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Running head: LEADERSHIP ASSESSMENT

Victoria Heagy

Perception of a Leader

Florida Atlantic University, Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing


Running head: LEADERSHIP ASSESSMENT 1

Leadership is complex phenomenon, yet there are a handful of fundamental features that

are essential for successful leadership. While it is commonly understood that one is not born a

leader, there are innate characteristics that would predispose one to successfully lead and guide

other individuals. Additionally, leadership skills can be taught and cultivated. Grossman and

Valiga’s Leadership Characteristics and Skills Assessment allows one to evaluate their own

understanding of leaderships skills and characteristics. More specifically, Part I allows one to

evaluate their perception of what makes a good leader. A score of 74 indicates an excellent

perception of a good leader. Part II lists skills that are useful in leadership and self-perception of

personal leadership values and characteristics. A score of 73 on Part II demonstrates an

extremely high perceived leadership ability (Grossman & Valiga, 2009, p. 16-19).

Based off of successful completion of Grossman’s and Valiga’s Leadership

Characteristics and Skill’s Assessment, it can be assumed that a superior perception of a good

leader includes the ideas that a leader is utilizes critical thinking, facilitates stewardship and

change, has short-term and long-term visions, has excellent communication skills, and develops

and renews a following (Grossman & Valiga, 2009, p. 7). However, interpretation of these

characteristics can be multifaceted and interpreted in complex ways. Leadership requires no

appointment or title, but is typically just a capability of one to serve in a way that fosters growth

and progress amongst a group. The field of nursing proposes a unique situation that not only

necessitates, but requires leadership. Whether it is utilizing creative thinking to problem solve,

mentoring and precepting new nurses, or advocating for a patient that cannot advocate for

themselves, leadership is required for evolution and advancement in healthcare.


Running head: LEADERSHIP ASSESSMENT 2

Score: 74
Running head: LEADERSHIP ASSESSMENT 3

Score: 73
Running head: LEADERSHIP ASSESSMENT 4

References

Grossman, S.C., & Valiga, T.M. (2009). The nature of leadership: Distinguishing leadership
from management. In The new leadership challenge: Creating the future of nursing (3rd
ed.). Philadelphia, PA: F.A. Davis Company.