Sie sind auf Seite 1von 1

Music Technology in the Classroom

Joey Morrow

IMPLICATIONS FOR
PRACTICE FUTURE RESEARCH

Having a music technology class More research could be into the effects
poses many challenges on a music that music making using technology
teacher such as lack of time or have on the brain and how that
funding. Despite these challenges, compares to traditional instruments
studies show that having a class in
music technology significantly Most research is done on students
increases comprehension of topics pursuing higher education so more
such as music theory and research on those at other levels of
composition. Studies have also shown education
that students enjoy the music
learning process more when music
More research on how music technology
technology is incorporated into the
may or may not have gender stereotypes
curriculum.
associated with them.

REFERENCES
Anthony, B. (2018). Mixing as a performance: Educating tertiary students in the art of playing audio equipment whilst mixing popular music. Journal of Music, Technology and
Education, 11(1), 103-122. doi:10.1386/jmte.11.1.103_1
Bauer, William & J. Dammers, Richard. (2016). Technology in Music Teacher Education: A National Survey. Research Perspectives in Music Education. 18. 2-15.
Ben-Tal, O., & Salazar, D. (2014). Rethinking the musical ensemble: A model for collaborative learning in higher education music technology. Journal of Music, Technology and
Education, 7(3), 279-294. doi:10.1386/jmte.7.3.279_1
Carey, G., & Grant, C. (2015). Peer Assisted Reflection for Studio Music Teachers. Teaching for Learning and Learning for Teaching, 63-78. doi:10.1007/978-94-6300-289-9_5
Landy, L. (2012). Discovered whilst entering a new millennium: A technological revolution that will radically influence both music making and music education. Journal of Music,
Technology and Education, 4(2), 181-188. doi:10.1386/jmte.4.2-3.181_1
Moore, A., & Moore, D. (2008). Adapting to change: Working with digital sound using open source software in a teaching and learning environment. Journal of Music, Technology and
Education, 1(2), 113-120. doi:10.1386/jmte.1.2and3.113_1
Rees, F. J. (2012). Redefining Music Technology in the United States. Journal of Music, Technology and Education ,4(2), 149-155. doi:10.1386/jmte.4.2-3.149_1
Savage, J. (2012). Toms story: Developing music education with technology. Journal of Music, Technology and Education, 4(2), 217-226. doi:10.1386/jmte.4.2-3.217_1
Stansbie, A. (2010). Sounds, agents, works and listeners; A model of computer music performance. Journal of Music, Technology and Education, 3(1), 17-30. doi:10.1386/jmte.3.1.17_1
Thompson, P. (2012). An empirical study into the learning practices and enculturation of DJs, turntablists, hip hop and dance music producers. Journal of Music, Technology and
Education, 5(1), 43-58. doi:10.1386/jmte.5.1.43_1
Wan, L. A., & Gregory, S. (2018). Digital tools to support motivation of music students for instrumental practice. Journal of Music, Technology and Education, 11(1), 37-64.
doi:10.1386/jmte.11.1.37_1
Webster, P. R. (2012). Key research in music technology and music teaching and learning. Journal of Music, Technology and Education, 4(2), 115-130. doi:10.1386/jmte.4.2-3.115_1
Williams, D. B. (2012). The non-traditional music student in secondary schools of the United States: Engaging non-participant students in creative music activities through
technology. Journal of Music, Technology and Education, 4(2), 131-147. doi:10.1386/jmte.4.2-3.131_1
Wilsmore, R. (2010). The demonic and the divine: Unfixing replication in the phenomenology of sampling. Journal of Music, Technology and Education,3(1), 5-16.
doi:10.1386/jmte.3.1.5_1