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CI121345-L

Planes, Trains and Automobiles with Vehicle Tracking – How To use


Vehicle Tracking
Heidi Boutwell
CADLearning

Learning Objectives
 Discover and understand Vehicle Tracking software alongside using InfraWorks
 Learn how to create swept path analysis in Vehicle Tracking
 Learn how to design parking lots that work in Civil 3D with Vehicle Tracking
 Learn how to create detailed roundabout options in Vehicle Tracking and Civil 3D

Description
Autodesk Vehicle Tracking is much more than just vehicle swept path analysis. Come join us in
this hands-on lab to find out for yourself how Vehicle Tracking in Civil 3D and InfraWorks can
improve your project decision making. Vehicle Tracking allows even beginner users to make
educated decisions concerning their individual projects. During this lab, we’ll explore all the
functions of Vehicle Tracking and design the following: start a project in InfraWorks and then
import it into Vehicle Tracking to design a parking lot; ensure our project design meets city
standards; utilize the Vehicle Tracking information for detailed grading design; create a
roundabout within the project; and much, much more. After this hands-on lab, you will have
gained new skills that you can take back to the office and show others the many different ways
to use Vehicle Tracking software, Civil 3D and InfraWorks. This session features Vehicle
Tracking, AutoCAD Civil 3D, and InfraWorks.

Speaker
Heidi Boutwell is the Infrastructure Content Manager for all infrastructure CADLearning products
from 4D Technologies, developing on-demand learning material for Autodesk software,
including AutoCAD Civil 3D, Vehicle Tracking, AutoCAD Map 3D, InfraWorks, Navisworks, BIM
360 Field, and BIM 360 Glue. Since 1998, Heidi has made a career of teaching engineering
professionals how to use the Autodesk infrastructure design tools to increase their productivity
and improve their design modeling skills. Heidi also continues to utilize Autodesk tools on a
daily basis to create a variety of infrastructure projects for various clients, is a contributing
author, and is an Autodesk AutoCAD Civil 3D Certified Professional. Heidi serves on the
InfraWorks Customer Council, the Civil Futures Council and is an Autodesk Civil 3D Gunslinger,
helping to drive the strategic direction of product development for infrastructure products for
Autodesk. She is also a repeat speaker at Midwest University.
Table of Contents
Discover and understand Vehicle Tracking software alongside using InfraWorks ...................... 3
InfraWorks .............................................................................................................................. 3
Importing from InfraWorks to Civil 3D ..................................................................................... 3
Civil 3D with Vehicle Tracking ................................................................................................ 6
Learn how to create swept path analysis in Vehicle Tracking ..................................................... 7
Program Standard Libraries.................................................................................................... 7
AutoDrive Arc & Bearing Swept Paths ...................................................................................10
Swept Path by Vehicle Selection ...........................................................................................10
Swept Path by AutoDrive Arc ................................................................................................12
Swept Path by AutoDrive Bearing..........................................................................................13
Follow Swept Paths ...............................................................................................................17
Manual Drive Swept Paths ....................................................................................................19
Learn how to design parking lots that work in Civil 3D with Vehicle Tracking ............................22
Parking Layout ......................................................................................................................22
Single and Double Row Parking ............................................................................................22
Parallel Parking .....................................................................................................................27
Drive Aisles for Parking .........................................................................................................30
Editing a Parking Bay ............................................................................................................31
Learn how to create detailed roundabout options in Vehicle Tracking and Civil 3D ...................33
2D Roundabouts ...................................................................................................................33
Converting a 2D to 3D Roundabout .......................................................................................37
3D Roundabouts ...................................................................................................................39
Drive the design ....................................................................................................................39
Discover and understand Vehicle Tracking software alongside using
InfraWorks
When you create a design or component road and then turn that standard intersection into a
roundabout, you have just accessed the technology provided by Vehicle Tracking.

InfraWorks
InfraWorks can create roundabouts from Design and Component Roads. From there,
intersections can be converted into roundabouts. Once converted, those files can then be
imported into Civil 3D. Vehicle Tracking can then be used to adjust the design standards of the
roundabout from InfraWorks.

Make sure to set the Model Properties to the correct coordinate system and design standard.
Then, you can import it into Civil 3D.

Importing from InfraWorks to Civil 3D


Once you have a model ready to go in InfraWorks, it’s a very simple process to bring that model
into Civil 3D for further, more detailed design.

InfraWorks Model Properties


In InfraWorks, simply close the model.
Then in Civil 3D, on the ribbon, Autodesk InfraWorks tab, select Import > Open Model or
Import IMX, depending on if you’re importing an SQLite file or IMX file.

Autodesk InfraWorks ribbon in Civil 3D 2018.1

Browse and select the model SQLite file, and then click Open.

Open InfraWorks Model dialog


Next in the Open InfraWorks Model dialog, you must set the coordinate system if it does not
match. Click Set a Coordinate System…

Set a Drawing Coordinate System dialog


In the Set a Drawing Coordinate System Dialog, select Use the InfraWorks model
coordinate system option.

To further define the area that will be imported, you can select Area of Interest in the Selection
Area group box, and then click Select Area…

The drawing will reposition to match the InfraWorks model, and the map will appear, along with
a box showing the current extents of the InfraWorks model. At this point, you can click two
points to define a box around the area in which you want to work.

Next, under Object settings, select All Objects.xml to bring in just the design roads,
intersections, and roundabouts that were converted.

Object settings drop-down menu


Lastly, before you open the model, take a look at what will be brought over. Click Refine Select
Set…

Refine Selection Set dialog


Deselect anything you do not want in your model.

Finally, click Open Model, and the InfraWorks model is imported into Civil 3D.

Civil 3D with Vehicle Tracking


The model from InfraWorks is now in the drawing, and a roundabout was created from the
roundabout information within InfraWorks. From here, you can manipulate the roundabout
using the roundabout properties in Civil 3D and Vehicle Tracking.
Learn how to create swept path analysis in Vehicle Tracking
There are 6 drive modes in Vehicle Tracking, and they are all found on the Vehicle Tracking
ribbon, Swept Paths panel: AutoDrive Arc, AutoDrive Bearing, Manual Drive, Guided Drive,
Follow, and Script.

Swept Paths panel on the Vehicle Tracking ribbon


In most cases when creating a swept path, you select the design or standard vehicle to drive
from the Vehicle Explorer Library, then place the vehicle on the path, and finally click Proceed.
However, if you select to use a line or polyline to follow, or if you decide to manually drive the
vehicle, then the process is a little different in the end.

Each time you create a swept path, you’ll create a path that is generated by the vehicle’s front
and rear axles, a path number, and grips that allow you to manipulate the path and continue the
path, if you need to extend it further.

You can easily remove a grip by selecting it and then pressing Delete on the keyboard.

Program Standard Libraries


Every time you access a command to create an object from the Vehicle Tracking ribbon, you’ll
be asked to select from a standard library explorer to start. Whether it’s a vehicle, parking
bay/stall design, or roundabout, you’ll always get the option to select from the design standards
in the library associated to the object. With that said, you can edit the library to meet your design
needs, and you can set your selection as the default, so that the library does not constantly
appear every time you start a create type command.
The following are the three different types of libraries that are available in the program: the
Vehicle Library Explorer, the Parking Standard Explorer, and the Roundabout Standard
Explorer.

Vehicle Library Explorer

Parking Standard Explorer


Roundabout Standard Explorer
AutoDrive Arc & Bearing Swept Paths
There are three ways in which you can add a swept path with the AutoDrive Arc or Bearing
commands. The AutoDrive Arc or Bearing command is a drop-down menu containing multiple
options to choose from. Each option can be a limiting factor during the layout of the swept path.
However, if you just select either AutoDrive Arc or AutoDrive Bearing, you’ll be freestyle
drawing a swept path. Lastly, be aware that whichever AutoDrive Arc or Bearing command was
last accessed will be the default command used the next time you simply double-click a vehicle
from the Vehicle Standard Library.

Swept Path by Vehicle Selection


By far, the fastest way to create a swept path is to open the Vehicle Standard Explorer, then
double-click the desired vehicle.

Swept Paths panel


Next, select a vehicle to use from the library.

Vehicle Library Explorer, choose a vehicle


Then, confirm the settings in the Vehicle Diagram dialog. Select whether or not to make this
vehicle the default vehicle to use for this and all future swept paths in this drawing only.

Place the vehicle on the driving area in the model and rotate the vehicle into position. Then click
Proceed.
Position Vehicle dialog
Draw the driving path of the vehicle from PC to PC or vertex to vertex. If you need to switch
from Arc to Bearing, in the AutoDrive dialog, enable the Turn onto bearing option, and then
continue selecting PC’s and PT’s for your path.

Once you press Enter to end the swept path command, the swept path is created for that
vehicle.

When you use this method, you are using the last used Swept Path by AutoDrive Arc or Bearing
command.
Swept Path by AutoDrive Arc
AutoDrive Arc allows you to manually place a swept path in your drawing. As you pick the PC’s
and PT’s, the path will be generated but always in an Arc. You can switch to Bearing when you
place a path down a straight stretch, and then back to Arc as needed.

Start by selecting the AutoDrive Arc command from the Swept Paths panel.

Swept Paths panel


Next, select a vehicle to use from the library.

Vehicle Library Explorer, choose a vehicle


Then, confirm the settings in the Vehicle Diagram dialog. Select whether or not to make this
vehicle the default vehicle to use for this and all future swept paths in this drawing only.

Place the vehicle on the driving area in the model, and then rotate the vehicle into position.
Then click Proceed.
Position Vehicle dialog
Draw the driving path of the vehicle from PC to PC or vertex to vertex. If you need to switch
from Arc to Bearing, in the AutoDrive dialog, enable the Turn onto bearing option, and then
continue selecting PC’s and PT’s for your path.

AutoDrive dialog
Once complete, double-click to end the command. The swept path is generated. When
selected, many grips appear that allow you to modify the swept path and continue the swept
path. To remove a vertex, select it, and then press Delete.

Editable Swept Path


Swept Path by AutoDrive Bearing
AutoDrive Bearing and the other Bearing commands beneath this command place a swept path
on a straight line at a bearing. You can switch to an Arc when you need to go around a corner
and then back to a straight line or bearing. Like the Arc command, you pick PC’s and PT’s or
vertices of the lines to place the path along. If you choose a command such as Bearing 30, the
swept path will be held at a 30° bearing as you place the vertices of the path.

Start by selecting the AutoDrive Bearing command from the Swept Paths panel.

Swept Paths panel – AutoDrive drop-down


Next, select a vehicle to use from the library.

Vehicle Library Explorer, choose a vehicle


Then, confirm the settings in the Vehicle Diagram dialog. Select whether or not to make this
vehicle the default vehicle to use for this and all future swept paths in this drawing only.

Place the vehicle on the driving area in the model, and then rotate the vehicle into position.
Then click Proceed.

Position Vehicle dialog


Draw the driving path of the vehicle from PC to PC or vertex to vertex. If you need to switch
from Bearing to Arc, in the AutoDrive dialog, enable the Turn onto arc option, and then
continue selecting PC’s and PT’s for your path.

AutoDrive dialog
Once complete, double click to end the command. The swept path is generated. When selected,
many grips appear that allow you to modify the swept path and continue the swept path. To
remove a vertex, select it, and then press Delete.

Editable Swept Path


Follow Swept Paths
A swept path can be created that follows a specific path using the Follow command. A polyline
or chain is selected that designates the path the vehicle should follow. The polyline attaches to
the insertion point of the vehicle, usually the middle of the vehicle. When you create the follow
polyline, you may need to offset it if you want to represent the driver’s side of the vehicle. This
method is primarily used for trains, trams, and planes, but it can also be used on any other
vehicle in the library.

Start by selecting the Follow command from the Swept Paths panel.

Swept Paths Panel – Follow.


Next, select a vehicle to use from the library.

Vehicle Library Explorer, choose a vehicle


Then, confirm the settings in the Vehicle Diagram dialog. Select whether or not to make this
vehicle the default vehicle to use for this and all future swept paths in this drawing only.

Then select the polyline or chain to apply the path to and press Enter.
When complete, the path will appear with grips only at the start and end of the path to allow you
to continue the path. There are no grips to edit the path, though.

Follow Path Edit


Manual Drive Swept Paths
Manual drive is my favorite, and the most fun of all the swept path options. This allows you to
place a vehicle in the drawing and then use the control box to drive it. You can drive the vehicle
in any direction that you wish, and at any speed. When you’re done and you exit the control box,
a swept path is generated over the area that you drove. It includes every move you made, even
if you backed up.

Start by selecting the Manual Drive command from the Swept Paths panel.

Swept Paths Panel – Manual Drive


Next, select a vehicle to use from the library.

Vehicle Library Explorer, choose a vehicle


Then, confirm the settings in the Vehicle Diagram dialog. Select whether or not to make this
vehicle the default vehicle to use for this and all future swept paths in this drawing only.

Place and rotate the vehicle at the starting point of where you want the vehicle path in the
model. Then click Proceed.
Position Vehicle dialog
Next, the Manual Drive dialog appears. Using your mouse, place the cursor in the area of the
box that corresponds with the direction you want to move the vehicle in the model. Think of the
Manual Driving dialog as a mini car, and each box set represents and axle and direction on the
vehicle.

When you want to start, click the Green stop light button to begin moving the vehicle in the
model.

When you want to stop, click the Red stop light to stop the vehicle and place the swept path in
the model.
Drive Straight

Forward-Right
Forward-Left
Stop – Place Path

Go - Start

Backward-Left
Backward-Left
Driving Dialog.
The top of the dialog moves forward, bottom moves backwards, left goes left, right goes right.
Place your cursor in the middle, and you drive straight forward or backward. The further you
place your cursor towards the top or bottom of the dialog, the faster your vehicle will move. The
closer it is to the middle toolbar, the slower the vehicle will go.
Once your path is complete, click Stop, and the vehicle path is placed in your model, with grips
that allow you to edit the drawn path or continue the path.

Manual Drive Path


Learn how to design parking lots that work in Civil 3D with Vehicle
Tracking
Vehicle Tracking includes commands to create parking and parking lot layouts. You can lay out
single row or double row parking, add in drive aisles, and convert parking bays or stalls into
handicap or accessible parking. Like all features in the program, you have a library of standards
to select from.

Parking Layout
When you lay out parking with the program, you are given the option to either lay out a complete
double row of parking, or start with just a single row of parking.

Single and Double Row Parking


Initially when you create parking, the first thing you’ll do is create a New Row. When you do, you
can either create a single row on the left or right of the location you select, or you can create a
double row all at once. The controls are handled in the Parking dialog.

Start by selecting New Row on the Parking panel.

Parking panel
Next, in the Parking Standard Explorer, select the design standard that the new parking will
adhere to, and then click Proceed.
Parking Standard Explorer
Select whether or not the standard you just selected will be the default from now on in this
drawing. Then, name the parking area that you will lay out. The name you choose will appear in
the Pool of the library after you lay out the first parking row, so that you can come back to it
every time, if you so choose.
Finally, in the Parking Row Properties dialog, give the parking row you’re about to lay out a
name or Title.

Then, select the Bay alignment and Bay end details.

In the Bay Details group box, select what side the parking will go on: Left only, Right only, or
Both (double row). Then, review the options and select the appropriate choices for vehicle
class, flow direction, bay angle, and bay style. If you select Right only, then the options under
Left only apply to the right only instead.

Parking Row Properties dialog


To add a sidewalk, in the Islands & Footpaths group box, select Footpath and then set a
width.

To remove islands at the start or end of the parking, since this will automatically add islands,
deselect Start Island and End Island.

Also, if you know exactly what side the parking will go on, and you have preset the side, you can
enable the option, Skip Row side selection. Once you lay out your parking, at the end, you’ll
be given an option to pick the side the parking could be placed on. This option will stop that
process.

Now, to lay out the parking:

Pick the starting and ending location of your first parking row. Then press Enter.

Now if the red arrows appear, pick the side the parking should go on.

Left side, Double, or Right side parking arrow options


The parking is created and is placed in the model. Grips appear, allowing you to continue
editing the parking row, islands, footpath, bays, and drive aisles. Also, the Parking Row
Properties dialog disappears. To continue, start the command all over again from the ribbon.

Parking Row, placed in the model


Parallel Parking
Now that you have parking in the model, you can duplicate your initial parking layout by
selecting Parallel Parking.

From the Parking panel, expand New Row, and from the drop-down, select Parallel row.

Parking panel
Choose the same standard that was used before, which is now found under the Pool library.
Then, click Proceed.

Parking Standard Explorer


Parking Row Properties dialog
Then, in the Parking Row Properties dialog, again fill out the known information.
Finally, select a part of the parking row object that was previously laid out.

Move the cursor to place the row in the model.

Make changes
on the fly.

Existing Blue Design


Parking Guide Line,
Object moves when you
move the cursor.

Placing the Parallel Parking Row in the model


If you need to reduce the parking from Double to either Left or Right, select the correct option in
the Parking Row Properties dialog before you click to place the row.

Once the new row appears in the model correctly, click to place the row.
Drive Aisles for Parking
Once you have parking laid out in your model, you may need to break up the parking with Drive
Aisles. Drive Aisles can be added manually, or you can set them to follow a line, polyline, or
alignment.

To manually add a drive aisle, select Create Access Road from the Parking panel.

Parking panel, Create Access Road tool


Next, select the beginning, or base point of the road or aisle, and then select the ending of the
road or aisle in the model.

In the Parking Access Road Properties dialog, select the standard to use, which comes from
the library. Also select the Service type, Flow type, and Line alignment. To modify the width
of the aisle, select Custom Width and then enter the new width of the aisle. Then, click OK.

Parking Access Road Properties dialog


The parking row objects are broken apart in the model, and an access aisle or road is created.
There are now at least 4 parking objects instead of 2 left behind.
Editing a Parking Bay
At this point, you have created parking in the model, but not a single bay represents a handicap
spot. To modify just one bay within a row of parking, select Edit Parking Bay from the Parking
panel.

Parking panel, Edit Parking Bay tool


Next, select the parking object where the handicap parking will go.

Edit Parking Bay


Then, select the blue box of the bay that will change into a handicap stall. As you pass the
cursor over the boxes in the bays, they change to red, to indicate that that bay is selectable for
edit.
The Parking Bay Properties dialog appears.

Parking Bay Properties dialog


To convert a standard bay to a handicap bay, expand the Bay type drop-down and choose
Accessible.

Before you click OK, edit the properties of the handicap bay. Select the ellipses (…) button and
then under Custom Width, modify the width to 11. Also, add an Accessible Safety zone, and
then click Ok.

Back in the Parking Bay Properties dialog, click OK, and the selected bay is now converted.

The dialog reappears so that you can continue to edit bays. Click Close once you’re done.
Learn how to create detailed roundabout options in Vehicle Tracking and
Civil 3D
Civil 3D has integrated the Vehicle Tracking Roundabouts feature into its main program. But
there are many more options for roundabouts within Vehicle Tracking than there are with Civil
3D alone.

First off, you can convert a roundabout from a 2D roundabout to a 3D Roundabout. Also, you
can swap roundabout standards, add crosswalks, islands, slip lanes, and more with Vehicle
Tracking. Some of the functions are also available in Civil 3D, but only after the roundabout has
been created will you see these options. Plus, in Vehicle Tracking, you can drive several
vehicles along a swept path through a roundabout in an animation, to see the 3D result of the
roundabout that you created.

2D Roundabouts
When creating a roundabout in Vehicle Tracking, the default setting is to create them in 3D. To
create a roundabout in 2D, you need to adjust the Drawing Settings first. Then, you can create
the roundabout. After a 2D roundabout is created and is modified to fit the design, you can then
convert that 2D roundabout into a 3D roundabout.

I have found that by creating a 2D roundabout first, you can quickly swap roundabout standards
and get results, whereas, if you try to swap the standards in a 3D roundabout, it may not fully
work. Meaning, it remains as the original design and not the new design you selected. When
that happens, it’s time to start them in 2D.

To create a roundabout in 2D, in the Settings panel, select Drawing Settings.

Settings panel
Then in the Drawing Settings dialog, expand Roundabouts and select Corridor.

Drawing Settings dialog


Deselect Create Alignments and everything under that option will deselect. Click Ok.

To create the 2D roundabout, from the Roundabouts panel, select Add Roundabout.

Roundabouts panel
In the Roundabout Standard Explorer, choose the standard you want to use for your new
roundabout from the Roundabout Standard Library.

Select whether or not this should be used as the default in the drawing from now on.
Then in the New Roundabout Details dialog, name the roundabout, confirm what surfaces the
roundabout should be placed on, and modify the size of the center island and Apron width, if
necessary.

New Roundabout Details dialog


Finally click OK.
Next, select the intersection for the roundabout location. Roundabouts work with Civil 3D
alignments. The intersection of 2 or more crossing alignments is acceptable to use.

Next, select the first road that enters the roundabout. The entry and exit roads are called “Arms”
and sometimes “Legs,” depending on which version of Vehicle Tracking you have.

In the New Arm dialog, confirm which profile from the alignment you want to use for the design.
Then modify the entry or approaching and departing road widths to match the corridor or
roadway width that the arm is from, and then click OK.

New Arm dialog


Continue to select the entry and exit arms around the intersection. As you select each arm, this
dialog reappears. Enter the appropriate data for each arm. When you’re done, click OK.
A 2D roundabout is generated in the model. It includes grips that you can use to modify just
about any part of the roundabout.

Finished 2D Roundabout
Converting a 2D to 3D Roundabout
Once you have a 2D Roundabout in your model, and you’ve modified it to marry with the rest of
the corridor design of the roads that make up the roundabout, you can convert the roundabout
into a 3D Roundabout.

Select the roundabout, and from the context-sensitive ribbon, Modify panel, select
Roundabout Properties.

Roundabout context-sensitive ribbon, Modify panel


In the Roundabout Properties dialog, you can modify any part of the roundabout, including the
arms, roundel, standard, turn arrows—just about everything.

Roundabout Properties dialog


But for this exercise, from the data tree, select 3D Corridor, and then select Create
Alignments from the data window. Click Apply and then close the dialog.

Roundabout Properties Dialog>3D Corridor


The 2D roundabout is now converted into a 3D roundabout. A corridor is generated, turning this
roundabout into a 3D work of wonder. At this time, roundabouts cannot be added to existing
corridors. Rather, they create their own individual corridors.
3D Roundabouts
3D roundabouts are created identical to 2D roundabouts. The main difference is in the Drawing
Settings dialog. To create a 3D Roundabout, all the settings under Roundabouts > Corridor
should be selected. Then, proceed just like you were creating a 2D roundabout.

Drawing Settings dialog > Roundabout > Corridor


Drive the design
Okay, once you have roundabouts, you can drive the design. It’s a very simple process. Create
2 swept paths that travel through the roundabout. Then, select both swept paths.

Next from the Review panel, select Animate.

Review Panel
In the Vehicle Tracking Animation toolbar, select Animate in 3D.

Vehicle Tracking Animation toolbar – floating and movable


The model will change to a 3D model.

Next, click Play from the toolbar and watch as the vehicles move. Pretty cool, if you ask me.

3D animation of paths in model


I do hope this handout was useful, and I hope you enjoyed our lab.
For more information:

www.cadlearning.com

hboutwell@cadlearning.com

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