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Study Guide

Maintenance Management
IMC 780
2016

Content compiled by Prof JK Visser


Instructional Design done by Mrs E Drysdale

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General premise and educational approach
The module Maintenance Management, IMC 780, will focus on insight in the field of
Maintenance Management and the application of first principles. It is important to do extensive
reading and to attend classes in order to obtain theoretical knowledge and insight of the subject
material.

Lecturer

Prof JK Visser
Lecturer

Office Room 4-10


Engineering 2 Building
University of Pretoria
Pretoria
Telephone +27 12 4203556
Fax +27 12 3625307
E-mail krige.visser@up.ac.za
If you use normal e-mail, use the module code as the first part of the
subject line. E.g. "IMC780: Request for assistance".
Consulting hours Please phone or send an e-mail to make an appointment.
Communication The discussion tool is enabled for the use of the students only. Please
Policy do not try to contact the lecturer via any of the clickUP communication
tools. Discussion will from time to time be monitored by the lecturer.

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References
Prescribed Textbook
• Campbell, J.D. & Reyes-Picknell, J.V. 2014. Uptime: Strategies for Excellence in
Maintenance. 3rd ed. Productivity Press.

Prescribed Material
• Coetzee, J. 1999. A holistic approach to the maintenance "problem". Journal of Quality in
Maintenance Engineering, Vol 5 (no 3), pp. 276-280.
• Duffuaa, S.O., Raouf, A, & Campbell, J.D. 1999. Planning and Control of Maintenance
Systems: Modeling and Analysis, Chapter 1. John Wiley and Sons, Inc.
• Kelly, A. 1997. Maintenance Strategy, Chapter 1. Butterworth-Heinemann.
• Kelly, A. 1997. Maintenance Strategy, Chapter 9. Butterworth-Heinemann.
• Nyman, D & Levitt, J. 2001. Maintenance Planning, Scheduling and Coordination. Chapter 7.
Industrial Press Inc.
• Nyman, D & Levitt, J. 2001. Maintenance Planning, Scheduling and Coordination. Chapter 13.
Industrial Press Inc.
• Powerpoint Presentations
• Sherwin, D. 2000. A review of overall models for maintenance management. Journal of Quality
in Maintenance Engineering, Vol 6 (no 3), pp. 138–164.

Additional Study Material (Not required to achieve outcomes)


• Campbell, JD, Jardine, AKS and McGlynn, J. 2011. Asset Management Excellence: Optimizing
Equipment Life-Cycle Decisions, CRC Press.
• De Groote, P. 1995. Maintenance Performance Analysis: a Practical Approach. Journal of
Quality in Maintenance Engineering, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 4-24.
• Geraerds, W.M.J. 1992. The EUT Maintenance Model. International Journal of Production
Economics, vol. 24, pp. 209 – 216.
• Kelly, A 1997. Maintenance Organisation and Systems. Oxford: Butterworth-Heinemann.
• Levitt, J. 1997. Handbook of Maintenance Management. New York: Industrial Press Inc.
• Lewis, E.E. 1987. Introduction to Reliability Engineering, Chapters 4 & 8. London: John Wiley.
• Mitchell, J.S. 2002. Physical Asset Management Handbook, Chapter 6, 3rd ed. Clarion
Publishing.
• Moubray, J. 1991. Reliability-centred Maintenance. New York : Industrial Press Inc.
• Palmer, R.D. 1999. Maintenance Planning and Scheduling Handbook: Introduction. New York:
Mcgraw-Hill.
• Riis, J.O. Luxhøj, J.T. & Thorsteinsson, U. 1997. A situational maintenance model.
International Journal of Quality and Reliability in Management, vol. 14, no. 4, pp. 349-366.
• Suzuki, T. 1992. TPM in Process Industries. New York: Productivity Press.
• Tompkins Associates Incorporated, The Scoreboard for Maintenance Excellence, Monograph
Series No. M0015, http://www.tompkinsinc.com.

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• Visser, J.K. 1997. A Conceptual Framework for Understanding and Teaching Maintenance.
Mechanical Engineering Transactions, ME22, no. 3 & 4, pp. 61–69.
• Wireman, T, 1998. Developing Performance Indicators for Managing Maintenance. New York:
Industrial Press, Inc.

Learning activities
General Information
Module credits: 16
Notional hours: 160
Number of lecture hours: 20
Examination hours: 3

Proposed Activity Schedule

Date Activity
4 Jul – 12 Aug Read and study the designated articles and chapters as preparation for
the class test
Refer section on "Tests" below
22 – 24 Aug The test will be done on the first day of the attendance block
Refer course Submit Assignment 1 (group) on last day of attendance block of the
schedule module
29 Aug – 23 Sep Prepare Assignment 2
Submit Assignment 2 (individual) by 23 Sep 23:00
25 Sep - 20 Oct Prepare for exam
21 Oct Write exam, 09:00 – 12:00

Table 1: Schedule for IMC 780

Rules of assessment
Calculation of Final Mark:

The total mark will be calculated as follows:

• Assignment 1 (group) • 10%

• Assignment 2 (individual) • 30%

• Class Test (Closed Book) • 10%

• Examination (Open Book) • 50%

• Total Mark • 100%

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Pass requirements You need a sub-minimum of 40% for your semester mark in
order to qualify to write the exam. If you did not obtain the
sub-minimum of 40% for your semester mark and you still
write the exam, your exam paper will not be graded. A sub
minimum of 40% is required in the exam to pass the course. A
final mark of at least 50% is required to pass the course.
Examination No laptops and/or cell phones are allowed in the examination venue.
disclaimer You will not be allowed to hand any item to another student or to receive
any item from another student. Therefore, please ensure that you bring
along everything that you might need during the exam (including
calculator, statistical tables, pens, pencils, erasers, ruler, notes, books,
etc.)

There is no supplementary examination. Please ensure that you are


available to write the examination at the date indicated on the schedule.
Please note that, if you arrive late for the examination, you will have to
hand in your examination paper at the scheduled end time of the
examination and will not receive any additional time.

Students are obliged to identify themselves positively by means of a valid


student card when writing a test and/or examination. No access to the
test or examination venue will be allowed without a valid student card.
Feedback Feedback will be given within a month after the due date for the specific
assignment/test, and your semester mark will be available on clickUP at
least a week before the examination.
Plagiarism Please read the plagiarism policy of the University of Pretoria, located at
http://www.up.ac.za/media/shared/409/ZP_Files/s4726_09-plagiarism-
prevention-policy.zp62477.pdf. If students are found to be copying work
done by other students (current and past), websites or any other source
when doing assignments, without providing the necessary references in
the required way, it will be viewed in a serious light and may lead to a
University disciplinary hearing. The punishment, if found guilty, may lead
to expulsion from this university and any other tertiary institution in South
Africa.

Referencing You need to use the GSTM Harvard Referencing method. You can find
the GSTM Harvard Referencing Method in Appendix 11 of the GSTM
Research Guide available on the University’s website at the following
link: www.up.ac.za/gstm/student. Students who do not comply with the
Harvard Referencing convention will be penalized with 10% for that
assignment. All students are encouraged to use EndNote or Refworks in
the preparation of the assignments. See Appendix 11 of the GSTM
Research Guide for instructions.
File naming The format, style and presentation should be in accordance with the
conventions standards laid down for the overall program. All assignments are to be
completed in PDF.
File names for electronic submission of all assignments to be compiled in
the following way:
• 12pt Times New Roman or 11pt Arial; 1.5 line spacing; 2cm
margins
• Year [e.g. 2016], module code [e.g. IMC780], assignment number
[e.g. Ass1 or Ass2 or Ass 3], your surname and initials and the
document extension pdf (e.g. 2016IMC780Ass1MandelaN.pdf).
The group assignments are to be submitted by the respective group
leaders only, USING THEIR SURNAMES FOR THE FILE NAMES.

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Assignment cover Make sure that the following information is indicated on the first page of
page and template your assignment:
• Initials and surname
• Student number
• Course name and code
• Lecturer
• Title of assignment
• Date of submission
You may use the assignment template available on the student web.
(www.up.ac.za/gstm/student).
Submission process TII is a web-based plagiarism detection service that is integrated with
and Turnitin (TII) clickUP.

o All assignments need to be submitted through TII by following the


Assignment Submission link on clickUP.
o With a group assignment, the group leader has to submit it
through TII.
o PDF your assignment using either Adobe software or cute PDF
(do not scan) and submit it through TII.
o Check your TII report for similarities to other material. You may
submit your assignment more than once through TII until the due
date for the assignment.
o The lecturer will check the reports generated by TII for possible
plagiarism.
o It may take up to 24 hours to generate a report so please do not
wait until the due date to submit your assignment on TII if you
would like to check your assignment for possible plagiarism.

A number of individual and group assignments will be given for this module in maintenance
management. Some background on each assignment is given below.

Assignment 1 These group assignment(s) will be done during the attendance block. It
(group, in class) consists of a number of practical exercises. The exercises will be
(10%) handed out and completed in class.
Assignment 2 – Develop a strategic plan, overall maintenance plan and detailed job plan.
(individual) Detail will be available after the attendance block
(30%)

Test
A 30 minute closed book test will be done on the first day of the attendance block. It will be
based on preparatory reading before the block (as prescribed). The following prescribed course
material must be read thoroughly as preparation for the class test.

• Campbell, J.D. and Reyes-Picknell, J. 2014. Uptime: Strategies for Excellence in Maintenance
Management, Introduction, pp. xxxi – xliii (13 pages)
• Duffuaa, S.O., Raouf, A, & Campbell, J.D. 1999, Planning and Control of Maintenance
Systems: Modeling and Analysis, Chapter 1: Maintenance Systems, pp. 1 - 16.
• Kelly, A. 1997. Maintenance Strategy, Chapter 1: Maintenance and the Indutrial Organization,
pp. 1 - 6.
• Sherwin, D. 2000. A review of overall models for maintenance management, only pages 138–
147.
• Coetzee, J. 1999. A holistic approach to the maintenance "problem", pp. 276-280.

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Examination
This will be a 3 hour open-book exam and any course material, books and calculator may be
used. The venue will be announced later.

Class Participation
Full time attendance is required during the contact session. This module will focus on insight and
will be evaluated as such in the assignments, test and examination. Relevant discussions are
welcome during the contact session. It is important to share / callibrate your knowledge with the
rest of the class.

Module objectives, articulation and learning outcomes


General Objective

The overall objective of this module is to obtain the required theoretical knowledge of maintenance
management, with an emphasis on the tools, techniques, tactics, procedures and processes to
manage the maintenance function within the business enterprise in a pro-active way. Having
completed this module the learner should be able to specify a maintenance objective, know how to
formulate a maintenance improvement strategy, how to develop a maintenance plan and how to
structure a maintenance organisation that is focused on achieving the objectives of the
organization. The learner should also be able to apply some quantitative techniques to calculate
reliability and maintainability.

Specific Learning Outcomes:


Having completed this module the student will be able to:
• Specify a maintenance process audit system for a maintenance department
• Perform a system breakdown for a technical system
• Compile a maintenance process configuration database and design queries for this
database
• Specify cost-effective maintenance tactics for each MSI of the system
• Assign intervals for usage-based maintenance and define optimum intervals for condition-
based maintenance
• Develop a master maintenance plan for the technical system
• Specify a maintenance resource structure and set performance standards for this structure.
• Forecast the maintenance workload / expected performance from historical and other data
• Perform a Pareto analysis for number of failures or cost of failures
• Apply the and Ashraf Labib tactic selection methodologies
• Understand the BCM approach to develop a maintenance plan
• Calculate the reliability of a system, given the reliability of the components

Critical Learning Outcomes:


• Identify and solve problems in which responses display that responsible calculated
decisions using critical and creative thinking have been made.
• Work effectively with others as a member of a team, group, organisation, community.
• Organise and manage oneself and departmental activities responsibly and effectively.
• Collect, analyse, organize, critically evaluate and present information.

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• Communicate effectively using visual, mathematical and/or language skills in the modes of
oral and/or written presentation.
• Use science and technology effectively and critically, showing responsibility towards the
economy, environment and health of others.
• Demonstrate an understanding of the maintenance environment as a set of related
systems.

Module Structure
This module in Maintenance Management comprises 9 themes as outlined below. The chapter
numbers refer to the prescribed textbook.

Study Themes Study Unit


1. Introduction 1.1 Overview
1.2 Maintenance Definitions
1.3 Historical Development
2. Maintenance Strategy (Ch 1) 2.1 Background
2.2 Framework for the strategy
2.3 Strategy components
2.4 Strategy development
2.5 Developing the vision
3. People and Organisation (Ch 2) 3.1 Background
3.2 Leadership
3.3 Teams
3.4 Change management
3.5 Maintenance structure
3.6 Multiskilling
4. Work Management (Ch 3) 4.1 Background
4.2 Work management cycle
4.3 Six key steps
4.4 Planning horizons
4.5 Outage management
4.6 Planning and scheduling
5. Basic Care (Ch 4) 5.1 Overview
5.2 Beyond the minimum
5.3 5S housekeeping
5.4 Audits
6. Materials Management (Ch 5) 6.1 Framework
6.2 Inventory control methods
6.3 MRO improvements
7. Performance Management (Ch 7) 7.1 Overview
7.2 Measuring maintenance
7.3 Benchmarking maintenance
8. Asset Reliability, Maintainability 8.1 RAM Basics
and Availability (Ch 8 and 9) 8.2 Simulation modelling
8.2 Reliability-centred Maintenance
8.3 Total Productive Maintenance
8.4 Business-centred Maintenance
8.5 Other Maintenance Approaches

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Study Themes Study Unit
9. Evidence-based Approach (Ch 10) 9.1 Overview
9.2 Life-cycle costing
9.3 Economic life of an asset
9.4 Optimising maintenance tactics

Study theme 1: Introduction


Specific Outcomes: • Define the historical developments in maintenance as outlined by
Sherwin
• Write definitions of maintenance
• Write a definition of maintenance management
• Distinguish between preventive and corrective maintenance
• Describe the systems approach to maintenance and maintenance
management
References: • Campbell, JD & Reyes-Picknell, JV, 2014. Uptime, Introduction
• Duffuaa, SO, Raouf, A and Campbell, JD. 1999. Planning and
Control of Maintenance Systems: Modeling and Analysis –
Chapter 1
• Kelly, A. 1997. Maintenance Strategy, Chapter 1
• Sherwin, D. 2000. A Review of overall models for maintenance
management, pp138 – 147
• Geraerds, WMJ. 1992. The EUT maintenance model
• Coetzee, J, 1999. Holistic approach to the maintenance "problem"
• Visser, JK, 1996. A conceptual framework for understanding and
teaching maintenance

Study theme 2: Building a Maintenance Strategy


Specific Outcomes • Define the elements of a good business strategy
• List the generic goals or targets for maintenance
• List the basic components of a maintenance strategy
• Define the subprocesses fo maintenance strategy deployment
• List the 8 steps of the Hoshin Kanri strategy process
References • Campbell, JD & Reyes-Picknell, JV. 2014. Uptime, Chapter 1:
Kelly, A, Maintenance Strategy – Chapter 1:

Study theme 3: People and Organisation


Specific Outcomes • Define an organigram for the maintenance department
• Forecast the corrective maintenance workload using the moving
average or exponential smoothing techniques
• Structure the maintenance resources, i.e. people, spares and
tools, using a resource structure diagram
• Implement multi-skilling and performance-based-payment for the
maintenance workforce

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• Write and distinguish between various motivational theories
• Distinguish between 3 types of maintenance error
References • Campbell, JD & Reyes-Picknell, JV. 2014. Uptime, Chapter 2
• Kelly, A. 1997. Maintenance Organisation and Systems
• Covey, S, Principle-Centered Leadership

Study theme 4: Work Management


Specific Outcomes • Sketch the work management cycle
• Write the six key steps/stages of work management
• Define the basic planning tools
• Define the the basic scheduling tools
• Define the operating pattern for an asset
• Perform a system breakdown for an asset
• Define basic tactics for maintenance
References • Campbell, JD & Reyes-Picknell, JV. 2014. Uptime, Chapter 3
• Nyman, D & Levitt, J. 2001. Maintenance Planning, Scheduling
and Coordination. Chapter 7.
• Nyman, D & Levitt, J. 2001. Maintenance Planning, Scheduling
and Coordination. Chapter 13.

Study theme 5: Basic Care


Specific Outcomes • Define the 5 basic house-keeping steps
• Perform a maintenance management Audit
• Distinguish between quality systems like ISO 9001, TQM,
TQMain, Lean, Six Sigma
References • Campbell, JD & Reyes-Picknell, JV. 2014. Uptime, Chapter 4

Study theme 6: Materials Management


Specific Outcomes • Apply inventory management techniques to the management of
spares
• Classify spares in terms of usage rate and value
• Apply Pareto method to rank spares
• Apply inventory models for fast moving spares
• Calculate spare part requirements
References • Campbell, JD & Reyes-Picknell, JV. 2014. Uptime, Chapter 5

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Study theme 7: Performance Management
Specific Outcomes • Define the 4 steps/stages of a generic performance and control
system
• Sketch the steps of developing a performance system for
maintenance
• Write key performance indicators (KPI's) for the maintenance
system
• Develop a budget as a cost objective for the maintenance
department
• Define benchmarks for the maintenance of a specific technical
system
• Apply the balanced scorecard in the selection of KPI’s
References • Campbell, JD & Reyes-Picknell, JV. 2014. Uptime, Chapter 6.
• Kelly, A, 1997. Maintenance Strategy.
• Kaplan, RS and Norton, DP, 1996, Using the Balanced Scorecard
as a Strategic Management System, Harvard Business Review,
74, (1), p75-85.
• Tsang, AHC, Jardine, AKS and Kolodny, H, 1999, Measuring
maintenance performance: a holistic approach, Int. J. of
Operations and Production Management, 19 (7), p691-715
• Wireman, T, 1998, Developing Performance Indicators for
Managing Maintenance, Industrial Press, Inc., New York

Study theme 8: Asset Reliability and Availability


Specific Outcomes • Write the reliability function, given the failure density function
• Write the function for the mean time to failure (MTTF), given the
failure density function
• Write the maintainability function, given the repair density function
• Write the function for the mean time to repair (MTTR), given the
repair density function
• Determine the reliability function of a system, comprising a number
of subsystems or components, given the reliability functions of the
components of the system
• Determine the availability function of a repairable system, given the
reliability as well as maintainability functions of the system
• Analyse the dynamic behaviour (reliability and availability) of a
complex, multi-component system using simulation software
• Write the 7 steps of the basic RCM process/method
• Apply the RCM tactic selection approach/technique for the
development of a maintenance plan for a technical system
• Apply the BCM approach, including the top-down-bottom-up
approach, for the development of a maintenance plan
• Write the goals and fundamental elements of TPM

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References • Campbell, JD & Reyes-Picknell, JV, Uptime, Chapter 8 and Chapter
9
• Kelly, A. 1997. Maintenance Strategy, Chapter 13: Reliability-
centered maintenance
• Kelly, A. 1997. Maintenance Strategy, Chapter 14: Total productive
maintenance
• Duffuaa, SO, Raouf, A and Campbell, JD. 1999. Planning and
Control of Maintenance Systems: Modeling and Analysis
• Moubray, J, Reliability-centred Maintenance
• Suzuki, T, TPM in Process Industries
• Lewis, EE, Introduction to Reliability Engineering

Study theme 9: Evidence-based Approach


Specific Outcomes • Optimize life-cycle decisions
• Calculate optimum purchase option
• Choose the best maintenance tactic
• Determine which is best option from repair or replace
• Optimize interval for time-based maintenance
• Optimize interval for failure finding tasks
References • Campbell, JD & Reyes-Picknell, JV. 2014. Uptime, Chapter 10
• Kelly, A. 1997. Maintenance Strategy
• Campbell, JD, Jardine, AKS and McGlynn, J. 2011. Asset
Management Excellence
• Duffuaa, SO, Raouf, A and Campbell, JD. 1999. Planning and
Control of Maintenance Systems: Modeling and Analysis

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