Sie sind auf Seite 1von 39

PORTFOLIO

Madison Prince

Note: This portfolio was designed to be viewed with a two page display format

Contents

01

02

03

04

05

06

Urban opening

2

Core Knowledge

8

The Children’s Nest

14

Urban oasis

20

Summer Design Studio

26

Post-Modernism

34

Project_01

Urban opening

Studio: ALAGASCO Competition Program: Mixed Use Housing Site: Mobile, AL Instructor: Kevin Moore Semester: 4th Year Fall

The project is a multi-use, multi-family complex in the heart of downtown Mobile, Alabama. It focuses on pulling the pedestrians from the exterior, to take a pause in a shaded plaza at the corner of St. Francis and Joachim St. Generous retail lots line the street while allowing pedestrians to enter the courtyard at the center of the project. The notch creates a plaza that exposes the project to the city and allows a sense of openness from the courtyard. The height of the building respects the neighboring construction, especially the historic church at the corner opposite to the courtyard. The project allows ample light to enter the courtyard and into the building along the corridors and points of egress. The tower, plaza and court connects the people to the city while providing a spacious place to live.

The tower, plaza and court connects the people to the city while providing a spacious place
Above : In regard to program, numerous retail lots were required on the ground foor,

Above: In regard to program, numerous retail lots were required on the ground foor, as well as necessary amenities including a lobby, activity room, club space, and small gymnasium. A small amount of parking spaces for the residents were required, with ease of access from St. Francis St.

Right: Section depicting spacious cantilevered plaza.

with ease of access from St. Francis St. Right : Section depicting spacious cantilevered plaza. 4
Above : A typical foor plan is shown. The apartments range from studios, 1, 2
Above : A typical foor plan is shown. The apartments range from studios, 1, 2

Above: A typical foor plan is shown. The apartments range from studios, 1, 2 and 3 bedroom units. Glazing is used as abundantly as possible allowing views towards the city as well as the spacious inner courtyard.

Left: Section through courtyard to view how ample light enters the project.

Shear Wall Concrete column and slab construction
Shear Wall
Concrete column and
slab construction

Structural

VRF HVAC System
VRF HVAC System

Level

Occupant load

Capacity for

Environmental

per foor each stair 5 60 146 4 130 146 3 130 146 2 100
per foor
each stair
5
60
146
4
130
146
3
130
146
2
100
146
1
Elevator

Life Safety

per foor each stair 5 60 146 4 130 146 3 130 146 2 100 146
per foor each stair 5 60 146 4 130 146 3 130 146 2 100 146
per foor each stair 5 60 146 4 130 146 3 130 146 2 100 146
per foor each stair 5 60 146 4 130 146 3 130 146 2 100 146
The project was taken further allowing the completion of certain detail drawings to understand the

The project was taken further allowing the completion of certain detail drawings to understand the full scope of design and the construction phases involved. Structure, HVAC, and egress were all considered and perfected through numerous trials. ADA guidelines were reviewed and the requirement of an accessible 1 bedroom unit was fulflled.

Below: The Methodist church is well known and respected in the community. This required careful consideration of the design to respect the history of Mobile. The project pulls back from the street allowing views and aids in bringing patrons within the site.

The project pulls back from the street allowing views and aids in bringing patrons within the

Project_02

Core Knowledge

Studio: Interior Architecture Thesis Program: Library Renovation Site: Anniston, AL Instructor: Kevin Moore/Matt Hall Semester: Summer 2018

The project is a renovation to the public library in downtown Anniston, Alabama. The frst phase was to focus on the current multi-purpose room on the second foor, and how it could be advanced regarding the programs and activities occurring in the space. This small scale preamble would allow the students to develop a thesis of study to be implemented in phase two. The second phase was to use what the students learned from the multi-purpose room and apply it to the frst foor stacks area of the library. Entry sequence and adaptability were considered while adhering to the needs of the library staff. Through ever-changing technology, it was important to consider future adjustments to the library and the changing needs of readers alike.

it was important to consider future adjustments to the library and the changing needs of readers

Overview: Wood material such as light oak on interior surfaces create an effectual visual impression as well as a distinct luminous effect. Decorative panels such as this will act as sound diffusers and be more effective in preventing echoes in a space so keen on quietness. A wooden core creates a warm sense of intimacy while evenly illuminating the center which is the icon of the library. The color of the wood allows light to wash evenly creating an ambient atmosphere with the help of a concave vaulted ceiling slightly dropped lower than the surrounding material yet creating a perception of added height.

10 CORE KNOWLEDGE

ceiling slightly dropped lower than the surrounding material yet creating a perception of added height. 10

,

blends with the monochrome foor and ceiling, but contains pops of color defning more important zones. The more informal perimeter obtains acoustic effects with carpet on the foor, and perforated metal panels hung from the ceiling, all surrounded by the identical, luminous light oak. Various metal panels generate different zones of study within the library, and varying furniture designs accompany these changes.

these different zones by fuctuating the types used. In the lounge, a play of brilliance is acquired by hung pendant lighting while ambient luminescence creates an effective working environment for the more collaborative spaces. These attributes create a material effect of a defnitive core, ambiently lit, surrounded by a vertical monochrome pallet with varying lights generating varying study spaces, benefcial to advancing a library’s design.

purpose room and the stacks area depicting room heights and materiality.

and the stacks area depicting room heights and materiality. Mirrored Can Light Focal Glow Perforated Metal
and the stacks area depicting room heights and materiality. Mirrored Can Light Focal Glow Perforated Metal

Mirrored Can Light Focal Glow

room heights and materiality. Mirrored Can Light Focal Glow Perforated Metal Panel Absorptive RZB Linear LED
room heights and materiality. Mirrored Can Light Focal Glow Perforated Metal Panel Absorptive RZB Linear LED

Perforated Metal Panel Absorptive

Can Light Focal Glow Perforated Metal Panel Absorptive RZB Linear LED Lighting Woven Metal Panel Ambient

RZB Linear LED Lighting

Woven Metal Panel

Ambient Luminescence

Absorptive

Woven Metal Panel Ambient Luminescence Absorptive Glass Pendant Light Acoustic Tiling Play of
Woven Metal Panel Ambient Luminescence Absorptive Glass Pendant Light Acoustic Tiling Play of

Glass Pendant Light

Acoustic Tiling

Play of Brilliance

Absorptive

Panel Ambient Luminescence Absorptive Glass Pendant Light Acoustic Tiling Play of Brilliance Absorptive

Below: Thoughtful furniture was required and each element was chosen because of sizing and durability. Library furniture is commonly abused and introducing easily washable seating elements and tables reduces maintenance costs.

seating elements and tables reduces maintenance costs. MultiGeneration stacking chair MultiGeneration stool Pfster

MultiGeneration stacking chair

reduces maintenance costs. MultiGeneration stacking chair MultiGeneration stool Pfster lounge chair K. lounge modular

MultiGeneration

stool

costs. MultiGeneration stacking chair MultiGeneration stool Pfster lounge chair K. lounge modular system Pixel desk

Pfster lounge chair

stacking chair MultiGeneration stool Pfster lounge chair K. lounge modular system Pixel desk Antenna workspace desk

K. lounge modular system

stool Pfster lounge chair K. lounge modular system Pixel desk Antenna workspace desk Rockwell unscripted table

Pixel desk

Pfster lounge chair K. lounge modular system Pixel desk Antenna workspace desk Rockwell unscripted table Right

Antenna workspace desk

K. lounge modular system Pixel desk Antenna workspace desk Rockwell unscripted table Right : An unfolded

Rockwell unscripted table

Right: An unfolded drawing of the multi-purpose room clearly depicts the foor area and emphasizes the curved attributes of the walls. The wooden slat roof can be seen with the additional canned lighting when speakers are at the front of the room. Lastly, the curtain and track can be seen, which is used for when the room requires full darkness.

which is used for when the room requires full darkness. Bottom : View from the North

Bottom: View from the North entrance looking towards the stacks. The reduced height of the area above the bookshelves creates a more intimate experience.

looking towards the stacks. The reduced height of the area above the bookshelves creates a more

Right: View from the entrance of the multipurpose room. This is a still shot of a physical model crafted at 1/2”=1’- 0” with slight post- production work applied. A physical model was necessary to fully grasp the spatial elements of the project and understand the experiences that might take place through the studies thesis.

that might take place through the studies thesis. Bottom : Multiple layouts were required because of

Bottom: Multiple layouts were required because of the different functions that would take place in the multi- purpose room. The staff requested seating and tables that could be arranged in multiple ways while obtaining easily maintainable qualities. The library shows movies weekly where two seats were required for a single table. For lectures the library has, the seating layout maximizes occupancy for over 100 people. Lastly, any workshop that might take place within the multi-purpose room required two tables put together and 8 chairs.

These layouts were completed by using a picture from the physical model and overlapping furniture in SketchUp.

a picture from the physical model and overlapping furniture in SketchUp. Movie Layout Lecture Layout Collaboration

Movie Layout

a picture from the physical model and overlapping furniture in SketchUp. Movie Layout Lecture Layout Collaboration

Lecture Layout

a picture from the physical model and overlapping furniture in SketchUp. Movie Layout Lecture Layout Collaboration

Collaboration Layout

Project_03

THE CHILDREN’S NEST

Studio: Interior Architecture Program: Sustainable Orphanage/School Site: West Haiti Instructor: Rebecca O’Neal Dagg Semester: 3rd Year Fall

The children’s nest is an orphanage designed as an earthquake resistant building that is focused on blending indoors with outdoors. With respect to surrounding buildings and cooling effects, the frst foor is sunken down. Through the use of screens and ventilation blocks, the children will feel protected and apart of the environment. Along the exterior edges of the hallways students and occupants of the building can circulate without interrupting other spaces within the system. The two voids allow for improved wellness and health for the kids while keeping them connected to the exterior with the interaction between people and nature. The idea behind the nest was to allow the users of the space to feel comfortable and appreciated while equipping them with knowledge and skills for the future.

feel comfortable and appreciated while equipping them with knowledge and skills for the future. 14 THE
Top : The frst foor plan contains classrooms for the students as well as the
Top : The frst foor plan contains classrooms for the students as well as the

Top: The frst foor plan contains classrooms for the students as well as the necessary complementing attributes. On the Northeast portion of the site, living quarters for the guard is provided. The property requires a security guard on duty 24/7 and is placed adjacent to the entry gate.

Left: Materiality was a focus of concern due to the lack of funds the country has and the clientele’s resources. Materials were strictly limited to concrete block, poured in place concrete, and available metals. This created the need for ventilation and lighting strategies throughout because of the unstable power- grid of the region. Water collection and sewage disposal and reuse were all considered highly important throughout the design process.

Top : A typical sleeping foor plan for the residents of the orphanage. Due to

Top: A typical sleeping foor plan for the residents of the orphanage. Due to the increasing population of orphans, the plan required for the maximization of beds. The children are given bunk beds which contain minimal storage for personal goods and curtains for privacy. The living quarters are also circulating around the bathroom which lies central to the plan with abundant stalls and bathing units. On the East side of the plan is a separate room for the adults on the property who are also required to stay within the boundaries of the site for safety concerns.

Right: A close up view of the North facade of the physical model. The second story Northeast corner contains a viewing platform and outdoor space which expands from the cafeteria offering the children a space to catch fresh air. The screens covered in vegetation can clearly be seen. These screens offer protection from the elements and any safety issues that could arise.

vegetation can clearly be seen. These screens offer protection from the elements and any safety issues

Top Right: View from the cafeteria looking out through the outdoor space. The abundant ventilation blocks can be seen as well as a light well offering ample circulation and lighting.

Right: View of one of the living quarters depicting spatial elements and quality of furniture. The children have more than enough room and storage for their things allowing for a comfortable living experience.

their things allowing for a comfortable living experience. Bottom : Section looking to the North showing
their things allowing for a comfortable living experience. Bottom : Section looking to the North showing

Bottom: Section looking to the North showing the overall height and the sunken ground foor. Patrons will arrive through the gate and immediately descend the stairs entering the lobby.

The roof is where games and recess would take place. Due to spatial limitations and child safety, the activities take place on the green roof where they are protected.

place. Due to spatial limitations and child safety, the activities take place on the green roof
Top Left : View of a student mud room where children can come and drop
Top Left : View of a student mud room where children can come and drop

Top Left: View of a student mud room where children can come and drop off backpacks, lunch boxes, and other possessions. Colors are implemented throughout the building creating a more charismatic architecture.

Left: View of a classroom for students aged 2-4. The alphabet wall encourages applied learning as well as a carpet area for reading time and sectional couches for adaptability and resting.

Bottom: A section facing west and an overall building image conceiving the whole design. The design encompasses everything the students and faculty will need on an everyday basis while staying protected from the elements and any civil unrest that might occur. There were many unique considerations to make throughout the design process and was a benefcial learning experience.

There were many unique considerations to make throughout the design process and was a benefcial learning
There were many unique considerations to make throughout the design process and was a benefcial learning

Project_04

URBAN OASIS

Studio: Preliminary Thesis Study Program: Art Gallery, Studios, and Education Center Site: Atlanta, GA Instructor: Justin Miller Semester: 5th Year Fall

The Atlanta Contemporary Art Center is both a gallery and production space. The Contemporary exhibits over 100 artists yearly, including works by the artists in residence. The Contemporary also runs over 100 educational programs each year. It resides in a collection of warehouses and commercial buildings situated to the south of the Georgia Institute of Technology and bounded by the rail yard and tracks to the west. The campus makes use of existing structures and open spaces for both visitors and resident. The design engages the public through the creation, presentation and advancement of contemporary art. Many of the existing facades and structure remain allowing additions to envelope the center from both sides. New gallery spaces are created as well as an educational center with classrooms and a multi-purpose room. In addition to required program, rent-able spaces are necessary to aid yearly proft and keep patrons entering the buildings. These spaces include studio, multi-purpose rooms, and a large outdoor courtyard. All amenities surround a central cafe where people from both sides of the site can meet together in a place of rest.

surround a central cafe where people from both sides of the site can meet together in
Above : The building fabric is highlighted in green. The gallery lies just south of

Above: The building fabric is highlighted in green. The gallery lies just south of Marietta Street, South of Georgia Techs’ campus. It is important to hold the street edge to emphasize the facility as well as maximize program requirements.

the facility as well as maximize program requirements. 01 Existing Mass Much of the existing building

01

Existing Mass

Much of the existing building is protected by the city. The addition required careful consideration of the current architecture and the new language that would take place.

architecture and the new language that would take place. 0 2 Gallery and Education Center Addition

02 Gallery and Education Center Addition

The design addition helps to hold the street edge while allowing ample light in and creating views outward. The education center will beneft the site as a whole from additional revenue created from increased sales.

whole from additional revenue created from increased sales. An aerial view of the existing site. Current

An aerial view of the existing site. Current events are held outside under the canopy on the West end and extend outward through the courtyard that lies next to the entrance to the gallery. The very East end of the site holds a storage facility for artwork yet is rarely used.

holds a storage facility for artwork yet is rarely used. 0 3 Added Height Maximizing Square

03 Added Height Maximizing Square Footage

The required square footage would not suffce unless additional height was granted. A sky-lit gallery clad in a varying brushed concrete facade towers the west end of the site. On the east end of the site, the education center, clad in glazing, allows for a continuous fow to the event space.

in glazing, allows for a continuous fow to the event space. 0 4 Places for Rest

04

Places for Rest

The gallery provides two locations to unwind while observing additional art outdoors. Around the cafe and education center are ample grounds to breathe fresh air while still feeling part of the site itself.

The existing rentable studios are in the middle of the site on the North and

The existing rentable studios are in the middle of the site on the North and South side with a privatized courtyard in between. Access to this area is restricted to the pubic and the new addition required such amenities.

to the pubic and the new addition required such amenities. Above : Section perspective through the
to the pubic and the new addition required such amenities. Above : Section perspective through the

Above: Section perspective through the spacious two story gallery with skylights. The outdoor courtyard next to the entrance allows patrons to rest before or after entering the main exhibition space.

Bottom: Section perspective through the existing building. This part of the site is protected by the city and require no changes. The left side depicts the end of the gallery extending into the café and the right side displays a spacious studio room.

the end of the gallery extending into the café and the right side displays a spacious
the end of the gallery extending into the café and the right side displays a spacious
Ground foor plan with white poché depicting conditioned space. The plan is split up into
Ground foor plan with white poché depicting conditioned
space. The plan is split up into three sections: the gallery
to the left, café and studios in the middle, and education
center on the right.
Second foor plan: the additional gallery foor creates maximum exhibition space to generate higher revenue.
Second foor plan: the additional gallery foor creates
maximum exhibition space to generate higher revenue.
Above the café holds the administration offces which is
connected by a sky-bridge to the classrooms and conference
room on the East side of the site.

Project_05

Summer Design Studio

Studio: Pre-architecture Summer Option Program Instructors: Margaret Fletcher, Matt Hall, Danielle Willkens Semester: 1st Year - Summer 2015

The Summer Design Studio is one of two tracks taken by students interested in the architecture program at Auburn University. The Summer Studio sequence is divided into two sessions. During the frst session, each student’s work is periodically ranked relative to her/his peers. At the end of the frst session, students with the highest rank-in-class are accepted into Session Two, subject to available space. Students not accepted may elect to retake the entire sequence of courses during the following Summer Design Session if they meet the admission criteria, or they may elect to change majors. The following work displays three of the major projects completed during the summer studio with each projects’ time line spanning about a week.

completed during the summer studio with each projects’ time line spanning about a week. 26 SUMMER

Operative Conditions

Operative conditions was the frst major project completed. The students were tasked in conceptual thinking in terms that were disassociated with assumed entities. Terms of a ‘window,’ ‘door,’ and ‘roof’ were eliminated, allowing spaces to be freely designed.

The medium was to use museum board and create two spaces connected by a cut. Students were required to have a certain number of notches, openings, bends, and cuts to have a successful completion.

Right: A two-dimensional drawing using pen and ink was required to coincide with the physical model. The lines depict the slices and bends and the inked portion displays the ‘occupiable’ spaces.

28 SUMMER DESIGN STUDIO

The lines depict the slices and bends and the inked portion displays the ‘occupiable’ spaces. 28
The lines depict the slices and bends and the inked portion displays the ‘occupiable’ spaces. 28
The lines depict the slices and bends and the inked portion displays the ‘occupiable’ spaces. 28
The lines depict the slices and bends and the inked portion displays the ‘occupiable’ spaces. 28

View through a slice of one of the entities with the second obtaining a bend and notch resulting in a successful project completion.

with the second obtaining a bend and notch resulting in a successful project completion. SUMMER DESIGN

Small Art Studio

Phase two was to design an art studio with specifc square footage requirements. The project lies on a sloped site adjacent

to a lake, pushing students’ abilities while attempting to obtain

the requirements.

A studio obtains the top of the site and leads to a place of rest

in the middle with a freplace. The latter building holds another

studio and a small art gallery for displaying work.

another studio and a small art gallery for displaying work. Hand drawings were required as well,

Hand drawings were required as well, testing students’ drafting abilities under a strict time line. Plan and elevation drawings are given as well as light studies drawn in charcoal shown below.

Plan and elevation drawings are given as well as light studies drawn in charcoal shown below.
Plan and elevation drawings are given as well as light studies drawn in charcoal shown below.
Plan and elevation drawings are given as well as light studies drawn in charcoal shown below.
Students learned a variety of skills about the design process while progressing their crafting skills.

Students learned a variety of skills about the design process while progressing their crafting skills. Lighting, heating, and circulation studies were established creating a benefcial learning experience of how design thinking should take place.

established creating a benefcial learning experience of how design thinking should take place. SUMMER DESIGN STUDIO

Auburn Fraternity Art Gallery

The fnal project of the Summer Option Studio was to design an art gallery for Paul Rudolph’s Kappa Sigma Fraternity house at Auburn University. The proposal was to keep the existing structure and build the gallery on the front lawn while connecting the two with a courtyard.

There were specifc program and square footage requirements developing a successful project completion. Hand drawings were required as well and a detailed physical model displaying the design and surrounding site.

were required as well and a detailed physical model displaying the design and surrounding site. 32
were required as well and a detailed physical model displaying the design and surrounding site. 32
were required as well and a detailed physical model displaying the design and surrounding site. 32
were required as well and a detailed physical model displaying the design and surrounding site. 32
were required as well and a detailed physical model displaying the design and surrounding site. 32

Right: The fraternity house extends into a courtyard and garden space to act as a place of rest, all situated next to a creek parallel to the site.

Bottom: A photo-model overlay was created to grasp a visual of the design within the environment.

: A photo-model overlay was created to grasp a visual of the design within the environment.
: A photo-model overlay was created to grasp a visual of the design within the environment.

Project_06

Post-Modernism

Class: Seminar in History and Theory Instructor: Rebecca O’Neal Dagg Semester: 5th Year Fall

The Seminar in History and Theory class was designed to teach students how post- modernism emerged in the 1960’s and its transition throughout the late 20th century. Critiques were given and discussed, aiding in the ability to decipher the different architectural styles and debate the anomalies between them.

Throughout the duration of the course, students were required to complete three carbon copies of post-modern work to study the mediums used and how they were constructed. Every student completed a different work of art generating a diverse showcase at the end of the semester. The very last project was to use the knowledge obtained throughout the class and apply that to a past project we have completed within our architectural studios.

Artist : Rem Koolhaas, Madelon Vriesendorp Program : Villa dall’Ava, Paris (Saint-Cloud), France, Exterior

Artist: Rem Koolhaas, Madelon Vriesendorp Program: Villa dall’Ava, Paris (Saint-Cloud), France, Exterior perspective

Year:1987

Medium: Synthetic polymer paint and ink on paper

Artist: Michael Graves Program: Saint Martin’s College Library Elevation

Year:1995

Medium: Prismacolor and graphite on yellow trace

Martin’s College Library Elevation Year : 1995 Medium : Prismacolor and graphite on yellow trace 36
Artist : Madison Prince Program : Mixed-Use Apartment Building Year : 2018 Medium : Prismacolor

Artist: Madison Prince Program: Mixed-Use Apartment Building Year: 2018 Medium: Prismacolor and graphite on yellow trace

The fnal project was chosen to imitate a Michael Graves drawing while implementing a past studio project. An elevation of the multi-use apartment building completed 4th year fulflled this requirement.

Artist : Aldo Rossi Program : Casa Dello Studente a Chieti Year : 1977 Medium

Artist: Aldo Rossi Program: Casa Dello Studente a Chieti

Year:1977

Medium: Acrylic, graphite, and pastels on illustration board