Sie sind auf Seite 1von 6

James Wilson A Brief Survey of Messiaen’s Harmonic Practise

 
     
 
Messiaen  in  Context  Assignment  No  2:  
 
 
A  Brief  Survey  of  Olivier  Messiaen’s  Harmonic  Practise  
 
 
 
     
  Olivier  Messiaen  is  one  of  the  most  important  composers  of  the  20th  Century.  He  is  a  
composer  whose  discoveries  and  attitudes  produced  genuinely  new  music.  As  a  teacher  and  
composer  he  influenced  and  taught  some  of  the  greatest  musicians  of  the  next  generation1.  In  
many  ways  his  ideas  and  innovations  were  prophetic  of  contemporary  classical  music  trends  
to  come  (as  will  be  discussed).  His  music  looks  around  the  globe  for  its  inspiration,  from  his  
motherland  of  France  to  the  east  and  even  into  antiquity.  His  rhythmic  ideas  come  from  
Greece  and  India,  his  melodic  ideas  from  birdsong  and  plainchant  and  his  musical  philosophy  
comes  from  his  Catholic  faith2.  However  it  is  in  Messiaen’s  harmonic  language  that  his  music  
gains  it’s  most  unique  and  individual  flavour.  He  built  up  a  huge  catalogue  of  exotic  chords,  
from  small  clusters  to  massive  twelve  note  constructions.  This  writing  will  look  at  the  main  
categories  of  chords  and  how  they  are  made.  It  will  also  try  and  summarise  Messiaen’s  
outlook  on  harmony  and  his  methods.  
 
Messiaen’s  Influences  
A  composer  who  became  key  in  the  development  of  Messiaen’s  harmonic  language  and  
that  of  many  other  modernists,  was  Wagner.  The  act  of  creating  the  Tristan  chord  is  widely  
regarded  as  the  moment  tonality  began  to  break  down  in  classical  music.  This  chord  is  
important  because  of  its  ambiguous  harmonic  relationship  with  passage  it  comes  from.  Since  
its  creation  it  has  sparked  great  debate  as  how  it  should  be  categorised  and  whether  one  
should  view  it  as  a  functional  or  non-­‐functional  harmony.  However  the  key  thing  this  chord  
illustrates  (aside  from  the  controversy  surrounding  it)  is  that  it  shows  a  shifting  of  priorities  
from  functional  harmony  to  the  exploration  of  sound  itself.  That  is  an  exploration  that  
Messiaen  furthers  as  we  will  see.  
 
Messiaen  owes  a  vast  debt  to  another  composer  whose  ethos  on  harmony  and  modal  
exploration  influenced  Messiaen’s  thinking  and  music  hugely.  That  composer  was  Claude  
Debussy,  another  composer  influenced  by  the  innovations  of  Wagner.  Interestingly  Messiaen  
was  given  a  vocal  score  of  Debussy’s  opera  Pelléas  and  Mélisande  at  a  young  age  and  used  this  
as  a  teaching  aid  for  the  rest  of  his  life.  Also  his  treatise  on  his  musical  language  is  full  of  
references  to  Debussy’s  music  (he  often  uses  Debussy’s  work  to  explain  how  his  ideas  evolved  
further3).  Probably  the  greatest  connection  between  Messiaen  and  Debussy  lies  in  the  fact  
that  their  music  is  full  of  non-­‐functional  harmonies.  Debussy  enriched  traditional  sonorities  
1
See http://www.oliviermessiaen.net/scholarship/teachers-and-students/students
2
The New Dictionary of Music and Musicians - Messiaen, Olivier
3
Olivier Messiaen - Technique de mon langage musical ch.8

Attn: Roderick Chadwick


James Wilson A Brief Survey of Messiaen’s Harmonic Practise

with  added  notes  purely  for  the  beauty  of  sound  (something  he  called  “a  feast  for  the  ears”)4.  
His  dissonances  were  not  prepared  or  resolved  in  the  traditional  manner  but  suspended  and  
juxtaposed  next  to  one  another.  Messiaen’s  chords  follow  the  very  same  debunking  of  the  
tonal  system.  Messiaen  moves  from  dissonance  to  dissonance  very  rarely  resolving  a  chord  in  
the  traditional  tonal  manner.  Instead  the  changing  timbres  become  the  logic  behind  the  
progressions.  
 
Messiaen’s  development  however  took  perhaps  its  biggest  influence  from  his  rare  
condition  of  synaesthesia.  This  is  a  medical  condition  in  which  the  patient  see’s  colour  when  
hearing  music.  Messiaen  describes  the  manner  in  which  he  experienced  this  condition  this  
way,  “I  am  affected  by  a  sort  of  synaesthesia,  of  the  mind  rather  than  of  the  body,  which  allows  
me,  when  I  hear  a  piece  of  music,  and  also  when  I  read  it,  to  see  internally,  through  the  mind’s  
eye  colours  which  move  with  the  music”5.  Messiaen  placed  this  relationship  between  sound  
and  colour  above  all  other  things,  even  rhythm6!  Messiaen  in  his  treatise  volume  No.7,  names  
the  colours  of  almost  every  chord  or  collection  of  chords.  This  implies  he  viewed  these  as  
important  to  understanding  the  thinking  behind  his  music.  This  sense  perhaps  is  what  led  him  
to  undertake  such  a  thorough  investigation  of  unusual  sonorities  in  an  effort  to  create  
complex  visceral  colours  in  music.  Due  to  importance  Messiaen  puts  on  these  colour  
associations  I  have  decided  to  include  them  in  my  survey  of  his  chords  where  appropriate.    
 
Messiaen’s  Chords  
The  interesting  thing  about  Messiaen  harmony  is  that,  although  he  experimented  
greatly,  almost  all  his  harmony  can  be  categorised  by  the  chords  he  left  in  the  seventh  volume  
of  his  Traité de rythme, de couleur, et d’ornithologie.  This  allows  a  very  thorough  survey  of  
Messiaen’s  entire  harmonic  language  simply  through  getting  to  grips  with  these  sets  of  chords  
and  their  make-­‐up.  
 
So  we  begin  this  analysis  with  the  first  chord  Messiaen  himself  discusses  in  his  treatise  
The  Technique  of  My  Musical  Language,  the  chord  on  the  dominant  (otherwise  
known  as  the  chord  of  transposed  inversion).  This  chord  (in  its  initial  form)  contains  
all  of  the  notes  of  a  major  scale  fig.1.  It  is  called  the  chord  on  the  dominant  because  its  
base  note  is  on  a  note  within  a  dominant  7th  chord  (from  it’s  respective  major  scale).  
For  instance  in  the  example  of  fig.  1  the  bass  note  is  on  the  root  of  C  major’s                                                        fig.17  
dominant  7th  chord  (g).  All  of  the  notes  within  the  chord  are  in  C  major.                                          
Another  reason  it  has  that  name  is  that  if  all  of  the  appoggiaturas  within  the  seven-­‐
note  chord  were  resolved  it  would  leave  a  dominant  7th  chord  behind.                  
Messiaen  then  goes  on  to  alter  this  chord  further  by  raising  the  top  two  
appoggiatura’s  by  another  step  fig.2.  These  double  appoggiaturas  give  an  even  greater              fig.28  
feeling  of  distance  and  are  very  beautiful.  So,  we  have  our  chord.    
 
Still  this  is  not  the  end  of  the  transformation  of  this  chord;  Messiaen  makes  a  
progression  of  these  chords  by  arranging  inversions  off  the  same  bass  note.  Messiaen  uses  the  
bass  note  like  a  pivot  and  he  inverts  the  dominant  7th  chord,  so  the  bass  note  become  the  
4
Debussy - Edward Lockspeiser 3rd edition pg.18
5
Paul Griffiths – Catalogue de couleurs quotes Claude Samuel - Entretiens avec Olivier Messiaen
6
The Messiaen Companion pg 203 quotes Conversations with Olivier Messaien
7
Olivier Messiaen - Technique de mon langage musical ch.8
8
ibid

Attn: Roderick Chadwick


James Wilson A Brief Survey of Messiaen’s Harmonic Practise

second  note  within  the  chord.    So  the  g  would  change  from  being  the  bass  note  of  G  dominant  
7  and  become  the  second  note  of  Eb  dominant  7.  The  major  scale  making  up  the  full  seven  
notes  (in  the  version  of  the  chord  before  the  appoggiatura’s  are  raised)  would  be  Ab  major.  
Then  after  Messiaen  raises  the  two  appropriate  appoggiaturas  by  a  tone.  This  process  would  
happen  twice  more  so  the  bass  note  has  moved  initially  from  being  the  root  of  the  dom  7th  
chord,  to  now  being  directly  on  the  4th  note  of  the  chord  
(the  7th),  yet  still  remaining  fixed  on  its  initial  pitch  fig.39.  
This  is  what  he  calls  the  ‘stained  glass  window’10  effect.                                                
Fig.311  This  example  is  on  the  bass  note  of  D.  Messiaen  notes  
that  every  chord  of  the  four  has  a  different  colour  (the  first  
being  yellow,  mauve  and  pale  green).    So  as  the  inversions  
change  it  is  like  having  light  shine  through  the  glass  and  
different  colours  being  produced  even  though  this  sequence  is  made  up  of  the  same  chord  
next  to  inversions  that  have  been  transposed.  Here  we  see  a  manifestation  of  Messiaen’s  
synaesthesia  going  to  work,  as  Messiaen  is  clearly  pleased  with  the  ever-­‐changing  colours  of  
this  sequence  of  chords.  
 
The  Chord  of  Resonance  is  the  next  sonority  Messiaen  discusses  in  his  treatise.  This  
chord  is  very  simple  but  highlights  some  insights  into  Messiaen’s  overall  feelings  about  
harmony  and  the  roots  of  his  music.  This  chord  is  made  from  Messiaen’s  3rd  mode  of  limited  
transposition  but  reflects  the  notes  found  in  the  harmonic  series.  Basically  it  is  the  4th  5th  6th  
7th  9th  11th  12th  and  15th  harmonics  of  a  fundamental  all  piled  on  top  of  one  another,  tempered  
and  made  to  fit  into  Messiaen’s  3rd  mode.  In  this  way  it  reflects  the  naturally  occurring  shape  
of  the  harmonic  series  but  still  conforms  to  his  mode  fig4a/4b.    
 
⇒  
fig.4a12                                     fig.4b13  
 
Messiaen  loves  these  connections  to  the  nature  of  sound  itself.  In  the  previous  chapter  
to  the  one  discussing  this  chord,  Messiaen  discusses  the  way  added  notes  in  chords  like  the  
major  6th  chord  and  a  major  chord  with  an  added  sharpened  4th,  come  from  the  logic  of  the  
harmonic  series.  This  takes  that  logic  a  step  further  by  creating  a  chord  simply  based  on  the  
overtones  of  a  fundamental.  This  is  the  kind  of  thinking  that  lead  to  spectral  music  which  is  
music  influenced  by  the  manipulation  or  analysis  of  sound  spectra.  Another  proto-­‐spectral  
idea  Messiaen  nurtured  was  the  way  in  which  he  linked  timbre  with  harmony.  He  states  that  
part  of  his  motivation  to  create  all  of  theses  “thousands  of  chords  [was]  to  reproduce  the  
timbres  of  bird  songs”  14.                                          Fig.515  
 
Next  Messiaen  creates  a  progression  of  these  chords  using  
pitch  rotation  (moving  intervals  around  in  a  circle)  creating  a  
9
Olivier Messiaen - Traité de rythme, de couleur, et d’ornithologie Volume 7
10
Olivier Messiaen - Technique de mon langage musical ch.8
11
Olivier Messiaen - Traité de rythme, de couleur, et d’ornithologie Volume 7
12
http://www.early-music.info/images/HarmonicSeriesC.gif
13
Olivier Messiaen - Technique de mon langage musical ch.8
14
Wai-ling Cheong - Rediscovering Messiaen’s Invented Chords quotes Conversations with Claude Samuel
15
Olivier Messiaen - Technique de mon langage musical ch.8

Attn: Roderick Chadwick


James Wilson A Brief Survey of Messiaen’s Harmonic Practise

sequence  of  chords  sitting  on  the  same  base  note  (and  again  calls  this  the  stained  glass  
window  effect16).  He  separates  the  top  stave’s  notes  and  the  bottom’s  and  rotates  
them  separately  (in  four  note  groups).                              Fig.617  
   
The  chord  in  fourths  is  another  sonority  used  by  Messiaen.  It  contains  all  
the  notes  of  the  5th  mode  of  limited  transposition  and  is  made  out  of  perfect  and  
augmented  fourths.  
 
Messiaen’s  modes  of  limited  transposition  are  defiantly  his  most  well  know  resource  
he  used  to  create  harmony  in  music.  These  scales  and  chords  are  another  window  into  
Messiaen’s  overall  view  of  harmony  and  thoughts  on  resonance.  These  scales  are  limited  in  
the  amount  of  times  they  can  be  transposed,  due  to  patterns  within  their  structures.  When  
they  are  transposed,  after  a  few  changes  they  becoming  an  ‘inversion’  of  a  previous  scale.  This  
is  what  Messiaen  called  the  ‘charm  of  impossibilities’,  or  as  he  describes  it  “a  certain  effect  of  
tonal  ubiquity  in  the  non-­‐transpositions”.    This  idea  of  the  impossible  goes  back  to  Messiaen’s  
religious  ideology  and  the  refection  of  God  in  music.  His  statement  that  hearing  these  non-­‐
transpositions  leads  to  a  “theological  rainbow”  18  implies  this.    
 
The  second  mode  of  limited  transposition  is  a  source  of  a  number  of  different  chords  
Messiaen  creates.  The  mode  is  made  out  of  a  repeated  pattern  of  a  tone  and  a  semitone  
alternating.  It  can  be  transposed  three  times  before  repeating  itself.  Here  are  some  chords  
Messiaen  creates  from  this  mode  Fig.7.                                                                        Fig.719  
Out  of  all  of  the  chords  Messiaen  could  have  chosen  to  make  
out  of  this  mode,  he  chose  to  use  chords  with  standard  triads  
in.  The  first  chord  is  C  major  with  its  sharpened  4th.  Again  this  
reminds  us  of  Messiaen’s  previous  statements  that  the  sharpened  4th  is  an  added  note  that  
gets  its  logic  from  the  harmonic  series.  Messiaen  seems  to  be  very  concerned  with  building  on  
the  laws  of  acoustics  and  on  tradition.  
    Messiaen  also  shows  that  a  passage  in  constant  mode  of  limited  transposition  contains  
a  dominant  colour  association.  For  instance  Fig.7’s  chords  are  blue  violet.  Due  to  their  
symmetrical  nature  Messiaen  did  not  view  the  chords  within  a  mode  to  be  of  the  colours  of  
the  rainbow,  like  other  chords  we  have  discussed.  This  is  implied  by  the  way  he  categorises  
them  in  volume  7,  giving  a  dominant  colour  for  all  the  chords  instead  of  just  focusing  on  their  
individual  colours.  Also  Jonathan  Bernard  agrees  with  this  in  his  essay  colour  in  the  Messiaen  
companion,  were  he  states  ‘the  definitive  attributions  of  specific  colours  to  specific  modal  
passages  can  be  tabulated’.    
 
His  third  mode  is  structured  slightly  differently  than  the  second  mode;  it  includes  nine  
notes  altogether.  There  are  a  total  of  four  transpositions  of  this  mode  and  the  chain  of  
intervals  of  a  semitone,  semitone  and  tone  are  what  produce  this  mode.  The  chords  of  this  
mode  are  more  dense  and  rich  than  those  of  the  2nd  mode  and  contain  6  notes  each.  There  are  
still  notable  triads  included  in  the  sonorities,  for  instance        Fig.820  
the  Db  major  triad  on  the  top  stave  of  the  first  chord.  
16
Ibid
17
Ibid
18
Ibid
19
Olivier Messiaen - Traité de rythme, de couleur, et d’ornithologie Volume 7
20
Ibid

Attn: Roderick Chadwick


James Wilson A Brief Survey of Messiaen’s Harmonic Practise

There  are  four  other  modes  that  Messiaen  uses  less  frequently  but  more  information  
can  be  found  on  these  in  Messiaen’s  The  Technique  of  My  Musical  Language.  
 
We  move  on  to  Rotating  Chords  as  Messiaen  describes  them.  These  as  Julian  
Anderson  explains  in  his  article  Messiaen  and  the  Notion  of  Influence,  come  out  of  the  work  of  
French  composer  Jolivet,  a  close  colleague  of  Messiaen’s.  They  are  chords  that  Jolivet  came  up  
with  originally  and  are  found  in  his  piano  work  Danse  Nuptiale.  Messiaen  made  them  rotating  
chords,  through  the  way  he  altered  the  top  line  of  these  chords.  Originally  the  top  note  of  the  
three  chords  did  not  change  but  stayed  on  a  fixed  pitch.  Messiaen  reflected  the  bass  lines  
movement  onto  the  top  line  using                                                                      Fig.921  
retrograde  inversion.  Practically  this  works  out  that  the  
bass  notes  moves  down  a  tone,  then  moves  up  a  
semitone,  so  the  top  line  instead  of  staying  on  the  same  
pitch,  moves  up  a  semitone  and  then  down  a  tone.  The  
rotating  idea  comes  from  the  mirroring  effect  this  
creates.  These  chords  are  dissonant  but  highly  beautiful  fig.9.  
 
Another  group  of  sonorities  that  originates  from  Jolivet  are  Messiaen’s  chords  of  
Contracted  Resonance.22  This  time  Messiaen  learnt  from  a  technique  Jolivet  pioneered.  
There  is  a  specific  process  to  create  these  chords:  Messiaen  creates  a  5  note  dominant  9th  
chord  and  creates  another  chord  made  up  of  five  appoggiaturas  that  resolve  onto  the  notes  of  
the  original  chord.  He  then  chooses  two  pairs  of  appoggiatura  and  its  resolving  note.  With  the  
two  sets  of  dyads,  Messiaen  “calculates  their  acoustical  difference  tones”23.  This  basically  
means  to  subtract  the  pitch  of  one  note  (in  hz)  from  another  and  the  new  note  is  the  
difference  tone  (or  inferior  harmonic  as  Messiaen  calls  it).  This  note  is  always  a  lot  lower  than  
the  notes  in  the  original  chords,  so  the  two  resultant  pitches  from  the  calculations  are  put  
together  and  then  are  moved  up  the  octave  into  the  original  two  harmonies.  
 
     ⇒                                                                     ⇒  
 
 
                     
 
 
   Fig10a  dom9th  down  8ve.                              fig.10b  appoggiaturas  to  dom9th                                  fig10c  both  chords  with  difference  tones24  
                                       (bottom  two  notes  of  the  chords  are  the  dif  tones)  
This  process  is  really  a  spectral  technique.  Many  composers  after  Messiaen  
investigated  difference  tones  and  other  acoustical  phenomenon  further.25  
 
The  last  chord  Messiaen  used  occasionally  was  his  Chords  of  the  total  chromatic;  
otherwise  know  as  twelve  note  chords.  This  chord  contains  two  triads;  on  the  bottom  a  major  
triad  in  3rd  inversion  and  above,  a  minor  triad  (a  semitone  below)  in  second  inversion.  Above  
both  of  these  two  resonating  chords,  there  are  three  connecting  semitones  carefully  separated  
in  time  and  with  octave  differences  to  avoid  a  strong  sound  of  dissonance.  Overall  this  
21
Ibid
22
Julian  Anderson  -­‐  Messiaen  and  the  Notion  of  Influence
23
Ibid
24
Olivier Messiaen - Traité de rythme, de couleur, et d’ornithologie Volume 7
25
Claude Vivier and Karlhizen Stockhausen are some that used the phenomenon of difference tones

Attn: Roderick Chadwick


James Wilson A Brief Survey of Messiaen’s Harmonic Practise

composition  of  pitches  creates  a  very  rich  sounding  12-­‐note  chord.  


Messiaen  acknowledges  the  two  zones  of  sound  visibly  by  the  two  
groups  of  chords  placed  on  different  staves.  When  notating  their  
colours  he  also  separates  the  two  sonorities.  fig.11:    
two overlapping areas-
below: white diamond, glints of light blue and purple moon
at the top: the 4 additional notes add a thin brown leather band, degrading to white26   Fig.1127    
 
So  that  is  all  of  Messiaen’s  exotic  chords  catalogued.  We  however  must  not  forget  that  
at  times,  especially  at  monumental  points  of  arrival,  Messiaen  did  revert  back  to  the  major  
and  dare  I  say  it,  tonic  chord.  For  instance  in  La  Transfiguration  de  Notre-­Seigneur  Jésus-­Christ  
the  last  two  bars  at  the  end  contain  a  massive  E  major  triad,  this  is  reached  by  a  progression  
of  dissonant  rotating  chords.  At  the  end  of  Turanaglila  Symphony  there  is  an  F  sharp  major  
triad.  Also  at  the  end  of  and  surprisingly  throughout  the  final  movement  of  Des  Canyons  aux  
Étoiles  we  hear  A  major  triads!!    
 
In  conclusion  it  is  clear  that  Messiaen’s  chords  are  rooted  in  his  synaesthesia  and  in  a  
genuine  attempt  at  extending  investigations  began  by  his  predecessors.  Another  source  
Messiaen  used  to  fuel  his  imagination  was  his  understanding  of  the  harmonic  series.  Through  
this  he  created  an  inner  logic  to  a  number  of  his  chords.  It  is  also  worth  restating  Messiaen  
when  he  said  his  motivation  was  to  create  “thousands  of  chords  to  reproduce  the  timbres  of  
bird  songs”.  Messiaen  defiantly  fulfilled  this  aim,  creating  a  huge  variety  of  chords  with  
varying  timbres.  Messiaen’s  harmonic  language  is  clearly  the  work  of  an  unswerving  and  
defined  musical  personality.  His  harmony  is  a  genuinely  new  innovation  and  facilitates  a  great  
deal  of  beauty  in  his  music.    
 
 
 
James  Wilson  
 
 
 
26
Olivier Messiaen - Traité de rythme, de couleur, et d’ornithologie Volume 7
27
Ibid

Attn: Roderick Chadwick