ENVELOPE CONT’D

LESSON OVERVIEW • Wall openings cut an opening in a wall, but include no panels
or other parts to fill the openings. Wall opening components
In this lesson, students will explore how to use the Autodesk®
are also available in the Revit Library to create nonrectangular
Revit® Architecture software to place and work with the elements
shapes, and some components include trim.
that compose a building envelope. They will learn how to:
You can change the sizes of doors and windows by choosing
• Model wall types and design features.
different types in the Type Selector or duplicating an existing type
• Create new wall types and edit their structure. and changing its dimension properties to create a new size.
• Place and adjust the properties of doors, windows, and wall Doors and windows can be placed individually, or you can use arrays
openings. to quickly place many components using an even spacing. All of the
elements in the array will be identical to the first and be spaced
• Create roofs with different shapes and slopes
evenly along the length of the array.
MODELING WALLS TYPES, STRUCTURES, AND DESIGN FEATURES
After placing a door, window, or opening, you can adjust its:
All walls placed in a building model have a wall type associated with
• Horizontal placement—by dragging the element along the wall
them. The wall type includes a definition of the layers and materials
or adjusting the temporary dimensions to precisely place it.
that determine the thickness of the wall, so choosing the correct
type for every wall is very important for creating accurate building- • Vertical placement—by adjusting the Header or Sill height
models. properties.

As you place new walls in your model, Autodesk® Revit® software • Orientation—by selecting the element and clicking its control
automatically chooses the same type as the last wall created. You arrows to flip the exterior and interior sides.
can accept this type or choose a different wall type using the Type
• Hinge side (for doors only) and swing—by selecting the element
Selector. You can also change the wall type after walls have been
and clicking its control arrows to change the location of the
placed, but it is typically more efficient and better practice to choose
hinge and the direction that thepanels swing.
the proper wall type as you place new walls.
CREATING ROOF WITH DIFFERENT SHAPES AND SLOPES
You can create new wall types to model materials and wall assem-
blies that are needed for your design. And you can specify settings The Roof by Footprint tool in Revit enables you to create roofs with
that determine the height of the top and bottom of the wall in the many different shapes and forms by sketching or picking the roof
Properties palette. boundary and specifying which edges of the roof should create
sloping roof planes. Using this tool, you can create model the
PLACING DOORS, WINDOWS, AND WALL OPENINGS
common roof shapes typical of most architectural styles, for
In Revit, doors, windows, and wall openings are modeled as example:
components that are hosted by walls. You place these elements by
• Hip roofs—all roofs edges are slope-defining.
opening the Door tool, Window tool, or Wall Opening tool, and then
placing the component in a wall that has already been modeled. • Gable roofs—some roof edges are not slope-defining, and
gable end walls appear at these edges.
While they are similar in many ways, the specific pieces contained in
each type of component differ slightly because they include unique • Shed roofs—one roof edge is slope-defining.
parts needed to perform their architectural functions: • Flat roofs—no roof edges are slope-defining.
• Door components cut an opening in a wall, which is filled by a You can also build up more complex roof shapes by creating several
door frame and one or more swinging, sliding, or folding door independent roof elements to model gambrel roofs, mansard roofs,
panels. Many door types also include interior and exterior trim. clerestory roofs, and dormer roofs. Where the edge of one roof
• Window components cut an opening in a wall, which is filled by intersects the face of another roof, you can join them to automati-
a window frame and one or more swinging or sliding sash cally determine the geometry of the intersection.
panels. Many window types also include interior and exterior Revit also provides a Roof by Extrusion tool that enables you to
trim. create roof surfaces by extruding a surface from a sketched roof
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Project Concepts
MODULE TWO: BUILDING ENVELOPE CONT’D

profile. This tool provides great flexibility for creating roofs that If a wall is a resized such that the placement point falls outside
cannot be defined using simple sloped planes, for example a curving the newboundary of the wall, Revit will report an error saying
roof or barrel vault. that it cannot cut the wall opening and will remove the
window.
ASSESSMENT GUIDELINES:

MODELING WALL TYPES, STRUCTURES, AND DESIGN FEATURES


• Can you place a door at a height above or below the associated
• How is the total thickness of a wall type computed? floor level?
The total wall thickness is determined by adding thickness to Most doors offer a sill height instance property that enables
each of the different layers that make up the wall assembly. you to specify an offset above or below a floor level.
• ow can changing a wall’s type affect the clear space between
H
adjacent walls?
CREATING ROOF SHAPES
Changing a wall’s type typically changes the wall thickness,
and this can change the space available between adjacent • What would be the method for creating a barrel vault roof?
walls. Where the thickness will be added depends on the
Barrel vaults are best modeled using a roof by extrusion. The
location line setting of the wall.
profile can be sketched as an arc or semicircle, and then
• In a typical residence, what locations are most critically affected extruded to form the length of the roof.
by the wall thickness?
• How about a dome?
Narrow hallways, closets, bathrooms, or anywhere where the
Dome roofs are more difficult to create. One strategy is to
space provided is close to the minimum clearances required.
create an in-place component that revolves an arc segment
around a vertical axis. Unlike roof by extrusion, the profile to
be revolved must be a closed loop indicating the thickness of
ADDING DOORS, WINDOWS, AND WALL OPENINGS the roof.
• Do the doors and windows move with the walls? • How would you model a sloping roof surface surrounding a
Doors and windows will automatically move when their lower flat roof—a strategy often used to conceal utilities and
hosting wall moves. mechanical equipment?

They can also move within a wall if constraints have been set This sloping roof form could be generated using roof by
up that link their position to other objects (for example, footprint, specifying two boundaries―the outer and inner
intersecting walls or nearby doors or windows). edges of the roof. The outer boundary is typically specified as
slope-defining, whereas the inner boundary is not, to create
Windows do not change location if the wall length or height is
roof planes that slope up from the exterior.
resized.
• What can you do if Revit reports that it cannot create a roof by
• Do doors and windows automatically adapt to the thickness of
footprint using the boundary sketched?
the host wall?
When Revit reports that it cannot create the roof by footprint,
Yes. The elements (frames, jambs, sills, and so forth) of the
this indicates that geometry specified in the sketch and slope
door and window components typically resize themselves
configuration is physically impossible to create. First create a
based on the thickness of the hosting wall.
simpler shape (with fewer slope-defining edges and equal eave
• What happens if the boundary of the door or window exceeds widths) and then iteratively edit the boundary sketch to add in
the extents of the wall? complexity and details.

Generally, Revit will allow you to place doors and windows as


long as the placement point―typically at the center of the
window―is within a wall.
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Project Concepts
MODULE TWO: BUILDING ENVELOPE CONT’D

KEY TERMS USED IN THIS LESSON

STACKED WALL A wall that has two or more horizontal layers, each
consisting of different materials and surfaces.

WALL SWEEP A horizontal or vertical projection from a wall, often


decorative in nature. Examples of wall sweeps include baseboards
and crown molding.

REVOLVE Solid geometry that turns (revolves) around an axis. For


example, you can use the Revolve tool to design a dome roof, a
column, or door knobs.

REVEAL A decorative cutout in a wall.

SLOPE DEFINING Characteristic referring to a roof edge’s role in


defining the roof slope.

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Project Concepts
MODULE THREE: CURTAIN SYSTEMS EXERCISE 4: PLACING DOORS IN CURTAIN WALLS

Estimated time 15-20 minutes

SOFTWARE COVERED: PROJECT STEPS IN EXERCISE FOUR:

Autodesk® Revit® 2015 and higher. • Adjust curtain grid segments to create a panel with the
dimensions for a desired door opening.
MODULE FOUR LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
• Change a curtain wall panel element into a single or double
• Explore new design alternatives made possible through the use
of curtain panels. door.

• Combine different techniques and components in order to


create a functional curtain system.
• Investigate the best way to divide curtain walls for various
applications.

EXERCISE 1: CREATING CURTAIN WALLS

Estimated time 10-15 minutes

PROJECT STEPS IN EXERCISE ONE:

• Create new curtain walls.

• Change the type of an existing wall to a curtain wall.

• Adjust the placement and orientation of curtain walls. EXERCISE 1 FINISHED

• Define curtain wall type properties to automatically place


curtain grids and mullions.

EXERCISE 2: ADJUSTING GRID LINES

Estimated time 15-20 minutes

PROJECT STEPS IN EXERCISE TWO:

• Add new grids to existing curtain walls.

• Edit existing curtain grid lines and segments.

• Add mullions to curtain grid lines.

• Pin and unpin curtain system elements to prevent or allow EXERCISE 2 FINISHED
changes to the layout.

EXERCISE 3: CHOOSING AND CREATING CURTAIN PANEL TYPES

Estimated time 15-20 minutes

PROJECT STEPS IN EXERCISE THREE:

• Choosing and Creating Curtain Panel Types.


• Change curtain wall panels to different types.

• Select multiple curtain wall panels to be modified at once.

• Create new curtain panel types and specifying their properties.

EXERCISE 3 FINISHED

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Project Concepts
MODULE THREE: CURTAIN SYSTEMS CONT’D

Regardless of which method you use to create a curtain wall, you


can easily modify (add remove, or move) grids and change the
mullions as desired to accurately model your design.

You specify a curtain wall’s horizontal and vertical grid layout (as
well as the mullions to be placed at the panel and wall edges) by
editing its type and instance properties. You set the pattern for each
direction independently, and the layout options include:

• None—creates no grids.

EXERCISE 4 FINISHED • Fixed number—divides the wall into panels of equal size. The
number of panels is set as an instance property each wall.

• Fixed distance—places grids at the fixed distance specified.


Smaller panels will be created at the beginning or end of the
LESSON OVERVIEW pattern if the total length to be divided is not an even multiple
of the distance specified.
In this lesson, students explore techniques for working with curtain
walls and the elements that define a complete curtain system— • Maximum spacing—divides the wall into panels of equal size
panels, grids, and mullions. They will learn how to: that are as big as possible without exceeding the maximum
specified.
• Specify the layout and spacing of the curtain wall elements for
new curtain wall systems and how to modify existing ones. • Minimum spacing—divides the wall into panels of equal size
that are as small as possible but that are no smaller than the
• Explore the design options available for customizing grid
minimum specified.
patterns, panel materials, and panel types.
ADJUSTING GRIDS AND MULLIONS
CURTAIN WALL ELEMENTS
You can edit the grid layout of existing curtain walls—adding,
Revit Curtain walls are composed of:
removing, or moving entire grids or selected segments—using the
• Panels—often made of glass, but a wide variety of materials can Curtain Grid tool.
be used
With the Curtain Grid tool selected, you hover the cursor over the
• Grids—horizontal and vertical divisions that subdivide the wall horizontal or vertical edges of a curtain panel, and Revit suggests
potential grid locations that would divide it into even increments (for
• Mullions—members that frame the panels and provide support
example, halves or thirds). You can also align curtain grids to other
for the weight of the panels as well as resistance to wind and
elements in your model by snapping to faces, reference planes, or
other lateral loads
levels.
DESIGNING CURTAIN GRID PATTERNS
When adding curtain grids to a wall, you can use placement options
Curtain walls are created using Autodesk® Revit® software’s Wall to:
tool and placed using the same techniques as other wall types. The
• Add grid lines across all segments (the entire face).
key difference is that you must choose one of the special curtain wall
types (which are listed after the basic wall types) from the Type • Add grid lines to one segment (a single panel).
Selector inthe Properties palette.
• Add grid lines across all segments except ones that you pick to
When creating a curtain wall, you can: exclude.

• Create a single wall panel that you will manually subdivide by Use the Mullion tool to place mullions on any grid line segment, on
adding grids and mullions to it. an entire grid lines, or on all of the curtain wall’s grid lines and
boundaries.
• Use a previously defined curtain wall type that specifies the grid
pattern and mullion types as part of the type definition.
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Project Concepts
MODULE THREE: CURTAIN SYSTEMS CONT’D

To make editing curtain grids and mullions easier, choose an By changing the vertical grid layout to the Maximum Spacing
elevation or 3D view thatdisplays the horizontal and vertical grid option, you can set a target spacing that will not be exceeded.
layout. This option will evenly divide a curtain wall until the actual
spacing is close to the desired spacing, leaving no need for a
CREATING AND USING CURTAIN PANEL TYPES
justification option.
When you create a curtain wall using a type-defined layout or add
• If you change the grid pattern layout and spacing rules for an
grids using the Curtain Grid tool, Revit subdivides the wall into
existing curtain wall type, are the walls that have already been
curtain panels with the same type properties.
placed updated using the new rules?
By default, curtain panels are set to a type named Glazed, which
Yes. If the type properties of a curtain wall have been changed,
specifies a transparent glass material. You change a curtain panel’s
all walls that have been assigned to that type will be updated.
type by selecting it and choosing another type from the Type
However, if instance properties are changed, only the wall
Selector.
being edited will be changed.
You can also create new curtain panel types to model panels with
ADJUSTING GRIDS AND MULLIONS
different properties (for example, different colors, materials, or
transparencies) by duplicating an existing type and setting the • Would it be easier to start by specifying a regular pattern in the
material properties to create the desired effect. curtain wall’s type properties, then modify it? Or would it be
better to manually subdivide the wall by adding curtain grids
PLACING DOORS IN CURTAIN SYSTEMS
individually?
Curtain wall systems behave like basic walls in many ways, but one
If a pattern is simple, or it is to be repeated on multiple walls,
key difference is that they cannot host standard door objects.
then it would be easier to specify a regular pattern in the type
You add doors to curtain walls in Revit by replacing curtain panel properties. If only minor adjustments to the pattern are going
elements (which are typically stationary or fixed) with a special panel to be made, then assigning a regular pattern may again prove
type that provides door functionality. to be helpful.

Before replacing a fixed curtain panel with a door panel type, you However, if each wall is extremely different, or the desired
should adjust the curtain grid lines by adding or removing segments pattern is extremely complex, it may be easier to start from
to create a panel with dimensions that match the size of the desired scratch instead of with a predefined pattern.
door panel.
• What types of patterns cannot be made using the layout
ASSESSMENT GUIDELINES: options in the curtain wall type properties?

DESIGNING CURTAIN GRID PATTERNS Vertical and horizontal grid lines can be placed at angles,
offset, added, or removed, however, there is no option to
• How would you specify a curtain wall’s properties to create create circular or curved grid lines.
vertical gridlines that are equally spaced—for example, 5 feet
(1.5 m) apart—on all sides of a building regardless of wall • How do you change the mullion properties (for example, the
length? profile or the material) for a curtain wall type?

Equally spaced gridlines can be created by editing a curtain If the mullions are placed using the curtain wall’s type
wall’s type properties. By select the Fixed Distance option for properties, then the mullion properties cannot be changed. We
the vertical grid pattern layout and assigning a spacing, the are only able to select a new, existing type within the curtain
new condition will be met for all walls using this wall type. wall’s type properties.

To change how excess wall is distributed if the wall length is If mullions are placed separately, they can be selected,
not evenly divisible by the desired spacing, you can change the changed, duplicated, and altered just like most other compo-
justification instance property for each wall separately. nents in Revit.

• ow would you specify panels of equal size but no larger than


H
10 feet (3.0 m) wide?
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MODULE THREE: CURTAIN SYSTEMS CONT’D

CREATING AND USING CURTAIN PANEL TYPES KEY TERMS USED IN THIS LESSON

• What types of materials are typically used in curtain wall CURTAIN WALL A system of panels, grids, and mullions, typically
panels? architectural and non–load bearing, used to separate spaces.
Glazing, which usually refers to glass or plastic finishes,
typically make up curtain wall panels since they usually have a
wide range of transparency properties that can be used for PANELS Individual curtain wall sections, often made of glass, but a
different applications. However, almost all materials―such as wide variety of materials can be used.
metal cladding, stone veneer, and wood―can be used as
curtain wall panels.

• How are opaque or semitransparent panels used in a curtain GRID Horizontal and vertical divisions that subdivide the wall into
wall designs? panels.

Absolute transparency is not always needed in curtain walls.


Opaque and semitransparent panels can be used architectur-
MULLION Members that frame the panels and provide support for
ally to create private spaces such as meeting rooms or
the weight of the panels as well as resistance to wind and other
bathrooms. They can also simply add flare to a building by
lateral loads..
adding more variety to a design.

• Can you create an open panel (with no material) in a curtain


wall system?

It is not possible to delete a panel, but it is possible to change


the type to an Empty System Panel, which is a panel type that
lacks a material.

PLACING DOORS IN CURTAIN SYSTEMS

• Do curtain wall door panels behave like standard door types?


Can you change the orientation or swing direction using
standard door editing techniques? Do they appear in door
schedules?

Yes. Once placed, doors in curtain walls act as any other door.
They appear in schedules and their orientation and swing can
be changed. However, you cannot drag them into another loca-
tion like a typical door. Instead, to relocate a door, a new
panel must be created and changed into a curtain wall door
panel type.

• What other types of operable panels would be useful in a


curtain wall? For ventilation? For shading?

Besides doors, curtain walls can include windows or sun


shading devices.

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Project Concepts
MODULE FOUR: INTERIORS AND CIRCULATION

SOFTWARE COVERED: EXERCISE 4: CREATING AN ELEVATOR

Autodesk® Revit® 2015 and higher. Estimated time 15-20 minutes

MODULE FOUR LEARNING OBJECTIVES: PROJECT STEPS IN EXERCISE FOUR:


• Determine the necessity of circulation elements in a structure • Place an elevator component.
and evaluate various options.
• Add walls to enclose the elevator.
• Explore the architectural and spatial advantages of creating
• Cut an elevator shaft that spans all levels.
stairs of different shapes and sizes.
• Provide openings in the shaft walls to access the elevator at
EXERCISE 1: CREATING A STAIR AND RAMP
each floor.
Estimated time 10-15 minutes

PROJECT STEPS IN EXERCISE ONE:

• Create stairs by sketching run lines.

• Flip a stair direction and move a stair into place.

• Create stairs with multiple runs and complex layouts (for


example, L-shaped, U-shaped, and curved stairs).

• Create and modify ramps.

EXERCISE 2: MODELING CUSTOM STAIRS


EXERCISE 1 FINISHED
Estimated time 10-15 minutes

PROJECT STEPS IN EXERCISE TWO:

• Edit the sketch to change the stair boundary and shape of the
risers.

• Change stair and rail types.

• Modify the steepness of a stair by adjusting the settings in the


Properties palette.

• Create and edit a spiral stair.

EXERCISE 3: CREATING A FLOOR OPENING


EXERCISE 2 FINISHED
Estimated time 10-15 minutes

PROJECT STEPS IN EXERCISE THREE:

• Cut an opening to allow stairs to pass through floors.

• Calculate the head height of stairways.


• Modify floor openings.

• Create railings.

• Modify the physical properties of railings.

EXERCISE 3 FINISHED
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MODULE FOUR: INTERIORS AND CIRCULATION
CONT’D

MODELING CUSTOM STAIR SHAPES

You can change a stair in many ways to fit your requirements and
the space available:

• Use the Move or Rotate tool to reposition or reorient the stair.


• Alter the stair properties (for example, the number of risers,
tread length, or stair width) in the Properties palette.

• Edit the sketch that defines the stair’s layout to change the
EXERCISE 4 FINISHED boundary shape or the placement and shape of the risers.

You can also sketch curved run lines to create curved or spiral stairs.
When creating spiral stairs, keep in mind that a curved stair run is
limited to a rotation of 360°. If you need to model a stair with
LESSON OVERVIEW greater rotation, create several segments, then move and join them
to create a continuous run.minimum specified.
In this lesson, students explore techniques for creating several types
of common circulation elements for multistory buildings, including MODELING FLOOR AND CEILING OPENINGS AND ADDING RAILINGS
stairs, elevators, and ramps. They will learn how to:
While the Stairs tool automatically creates all of the stair elements
• Create simple examples demonstrating circulation techniques. needed to connect between two levels, it does not cut openings in
the floors or ceilings that separate those levels. You can create these
• Edit and customize elements as needed to model more complex
openings in two ways:
conditions.
• Use the Edit Boundary tool and adjust the floor or ceiling
• Add railings at floor edges and around floor openings.
boundary sketch to include the layout of the opening.
CREATING SIMPLE STAIRS AND RAMPS
• Place a vertical opening or shaft opening element.
Using Autodesk® Revit® software’s Stair tool, specify a few key
When creating stairs and ramps, Revit automatically adds railings to
characteristics, and Revit automatically creates a stair with all of
these circulation elements for safety. You can use the Railings tool to
these elements.
adjust these railings or add new ones in locations where they are
The simplest way to create a stair is to: needed:

• Specify the essential properties that set the height and length • Around floor openings
of the stair―the levels of the top and bottom of the stair.
• At exposed edges of floors and balconies
• Sketch the run line―an imaginary line that specifies the
MODELING ELEVATORS AND SHAFTS
direction and length of each stair section.
Modeling an elevator in the Revit software requires several steps:
Revit automatically calculates the number of risers required to
connect the top and bottom levels and reports the number of risers • Placing an elevator component
created as you sketch the run line.
• Creating a vertical shaft to cut openings in floors and ceilings
Ramps are created in a similar way using the Ramp tool, which also
• Adding walls around the elevator shaft
appears in the Circulation panel of the Home tab:
• Cutting openings in the shaft walls for the doors on each floor
• Specify the top and bottom levels.
If an elevator component is not included into your model, you can
• Sketch the run line.
load one from an external library.
Revit automatically calculates the length of the ramp required using
The Shaft Opening tool is especially useful for modeling elevators
a slope of 1/12 for accessibility, but you can customize this slope as
because it can cut a vertical opening through many floors, ceilings,
needed.
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Project Concepts
MODULE FOUR: INTERIORS AND CIRCULATION
CONT’D

and roofs. When you move or modify the boundary of a shaft • What types of patterns cannot be made using the layout
opening, the changes are automatically updated on every level. options in the curtain wall type properties?

ASSESSMENT GUIDELINES: Vertical and horizontal grid lines can be placed at angles,
offset, added, or removed, however, there is no option to
CREATING SIMPLE STAIRS AND RAMPS create circular or curved grid lines.
• How does changing the riser height affect the number of risers • What is the maximum riser height and minimum stair width
required and as the number of risers changes, what happens to allowed by today’s building codes?
the overall length of the stair?
Except for spiral stairs and winders, risers may not exceed 8
Increasing the riser height decreases the total number of risers inches in height measured vertically from tread to tread. Treads
needed since each step provides a larger gain in elevation. If shall be at least 9-inches wide measured horizontally from
we assume a constant tread depth, the total length of the stair nosing to nosing.
decreases. This method essentially increases the slope of the
stair. MODELING FLOOR AND CEILING OPENINGS AND RAILINGS

• If you need to shorten (or lengthen) the total run of a stair, • How much clearance is required between the treads of a stair
which properties can you change to accomplish this? and the floor above (so users do not bump their heads).

To shorten a stair, increase the riser height and decrease the The required clearance between the treads of a stair and the
tread depth. To lengthen a stair, decrease the riser height and floor above varies slightly based on the building code used.
increase the tread depth. Typical values are 76 to 80 inches (1.93 to 2.03 m).

• What are the required properties of a wheelchair-accessible • What can you do to a floor opening to increase the clearance
ramp as specified by the Americans with Disabilities Ac? provided?

The ADA defines regulations for ramps in section 4.7 and 4.8 of You can enlarge a floor opening to increase the clearance
their Standards for Accessible Design. In general, the maximum between the floor and the treads of the stair below.
slope for a ramp in new construction is 1:12 with a clear width • What are the key differences between a handrail and a
of 36 inches (0.91 m). guardrail?
MODELING CUSTOM STAIR SHAPES Handrails are generally defined as being used for guidance and
• What is the typical relationship between tread length and riser support while the purpose of guardrails is to resist accidental
height in a single family residence? For an exterior stair? Explain falls. Handrail heights are commonly between 34” (0.86 m) and
the difference. 38” (0.97 m), while guardrails are 42” (1.07 m) in height. There
is often a requirement that a guardrail have a handrail
Interior stairs in a typical residence typically have a riser height included as well.
of about 7.25 inches (0.18 m) tall with a tread length of about
11 inches (0.28 m). For comfortable and safe use, the riser Handrails are required on stairs, and guardrails are required on
height and tread length should maintain the relationship: balconies and around floor openings.
2*Riser Height + 1*Tread Length = 25–26” (0.64 to 0.66 m).
Building codes in the United States limit the riser height to no
more than 8 inches (0.20 m).

Exterior stairs are typically designed with a shorter riser height


and a longer tread length to create a shallower slope. This
reduction is appropriate for exterior conditions which are often
slippery or wet.

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MODULE FOUR: INTERIORS AND CIRCULATION
CONT’D

MODELING ELEVATORS AND SHAFTS

• What are the advantages and disadvantages of creating floor


openings with shaft opening elements versus editing the floor
boundary?

By using the shaft opening tool, Revit automatically creates an


opening extending through multiple surfaces. This is conve-
nient when multiple boundaries must be edited because it
eliminates the need to do each one separately.

The shaft tool creates problems when different shapes need to


be created or when a different floor must extend into the shaft
region. If part of a new floor or roof passes through a shaft
region, it will not be displayed.

• Why are stairs and elevators typically located very close to each
other?

Both stairs and elevators are essential circulation elements and


they must be easily located. If the elevators are nonoperational
and in cases of emergency, the stairs should be easy to access
from the elevator location.

It is also common to place elevators next to stairways since


they both require continuous vertical shafts.

KEY TERMS USED IN THIS LESSON

TREADS The horizontal surfaces of the stair that you step on.

RISERS The vertical surfaces of the stair between the treads.

STRINGERS The supports for the treads and risers, which can be
located at the sides of the stair or in the center (underneath the
treads and risers).

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Project Concepts
MODULE FIVE: FIXTURES, FITTINGS, AND
FURNITURE
SOFTWARE COVERED: • Test parameters and define family types.

Autodesk® Revit® 2015 and higher. • Create forms, set constraints, and assign materials to forms.

MODULE FIVE LEARNING OBJECTIVES: • Save, load, and place instances of a custom component family.

• Understand when to create unique components when suitable


component families do not exist.

• Explore the various techniques for creating custom geometry,


including extrusions, blends, revolves, sweeps, and swept
blends.

• Appreciate the value of adapting existing components into


custom components.

• Understand the techniques for creating new parametric families


from scratch and loading them into projects.

EXERCISE 1: MODELING IN-PLACE COMPONENTS

Estimated time 20-30 minutes


EXERCISE 1 FINISHED
PROJECT STEPS IN EXERCISE ONE:

• Use the Model In-Place tool to create project specific custom


forms.

• Create simple extruded shapes and set the extrusion’s thickness


and material properties.

• Combine and resize extruded shapes to model common building


elements, such as furniture objects.

EXERCISE 2: MODIFYING A FAMILY DEFINITION

Estimated time 20-30 minutes

PROJECT STEPS IN EXERCISE TWO:

• Utilize existing component families to adapt them for new uses. EXERCISE 2 FINISHED

• Add new forms to the families and change the instance


parameters.

• Assign new materials and dimension properties.

• Define new component family types and load them into a


project.

EXERCISE 3: CREATING NEW FAMILIES

Estimated time 20-30 minutes

PROJECT STEPS IN EXERCISE THREE:

• Use the family editor to add reference planes, dimensions, and


parameters. EXERCISE 3 FINISHED
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MODULE FIVE: FIXTURES, FITTINGS, AND
FURNITURE CONT’D
LESSON OVERVIEW • Swept blend—3D interpolation of two different 2D Sketch
Profiles, each on located at opposite ends of a planar 2D Sketch
In this lesson, students explore techniques for creating and adapting
Path.
components to model fixtures, fittings, and furniture. They will learn
how to: These five methods can be combined to create almost any geometry
required.
• Create in-place components to model project-specific elements
and geometries. ADAPTING COMPONENTS TO FIT YOUR NEEDS
• Adapt existing component families to meet their needs by You can adapt existing component families to model objects with
adding and removing forms as well as assigning materials. similar geometries. This approach is especially effective when
• Create new component families and add parameters that enable components are available that have many common characteristics
them to dynamically resize the components and change their but are not exactly what you need. Rather than starting from
materials. scratch, it is often easier to edit an existing component family and
change only the parts that are different.
USING COMPONENT FAMILIES
You can open an existing component family in Revit software’s
Autodesk® Revit® software enables you to use and create compo- family editor in two ways:
nent families that can be easily modified to help meet the require-
• Open the Revit family file using the Open command in the Revit
ments of different projects. It offers great flexibility and to help
menu, then choose Family in the submenu.
increase your modeling productivity. You can easily change the
parameters defined for existing component and create new types as • Select an existing component placed in your project, then
needed with different dimensions, appearances, visibility, and opening the Edit Family tool.
performance characteristics.
Either method opens the Revit family editor, where you can explore
By creatively working with the parameters available, you can often the existing forms (extrusions, blends, revolves, and sweeps) defined
adapt a single component family to model a wide variety of elements in the component and edit their properties as desired to create your
in your project. component.

MODELING IN-PLACE COMPONENTS Be sure to save the adapted component using a new family with a
new filename to avoid accidentally overwriting the existing version.
You can use the Model In-Place tool to create unique components
when a suitable component family does not exist. The Model CREATING NEW FAMILIES
In-Place tool affords the designer flexibility and creativity in
You can also create new component families from scratch to model
designing and specifying custom, one-of-a-kind components for use
objects that cannot be easily adapted from an existing component.
within a single project.
You create new components by opening the Revit family file using
Revit software offers five methods to create model geometry:
the New command in the Revit menu, and then choose Family in the
• Extrusion—pushes or pulls a 2D Sketch Profile along z-axis of submenu. Choose a template from the library that determines the
Work Plane that the sketch was created in. category and hosting conditions for your component, and then
define the component using tools in the Revit family editor:
• Blend—3D shape extrapolated from two 2D Sketch Profiles, one
at bottom and another at top of shape, with blend depth • Reference planes to establish the key boundaries.
determining transition between top and bottom shapes.
• Dimensions and parameters to dynamically set their location.
• Revolve—creates 3D shape by revolving a 2D Sketch Profile
• Solid and void forms (extrusions, blends, revolves, and sweeps)
about specified axis.
to define the parts of the components.
• Sweep—drives a 2D Sketch Profile along a planar 2D Sketch
• Materials and parameters to dynamically assign them.
Path.
As you define new parametric components, plan the critical
dimensions that will drive the geometry carefully. Be careful not to
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MODULE FIVE: FIXTURES, FITTINGS, AND
FURNITURE CONT’D
over-constrain the forms by locking too many dimensions or adding rectangular shape.
too many parametric constraints. This is a common pitfall, and Revit
• For which characteristics of the modern lamp would it be useful
will warn you when all the constraints defined cannot be met. When
to vary parametrically by defining new types? By changing
this happens, examine the constraints that have been added
instance properties?
carefully, determine which constraints are in conflict, and remove
the constraints that are not truly needed. It is most useful to set dimensions as type properties because
they have a drastic effect on the component in terms of
Well-designed parametric components greatly improve your
spacing and compatibility issues. Characteristics that we want
modeling efficiency, because they enable easy modification and
repeated many times should also be considered type proper-
repurposing by simply creating new types and adjusting the type and
ties.
instance properties. While mastering the skills required to create
new parametric component families can be challenging, the time is For simpler characteristics, such as materials, we can use
well invested and yields tremendous returns. instance properties. These changes will only affect the instance
being modified and it will help to create variation.
ASSESSMENT GUIDELINES:
• Are materials assigned in the component definition automati-
MODELING IN-PLACE COMPONENTS cally loaded into a host project? Where do they appear?
• What types of objects do you typically need to model as Yes. The materials assigned a component family definition are
in-place components? loaded into the host project and appear in the Materials dialog
You will typically model in-place any object where their shape box under the same name.
depends on the geometry of the surrounding walls or elements, CREATING NEW FAMILIESS
for example, countertops and casework are typically sized to
match the precise distance between walls. • What are the advantages and disadvantages of creating single
components with many parameters to create variations versus
In the example house, with its unique triangular geometry, creating many independent component families?
many of the furniture elements and plumbing fixtures would
have to be modeled as in-place components. By creating one component with different parameters, we are
enabling multiple variations without the extra work or time it
• Can you copy/paste to duplicate in-place components? Can you takes to create new families. However, we are also being
reuse your inplace component in another project? locked into certain constraints when using a specific family. In
We can copy and paste to the clipboard within the same order to expand upon a family and to be even more creative, it
projects or even to a new project. However, we cannot copy is better to create a new family. This enables unlimited
and paste between projects and families. So in-place compo- variation, instead of only the limited changes prescribed to us
nents cannot be easily converted into reusable component in a predefined family.
families. • When would it be useful to define a relationship between
• What factors determine whether a component should be parameters with formulas?
modeled in-place or using the family editor? Formulas should be used when a parameter is dependent upon
The question is whether the component’s geometry is project another parameter. If there should be a shelf for every three
specific or whether the shape is the sort that is compatible and feet of cabinet, a formula should be used. If a table’s width
easily resized for use in other projects. should always be half of its length, a formula should be used.
Independent parameters do not need formulas.
ADAPTING COMPONENTS TO FIT YOUR NEEDS

• Which forms in the lamp component could be modeled in other


ways (for example, as extrusions rather than revolves)?

Many answers are possible. For example, the lamp base could
be modeled as an extrusion of a round shape or by revolving a

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Project Concepts
MODULE FIVE: FIXTURES, FITTINGS, AND
FURNITURE CONT’D
• What types of constraints can be added to a component
definition to prevent users from creating impossible geome-
tries??

Formulas can be added to parameters to ensure that the values


specified are within valid limits. For example, if a parameter is
used to specify the size of an opening in a form, you can set up
a formula to ensure that the size of the opening never exceeds
the boundaries of the hosting form.

KEY TERMS USED IN THIS LESSON

PARAMETER A detail that can be changed or adjusted―includes


dimensions, materials, and offsets.

PARAMETRIC COMPONENT A component―such as a piece of


furniture, a door, or a window―that is composed of adjustable
parameters used to create variation within our model.

FAMILY A group of components with different settings for the same


parameters. Each type is based on the same initial model but usually
has different dimensions.

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Project Concepts
MODULE SIX: VIEWS AND VISUALIZATION

SOFTWARE COVERED: SteeringWheels® widget to change the view settings.

Autodesk® Revit® 2015 and higher. • Use the section box to create 3D plans and section views.

MODULE SIX LEARNING OBJECTIVES: • Use the Camera tool to create new perspective views.

• Use 2D and 3D views to accurately convey information about • Adjust the crop region, far clip offset, and camera and target
their design to different audiences. positions for perspective views.
• Adjust the properties of model views to emphasize key elements EXERCISE 4: ADJUSTING THE APPEARANCE OF ELEMENTS IN A VIEW
of their design and hide unnecessary or unwanted detail.
Estimated time 10-15 minutes
EXERCISE 1: CREATING PLAN VIEWS
PROJECT STEPS IN EXERCISE FOUR:
Estimated time 15-20 minutes
• Use the View Control bar to quickly change a view’s display
PROJECT STEPS IN EXERCISE ONE: properties―for example, the level of detail and the visual style.
• Create new plan views by using the Plan View tool or dupli- • Display shadows and specifying the location of the lighting
cating existing plan views. source.
• Select which types of elements appear in a plan view by setting • Set a project’s location and orientation to cast accurate
visibility graphics overrides. shadows in a solar study.
• Turn on cropping and resize the crop region for a plan view. • Use Graphic Display Options to enhance the silhouettes of
• Adjust the view range (the height of the cutting plane and the elements and add gradient backgrounds to 3D views.
view depth) forplan views and plan regions.

• Select another level to underlay in a view.

• Change the scale of a plan view and adjust the level of detail
shown.

EXERCISE 2: CREATING ELEVATION AND SECTION VIEWS

Estimated time 15-20 minutes

PROJECT STEPS IN EXERCISE TWO:

• Place elevation tags to create new elevation views.

• Draw section lines to create new section views. Structural plan Furniture plan

• Modify view properties to adjust the crop region, level of detail,


and scale of elevations and sections.

• Set visibility graphics overrides to choose which types of objects


appear in the views.

EXERCISE 3: CREATING 3D VIEWS

Estimated time 10-15 minutes

PROJECT STEPS IN EXERCISE THREE:

• Duplicate the Default 3D View to create additional orthogonal


views. Residence - Level 1 plan Residence - Level 2 plan

• Use the Autodesk® ViewCube® widget and the Autodesk® EXERCISE 1 FINISHED
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MODULE SIX: VIEWS AND VISUALIZATION CONT’D

LESSON OVERVIEW

In this lesson, students explore the tools available in the Autodesk®


Revit® software to create several types of common project views
and specify the information that appears in them. Students will learn
how to:
• Create 2D views of their building model, such as plans,
elevations, and sections—creating new views from scratch and
duplicating existing views.

• Create 3D views by duplicating and editing the default 3D


EXERCISE 2 FINISHED orthographic view.

• Customize the information presented in those views.

CREATING PLAN VIEWS AND SETTING VIEW PROPERTIES

When you create a new project, the Revit software automatically


creates two types of plan views for each of the levels defined in the
project template:

• Floor plans, which look down on a level from a cutting plane


above

• Reflected ceiling plans, which look up to a level from a cutting


plane below
EXERCISE 3 FINISHED While this initial set of views is typically sufficient to get started with
your modeling, your views can get crowded and confusing as you
add more elements and detail to the building model. Rather than
trying to view all of the model information in a single view, it is
typically a better practice to create many views of your model, each
focusing on the types of information needed for a particular aspect
of the design process.

You add new plan views by:

• Using the Plan View tool to create a new floor plan, reflected
ceiling plan, or area plan for any of the project levels

• Duplicating an existing plan view and adjusting the properties


of the new view
EXERCISE 4 FINISHED
Creating additional views and customizing the information displayed
does not change the underlying building model. All of the elements
are still available in the model (regardless of visibility) and will be
affected by changes made in any view.

You can set the properties of any view to precisely control how the
elements in your building model will be displayed. You choose these
settings by selecting a view in the Project Browser, then adjusting
the view properties in the Properties palette.

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MODULE SIX: VIEWS AND VISUALIZATION CONT’D

The view properties vary slightly depending on the type of view, but detail, and visibility of model elements.
the options available typically allow you to set:
CREATING 3D VIEWS
• View range—the location of cutting plane (the imaginary plane
You can create two types of 3D views in Revit:
that cuts through your building model to create the 2D view) as
well as the depth beyond and in front of the cutting place to • Default 3D views, which are orthogonal projections of the
display in the view. building model elements. In these views, the appearance of the
model elements is not affected by their distance from your
• Cropping—the crop region that limits the portion of the model
viewpoint. Orthogonal views are used when accurately
that will be visible. Elements outside of the crop region are
representing the size of objects is important. They can depict
hidden in the view.
views from the ground level, but they are typically used to
• Scale—the relationship between the size at which elements present bird’s-eye views.
appear in printed views and their actual size. The scale also
• Perspective views, which use a camera metaphor to create a
affects relative size of text annotations and dimensions that
perspective projection. In these views, the appearance of the
appear in the view.
model elements is affected by distance. Objects that are near
• Level of detail—the amount of detail to show for the model the viewpoint appear larger, while objects in the distance
elements. This setting ranges from Coarse (which displays appear smaller. Perspective views are used when having a
simplified representations) to Fine (which displays the full realistic understanding of how the design will be perceived by
detail). nearby viewers is important. They are often used to create
interior or exterior renderings.
• Underlay—another level that can be displayed to assist with
tracing or aligning elements between levels. You create new 3D views in three ways:
You can use plan regions to adjust the view range settings used for • Using the 3D View tool (which appears on the View tab in the
specific areas in a plan view. This is useful when elements are not ribbon panel) and choosing the Default 3D View option. If this
being displayed, because they are located outside the view range view has already been created, it will be opened instead.
(for example, clerestory windows, which are located high on a wall
• Duplicating the Default 3D View, which appears as {3D} in the
above the cutting plane of a view) or on slightly offset levels (for
Project Browser. The view properties and settings will be copied
example, floors in a splitlevel house).
and used to create a new view, which will appear in the 3D
CREATING ELEVATION AND SECTION VIEWS View section of the Project Browser.

When you create a new project, the Revit software creates four • Using the 3D View tool and choosing the Camera option, which
elevation views named North, East, South, and West. These names allows you t0 specify the location and elevation of a camera
describe the orientation of the elevation view relative to project object and a target for the camera view.
north.
You can also add section boxes to your 3D views to cut away
As you progress with your design and modeling, you will typically portions of the building model so that you can see inside. Each face
need to create additional elevation views and section views to focus of the section box acts as a cutting plane, so you can use the section
on specific aspects of the project. You do this by: box to create a wide variety of views to share your design and show
the details of how it will be constructed—for example, 3D plans, 3D
• Using the Elevation tool to place an elevation tag that estab-
sections, and 3D detail views.
lishes the location and direction of the new elevation views.

• Using the Section tool to place a section line that determines ADJUST THE APPEARANCE OF ELEMENTS IN A VIEW
the location of the cut plane and direction of the new section You can change the appearance of the elements that appear in any
view. view by adjusting the View Properties that control how objects are
• Duplicating an existing elevation or sections view. displayed.

Like plan view, you can set visibility graphics overrides and adjust the
view properties to set the crop boundaries, view scale, level of
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MODULE SIX: VIEWS AND VISUALIZATION CONT’D

You can specify the level of detail to display: gradient background that adds context and enhances the
realism of your views.
• Coarse—shows the least amount detail and simplified represen-
tations of the elements for an uncluttered view. Displaying shadows can slow down the display of your views. If you
are making many changes to your model and you find that your
• Medium—displays elements using a level of detail that balances
computer’s performance is feeling sluggish, try temporarily turning
accuracy with complexity.
off the shadows in the open views. It is often helpful to keep
• Fine—shows all elements using the most detailed, accurate twoversions of a view—one with the shadows turned on for
representation. enhanced display, and another with the shadows turned off for quick
editing.
You can also change the visual style for displaying the elements in
this view. Your options include: ASSESSMENT GUIDELINES:
• Wireframe—displays all edges and lines drawn in the model, CREATING PLAN VIEWS AND SETTING VIEW PROPERTIES
but no surfaces.
• Which types of objects are copied when you duplicate a view
• Hidden Line—displays all edges and lines, except ones hidden without detailing? With detailing?
in the view by other elements.
Duplicating a view without detailing leaves out certain
• Shaded—displays all surfaces shaded and colored using the elements such as annotations, dimensions, door tags, and
applicable material and lighting settings, but omits the edges window tags. These elements are included when duplicating
and lines. with detailing.
• Shaded with Edges—displays elements in a style similar to In both cases, the visibility and graphics settings are carried
Shaded views, but includes the edges and lines that are not over. For example, if the furniture lines are set to red in a view
hidden by other elements. that is being copied, they will still be red whether or not the
• Consistent Colors—displays all surfaces shaded and colored view is duplicated with detailing.
using their material properties, but does not take light sources • What factors affect whether it is better to duplicate with or
and shading into account. without detailing?
• Realistic—displays all surfaces using the render appearance of Detailing is best used when preparing structural or construc-
their material properties. tion documents. When considering these applications, details
These display properties are set independently for each view. So you like dimensions and door tags are important for designing,
can create new views or duplicate existing views as needed, then planning, and scheduling.
assign different display properties to each view to achieve the Duplicating without detailing is more useful to convey
desired visual effects. architectural ideas. This reduces clutter and allows you to
You can further enhance your views using Revit software’s Graphic focus more clearly on the space being designed.
Display Options to: • How would you change the view properties to show clerestory
• Display shadows—showing the shadows cast by a light source windows with sills located at 6 feet (1.8 m) above the floor
at a preset location relative to the view or for a specific level?
location, date, and time. To accurately display shadows for a By editing the view range of a plan view and setting the cut
specific location, you must set your project’s location and plane to 6 feet, we would be able to make the high clerestory
orientation relative to true north. windows visible. However, this change may hide lower
• Enhance the edges—displaying the silhouettes of the elements windows. To fix this, we can create a plan region around the
in a special line style (for example, thick lines to emphasize the clerestory windows and set the view properties in this region
boundaries). independently of the rest of the view.

• Display a gradient background—specifying three colors for the


ground, the horizon, and the sky, which will be used to create a
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MODULE SIX: VIEWS AND VISUALIZATION CONT’D

CREATING ELEVATION AND SECTION VIEWS ment?

• What types of information are typically displayed in: If the view has already been created, you can use the
AutodeskSteeringWheels widget walk option to back up and
• Exterior elevation views?
see a broader view. You can also show the camera in a plan
• Interior elevation views? view, and then move it farther away from the target object.
• Building sections? • Can you use a section box to cut away parts of a perspective
view?
Exterior elevation views are useful for showing the architec-
tural details and materials of the building facade and are often Yes. In a 3D perspective view, the section box can be displayed
used to illustrate the exterior architectural appearance and and its edges can be moved in much the same way as in the
features. default 3D view.
Interior elevation views are useful for showing the details of ADJUST THE APPEARANCE OF ELEMENTS IN A VIEW
elements placed on interior walls, such as moldings, cabinetry,
• What visual styles would you recommend for views that will be:
and fixtures.
• Printed in construction documents?
Building sections are typically used to explain the vertical
relationships between building elements and their connection Hidden line. This visual style minimizes the visual clutter by
details. They are also useful for displaying the details of obscuring hidden lines and keeps the image simple for printing
vertical shafts and circulation elements, such as stair wells and on noncolor printers.
elevators.
• Presented to clients to show materials recommendations?
• Should you create interior elevations for every room? What
Realistic. This visual style gives the truest representation of
features of a room are best illustrated using interior elevations?
selected colors and material appearances.
Interior elevations are typically not needed unless it is
• Used to check for intersections or interferences between
necessary to display a specific aspect of the design that cannot
objects?
be explained well in a plan view. These features often include
moldings, cabinetry, fixtures, appliances, and other interior Wireframe. This visual style enables you to clear see how
details where the placement height is best explained in a elements interact and join, even if the edges would be hidden
vertical view. by the surfaces. Wireframe views are similar to X-ray vision.

• What are the key differences between elevation and section • How are the shadows displayed in your view affected by:
views?
• Project location?
Elevation and sections views are similar in many ways. The key
The latitude of the project location determines where the sun
difference is typically that elevations display an external
will be located in the sky at different times of the day and the
projection of the elements that appear in the view, where
year. This is reflected in the position of the shadows cast in
sections are used to display a cut through the key elements.
model views.
• What happens to the accuracy of objects that appear at the
• Time of day?
edges as you expand a perspective view’s crop region?
The time of day also affects the position of the sun in the
When expanding the crop region of a perspective view, the
sky—rising from the east in the morning and setting to the
objects near the edges appear to be stretched out. To prevent
west in the afternoon. As the day progresses, the shadows cast
this, it is important for the focus of the image to be located in
in model views change to reflect this position.
the center of the image.

• If you want to include a broader view of your model in a


perspective view, how should you change the camera place-
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MODULE SIX: VIEWS AND VISUALIZATION CONT’D

• Month of year?

The month of the year also affects the path of the sun in sky.
During the summer months, the sun’s path is relatively high in
the sky and shadows cast at midday are typically short. During
the winter months, the sun’s path is relatively low in the sky,
and the shadows cast at midday are much longer.

KEY TERMS USED IN THIS LESSON

PLAN VIEW A horizontal view looking directly down toward a level


from a viewpoint above.

REFLECTED CEILING PLAN A horizontal view looking direct up toward


a level from a viewpoint below.

ELEVATION VIEW Interior or exterior vertical views with a line of site


parallel to the ground. Elevation views typically present external
projections of building elements.

SECTION VIEW A vertical view that slices through a building to


displays the relationships between the cut elements.

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Project Concepts
MODULE SEVEN: MATERIALS, LIGHTING, AND
RENDERING

SOFTWARE COVERED:

Autodesk® Revit® 2015 and higher.

MODULE SEVEN LEARNING OBJECTIVES:


• Explore the visual effect of specifying various materials for
different building elements.
• Appreciate the importance of providing adequate daylighting
and artificial lighting sources in a building.
• Accurately present views of buildings models in realistic and
effective ways.

EXERCISE 1: ASSIGNING MATERIALS TO A COMPONENT

Estimated time 15-20 minutes

PROJECT STEPS IN EXERCISE ONE:

• Assign materials to model elements by object category.

• Assign materials by altering an element’s type properties.

• Assign materials by specifying an element’s instance properties.

EXERCISE 2: CREATING NEW MATERIALS

Estimated time 15-20 minutes

PROJECT STEPS IN EXERCISE TWO:

• Create new materials by duplicating existing ones and setting


the shading color and surface pattern.

• Replace the render appearance assigned to materials using


options available in the Autodesk library. EXERCISE 1 FINISHED

• Adjust settings to fine-tune or alter a material’s render


appearance.

EXERCISE 2 FINISHED
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MODULE SEVEN: MATERIALS, LIGHTING, AND
RENDERING CONT’D

LESSON OVERVIEW • Shading color

In this lesson, students explore how to use Autodesk® Revit® • Transparency


software to adjust the appearance of the building model elements
• Surface patterns (for cut and uncut surfaces)
that appear in their 2D and 3D views. They will learn how to:
You can also assign a render appearance to each of the materials
• Assign materials to model elements through object styles, type
that will be displayed:
properties, and instance properties.
• Views set to use the realistic visual style.
• Adjust the render appearance of materials to display realistic
views. • Photorealistic views created using Revit software’s rendering
tools (which we will learn about in the next lesson).
• Render views to create realistic views in daylight and artificial
lighting conditions. To change a material’s render appearance, open the Materials dialog
box, then switch to the Render Appearance tab, where you can
ASSIGNING MATERIALS TO MODEL ELEMENTS browse the library of render appearances by material type or search
You can assign materials to the elements in a building model to to find specific items. You can:
accurately display their appearance in shaded and rendered views. • Replace the current render appearance by choosing a new one
All elements in a building model have a material—either a default from the library.
material based on the object category or a specific material that has
been assigned through the element’s type or instance properties. • Adjust the settings to change or fine-tune the current render
Materials are assigned to elements using this hierarchy: appearance.

• Defaults—using default materials, which typically display a solid ASSESSMENT GUIDELINES:


gray color.
ASSIGNING MATERIALS TO MODEL ELEMENTS
• Object style—using the materials assigned to an object
• If you cannot find material settings in an element’s type or
category or subcategory.
instance properties, how can you assign materials to the object?
• Type properties—using the materials assigned to all elements of
Changing an element’s type or instance properties are
the same type in the family’s type properties.
high-level ways to edit materials assigned to the object. If
• Instance properties—using the materials assigned to a single these options are not available, the object style for the
element through its instance properties. category that the element belongs to can be changed.

If an element has properties that assign a material at a higher level For example, if a door is displayed as gray and material
in this hierarchy, lower-level settings will be overridden. For example, options are not available in its type or instance properties, you
a furniture element that has materials assigned through its type can change the object styles for the Door category in order to
properties will use those materials, rather than the default material set a default material for all door components.
assigned to the furniture category.
• What are the advantages and disadvantages of assigning
CHANGING MATERIAL DISPLAY AND RENDER APPEARANCE materials as type properties versus instance properties?

Revit software includes an extensive library of predefined materials Instance properties allow for an easier way to create variability
and rendering appearances, and you can edit the existing materials between multiple instances of the same component. If we have
or duplicate them to create new ones as needed for your design. multiple objects that we would like to be different materials,
instance properties allow us to change each one individually.
Use the Material tool in the Manage tab to edit existing materials,
However, if we want to change the material of many instances
create new ones, and specify how the materials will be displayed in
at the same time (like a large set of chairs), assigning materials
views.
as a type property is much easier.
You can set these options for hidden line, shaded, and consistent
• If you want to define a new material for some elements in you
color views:
model, is it better to change an existing material or to duplicate
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MODULE SEVEN: MATERIALS, LIGHTING, AND
RENDERING CONT’D

one and change the settings of the new material?

It is typically better to duplicate a similar material when


creating a new one. This prevents you from deleting a useful
material or accidentally changing a material that is being used
elsewhere in the project.

CHANGING MATERIAL DISPLAY AND RENDER APPEARANCE

• If you want to change the render appearance of some of the


elements in your model, is it better to modify an existing
material’s settings or to create a new material and assign it to
those elements:

If you are sure that you want to change the render appearance
of every element using a specific material, then it is generally
okay to modify the render appearance of that existing
material. Otherwise, create a new material for each element
that needs to be altered.

• When creating new render appearances from photographs or


scanned images of materials, what types of images work best?

Pictures and images with repeated patterns and limited


distortions caused by a poor camera angle work best for
creating new render appearances.

KEY TERMS USED IN THIS LESSON

RENDERING The process of creating realistic images of a model by


replacing the shaded appearances of materials assigned to the visible
elements with images of actual materials.

MODEL CATEGORY A grouping that includes similar model elements.


For example, tables, chairs, and beds are all members of the
Furniture model category. Materials can be changed by editing an
object category’s style.

OBJECT STYLE Settings that determine how elements that belong to


a model category are displayed if the materials are not assigned-
through the element’s type or instance properties.

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Project Concepts
MODULE EIGHT: CLOUD RENDERING

SOFTWARE COVERED: EXERCISE 4: CREATING AN INTERIOR ILLUMINANCE STUDY


Autodesk® Revit® 2015 and higher. Estimated time 15-20 minutes
Autodesk® A360® Rendering (see instructor notes) PROJECT STEPS IN EXERCISE FOUR:
MODULE EIGHT LEARNING OBJECTIVES: • O pen a 3D view for rendering
• Explore the visual effect of specifying various materials for • C onfigure cloud rendering parameters
different building elements.
• G enerate and view illuminance rendering
• Appreciate the importance of providing adequate daylighting
and artificial lighting sources in a building. EXERCISE 5: DOWNLOADING IMAGES FOR SHARING
• Accurately present views of buildings models in realistic and Estimated time 15-20 minutes
effective ways.
PROJECT STEPS IN EXERCISE FIVE:
EXERCISE 1: CREATING AN EXTERIOR RENDERING
• D ownload still images
Estimated time 15-20 minutes
• D ownload interactive panorama
PROJECT STEPS IN EXERCISE ONE:
• D ownload solar study
• O pen a 3D view for rendering
• D ownload illuminance study
• C onfigure cloud rendering parameters
• Share images via links
• G enerate rendering

• V iew rendered image

EXERCISE 2: CREATING AN INTERACTIVE PANORAMA

Estimated time 15-20 minutes

PROJECT STEPS IN EXERCISE TWO:

• O pen a 3D view for rendering

• C onfigure cloud rendering parameters

• G enerate panorama

• V iew panorama EXERCISE 1 FINISHED

EXERCISE 3: CREATING SOLAR STUDIES

Estimated time 15-20 minutes

PROJECT STEPS IN EXERCISE THREE:

• O pen a 3D view for rendering

• C onfigure cloud rendering parameters


• G enerate interior rendering

• C reate solar study from interior rendering

• V iew solar study movie


EXERCISE 2 FINISHED
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MODULE EIGHT: CLOUD RENDERING CONT’D

LESSON OVERVIEW

In this lesson, students explore the potential of infinite computing


using Autodesk® A360® Rendering to present their design ideas in
less time with rich visualization to deepen design insights for
building materials, shadow studies, and lighting analysis leveraging
the power of the cloud. They will learn how to:

• Sign in to their Autodesk account inside of Autodesk® Revit®.

• Open model views of a project and configure settings for cloud


rendering.

• Render various exterior and interior scenes.


EXERCISE 3 FINISHED
• Create various photorealistic and analysis studies.

ABOUT RENDERING

Rendering is the process of generating an image from a model by


means of computer software. Rendering is used in architecture,
simulators, video games, movies and television visual effects and
design visualization. Rendering, the last step in an animation
process, gives the final appearance to the models and animation
with visual effects such as shading, texture-mapping, shadows,
reflections and motion blurs.

ABOUT AUTODESK® A360® RENDERING

Autodesk® A360® Rendering provides powerful cloud rendering


EXERCISE 4 FINISHED
capabilities that reduce time and costs by enabling users to produce
compelling, photorealistic visualizations without tying up the
desktop or requiring specialized rendering hardware.

COMPONENTS ASSOCIATED WITH RENDERING

• 3 D model

• 3 D views

• M odel element material assignments

• E nvironmental settings

RENDERING AS AN ITERATIVE PROCESS FOR INFORMING DESIGN

By combining a BIM model with a cloud rendering service, architects


EXERCISE 5 FINISHED
and designers are positioned to study more design alternatives in the
same amount of time as traditional methods. Thus, providing
opportunities to discover and develop new ideas faster with higher
quality.

A BIM model provides the ability to study your designs across


multiple design dimensions of: form, materials, lighting, and solar
performance in the context of your site environment. Cloud

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MODULE EIGHT: CLOUD RENDERING CONT’D

rendering provides a means to validate design intent at various • For illuminance studies, where are Sky Model values obtained
quality levels at the earliest stage of design development to quickly from?
assist you in exploring which design options to pursue with access to
Sky Model values can be found in Autodesk Green Building
infinite computing!
Studio.
RENDERING APPLICATIONS
• B etter decision making
KEY TERMS USED IN THIS LESSON
• D esign charettes
RENDERING The process of creating realistic images of a model by
• M aterial studies replacing the shaded appearances of materials assigned to the visible
• S olar performance studies elements with images of actual materials.

• F inal presentations

ASSESSMENT GUIDELINES: CLOUD RENDERING A cloud based service that creates high quality
renderings from a BIM model created in Autodesk® Revit®.
RENDERING

• Which tab and panel is the Render in Cloud command found?

The Render in Cloud command is located on the View tab in the INTERACTIVE PANORAMA Panoramas provide views of your project
Graphics panel. from multiple directions from a fixed camera point in the model.

• Is it possible to render more than one view in A360 Rendering?

Yes. Inside the Render in Cloud configuration dialog box, just SOLAR STUDIES Are a means for simulating the course of the sun’s
mark the box in front of the named views to be rendered. movements in context of the building design to study the implica-
• Is it possible to render a 2D orthographic view in A360 tions of shading at various times of day and year that may impact
Rendering? thermal comfort inside the building.

Yes. Duplicate an existing 3D view and access the right-click


menu on the View Cube and select Orient to View > Floor
ILLUMINANCE STUDIES Illuminance is a measure of how much light
plans, Elevations, or Section views.
falls on a surface. It is useful for determining whether or not there is
• Is it possible to set time of day and enable shadows inside the enough light to perform different activities (like reading, office
Render in Cloud configuration dialog box? work, or drafting). Illuminance is measured in lux or foot-candles (1
foot-candle = 10.7 lux)
No. These are view specific properties that must be set prior to
creating a rendering.

• What is the difference between native and advanced exposure


INSTRUCTOR NOTES
settings?
To use both Autodesk® Revit® and A360® Rendering cloud service
Native exposure settings will use the setting of the view in the
you will need an Autodesk ID. As a Student or Educator, you can
Revit model. Advanced exposure settings will use A360
obtain an Autodesk ID for free at www.autodesk.com/education .
Renderings exposure settings.
The A360® Rendering cloud service is offered to students and
• Solar studies can be created from the Render in Cloud configu- educators for free with a valid Autodesk ID obtained from the
ration dialog box, true or false? Autodesk Education Community site.

False. Solar studies can only be created from the Render Renderings created through the Autodesk A360® Rendering cloud
Gallery page for your project. Left-click on the image thumb- service will be stored on the cloud in Autodesk’s A360 site and
nail and from the flyout menu select Render As> Solar study. organized by projects. Google Chrome web-browser is required.

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PROJECT RESOURCES

MODULE 01 MODELING BUILDING ELEMENTS


Imperial
Module01Ex01_Modeling Exterior and Interior Walls_Imperial_Start.rvt
Module01Ex01_Modeling Exterior and Interior Walls_Imperial_Finished.rvt
Module01Ex02_Adding Doors and Windows_Imperial_Start.rvt
Module01Ex02_Adding Doors and Windows_Imperial_Finished.rvt
Module01Ex03_Creating Roofs_Imperial_Start.rvt
Module01Ex03_Creating Roofs_Imperial_Finished.rvt
DATASETS
Metric
Module01Ex01_Modeling Exterior and Interior Walls_Metric_Start.rvt
Module01Ex01_Modeling Exterior and Interior Walls_Metric_Finished.rvt
Module01Ex02_Adding Doors and Windows_Metric_Start.rvt
Module01Ex02_Adding Doors and Windows_Metric_Finished.rvt
Module01Ex03_Creating Roofs_Metric_Start.rvt
Module01Ex03_Creating Roofs_Metric_Finished.rvt
Module01Ex01_Modeling Exterior and Interior Walls_video.mp4
SOFTWARE TUTORIAL Module01Ex02_Adding Doors and Windows_video.mp4
Module01Ex03_Creating Roofs_video.mp4

STEP BY STEP GUIDE Module01_Step by step guide.doc

MODULE 02 BUILDING ENVELOPE


Imperial
Module02Ex01_Modelling wall types_structures_design features_Imperial_Start.rvt
Module02Ex01_Modelling wall types_structures_design features_Imperial_Finished.rvt
Module02Ex02_Adding doors windows openings_Imperial_Start.rvt
Module02Ex02_Adding doors windows openings_Imperial_Finished.rvt
Module02Ex03_Creating roof shapes_Imperial_Start.rvt
Module02Ex03_Creating roof shapes_Imperial_Start.rvt
DATASETS
Metric
Module02Ex01_Modelling wall types_structures_design features_Metric_Start.rvt
Module02Ex01_Modelling wall types_structures_design features_Metric_Finished.rvt
Module02Ex02_Adding doors windows openings_Metric_Start.rvt
Module02Ex02_Adding doors windows openings_Metric_Finished.rvt
Module02Ex03_Creating roof shapes_Metric_Start.rvt
Module02Ex03_Creating roof shapes_Metric_Start.rvt

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PROJECT RESOURCES

MODULE 02 BUILDING ENVELOPE CONTINUED


Module02Ex01_Modeling wall types_structures_design features_video.mp4
SOFTWARE TUTORIAL Module02Ex02_Adding doors_windows_wall openings_video.mp4
Module02Ex03_Creating roof shapes_video.mp4

STEP BY STEP GUIDE Module02_Step by step guide.doc

MODULE 03 CURTAIN SYSTEMS


Imperial
Module03Ex01_Creating curtain walls_Imperial_Start.rvt
Module03Ex01_Creating curtain walls_Imperial_Finished.rvt
Module03Ex02_Adjusting grid lines_Imperial_Start.rvt
Module03Ex02_Adjusting grid lines_Imperial_Finished.rvt
Module03Ex03_Creating curtain panel types_Imperial_Start.rvt
Module03Ex03_Creating curtain panel types_Imperial_Finished.rvt
Module03Ex04_Placing door in curtain walls_Imperial_Start.rvt
Module03Ex04_Placing door in curtain walls_Imperial_Finished.rvt
DATASETS
Metric
Module03Ex01_Creating curtain walls_Metric_Start.rvt
Module03Ex01_Creating curtain walls_Metric_Finished.rvt
Module03Ex02_Adjusting grid lines_Metric_Start.rvt
Module03Ex02_Adjusting grid lines_Metric_Finished.rvt
Module03Ex03_Creating curtain panel types_Metric_Start.rvt
Module03Ex03_Creating curtain panel types_Metric_Finished.rvt
Module03Ex04_Placing door in curtain walls_Metric_Start.rvt
Module03Ex04_Placing door in curtain walls_Metric_Finished.rvt
Module03Ex01_Creating curtain walls_video.mp4
Module03Ex02_Adjusting grid lines_video.mp4
SOFTWARE TUTORIAL
Module03Ex03_Choosing and creating curtain panel types_video.mp4
Module03Ex04_Placing doors in curtain walls_video.mp4

STEP BY STEP GUIDE Module03_Step by step guide.doc

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INSTRUCTOR MANUAL

PROJECT RESOURCES

MODULE 04 INTERIORS AND CIRCULATION


Imperial
Module04Ex01_Creating Stair and Ramp_Imperial_Start.rvt
Module04Ex01_Creating Stair and Ramp_Imperial_Finished.rvt
Module04Ex02_Modeling Custom Stairs_Imperial_Start.rvt
Module04Ex02_Modeling Custom Stairs_Imperial_Finished.rvt
Module04Ex03_Creating Floor Opening_Imperial_Start.rvt
Module04Ex03_Creating Floor Opening_Imperial_Finished.rvt
Module04Ex04_Creating an Elevator_Imperial_Start.rvt
Module04Ex04_Creating an Elevator_Imperial_Finished.rvt
DATASETS
Metric
Module04Ex01_Creating Stair and Ramp_Metric_Start.rvt
Module04Ex01_Creating Stair and Ramp_Metric_Finished.rvt
Module04Ex02_Modeling Custom Stairs_Metric_Start.rvt
Module04Ex02_Modeling Custom Stairs_Metric_Finished.rvt
Module04Ex03_Creating Floor Opening_Metric_Start.rvt
Module04Ex03_Creating Floor Opening_Metric_Finished.rvt
Module04Ex04_Creating an Elevator_Metric_Start.rvt
Module04Ex04_Creating an Elevator_Metric_Finished.rvt
Module04Ex01_Creating a stair and ramp_video.mp4
Module04Ex02_Modelling custom stairs_video.mp4
SOFTWARE TUTORIAL
Module04Ex03_Creating a floor opening_video.mp4
Module04Ex04_Creating an elevator_video.mp4

STEP BY STEP GUIDE Module04_Step by step guide.docx

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INSTRUCTOR MANUAL

PROJECT RESOURCES

MODULE 05 FAMILIES AND COMPONENTS


Imperial
Module05Ex01_Modeling InPlace_Imperial_Start.rvt
Module05Ex01_Modeling InPlace_Imperial_Finish.rvt
Module05Ex02_Modifying Family Definition_Imperial_Start.rvt
Module05Ex02_Modifying Family Definition_Imperial_Finished .rvt
Module05Ex03_Creating New Families_Imperial_Start .rvt
Module05Ex03_Creating New Families_Imperial_Finish.rvt
DATASETS Floor Lamp - Modern.rfa
Metric
Module05Ex01_Modeling InPlace_Metric_Start.rvt
Module05Ex01_Modeling InPlace_Metric_Finish.rvt
Module05Ex02_Modifying Family Definition_Metric_Start.rvt
Module05Ex02_Modifying Family Definition_Metric_Finished .rvt
Module05Ex03_Creating New Families_Metric_Start .rvt
Module05Ex03_Creating New Families_Metric_Finish.rvt
Module05Ex01_Modeling inplace_part 1_video.mp4
Module05Ex01_Modeling inplace_part 2_video.mp4
SOFTWARE TUTORIAL
Module05Ex02_Modifying a family definition_video.mp4
Module05Ex03_Creating new families_video.mp4

STEP BY STEP GUIDE Module05_Step by step guide.docx

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INSTRUCTOR MANUAL

PROJECT RESOURCES

MODULE 06 VIEWS AND VISUALIZATION


Imperial
Module06Ex01_Creating Plan Views_Imperial_Start.rvt
Module06Ex01_Creating Plan Views_Imperial_Finish.rvt
Module06Ex02_Creating Elevation and Section Views_Imperial_Start.rvt
Module06Ex02_Creating Elevation and Section Views_Imperial_Finished.rvt
Module06Ex03_Creating 3D Views_Imperial_Start.rvt
Module06Ex03_Creating 3D Views_Imperial_Finished.rvt
Module06Ex04_Adjusting the Appearance of Elements in a View_Imperial_Start.rvt
Module06Ex04_Adjusting the Appearance of Elements in a View_Imperial_Finished.rvt
DATASETS
Metric
Module06Ex01_Creating Plan Views_Metric_Start.rvt
Module06Ex01_Creating Plan Views_Metric_Finish.rvt
Module06Ex02_Creating Elevation and Section Views_Metric_Start.rvt
Module06Ex02_Creating Elevation and Section Views_Metric_Finished.rvt
Module06Ex03_Creating 3D Views_Metric_Start.rvt
Module06Ex03_Creating 3D Views_Metric_Finished.rvt
Module06Ex04_Adjusting the Appearance of Elements in a View_Metric_Start.rvt
Module06Ex04_Adjusting the Appearance of Elements in a View_Metric_Finished.rvt
Module06Ex01_Creating Plan Views part 1_video.mp4
Module06Ex01_Creating Plan Views part 2_video.mp4
SOFTWARE TUTORIAL Module06Ex02_Creating Elevation and Section Views.mp4
Module06Ex03_Creating 3D Views.mp4
Module06Ex04_Adjusting the Appearance of Elements in a View.mp4

STEP BY STEP GUIDE Module06_Step by step guide.docx

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INSTRUCTOR MANUAL

PROJECT RESOURCES

MODULE 07 MATERIALS, LIGHTING, AND RENDERING


Imperial
Module07Ex01_Assigning Materials to a Component_Imperial_Start.rvt
Module07Ex01_Assigning Materials to a Component_Imperial_Finished.rvt
Module07Ex02_Creating New Materials_Imperial_Start.rvt
Module07Ex02_Creating New Materials_Imperial_Finished.rvt
DATASETS
Metric
Module07Ex01_Assigning Materials to a Component_Metric_Start.rvt
Module07Ex01_Assigning Materials to a Component_Metric_Finished.rvt
Module07Ex02_Creating New Materials_Metric_Start.rvt
Module07Ex02_Creating New Materials_Metric_Finished.rvt
Module07Ex01_Assigning Materials to a Component_video.mp4
SOFTWARE TUTORIAL
Module07Ex02_Creating new materials_video.mp4

STEP BY STEP GUIDE Module07_Step by step guide.docx

MODULE 08 CLOUD RENDERING

Module08_Unit_CloudRendering_Imperial_Start.rvt
Module08_Unit_CloudRendering_Metric_Start.rvt
Module08_Unit_CloudRendering_GBS_Weather file.xlsx
Module08_Unit_CloudRendering_InteractivePanorama_Exterior_Perspective.html
DATASETS
Module08_Unit_CloudRendering_Living Room Interior_illuminance.png
Module08_Unit_CloudRendering_start_R2015.rvt_Living_Room_Interior_Solar Study.zip

Note: Finished images are stored in the individual’s A360 Rendering gallery.
Module08Ex01_Cloud rendering_Exterior rendering_video.mp4
Module08Ex02_Cloud rendering_Interactive panoramas_video.mp4
SOFTWARE TUTORIAL Module08Ex03_Cloud rendering_Solar studies_video.mp4
Module08Ex03_Cloud rendering_Interior Illuminance Studies_video.mp4
Module08Ex05_Cloud rendering_Sharing renderings_video.mp4

STEP BY STEP GUIDE Module08_Step by step guide.docx

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INSTRUCTOR MANUAL

Academic Standards
NATIONAL ARCHITECTURAL ACCREDITATION BOARD (NAAB)

STANDARD ALIGNS
TO PROJECT
This course was also developed to introduce students to Building Information Modeling (BIM) and demonstrates
applications of its use for design representation and visualization.
Students will leverage technology to offer new ways to communicate in both 2D and 3D. (A.1). They can develop
and test alternative outcomes, through the use of building component variations using substitution techniques to
look at design alternatives (A.2). They can see spatial relationships of architectural design between 2D and 3D
design representation. (A.4). Students will create accurate plan and elevation views of architectural designs for
the purposes of creating building documentation. (B.4). Students will gain an understanding of the tectonics of
building envelope systems by creating and modifying multi-material wall assemblies and curtain systems. (B.7).
In summary and in reference to 2014 Conditions for Accreditation, if applied correctly the course should cover
the following Student Performance Criteria:

REALM A: CRITICAL THINKING AND REPRESENTATION


• A.1 Professional Communication Skills: Ability to write and speak effectively and use representational media
appropriate for both within the profession and with the general public.
• A.2 Design Thinking Skills: Ability to raise clear and precise questions, use abstract ideas to interpret informa-
x
tion, consider diverse points of view, reach well-reasoned conclusions, and test alternative outcomes against
relevant criteria and standards.
• A.4 Architectural Design Skills: Ability to effectively use basic formal, organizational and environmental
principles and the capacity of each to inform two- and three-dimensional design.

REALM B: BUILDING PRACTICES, TECHNICAL SKILLS, AND KNOWLEDGE


• B.4 Technical Documentation: Ability to make technically clear drawings, prepare outline specifications, and x
construct models illustrating and identifying the assembly of materials, systems, and components appropriate
for a building design.
• B.7 Building Envelope Systems and Assemblies: Understanding of the basic principles involved in the appro-
priate selection and application of building envelope systems relative to fundamental performance, aesthetics,
moisture transfer, durability, and energy and material resources.

REALM C: INTEGRATED ARCHITECTURAL SOLUTIONS


• Does not apply

REALM D: PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE


• Does not apply

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INSTRUCTOR MANUAL

Appendix A
REVIT KEYBOARD SHORTCUTS

COMMAND SHORTCUT COMMAND SHORTCUT


VIEW CONTROL EDIT

HIDDEN LINE HL ARRAY AR

SHADING WITH EDGES SD COPY CO

VISIBILITY / GRAPHICS VG DELETE DE

VIEW PROPERTIES VP GROUP GP

WIRE FRAME WF LOCK OBJECTS LO

ZOOM ALL TO FIT ZA MODIFY MD

PREVIOUS SCROLL ZOOM ZC MIRROR MM

ZOOM TO FIT ZX MOVE MV

ZOOM OUT (2X) ZV PROPERTIES PR

ZOOM IN REGION ZZ ROTATE RO

REFRESH WINDOW F5 DRAFTING

SNAP OVERRIDES DIMENSION DI

ENDPOINT SE DETAIL LINES DL

HORIZONTAL / VERTICAL SC SPOT ELEVATION EL

INTERSECTION SI GRID GR

MIDPOINT SM LEVEL LL

NEAREST SN REFERENCE PLANE RP

SNAPS OFF SO ROOM TAG RT

PERPENDICULAR SP TEXT TX

QUADRANTS SQ TAG TG

SNAP TO REMOTE SR TOOLS

STANDARD SNAPPING SS ALIGN AL

TANGENT ST LINEWORK LW

WORK PLANE GRID SW OFFSET OF

MODELING PAINT PT

WALL WA SPLIT FACE SF

WINDOW WN SPLIT WALL AND LINES SL

DOOR DR TRIM AND EXTEND TR

COMPONENT CM

MODELING LINES LI

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