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1 GHG17 Medium Duty Workshop (DDC-SVC-MAN-0194)

General Information

1.1 California Proposition 65 Warning and Engine Idle


Notice

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1.2 Cleaning and Preparation


1.2.1 General Steam Clean
Observe all environmental protection regulations. Use high-pressure equipment as follows:

CAUTION
EYE INJURY
To avoid injury from flying debris, wear a face shield or goggles.

WARNING
FIRE HAZARD
Do not power wash or steam clean the engine bay in the area of vehicle electrical
components, unless specified by vehicle manuals or service literature. Power
washing/steam cleaning can permanently damage these components, which could result
in fire, personal injury, or property damage.

NOTICE
To prevent damage to engine components, keep the water moving at all times while
cleaning. Never direct water onto electrical components, plug connectors, seals or flexible
hoses.

Information on suitable cleaning and protective products is available from any authorized dealer. Note the
equipment manufacturer's operating instructions.
Use the following minimum working distance between the high-pressure nozzle and the surface being cleaned:
• Approximately 700 mm (28 in.) for circular pattern jets
• Approximately 300 mm (12 in.) for 25-degree flat jets and dirt cutters
Steam clean the engine as follows:
1. Allow engine to cool down to room temperature before spraying the engine.
2. Thoroughly clean the entire engine using a steam cleaner or high pressure washer with mild soap and
warm water.

WARNING
EYE INJURY
To avoid injury from flying debris when using compressed air, wear adequate eye
protection (face shield or safety goggles) and do not exceed 276 kPa (40 psi) air pressure.

Note : Do not use compressed air or pressurized water to clean or dry the engine if any part of the engine is
disassembled.
3. Once the engine is clean, use compressed air to dry the engine.
4. Allow the engine to dry completely before making any kind of repair.
5. When reassembling, ensure that all electrical connectors are dry before seating the plug.

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1.3 Engine Storage


1.3.1 Temporary Storage (30 Days or Less)
An engine prepared in this manner can be returned to service in a short time by removing the seals at the engine
openings and by checking the engine coolant, fuel, lubricating oil and transmission oil.
To protect the engine for a temporary period of time (30 days or less), follow this procedure:
1. With the engine at ambient temperature and cool to the touch, drain engine lubricating oil into a suitable
container. Dispose of the oil in an environmentally-friendly manner, according to state and/or federal (EPA)
recommendations.
2. Fill the engine to the proper level with the recommended viscosity and grade of engine oil.

WARNING
ENGINE EXHAUST
To avoid injury from inhaling engine exhaust, always operate the engine in a well-
ventilated area. Engine exhaust is toxic.

3. Fill the fuel tank(s) with the recommended fuel. Operate the engine for two (2) minutes at 1200 rpm and no
load. Do not drain the fuel system or the engine oil after this run.
4. Check the air filter and service, if necessary.
Note : If a coolant solution is not required during storage, flush the cooling system with a good soluble rust
inhibitor to prevent corrosion.
5. If freezing weather is expected during the storage period, check the coolant for required freeze and inhibitor
protection.

WARNING
EYE INJURY
To avoid injury from flying debris when using compressed air, wear adequate eye
protection (face shield or safety goggles) and do not exceed 276 kPa (40 psi) air pressure.

6. Clean the exterior of the engine (except electrical parts) with fuel oil and dry with compressed air.
7. Seal all engine openings. The material used must be waterproof, vapor-proof and possess sufficient
physical strength to resist puncture and damage from the expansion of entrapped air.

1.3.2 Extended Storage (More than 30 Days)

NOTICE
Outdoor storage of the engine is not recommended. If units must be kept outside, follow
the preparation and storage instructions already given. Protect units with quality, weather-
resistant tarpaulins (or other suitable covers) arranged to provide for air circulation.

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NOTICE
Do not use plastic sheeting for outdoor storage. Enough moisture can condense on the
inside of the plastic to rust ferrous metal surfaces and pit aluminum surfaces. If a unit is
stored outside for any extended period of time, severe corrosion damage can result.
Plastic is fine for indoor storage.

Note : The stored engine should be inspected periodically. If there are any indications of rust or corrosion,
corrective steps must be taken to prevent damage to the engine parts. Perform a complete inspection at the end
of one year and apply additional treatment as required.
To prepare an engine for extended storage (more than 30 days), follow this procedure:
1. Drain the cooling system. Refer to section "Cooling System Drain Procedure", and flush with clean, soft
water. Refill with clean, soft water and add an approved rust inhibitor to the cooling system.

WARNING
ENGINE EXHAUST
To avoid injury from inhaling engine exhaust, always operate the engine in a well-
ventilated area. Engine exhaust is toxic.

2. Circulate the water/rust inhibitor mixture by operating the engine until normal operating temperature is
reached.
3. Stop the engine.
4. With the engine at ambient temperature and cool to the touch, drain the engine oil into a suitable container.
Remove the oil filter. Dispose of the oil and filter in an environmentally-friendly manner, according to state
and/or federal (EPA) recommendations. Install and torque the oil drain plug.
5. Install a new lubricating oil filter. Fill the crankcase to the proper level with Tectyl® 930A preservative
lubricating oil or an equivalent 30-weight preservative lubricating oil meeting Mil-L-21260C, Grade 2
Specification.
Note : If engines are stored where condensation of water in the fuel tank may be a problem, additives containing
methyl carbitol or butyl cellusolve may be added to the fuel. Follow manufacturer’s instructions for treatment.
Where biological contamination of fuel may be a problem, add a biocide such as Biobor® JF (or equivalent) to the
fuel. When using a biocide, follow the manufacturer’s concentration recommendations and observe all cautions
and warnings.
6. Drain the fuel tank(s). Refill with enough clean No. 1 diesel fuel to permit the engine to operate for about
ten (10) minutes. If draining the fuel tank is not convenient, use a separate, portable supply of
recommended fuel.
7. Drain the fuel system and remove the fuel filters. Dispose of used filters in an environmentally-responsible
manner, according to state and/or federal (EPA) recommendations. Install new fuel filters.

WARNING
ENGINE EXHAUST
To avoid injury from inhaling engine exhaust, always operate the engine in a well-
ventilated area. Engine exhaust is toxic.

8. Operate the engine for five (5) minutes to circulate the clean fuel throughout the engine. Be sure the engine
fuel system is full.
9. Stop the engine and allow it to cool. Then disconnect the fuel supply and return lines at the fuel filter
module and securely plug both to retain the fuel in the engine.
10. Transmission: Follow the manufacturer’s recommendations for prolonged storage.

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11. Power Take-Off (PTO): If equipped, follow manufacturer’s recommendations for prolonged storage.

NOTICE
Failure to properly seal off the turbocharger air inlet and exhaust outlet openings before
engine storage may permit air drafts to circulate through the turbocharger and rotate the
turbine/compressor shaft without an adequate flow of lubricating oil to the center housing
bearings resulting in severe bearing damage.

12. Turbocharger: Since turbocharger bearings are pressure lubricated through an external oil line while the
engine is operating, no further attention is required. However, the turbocharger air inlet and turbine exhaust
outlet connections should be sealed off with moisture-resistant tape.

NOTICE
Do not apply oil, grease or any wax-base compound to the flywheel. The cast iron will
absorb these substances, which can sweat out during operation and cause the clutch to
slip.

13. Apply a non-friction rust preventive compound to all exposed engine parts. If convenient, apply the rust
preventive compound to the engine flywheel. If not, disengage the clutch mechanism to prevent the clutch
disc from seizing to the flywheel.
14. Drain the engine cooling system. If the engine will be exposed to freezing temperatures, install genuine
Detroit Power Cool coolant or an equivalent ethylene glycol-base or propylene glycol-base coolant solution
that provides the required freeze, boil over and inhibitor protection.
15. Drain the preservative oil from the engine crankcase. Reinstall and torque the oil drain plug.
16. Remove and clean the battery and battery cables with a baking soda-water solution and rinse with fresh
water. Do not allow the soda solution to enter the battery. Add distilled water to the electrolyte (if
necessary) and fully charge the battery. Store the battery in a cool (never below 0°C or 32°F) dry place.
Keep the battery fully-charged and check the level and specific gravity of the electrolyte regularly.
17. Insert heavy paper strips between the pulleys and drive belts to prevent seizing.
18. Seal all engine openings, including the exhaust outlet, with moisture-resistant tape. Use cardboard,
plywood or metal covers where practical.
19. Clean and dry the exterior painted surfaces of the engine and spray with a suitable liquid automobile body
wax, a synthetic resin varnish, or a rust preventive compound.
20. Protect the engine with a good weather-resistant tarpaulin and store it under cover, preferably in a dry
building which can be heated during the winter months.

1.3.3 Procedure for Restoring an Engine to Service that Has Been in


Extended Storage
If an engine has been in extended storage, prepare it for service as follows:
1. Remove the covers and tape from all the openings of the engine, fuel tank and electrical equipment. Do not
overlook the exhaust outlet.
2. Remove the plugs from the supply and return fuel fittings and reconnect the lines to their proper positions.

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GHG17 Medium Duty Workshop (DDC-SVC-MAN-0194) 1

WARNING
FIRE HAZARD
Do not power wash or steam clean the engine bay in the area of vehicle electrical
components, unless specified by vehicle manuals or service literature. Power
washing/steam cleaning can permanently damage these components, which could result
in fire, personal injury, or property damage.

3. Wash the exterior of the engine with fuel oil to remove the protective coating. Do not wash electrical
components.
4. Remove the rust preventive coating from the flywheel, if applied.
5. Flush any soluble oil rust inhibitor (if used) from the cooling system.
6. Remove the paper strips from between the pulleys and drive belts.
7. Prime the engine lubrication system. Refer to Section "Priming the Engine Lubrication System".
8. Fill the fuel tank(s) with the required fuel.
9. Close all coolant drains and fill the cooling system to the appropriate level.
10. Install and connect the battery. Charge the battery, if necessary.
11. Service the air filter, if necessary.
12. Transmission: Follow the manufacturer’s recommendations covering the return of the transmission to
service.
13. Power Take-Off (PTO): If equipped, follow the manufacturer’s recommendations covering the return of the
power take-off to service.
14. Turbocharger: Remove the covers from the turbocharger air inlet and turbine outlet connections. Reconnect
piping as required.
15. Prime the fuel system. Refer to section "Priming of the Fuel System".

WARNING
ENGINE EXHAUST
To avoid injury from inhaling engine exhaust, always operate the engine in a well-
ventilated area. Engine exhaust is toxic.

16. After all preparations are completed, start the engine.

NOTICE
Before subjecting the engine to a load or high speed, allow it to reach normal operating
temperature.

17. Check for fault codes.

WARNING
HOT EXHAUST
During parked regeneration the exhaust gases will be extremely HOT and could cause a
fire if directed at combustible materials. The vehicle must be parked outside.

17.a If there are no codes, perform a parked regeneration.


17.b If there are codes, repair what is necessary, then perform a parked regeneration.

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1.4 Engine Model and Serial Number Designation


The following information covers the DD5 engine model number and engine serial number.
Engine Model and Serial Number
The fourteen-digit engine model and manufacturing serial number is located on the left front of the engine cylinder
block. Using 934913C0043228 as an example:
• 934 = engine model (DD5)
• 913 = application/high level identifier
• C = assembly plant (C for Mannheim Germany, S for Detroit Michigan)
• 0043228 = production serial number

Fig 1.1, Engine Model and Serial Number Location

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1.5 Engine Views


1.5.1 DD5 Engine Components

1. Water Pump
2. Coolant Thermostat
3. High Pressure Fuel Rail
4. Hydrocarbon (HC) Fuel Doser Block
5. High Pressure Fuel Pump
6. Air Compressor
7. Motor Control Module (MCM)
8. Fuel Filter Module
9. Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) Valve

Fig 1.2, DD5 Left Side View

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1. Exhaust Manifold
2. Camshaft Phase Actuator
3. Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) Cooler
4. Coolant Outlet Elbow
5. Charge Air Cooler (CAC) Inlet Pipe
6. Coolant Inlet Elbow
7. Oil Coolant Module
8. Turbocharger Assembly
9. Wastegate Actuator
10. Hydrocarbon (HC) Fuel Doser Injection Valve

Fig 1.3, DD5 Right Side View

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1.6 General Cleaning and Gasket Preparation Guidelines


Cleanliness is very important for any engine repair and particularly important for any repair that exposes the
engine lubrication system or fuel system to possible debris contamination. These systems contain parts with very
small clearances and material that can be easily damaged by debris. Failures can occur if foreign material is
allowed to enter oil or fuel galleries during repair. These failures can range from a minor nuisance to complete
engine replacement from damaged crankshaft bearings. The following guidelines should be used when making
repairs to any Detroit engine.

1.6.1 Disassembly
Careful disassembly is an important starting point for a clean repair. Spot cleaning the area prior to repair is
recommended to remove any residual fluid and loose debris. Steam cleaning is only necessary if called out in the
appropriate repair procedure in the Workshop Manual. Electrical contact cleaner may be used to wash away dirt
and debris. This is a good alternative to steam cleaning and compressed air.
Rust, paint and dirt can enter the lubrication or fuel system during removal of a component. A good practice is to
loosen a joint to break the paint and rust loose, and then clean the area again before final removal of any lines,
fittings or parts. This will minimize the potential for debris contamination.

1.6.2 Protection from Debris


Many performed repairs can expose the engine to harmful debris such as dirt, rust and paint. For example, the
clean side oil port to the main oil gallery is exposed when the oil coolant module is removed from the cylinder
block. Debris from disassembly, cleaning, or general shop debris can enter this port during repair and cause
severe engine damage.
Any opening in the engine that can introduce debris into the lubrication or fuel systems during repair must be
covered. This includes all oil returns to the oil sump. There are many options for providing this protection. Caps
and plugs should be used when available. Many new parts are shipped with protective covers. It would be wise to
save these covers for future use. When caps and plugs are not available, alternate methods can be used such as
clean shop towels and tape. Whatever method is used must also be clean. Using a dirty plug, for example, can
introduce as much debris as leaving the port open during repairs.
Do not use compressed air to clean passages after they have become contaminated. Compressed air will typically
push any debris farther into the cavity and make removal difficult, if not impossible.

1.6.3 Gasket Removal and Surface Preparation


Surface preparation is an important step of any repair. This step should follow protecting critical openings from
debris contamination. The sealing area(s) must be flat, clean, and dry before reassembly. Most gaskets used on
today's Detroit engines are of stamped metal construction with bonded elastomer seals. These types of gaskets
leave a minimal amount of sealing material when removed. The residual material can typically be wiped clean with
a shop towel and solvent. Gasket material that is bonded to the surface, or rust, can be removed with a non-
marring gasket scraper. It is important to note the metal part of this style gasket does not actually create the seal,
except for the fire seals on the head gasket. The metal part of the gasket only provides an area to mount the
elastomer and adds stability to the joint.
Detroit does not recommend using any type of power abrasive tool to clean surfaces during an engine repair.
Abrasive cleaning products contain aluminum oxide particles or other similar hard materials. These particles can
shed during use and create debris that can damage a bearing or friction surface.
It is also possible to over-clean and damage a sealing surface. Cleaning gasket surfaces until the factory
machining marks are removed adds no value and can actually be harmful to creating a seal. Surface finish and
flatness must be maintained to form a good sealing surface. Gaskets and seals are designed to fill small voids in
the surface finish. It is not necessary to clean a sealing surface to appear as new during repairs.

1.6.4 Cleaning with Solvent


Solvent can be used to clean any additional dirt, fuel, oil or grease from the part after all residual gasket and seal

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material is removed. Detroit does not recommend any specific chemical for this purpose. Follow the cleaner
manufacturer's instructions. Make sure the cleaning solution is safe for the material being cleaned.
The part must be rinsed with water or steam cleaned after the solvent is used. It is best to wait to solvent or steam
clean any component until it is almost ready for installation. This will minimize the possibility of debris
contamination and accumulation of rust or oxidation.

WARNING
EYE INJURY
To avoid injury from flying debris when using compressed air, wear adequate eye
protection (face shield or safety goggles) and do not exceed 276 kPa (40 psi) air pressure.

Parts should be dried with compressed air after being cleaned and rinsed. Blow the rinse water out of any screw
holes.

1.6.5 Steam Cleaning

WARNING
FIRE HAZARD
Do not power wash or steam clean the engine bay in the area of vehicle electrical
components, unless specified by vehicle manuals or service literature. Power
washing/steam cleaning can permanently damage these components, which could result
in fire, personal injury, or property damage.

A steam cleaner is a necessary item in a large shop and is useful for removing heavy accumulations of grease
and dirt from the exterior of the engine and its subassemblies.

WARNING
EYE INJURY
To avoid injury from flying debris when using compressed air, wear adequate eye
protection (face shield or safety goggles) and do not exceed 276 kPa (40 psi) air pressure.

Parts should be dried with compressed air after being cleaned and rinsed. Blow the rinse water out of any screw
holes

1.6.6 Rust Prevention


If parts are not to be used immediately after cleaning, coat them with a suitable rust preventive compound. The
rust preventive compound must be removed before installing the parts onto an engine.

1.6.7 Tool Cleaning


Any special service tools used for internal engine, lubrication, or fuel system repairs should be kept clean to avoid
debris contamination. Tools can attract just as much dirt and contaminants as engine parts. Fuel system tools
should also be stored in sealed containers as an additional cleanliness measure.

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1.7 General Engine Information


1.7.1 The Four-Cycle Principle for Diesel Engines
The diesel engine is an internal combustion engine, in which the energy of burning fuel is converted into energy to
work each cylinder of the engine. In the diesel engine, air alone is compressed in the cylinder, raising its
temperature significantly. After the air has been compressed, a charge of fuel is sprayed into the cylinder and
ignition is accomplished by the heat of compression. The four piston strokes of the cycle occur in the following
order: intake (1), compression (2), power (3) and exhaust (4).

1.7.2 Intake Stroke


During the intake stroke, the piston travels downward, the intake valves are open, and the exhaust valves are
closed. The down stroke of the piston facilitates air from the intake manifold to enter the cylinder through the open
intake valves. The turbocharger assures a full charge of air is available for the cylinder by increasing the air
pressure in the engine intake manifold. The intake charge consists of air only with no fuel mixture.

1.7.3 Compression Stroke


At the end of the intake stroke, the intake valves close and the piston starts upward on the compression stroke.
The exhaust valves remain closed. At the end of the compression stroke, the air in the combustion chamber has
been compressed by the piston to occupy a space about one-seventeenth as great in volume as it occupied at the
beginning of the stroke. Thus, the compression ratio is 17.4:1. Compressing the air into a small space causes the
temperature of that air to rise. During the last part of the compression stroke and the early part of the power
stroke, a small metered charge of fuel is injected into the combustion chamber. Almost immediately after the fuel
charge is injected into the combustion chamber, the fuel is ignited by the hot air and starts to burn, beginning the
power stroke.

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1.7.4 Power Stroke


During the power stroke, the piston travels downward and all intake and exhaust valves are closed. As the fuel is
added and burns, the gases get hotter, the pressure increases, pushing the piston downward and adding to
crankshaft rotation.

1.7.5 Exhaust Stroke


During the exhaust stroke, the intake valves are closed; the exhaust valves are open, and the piston travels
upward. The burned gases are forced out of the combustion chamber through the open exhaust valve ports by the
upward travel of the piston.
From the preceding description, it is apparent that the proper operation of the engine depends upon the two
separate functions: first, compression for ignition, and second, that fuel be measured and injected into the
compressed air in the cylinder in the proper quantity and at the proper time.

1.7.6 DD5 General Description


The DD5 engine described in this manual is a four-stroke cycle, high speed, diesel engine. It uses an inline cast
iron block and has a cast iron cylinder head, aluminum camshaft housing and dual overhead camshafts. The
vertically aligned gear train, located at the rear end of the engine, in a timing case, contains gears for the
lubricating oil pump, crankshaft, camshafts, air compressor drive, and fuel pump drive.
Full pressure lubrication is supplied to all main, connecting rod, camshaft and rocker arm assembly
bearings/bushings and to other moving parts. The piston oil spray nozzles spray engine oil continuously to ensure
the pistons are properly cooled. A gear-type pump draws oil from the oil pan through a screen and delivers it to
the oil coolant module. The engine oil is first fed through the oil/water heat exchanger located on the oil coolant
module. During the cold start phase of the engine the oil/water heat exchanger will rapidly warm the oil. After the
warm-up phase of the engine the oil/water heat exchanger will cool the engine oil. Once the engine oil has passed
through the oil/water heat exchanger it then goes to the oil filter. The filtered oil then travels to the oil galleries,
where it is distributed to the various lubricated components. Oil returns to the oil pan by return ducts and return
passages in the cylinder head and cylinder block.
Coolant is circulated through the engine by a centrifugal-type water pump. The cooling system, including the
radiator, is a closed system. Heat is removed from the coolant by the radiator. Control of the engine coolant
temperature is accomplished by a thermostat assembly that regulates the flow of the coolant within the cooling
system.
The fuel supply ensures that the fuel required for combustion is available under all operating conditions in the
sufficient quantity, at the correct time and at the required pressure. Fuel to the individual cylinders is supplied via
the common rail direct injection system. The fuel system is supplied fuel via the low pressure fuel circuit, then to
the high pressure fuel pump, then to the fuel rail where it is distributed to the individual fuel injectors.
Air is supplied by the turbocharger assembly to the intake manifold and into the engine cylinders after passing
through a charge air cooler (CAC) mounted in front of the cooling system radiator. The CAC cools the pressurized
intake air charge coming from the turbocharger assembly before it enters the intake manifold.
Engine starting is provided by an electric starting motor energized by batteries. An alternator, with a suitable
voltage regulator, keeps the batteries charged.
The DD5 engine uses Detroit Diesel Electronic Controls (DDEC) for the electronic control system. The Motor
Control Module (MCM) receives electronic inputs from sensors on the engine and vehicle to control engine
operation. It computes fuel timing and fuel quantity based upon predetermined calibration tables in its memory.
There is also an Aftertreatment Control Module (ACM) that is used to control functions of the aftertreatment
system. The MCM and ACM continually monitor the DDEC system. Any faults that occur are stored as fault codes
in the MCM or ACM memory. Detroit Diesel DiagnosticLink software can be used to read the codes.

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1.8 Maintenance Intervals


1.8.1 DD5 Short Haul
Short Haul service applies to vehicles that annually travel up to 96,000 km (60,000 miles), average between 10.1
and 11.9 miles per gallon and operate under normal conditions. Examples of Short Haul service are operation
primarily in cities and densely populated areas, local transport with infrequent freeway travel, or a high percentage
of stop-and-go travel.

DD5 Short Haul Maintenance Intervals (GHG17)


Miles X 45 90 135 180 225
1000
Km X 73 145 217 290 362
1000
Hours* 1500 3000 4500 6000 7500
Months 18 36 54 72 90
Lubricat R R R R R
ing Oil
Lubricat
ing Oil R R R R R
Filter
Coolant Refer to DDC-SVC-BRO-0002 for the listing of required intervals using the recommended coolants.
Fuel
Filters
(frame Every 72,000 km (45,000 miles) (1,500 hrs)
and
engine)
Valve Every 145,000 km (90,000 miles) (3,000 hrs)
Lash
Adjustm
ent
Belts I I I I R
Air I I I I I
System
Air Refer to vehicle maintenance procedures
Cleaner
Exhaust I I I I I
System
Aftertre
atment Inspect external hardware and connections every 6 months or at oil change intervals.
Devices
Diesel
Particul A Check Engine Light will illuminate when ash requires removal. Normal DPF ash clean interval is 306,000 to
ate 362,000 km (190,000 to 225,000 miles) (6300 to 7500 hrs)
Filter Detroit DPF Cleaning Process (Liquid Cleaning)**
DEF
Pump 3 years or 483,000 km (300,000 miles*) (10,000 hrs)
Filter
Air
Compre I I I I I
ssor

R = Replace
I = Inspect
*Whichever comes first.
**Detroit highly recommends replacing the DPF with a Detroit™ genuine DPF to ensure maximum replacement life.

1.8.2 DD5 Long Haul


Long Haul service (over-the-road transport) applies to vehicles that annually travel more than 96,000 km (60,000

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miles) and average greater than 12.0 miles per gallon with minimal city stop-and-go operation. Examples of Long
Haul service are regional delivery that is mostly freeway mileage, interstate transport, and any road operation with
high annual mileage.

DD5 Long Haul Maintenance Intervals (GHG17)


Miles X 50 100 150 200 250
1000
Km X 80 161 241 322 402
1000
Lubricat R R R R R
ing Oil
Lubricat
ing Oil R R R R R
Filter
Coolant Refer to DDC-SVC-BRO-0002 for the listing of required intervals using the recommended coolants.
Fuel
Filters
(frame Every 80,450 km (50,000 miles) (1,700 hrs)
and
engine)
Valve Every 160,900 km (100,000 miles) (3,300 hrs)
Lash
Adjustm
ent
Belts I I I I R
Air I I I I I
System
Air Refer to vehicle maintenance procedures
Cleaner
Exhaust I I I I I
System
Aftertre
atment Inspect external hardware and connections every 6 months or at oil change intervals.
Devices
Diesel
Particul A Check Engine Light will illuminate when ash requires removal. Normal DPF ash clean interval is approximately
ate 362,000 km (225,000 miles) (7,500 hrs)
Filter Detroit DPF Cleaning Process (Liquid Cleaning)**
DEF
Pump 3 years or 483,000 km (300,000 miles*) (10,000 hrs)
Filter
Air
Compre I I I I I
ssor

R = Replace
I = Inspect
*Whichever comes first.
**Detroit highly recommends replacing the DPF with a Detroit™ genuine DPF to ensure maximum replacement life.

1.8.3 DD5 Severe Service


Severe service applies to vehicles that average below 10.0 miles per gallon or that operate under severe
conditions. Examples of Severe Service are idle time over 40%, load factor over 55%, operation on extremely
poor roads or under heavy dust accumulation; constant exposure to extreme hot, cold, salt-air, or other extreme
climates; frequent short-distance travel; construction-site operation; or farm operation. Only one of these
conditions is necessary to categorize an application as Severe service.

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DD5 Severe Service Maintenance Intervals (GHG17)


Miles X 35 70 105 140 175
1000
Km X 56 113 170 225 282
1000
Hours* 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000
Months* 12 24 36 48 60
Lubricat R R R R R
ing Oil
Lubricat
ing Oil R R R R R
Filter
Coolant Refer to DDC-SVC-BRO-0002 for the listing of required intervals using the recommended coolants.
Fuel
Filters
(frame Every 56,000 km (35,000 miles) (1,200 hrs)
and
engine)
Valve
Lash Every 113,000 km (70,000 miles) (2,300 hrs)
Adjustm
ent
Belts I I I I R
Air I I I I I
System
Air Refer to vehicle maintenance procedures
Cleaner
Exhaust I I I I I
System
Aftertre
atment Inspect external hardware and connections every 6 months or at oil change intervals.
Devices
Diesel
Particul A Check Engine Light will illuminate when ash requires removal. Normal DPF ash clean interval is less than 306,000
ate km (190,000 miles) (6,300 hrs)
Filter Detroit DPF Cleaning Process (Liquid Cleaning)**
DEF
Pump 3 years or 483,000 km (300,000 miles)* (10,000 hours)
Filter
Air
Compre I I I I I
ssor

R = Replace
I = Inspect
*Whichever comes first.
**Detroit highly recommends replacing the DPF with a Detroit™ genuine DPF to ensure maximum replacement life.

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1.9 Safety Precautions


The following safety measures are essential when working on any Detroit™ engine.

1.9.1 Exhaust (Start/Run Engine)


Before starting and running an engine, adhere to the following safety precautions:

WARNING
PERSONAL INJURY
To avoid injury before starting and running the engine, ensure the vehicle is parked on a
level surface, parking brake is set, and the wheels are blocked.

WARNING
PERSONAL INJURY
Diesel engine exhaust and some of its constituents are known to the State of California to
cause cancer, birth defects, and other reproductive harm.

1.9.2 Stands
Appropriately rated safety stands are required in conjunction with hydraulic jacks or hoists. Do not rely solely on
either the jack or the hoist to carry the load. When lifting an engine, ensure the lifting device is fastened securely.
Ensure the item to be lifted does not exceed the capacity of the lifting device. Never stand beneath a suspended
load.

1.9.3 Glasses
Select appropriate safety glasses for the job. It is especially important to wear safety glasses when using tools
such as hammers, chisels, pullers or punches.

WARNING
EYE INJURY
To avoid injury from flying debris when using compressed air, wear adequate eye
protection (face shield or safety goggles) and do not exceed 276 kPa (40 psi) air pressure.

1.9.4 Welding
Wear welding goggles and gloves when welding or using an acetylene torch.

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WARNING
PERSONAL INJURY
To avoid injury from arc welding, gas welding, or cutting, wear required safety equipment
such as an arc welder's face plate or gas welder's goggles, welding gloves, protective
apron, long sleeve shirt, head protection, and safety shoes. Always perform welding or
cutting operations in a well ventilated area. The gas in oxygen/acetylene cylinders used in
gas welding and cutting is under high pressure. If a cylinder should fall due to careless
handling, the gage end could strike an obstruction and fracture, resulting in a gas leak
leading to fire or an explosion. If a cylinder should fall resulting in the gage end breaking
off, the sudden release of cylinder pressure will turn the cylinder into a dangerous
projectile. Observe the following precautions when using oxygen/acetylene gas cylinders:

WARNING
FIRE
To avoid injury from fire, check for fuel or oil leaks before welding or carrying an open
flame near the engine.

NOTICE
Use proper shielding around hydraulic lines when welding to prevent hydraulic line
damage. Ensure that a metal shield separates the acetylene and oxygen tanks. (Tanks
must be chained to a cart).

1.9.5 Work Place


Organize your work area and keep it clean. A fall could result in a serious injury. Eliminate the possibility of a fall
by:
• Wiping up oil spills
• Keeping tools and parts off the floor
After servicing or adjusting the engine:
• Reinstall all safety devices, guards or shields
• Ensure that all tools and servicing equipment are removed from the engine

1.9.6 Clothing
Safe work clothing fits and is in good repair. Work shoes are sturdy and rough-soled. Bare feet, sandals or
sneakers are not acceptable foot wear when adjusting and/or servicing an engine. Do not wear the following when
working on an engine.

WARNING
PERSONAL INJURY
To avoid injury when working on or near an operating engine, wear protective clothing, eye
protection, and hearing protection.

Any of these items could catch on moving parts causing serious injury:

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• Rings
• Wrist watches
• Loose fitting clothing

1.9.7 Power Tools


Do not use defective portable power tools. Check for frayed cords prior to using the tool. Be sure all electric tools
are grounded. Defective electrical equipment can cause severe injury. Improper use of electrical equipment can
cause severe injury.

WARNING
ELECTRICAL SHOCK
To avoid injury from electrical shock, follow OEM furnished operating instructions prior to
usage.

1.9.8 Air
Recommendations regarding the use of compressed air are indicated throughout the manual.

WARNING
EYE INJURY
To avoid injury from flying debris when using compressed air, wear adequate eye
protection (face shield or safety goggles) and do not exceed 276 kPa (40 psi) air pressure.

1.9.9 Fluids and Pressure


Be extremely careful when dealing with fluids under pressure. Fluids under pressure can have enough force to
penetrate the skin. These fluids can infect a minor cut or opening in the skin. If injured by escaping fluid, see a
doctor at once. Serious infection or reaction can result without immediate medical treatment.

WARNING
PERSONAL INJURY
To avoid injury from penetrating fluids, do not put your hands in front of fluid under
pressure. Fluids under pressure can penetrate skin and clothing.

1.9.10 Fuel
Keep the hose and nozzle or the funnel and container in contact with the metal of the fuel tank when refueling to
avoid the possibility of an electric spark igniting the fuel.

WARNING
FIRE
To avoid injury from fire caused by heated diesel-fuel vapors:

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WARNING
GASOLINE VAPOR IGNITION
To avoid injury from possible gasoline vapor ignition when refueling, keep the hose,
nozzle, funnel, or container in contact with the metal opening of the fuel tank. This will
reduce the likelihood of a dangerous spark.

CAUTION
PERSONAL INJURY
To avoid injury from fuel spills, do not overfill the fuel tank.

WARNING
FIRE
To avoid injury from fire, keep all potential ignition sources away from diesel fuel, including
open flames, sparks, and electrical resistance heating elements. Do not smoke when
refueling.

1.9.11 Batteries
Electrical storage batteries emit highly flammable hydrogen gas when charging and continue to do so for some
time after receiving a steady charge.

WARNING
Battery Explosion and Acid Burn
To avoid injury from battery explosion or contact with battery acid, work in a well ventilated
area, wear protective clothing, and avoid sparks or flames near the battery. If you come in
contact with battery acid:

Always disconnect the battery cable before working on the electrical system.

WARNING
PERSONAL INJURY
To avoid injury from accidental engine startup while servicing the engine,
disconnect/disable the starting system.

Disconnect the batteries or disable an air starter when working on the engine (except DDEC) to prevent accidental
starting.

CAUTION
To avoid injury from electrical shock, use care when connecting battery cables. The magnetic switch
studs are at battery voltage.
Use care when connecting battery cables to avoid electrical shock.

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1.9.12 Fire
Keep a charged fire extinguisher within reach. Be sure you have the correct type of extinguisher for the situation.
The correct fire extinguisher types for specific working environments are listed in the following table.

Fire Extinguisher Work Environment


Type A Wood, Paper, Textile and Rubbish
Type B Flammable Liquids
Type C Electrical Equipment

1.9.13 Cleaning Agent


Avoid the use of carbon tetrachloride as a cleaning agent because of the harmful vapors that it releases. Ensure
the work area is adequately ventilated. Use protective gloves, goggles or face shield, and apron.

WARNING
PERSONAL INJURY
To avoid injury from harmful vapors or skin contact, do not use carbon tetrachloride as a
cleaning agent.

Exercise caution against burns when using oxalic acid to clean the cooling passages of the engine.

1.9.14 Working on a Running Engine


When working on an engine that is running, accidental contact with the hot exhaust manifold can cause severe
burns.

CAUTION
PERSONAL INJURY
To avoid injury from unguarded rotating and moving engine components, check that all protective
devices have been reinstalled after working on the engine.

WARNING
PERSONAL INJURY
To avoid injury, use care when working around moving belts and rotating parts on the
engine.

1.9.15 Turbocharger Compressor Inlet Shield


A turbocharger compressor inlet shield, is available and must be used anytime the engine is operated with the air
inlet piping removed. The shield helps to prevent foreign objects from entering and damaging the turbocharger
and will prevent the mechanic from accidentally touching the turbocharger impeller.

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WARNING
PERSONAL INJURY
To avoid injury from contact with rotating parts when an engine is operating with the air
inlet piping removed, install an air inlet screen shield over the turbocharger air inlet. The
shield prevents contact with rotating parts.

Use of this shield does NOT preclude any other safety practices contained in this manual.

1.9.16 Fluoroelastomer (VITON®) Caution


Under normal design conditions, fluoroelastomer (VITON®) parts, such as O-rings and seals, are perfectly safe to
handle.

WARNING
CHEMICAL BURNS
To avoid injury from chemical burns, wear a face shield and neoprene or PVC gloves
when handling fluoroelastomer O-rings or seals that have been degraded by excessive
heat. Discard gloves after handling degraded fluoroelastomer parts.

However, a potential hazard may occur if these components are raised to a temperature above 316°C (600°F),
such as during a cylinder failure or engine fire. At temperatures above 316°C (600°F) fluoroelastomer will
decompose (indicated by charring or the appearance of a black, sticky mass) and produce hydrofluoric acid. This
is extremely corrosive and, if touched by bare skin, may cause severe burns, sometimes with symptoms delayed
for several hours.

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