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T&L Instructional Plan Template

(Updated 4/17/15)
(edTPA Aligned)

Overview
The information included in this document is to support faculty in teaching about and supporting students with the
T&L (and edTPA) Instructional Plan. While there are many variations of lesson plans, this format meets
departmental requirements and is aligned with the 2014 edTPA as well.

Background Information (When doing the actual edTPA, leave out identifiers)

Teacher Candidate: __Christiana Jade Payad__ Date:__10 April 2018__


Cooperating Teacher: __Ms. Wallace___ Grade:__Kindergarten__
School District: Pullman School District_ School: _Jefferson Elementary School_________
University Supervisor: Ms. Lori White
Unit/Subject: Literacy/ Reading: Foundational Skills
Instructional Plan Title/Focus: Silent “e” is a Ninja

Section 1: Planning for Instruction and Assessment

a. Instructional Plan Purpose: Teacher candidates explain how this instructional plan develops students’
conceptual understanding of overall content goals. This is sometimes also called a “rationale” and includes a
“what, why, how” general statement (see also Central Focus in edTPA)

Additionally, explain where in a unit this lesson would be taught. What lesson topic came prior to this one
(yesterday) and what related lesson will come after this one (tomorrow)?

---The purpose of this lesson plan is to help students develop their ability to demonstrate understanding of
grade level phonics and word analysis skills to decode words. Through examples, worksheets and practice,
students will understand that the final “e” and common vowel team conventions for representing long vowel
sounds. This lesson is important to help students decode words for them to develop their reading skills. The
lesson prior to this was the consonant diagraphs. With this skill, students were able to develop their
knowledge to decode consonant diagraphs when reading.

b. State/National Learning Standards: Teacher candidates identify relevant grade level concepts/content and
align them to Content Standards—Common Core Standards or Washington State EALRs, or National.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.1.3.C
Know final -e and common vowel team conventions for representing long vowel sounds.

c. Content Objectives (to be copied in Assessment Chart below) and alignment to State Learning
Standards:

1. SWBAT… read and recognize that words that have a silent “e” will make the vowel of the word into a
long vowel sound

Aligned standard:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.1.3.C
Know final -e and common vowel team conventions for representing long vowel sounds.

Language Objectives:
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1. SWBAT… correctly read words with silent “e” at the end

Aligned standard:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.1.3.C
Know final -e and common vowel team conventions for representing long vowel sounds.

d. Previous Learning Experiences: Teacher candidates should explain what students know and have learned
that is relevant to the current lesson topic and process.
-By the time the lesson is taught, students have already learned and know the consonant diagraphs, and know
that some words might be tricky to read. Students have also experience and know how to decode one syllable
words, and have an idea of how to orally read them. Grammatically students have an idea how to spell one
syllable words and consonant digraph.

e. Planning for Student Learning Needs (accommodations, student experiences, prior learning and
experiences):
ELLs: To accommodate ELL students, we would scaffold by modeling and demonstrating the new
concept we are introducing. Giving ELLs extra support can help them understand English words that
might be unfamiliar or new to them can be an effective way to make sure that these students are
understanding the lesson. Giving ELLs words with its meaning through a photo can also be helpful for
them or explaining some words through actions will help them understand the words. Since it could
potentially take these students a bit longer to complete this assignment, I would give students more time
to finish this assignment if they needed it. As a teacher, I wouldn’t want to rush them, but would want to
make sure that we gave them the chance to think the assignment through.

Special Needs/IEP: Since students will have different needs and reasons for their IEPs, the
modifications these students receive will depend on exactly what they need to best help them learn. We
will make sure to be flexible to suit students and those needs. Whether that be moving closer to the
board, having a little more one on one help, making the fonts larger, having subtitles when watching a
video or having a different worksheet, we will make sure to provide our students with the resources they
need to succeed.

Hi-Cap: Students who are Hi-Cap will write pick two words and write a sentence about the words that they
choose

f. Assessment Strategies (Informal and formal)


Teacher candidates should attach questions, worksheets, tests or any additional documentation related to their
assessment strategies, including accommodations or modifications for students with disabilities as stated in
their IEPs. They may also attach appropriate marking rubrics, criteria lists, expectations, answer keys, etc.
Consideration for multiple means of expression should occur here. That is, how will teacher candidates allow
for K-12 students to express their learning in different ways? Will K-12 students be given some choice?

Content/Language Objectives Assessment Strategies


Content: SWBAT… read and recognize that Formal: The students will be assessed largely by the work
words that have a silent “e” will make the they do on the worksheet shown in figure 1. The worksheet
vowel of the word into a long vowel sound will be graded by the completion of it, as well as the teacher
checking if they got all of the worksheets correct.

Language: SWBAT… correctly read words Informal: The students will be assessed largely as a group.
with silent “e” at the end As the teacher is doing their lesson, they will ask the
students to read along with them. The teacher may also call

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on some students to read some of the words out loud, to
assess if they understand the lesson.

(Add rows as needed)


*In the right column, describe whether the assessment you’ll collect is informal or formal. Note: most
assessment is considered formative when thinking about day-to-day lessons. Summative is related to mastery.
An exception might be having a “formal” quiz mid-way in a unit to assure that students are on track with a
certain degree of proficiency. Should the quiz indicate students are not progressing, and adjustment of timing in
the instructional “unit” will be required.

g. Student Voice: Student voice is a term used to describe students expressing their understanding of their own
learning process. For your lesson, respond to the three required components of student voice and identify how
students will reflect and/or communicate on their learning or progress toward meeting the goals. (Use the
following table.)

Student-based evidence to be Description of how students


K-12 students will be able to: collected (things produced by will reflect on their learning.
students: journals, exit slips, self-
assessments, work samples,
projects, papers, etc.)
1. Explain student learning targets Worksheets The students will show the
and what is required to meet understanding of their
them (including why they are learning by the completion of
important to learn). the worksheet

2. Monitor their own learning Worksheet The students will show their
progress toward the learning work to the teacher when they
targets using the tools provided have completed the worksheet
(checklists, rubrics, etc.).

3. Explain how to access Dictionary The student will have


resources and additional dictionaries available if they
support when needed (and need to use
how/why those resources will
help them).

h. Grouping of Students for Instruction: Describe why, how, and where in the lesson students will be divided
into groups, if applicable (e.g., "why" could be to support language learners, for reciprocal teaching, and/or to
use jigsaw, and "how" might include random, ability-based, interest, social purposes, etc.). Recognize that
some lessons or parts of a lesson may call for grouped work or individualized work or both.
The class will start with the lesson in the carpet, where the teacher will be able to see all of the students. The
teacher will teach a mini lesson about the silent “e”. This will take about 5-8 minutes. The students will be
asked to participate and raise their hands in this lesson. The class will then go back to their seats and watch a
short clip about the topic. After the video is watched, the students will work individually to finish the
worksheet that is given to them. After this, the students will be able to talk to the students about the
worksheets and the students will check with the teacher if their work is done. This is beneficial for the
students because they can learn from their peers.

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Section 2: Instruction and Engaging Students in Learning

a. Introduction: Teacher candidates identify how they are going to introduce the concept, skill or task in a way
that gains students’ attention and gets them involved (the lesson “hook”).

“Ok class, today we will be working on the very sneaky letter ‘e’. The letter ‘e’ at the end of a word is very
sneaky because they are silent, just like a ninja. What do we think a ninja is like? (Possible answers might be;
ninjas are very quiet, you can’t hear a ninja, etc.)”

b. Questions: Questions teacher candidate will ask during the lesson that drive thinking and learning and
engagement (5 or more questions) and in parentheses, indicate Bloom level and/or question type to ensure
that you are posing questions that push critical thinking and engagement (e.g. Analysis/Divergent)
- What do we think a ninja is like? (Analysis)
- What is the similarities that a ninja and the letter “e” have? (Divergent)
- What might be some differences that we see in the ninja and the letter “e”? (Divergent)

c. Learning Activities: Describe what the teacher will do and say and students will do during the lesson.
Write it as a procedural set of steps in the left column of table below. On the right, refer to a supporting
learning theory or principle driving that activity and/or your rationale for doing what you are doing.

Learning Steps and Activities Supporting Theories/Principles


(Why are you doing what you are doing?)
Example: Transition from introduction by asking Supports multiple means of engagement, and
students to look at “inputs” and in pairs, create a list allowing students to generate their own inputs
of additional community assets/contributions (inputs) from experience; is more culturally responsive
for social change diagram. Circulate around groups than teacher generated ideas only.
to observe students’ progress.
“Okay everyone, what do we know about the letter Bandura’s Observational Learning Theory
‘e’ at the end of a word? (Wait for student’s in use as students learn from my modeling of
response) Those we’re all great answers, we sure teaching strategy.
did learn a lot today didn’t we! Tomorrow we will
continue to use our new information and read
books that might have the silent ’e’ words. I think
you will really enjoy it! Thank you so much for all
your hard work today.”

“We are now going to go back in our seats and watch UDL guidelines, providing multiple means of
a short video” This is important, so that they can representation by providing options for
understand and remember the lesson. language and comprehension through the video.

“We will now move on to the worksheet, we will Vygotsky, Piaget, Wertsch, John-Steiner
make sure that everyone is done with the worksheet and Mahn’s theory of constructivism is
and I will see what you wrote. First you are going to being used by both the teacher and students
cut the ‘e’ and put it on its designated spot, then re- because the teacher has created assignments
write the words.” that allow students to demonstrate their new
found knowledge. Through the worksheets
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students get the chance to engage in the
learning process while constructing their own
understanding of the material

“Okay everyone, what do we know about the letter Bandura’s Observational Learning Theory in
‘e’ at the end of a word? (Wait for student’s use as students learn from my modeling of the
response) Those we’re all great answers, we sure teacher and as well as the teacher going back
did learn a lot today didn’t we! Tomorrow we will and asking the students about their learning.
continue to use our new information and read
books that might have the silent ’e’ words. I think
you will really enjoy it! Thank you so much for all
your hard work today.”

b. Closure: Closure is the signal to students that the lesson is now coming to an end. In closure, teachers
review the learning targets (what was taught) for the day and refocus on what is important.
“Okay everyone, what do we know about the letter ‘e’ at the end of a word? (Wait for student’s response)
Those we’re all great answers, we sure did learn a lot today didn’t we! Tomorrow we will continue to
use our new information and read books that might have the silent ’e’ words. I think you will really
enjoy it! Thank you so much for all your hard work today.”

c. Independent Practice: Describe how students will extend their experiences with the content and
demonstrate understanding in a new and different context (perhaps even outside of the classroom). Include
possible family interaction (identify at least one way in which you might involve students’ families in this
instructional plan.)

d. Instructional Materials, Resources, and Technology: Attach a copy of ALL materials the teacher and
students will use during the lesson; e.g., handouts, worksheets, multi-media tools, and any assessment
materials utilized.

- Worksheet
- Pencil
- Projector
- Document Camera
- Computer
- Video
- Crayons

e. Acknowledgements: Acknowledge your sources

http://www.k6edu.com/1stgrade/language_arts/the_silent_e.html
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eTqgFj-gWek&t=3s&index=5&list=LLfy_t2QSUmDqKrbrOyJXPrA

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Figure 1