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www.scoe.

org/science

2009-10
Science Olympiad
Handbook
Saturday, April 24, 2010

A guide for teachers, students, judges, and others.

Important Dates and Deadlines


Meeting for new schools: SCOE, C &I conference room 4 p. m. - 5 p.m. Wed. 10/14/09
Meeting for all schools: L. Burbank School,
4 p.m. - 5 p.m. TBD
203 A St., Santa Rosa - 522.3140
On-time registration * for first team from a school (round 1) 4 p.m. Fri. 11/06/09
Online registration at www.scoe.org
Last chance to request refund (written request) 4 p.m. Fri. 1/08/10
On-time registration * for second team from a school (if space available) 4 p.m. Fri. 1/15/10
Online registration at www.scoe.org
Late registration * closes 4 p.m. Fri. 3/31/10
T-shirt order form and check made out to SCOE due 4 p.m. Mon., 4/5/10
Team roster, one volunteer's contact information (via email) 4 p.m. Mon., 4/5/10
Photo releases due (via fax or US Mail) 4 p.m. Mon., 4/5/10
School plaque due 4 p.m. Mon., 4/12/10
2010 Science Olympiad: Creekside Middle School: 8:30 a.m.- 4 p.m. Sat., 4/24/10
5154 Snyder Lane Rohnert Park
* Registration dates and costs are explained on page i.

Dr. Carl Wong, Superintendent of Schools

Coordinated by
Sonoma County Office of Education
5340 Skylane Boulevard, Santa Rosa, CA 95403

Mike Roa, 707.522.3253 or mroa@scoe.org


Jill McIntyre, 707.524-2816 or jmcintyre@scoe.org
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Important dates and registration information:
School
Registration Form (online) and $40 per team*. To allow more schools to participate, there will be two
rounds of on-time school registrations. We have space for a maximum of 24 teams. Schools may enter
one team in the first round, which closes on Friday, November 6. You may register more than one team
prior to November 6, but only one space will be allocated to your school until after November 6.

If we have less than 24 teams registered at 4 p.m. on November 7, we will accept additional teams (first
come, first served) at the $40 rate until Friday, January 15.

If space is available, additional schools/teams may register for $60 between January 16 and March 31.

If your team "drops out," we want to be able to offer another school the opportunity to partici-
pate. Since it takes a while for a team to prepare for the Science Olympiad, requests for refunds
for teams that drop out must be received in writing (email okay) by 4 p.m. on January 8. No re-
funds after January 8 except for teams that prepaid for two and are not allowed space for two.

*We hope to find sponsors to pay for both the registration fees and the t-shirts, but we cannot promise.

Due by Monday, April 5, 2010:

• T-shirt order form (online) and check made out to SCOE


• Team roster (online) including the name and contact information for at least one volunteer judge
• Please ask your volunteer judge(s) to complete the online volunteer form and indicate your school
as their affiliation.
• Photo release (via U.S. mail, drop off at SCOE, or fax to 524-2734)

Due by Monday, April 12: school plaque: deliver to SCOE or to Mike Roa's home: 294 Murphy Avenue,
Sebastopol.

Permission Slips: per your district's requirements. Samples are provided in the handbook, but we don't
want or need them returned to us.

What's new in 2010?


1. Two rounds of on-time registrations (to potentially allow more schools to participate)
2. Each team MUST provide a volunteer to help supervise events
3. Tell Me About it is replaced by Science Jeopardy
4. 30 minutes added to the times of events, so Naked Egg Drop starts at 2 p.m.
5. We hope, but can not promise, to arrange for team sponsors to pay for registration fees and t-shirts.
6. No more alternates! Each student on the roster submitted April 5 will receive 3 "tickets" that will be
their entrance into events. Only students on the April 5 roster may participate.

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General Information www.scoe.org/science

The Science Olympiad is an opportunity for teams of students to compete in science-related events. The events
are described in this Handbook. Although the Olympiad is a competition, the emphasis is on having fun while
doing science.

Most teams consist of 12 -15 students, in grades 4, 5, and 6. A team may have a maximum of six students in the
sixth grade. However, if a school has less than a total of 70 students in grades 4-6, they may include third graders
on their team, and they may compete with a team of 8 or more students. (The minimum numbers are intended
to allow more students to participate, rather than just a few science “stars.”) Elementary schools without 6th
graders may include 6th graders from the middle school that they “feed” into. Middle Schools without 4th and
5th graders may include students from their “feeder” schools.

A given student is only allowed to compete in 3 events. This is to allow more students to participate. On
the morning of the Science Olympiad, the coach will be given 3 tickets for each student; these tickets are the
students' admission to events.

There is a $40 fee per team to participate. * The fee covers such expenses as facilities use fees, lunches, awards,
and decorations. (Note: lunch is provided for students, coaches, and judges. Parents and siblings should plan
to bring their own lunches. Also, many teams like to bring snacks and drinks of their own.)

*Team t-shirts can be ordered for an additional charge. At this time, the exact cost is unknown, but will be in
the $6 - $12 range.

* We hope to find team sponsors to pay for the registration fees and t-shirt costs.

Other requirements/expectations:
1. The team’s head coach should be available for general supervision during the day. This means that the head
coach should not plan to judge an event, although assistant coaches may do so.

2. Each team must provide at least one volunteer to help with judging events. Please provide your volunteer's
name on your school registration form. Volunteers should sign up online at:
http://www.scoe.org/pub/htdocs/science-olympiad.html

3. Each team is also encouraged to provide an activity (and supervision and clean up) for the Activity Room.

4. General Supervision: The head coach should provide general supervision in the quad area and the
activity room. We sometimes have problems with students climbing in trees, breaking branches, littering,
wandering, or with unsafe play.

5. Please note the due dates on the cover of this Handbook.

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Welcome

Welcome to the 2010 Science Olympiad! This Handbook provides the rules for the events in this year’s
Science Olympiad. Please read them carefully even if you have participated before…the rules may have
changed! Samples of the various forms are at the back of the Handbook.

For those who have not participated in the Science Olympiad, here’s how the day goes:

Judges will arrive at 8:00 a.m. to obtain their materials and have last minute questions answered.

Coaches and teams should arrive at between 8:00 and 8:30 a.m. Please do not come early. Coaches will
pick up packets near the entrance. The packets will include students' tickets. Teams should gather at one
of the tables in the quad or at another nearby meeting place.

At 8:30 a.m. all teams will enter the cafeteria to be welcomed and to receive last minute information.

At 9:00 a.m. teams will be released to start the events. Some events are scheduled; others are done on a
“drop-in” basis. It is extremely important that students be at the scheduled events on time. Late teams
will not be given extra time because other teams are scheduled to follow.

When not competing, students should be at their agreed upon meeting area so that their coach can find
them if necessary. It is a good idea to bring reading material or other entertainment, but please, no
electronic devices…they are too easy to lose or break in the excitement of the day!

Coaches should remind students that the events are supposed to be educational and fun…that the
important thing is participation and the learning that has already happened, not the competition.

Lunch (pizza) will be provided at approximately 12:15 p.m.

At 1:30 p.m. the Naked Egg Drop teams should report to the gym. At 1:30 p.m. I will ask all other
students to form a line and walk across the quad to pick up any litter.

At approximately 1:45, everyone will enter the gym for the Naked Egg Drop, which will be followed by
the awards ceremony. We expect to finish at approximately 4:00 p.m.

That’s it…We look forward to a fun day to reward the students for all of their hard work. Thank you for
joining us at the Sonoma County Office of Education’s Science Olympiad!

Mike Roa

Science Curriculum Specialist


Science Olympiad Coordinator

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Message from Mike

The Sonoma County Office of Education welcomes you as a participant in this year’s Science Olympiad.
There are some important things we want all of you to remember so that this will be a fun and successful
day of science activities.

• Please follow rules, stay in designated areas and act appropriately while on the school campus.
Remember, we are guests of Creekside Middle School.

• Be sure to throw garbage in the appropriate container. There will be recycling cans as well as
trash cans. Please read the labels and keep garbage separate from recycling materials.

• There will be activities in the cafeteria from 9:00 - 11:30 a.m. Please clean up after you have
enjoyed these fun and fascinating activities.

• All events are supervised by volunteer judges. Please be sure to show your appreciation to them.

• If it is a rainy day, we will eat in the cafeteria or under the shelters in the quad.

• During the Naked Egg Drop, our last event for the day, we would like you to please sit on the
bleachers with your school team. Remember to keep your voices low so you do not distract the
students competing. Parents and friends will sit in a different area of the bleachers.

• The awards ceremony will begin after the Naked Egg Drop.

• To facilitate the distribution of ribbons, designated team members should sit on the floor of the
gym close to the awards table during the awards ceremony.

• School participation plaques will be given out at the end of the day.

• And let’s remember that even though this is a competition, the purpose is to have fun!

Let’s do what we can so that all involved have an excellent day! Thank you.

Mike Roa, Coordinator


522-3253 or mroa@scoe.org

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Table of Contents

Topic Page

Barge Building.....................................................................................................................1
Calculator Contest................................................................................................................2
Mathematics—Rubric...................................................................................................3
Examples: Planets in the Solar System, As Divers Descend, Oceans Area..................4
Examples: Mass, Rainfall, Digit Difference.................................................................5
Catapult................................................................................................................................6
Categories......................................................................................................................... 7-8
Describe It, Make It..............................................................................................................9
Hit the Spot........................................................................................................................10
Investigations (formerly Science in Action I)............................................................................11
Metric Measurement Mania...............................................................................................12
Naked Egg Drop.................................................................................................................13
Picture This.................................................................................................................. 14-15
Science Jeopardy...........................................................................................................16-18
Taking Flight......................................................................................................................19
Tower of Strength...............................................................................................................20
Who Am I (formerly What Went By?)......................................................................................21
Materials List......................................................................................................................22
Forms Information ............................................................................................................23
T-shirt Order Form (sample)..............................................................................................24
Team Roster Form (sample)...............................................................................................25
Permission Slip...................................................................................................................26
Photo Release (English).....................................................................................................27
Photo Release (Spanish).....................................................................................................28
Notes...................................................................................................................................29

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Barge Building

Description:
The purpose of this event is to construct a barge using heavy duty aluminum foil that can support a cargo of the
largest number of pennies without getting them wet. (Pennies made prior to 1980 are heavier than those made
in 1980 or after. All pennies used for the competition will be post-1980.)

Number of participants: 1 or 2

Maximum time: 25 minutes

The competition:
1. Each team of two persons will be given a piece of heavy duty aluminum foil (approximately 15 cm. x 15 cm.)
and 10 minutes to construct the barge.

2. The barge captain may load the barge or the two team members may take turns loading the barge with
pennies one at a time while it is floating in a pan of water. The team will make this choice before they begin
loading the barge with pennies. Once the decision is made, it must be continued throughout the loading
process.

3. Loading must stop as soon as water enters the barge.

4. No other materials may be used to make the barge.

Scoring:
The winner is the barge that contains the largest number of pennies.

Note to judges:
Be sure there is enough water in the pan so the barge does not
touch the bottom before it actually sinks.

(This image shows only one


of many possible designs.)
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Calculator Contest

Description:
This is a team event for students to demonstrate their knowledge of problem-solving using a hand-held,
non-programmable calculator.

Number of participants: 2 required



Maximum time: 25 minutes

The competition:
This event consists of one open-ended question to be “solved” by the team. This item will be scored on a rubric
basis. There may be more than one way to solve this problem. Students are strongly encouraged to show
calculations, drawings, written explanations, or diagrams to support their solutions.

1. Teams will be given the problem and a hand held calculator. All teams will use calculators provided by the
Olympiad (Texas Instruments Explorers).

2. If the calculator malfunctions, it is the team’s responsibility to immediately notify the supervisor to get a
different calculator.

3. You may work on the problem together, or split up and work separately. Your team score will be based on
your ability to solve the problem and to communicate your thinking about your solution.

4. The team may submit only one answer.

5. Formulae will be provided for any problems that require them. They may include areas or volumes for
common shapes such as circles, triangles, rectangles, cylinders, cubes, etc. 3.14 will be used for pi.

Scoring:
1. A team’s response to the problem may include: calculations, drawings, written explanations, or diagrams to
support their solution.

2. Team responses will be scored on a 4 level rubric for performance


(see attached) with 16-20 points for a level 4 response,
11-15 points for level 3, 6-10 points for level 2, and 5 points for level 1.

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Mathematics - Rubric

Level Points

4 (16-20) Fully accomplishes the purpose of the task


Shows full grasp and use of the central mathematical idea(s).
Recorded work communicates thinking clearly using some combination of written, symbolic,
or visual means.

3 (11-15) Substantially accomplishes the purpose of the task


Shows full grasp and use of the central mathematical idea(s).
Recorded work in large part communicates the thinking.

2 (6-10) Partially accomplishes the purpose of the task


Shows partial but limited grasp and use of the central mathematical idea(s).
Recorded work may be incomplete, misdirected or not clearly presented.

1 (5) Little or no progress toward accomplishing the purpose of the task


Shows little or no grasp of the central mathematical idea(s).
Recorded work is barely (if at all) comprehensible.

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Calculator Contest: Examples

Planets in the
Solar system

As Divers
Descend

Oceans
Area

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Calculator Contest: Examples

Mass

Rainfall

Find two 4 digit numbers whose difference is 1237. Do


you think there could be more than one answer?

Your score will depend on how well:


Digit • You show your understanding of mathematics.
Difference • You explain and communicate your thinking.
• You use charts, graphs, and diagrams in your explanation.
• Your work is organized.
• You can show the solution in more than one way or
relate it to other situations.

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Catapult

Description:
A team of two students will construct a catapult and launch a clay projectile for the greatest distance.
Materials:
5 rubber bands (3.5" x 1/8") 2 straws (7" x 1/4" approx.) 1 meter masking tape (3/4" width)
5 jumbo craft sticks (6" x 3/4") 5 jumbo paper clips 2 16 oz. plastic cups
4 1" paper fastener brads 1 nail (#16 -d coated sinker) scissors (for cutting)
1 5/8" cube of red clay will be available for practice launches lever arm (12" x 1/4" x 1/8")
Number of participants: 1 or 2
Maximum time: 25 minutes
The competition:
1. Students will be given a wooden beam for the lever arm and a bag containing all other materials that 1™1™1™1
they may use. Students may use any or all of the materials.

2. Students may mark holes in desired location on the wood and on the cup for adult supervisor to drill.

3. Operators place the catapult behind the launch line. The cup may rest on either its top or its bottom.

4. When the catapult is operated, the hand of the operator may move down or backward, but may not
use a forward motion, nor move in the direction of the flow of the clay projectile (in other words, you
may not throw or assist the projectile).
• The operator may steady the clay in the catapult before “firing” the catapult.
• The clay must be launched by the catapult, not by the students. The rubber bands must
provide the force
• The clay must be launched by a catapult, not by a “sling shot.”
• The student may hold the catapult in place, but may not tilt it.

5. After the catapult is completed, students may test it in the testing area before
bringing it to the launch line. As each projectile is shot, the judges will measure
from the front of the launch line to the landing spot of the projectile
(where the projectile first touches the floor.) Each team will be allowed to shoot
twice and the best score will be recorded.

Scoring:
The team with the longest single shot will be the winner.

Note: Materials for adult supervisor—needle nose pliers, hand-held drill.


(This picture shows only one
of several possible designs.)
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Categories

Description:
The game consists of three or four rounds. Each team begins the round with three or four blank category sheets
on which they write their names, and school team names or color as appropriate
Number of participants: 1-3
Maximum time: 25 minutes

The competition:
1. Each category sheet contains a grid of categories and letters.

2. MAKING ENTRIES. After the time is set, each team of three players attempts to enter a word or phrase
in each of the 36 blanks on their category sheets. Each entry must agree with or fit the category at the top
of that column and its “Key Word” must begin with the letter at the left of the row in which it is written. A
specific entry may be written only once on the play card even though it may be valid in another blank.

KEY WORDS. Generally, the “Key Word” in an entry is the first word. However, if the first word or title
prefix of an entry is part of the category, the next main word is to be regarded as the Key Word (e.g., River
Seine would be under the S, Sir Walton would be under W and giant Panda would be under P). A person’s
last or surname must always be regarded as the Key Word. Stage or title names are permissible if validated.
The articles “a”, “an” and “the” are never Key Words. Common surnames given only will be disallowed as
guesses unless accompanied by appropriate first names.

Key Words in a row with a wild initial letter (*) may begin with any letter of the alphabet but need not begin
with same letter (see example on next page). When the team is finished, the category sheets will be given to
the Judge. The Judge will score at a later time.

3. Each category sheet has different categories. The initial letters, however, may be the same.

4. Categories will be chosen that reflect subject matter in the California Science Content Standards.

5. An example chart is shown on the next page. If only a common


surname is given it will be disallowed as a guess unless accompanied
by an appropriate first name.

continued...

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Categories (continued from page 9)

Units of
Categories Mammals Acids Elements Scientists
Measure

A apes acetic arsenic amperes Anderson


Initial Letters

M man mercury meter Mendel

F fox formic fourine Fermi

* cat suluric chlorine liter Einstein

D dog decigram

* horse hydrogen Watt

* = free letter

Scoring:
One point will be given for each correct answer. A six-point bonus will be given for each complete column and
row.

The judge will have discretion with regards to spelling errors. In general, if the answer is very close or
phonetically correct, it will be accepted.

In the example, 23 answers are given.


fourine is close enough to fluorine to be accepted.
suluric is not close enough to sulfuric to be accepted
Anderson is a common name, so it should have included a first name. “Carl Anderson” would have been
okay. (He won a Nobel prize in physics in 1936.)

So this sheet would earn 21 points for acceptable answers, plus 12 bonus points (one column and one row) for a
total of 33 points.

The judge will have discretion in scoring spelling errors. In general, if it is phonetically correct, it will be
accepted.

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Describe It, Make It

Description:
This event tests competitor’s ability to orally communicate observations and to reconstruct a model based on
auditory input.

Number of participants: 2 (1 Describer and 1 Builder)

Maximum time: 15 minutes



The competition:
Participants work behind a screen, blocking the view of each other and of the model to be reconstructed. The
describer is given a model that is built from Legos from a variety of sizes and colors and glued together. The
builder listens to the description and attempts to recreate (build) the original object given an identical set of
disassembled Legos. Builder and describer may engage in dialog. No diagrams allowed—words only may be
used, partners may not see each other or the object to be reconstructed.

Scoring:
The team building the object nearest to the original, is declared the winner. A point will be given for each piece
placed in the proper location. No penalty will be assessed for parts that were not assembled. The decision of the
judges is final.

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Hit the Spot


(Formerly Aerodynamics - Accuracy)

Description:
Each two-member team will build one or two paper airplanes to be flown at a predetermined target for accuracy.
Airplanes must be of a folded aerodynamic design. Crumpled wads of paper do not qualify.

Number of participants: 2 (required)

Approximate time: 90 minutes entire event. Teams have no time limit.

The competition:
1. Two sheets of plain 8.5" x 11" white paper and one small paper clip, approximately five centimeters of
3/4" masking tape, and a pair of scissors will be provided. The team may build one or two planes. Each
plane can be built using one or two sheets of paper.

2. Planes flown in competition must be made on site, during the allotted time, using only
the materials provided.

3. Planes will be hand launched from behind a line on the floor, at a specific target, an *, on the floor
8 meters away.

4. Each team member will be allowed two tosses and the best toss of each will count towards the score.

Scoring:
The distance will be measured from the center of the target to the point at which the airplane first hits the
ground. Each team member is allowed two tosses and the better of the two flights will be scored. Team score will
be determined by adding the best of each individual’s two scores. The distance away from the target will become
the school’s score for Accuracy. The lowest score (signifying the closest to the target), will be the winner.

(This image shows only one


of many possible designs.)

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Investigations
(Formerly Science in Action, Part 1)

Description:
This event will consist of a “performance task” such as an experiment to complete and discuss (in writing).

The Standards for the 2010 Investigations will be:


• Grade 4: Physical Science : l. a, b, c (Electricity and Magnetism)
• Grade 5: Earth Science: 3. a, b (water)

Teams are encouraged to use charts, data tables, drawings, symbols, and units in their written response.

Number of participants: 2-4



Maximum time: 25 minutes

The competition:
1. Each team will be given an open-ended hands-on performance task to be completed.

2. Working as a group, each team will respond to the task.

3. The responses will be scored based on a holistic scoring rubric.

4. The team will submit a single written answer to be scored.

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Metric Measurement Mania

Description (this event has two parts):


Part I: The team is shown a variety of objects and asked to select an object with a given measurement. (See
examples under “The Competition” below.)

Part II: The team is provided with appropriate tools with which to measure a variety of objects. Tools will
include a ruler, a meter stick and a graduated cylinder.

Number of participants: 1 or 2

Maximum time: 25 minutes

The competition:
Part I: A number of objects will be displayed on a table or counter. Students will be asked to select objects of
the size indicated. The object may be picked up to estimate mass. Their answers will be written on a
form (provided). For example:
Which of these objects is 30 centimeters long?
Which of these objects has a volume of 700 mL?
Which of these objects has a mass of 500 g?

Part II: Several objects will be displayed on a table or counter. Students will be provided with a ruler, a meter
stick and a graduated cylinder, and will be asked to measure the objects. For example:
How many millimeters long is this stick? How many centimeters?
How many meters long is this cord?
How many cubic centimeters is this block?
To the nearest mL, what is the volume of this liquid?
How many liters will this jar hold?

Scoring:
Part I: 5 points for each correctly identified object.

Part II: Scores will be rated according to the precision of the measurement. Measurements within 5% will
receive 5 points; within 10% receive 3 points; within 15% receive 1 point. If the measurement is off by
more than 15%, zero points will be awarded.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

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Naked Egg Drop

Description:
Raw, grade A, medium eggs will be dropped from ever increasing heights into a landing pad/egg catching device
which will be built by the team on site the day of the competition. The eggs and materials for building the device
will be provided at the competition site. Nothing may be attached to the egg.

Number of participants: 2

Time: 15 minutes to prepare catcher. The time of the actual event will vary.

The competition:
1. Each team of two will be provided with ten sheets of 8.5" x11" copier paper (8.5" x 11"), one meter of 3/4"
wide masking tape, and a pair of scissors with which to construct their catcher. Students may only use the
paper and tape that was issued to them; they may NOT “borrow” from other teams.
2. Fifteen minutes will be allowed for the construction of the device.
3. The eggs, paper, tape, and scissors will be provided by the Olympiad officials.
4. The egg catcher is NOT to be taped to the floor covering; it must be able to be moved easily.
5. Eggs will be dropped by the students. Eggs will be inspected before and after each drop and must not have
any cracks in them when inspected after the fall. If your egg breaks when you are handling it, your team is
out.
6. Dropping height is defined as the distance from the point of egg release to the ground.
7. The top of the egg should touch the bottom of the string.
8. You may use the plumb bob when the height of the rope is at eye level and above. You will have a choice of
holding the plumb bob or asking the judge to hold the plumb bob when the height of the rope is at eye-level
and above.
9. Teams will be called to report to the gym to begin making their egg catchers 15 minutes before the gym is
opened for this final event.

Scoring:
Successful egg dropping heights will be recorded for each team.
The team with the highest successful height will win.

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Picture This

Description:
The object of this event is to have a team member draw a representation of a particular scientific term or concept
for team members who must guess the term while watching it being drawn.

Number of participants: 4-5

Maximum time: 15 minutes (to sketch and identify terms)



The competition:
1. There will be a maximum of 20 words in a round. All teams will use the same words in the same order.
2. At the start of the competition, one team member (the sketcher) will be selected to draw the science
term. No other team member may see the term. The other team members will try to identify the term
being drawn.
3. The sketcher will begin drawing pictures and visual clues on the whiteboard when instructed by the
moderator to begin.
4. The sketcher may not speak except to notify the judge that the team wishes to pass a term. When a
pass occurs, the judge will give the next sketcher a new term. The team may not go back to any
passed terms.
5. Letters of any alphabet, numbers, or codes of any kind are not allowed. (This rule is to prevent teams from
inventing alphabets, codes, etc.)
6. Sketchers may use hand motions to indicate such things as “sounds like,” “you’re getting close,” etc., but
they may not turn around to face the team. The Sketcher must face the drawing board and away from team
members at all times. This is to prevent the sketcher from "mouthing" the answer.
7. If a team violates any of the rules regarding the use of alphabets, numbers, verbal communication,
etc., the team will be penalized the term in play at the time of the violation.
8. The event judge will indicate when a correct response is given. At this time, the team will be given a new
term.
9. Each team must rotate sketchers when a new term is put into play. A definite order of rotation shall be
followed.
10. Play continues in this manner for 15 minutes or until the team has gone through their set of terms.

continued...

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Picture This (continued from page) 14

Scoring:
One point will be awarded for each term correctly identified in the allotted tine. The team correctly identifying the most
terms will be declared the winner.

Additional Comments:

Science terms used in Picture This may be found in the glossary of adopted science texts, the index of a generic science
dictionary, or encyclopedia. Care will be taken to ensure that selected terms represent a cross-sampling of science disci-
plines at appropriate levels.

EXAMPLES OF SCIENCE TERMS


(note that terms may cross disciplines)

LIFE EARTH PHYSICAL


kingdom earthquake liquid
muscle Galileo electron
mandible fault shadow
skeleton equator atom
genes minerals circuits

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Science Jeopardy

Description:

This event is similar to the television game Jeopardy, but teams of students play the game one at a time rather
than competing against other teams.

Number of participants: 4 or 5, with a maximum of two 6th graders.

Maximum time: 25 minutes: up to 5 minutes of introduction/preparation 20 minutes of actual "playing" of


the game.

The competition:

1. The game board is projected by an overhead projector.

2. The categories are Life Science, Earth Science, Physical Science, Health & Environment and
Science Potpourri.

3. Questions have values of $100, $200, $300, $400, and $500.

4. In the Life, Earth, and Physical Science categories, the questions are based on the California State
Content Standards.

a. Lower value questions ($100-$200) are based on standards from grades 3-4.
b. Higher value questions ($400-$500) are based on standards from grades 5-6.

5. The team must confer to select a category and question value. One student is to be selected ahead
of time to serve as the person to tell the team's selected categroy.

6. Answers must be stated as a question for full credit. Otherwise correct answers not stated as a
question receive half credit.

7. The team must confer before answering a question...no blurting out. If an answer is blurted out
without conferring, it will receive no credit even if it is correct.

8. Only one person may answer a given question. The team decides who will answer each question.
The answerer may be the same person each time, or may change with each question.

9. The judge's decision is final. A student may politely question or explain the answer, but arguing
will result in disqualification. No time will be added to the "playing time" for questioning
the answer. The 20 minute playing time includes any questioning.

10. See the next two pages for sample questions and answers.

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Science Jeopardy

Science Jeopardy Sample Questions

Physical Life Earth Health & Science


Science Science Science Environment Potpourri

Energy comes to If this term I am used to If a disease can be This is the term
$100 Earth from the sun describes me, no magnify distant passed from one for the amount of
in this form. more of my kind objects such as person to another space that some-
live. planets. it is said to be. thing takes up.

The north ends of Animals that I am a type of rock The addition of This scientist
$200 two magnets will do mostly eat plants produced from harmful substances is famous for
this. are called ... molten material. to the environment writing about the
is called this. theory of natural
selection.

Insects and bats This drug is


$300 This type of circuit fertilize plants This process results in produced by the 100 of these
is used in houses. through this water vapor in the air. fermentation of equals a meter.
process. sugars.

This group of
Plants use water, Uneven heating of Meats, dairy organs and
$400 All mater is made of sunlight and Earth causes air products, and nuts tissues breaks
these. carbon dioxide to movements called... are a good source food down into
produce of this type of nutrients that we
nutrients. need.
This would show This chemical, pro-
This layer is the what organisms Another name for oil duced by burning A scientist who
$500 outer layer of the eat what other is... fuels, is believe to studies the Earth
Earth. organisms in an be causing global is called a ...
ecosystem. climate change.

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Science Jeopardy

Sample Answers

If not stated as a question, they lose half credit. Only one


person can answer each question.

Physical Life Earth Health & Science


Science Science Science Environment Potpourri

What is
$100 What is light, or What is What is a communicable or What is
what is electromag- extinct? telescope? what is volume?
netic spectrum? transmittable?

What is What is What is Who is (Charles)


$200 What is repel? herbivore? igneous? pollution? Darwin?

What is What is a
$300 What is parallel? What is evaporation, or What is alcohol? centimeter?
pollination? what is
transpiration?

$400 What are What is What is What are What is the


atoms? photosynthesis? convection, or proteins? digestive
convection system?
currents?

What is the crust, or What is a food What is What is carbon What is a


$500 What is the web? (Food chain petroleum? dioxide? geologist?
lithosphere? is half credit:
$250)

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Taking Flight
(Formerly Aerodynamics - Distance)

Description:
Each two-member team will build one or two paper airplanes to be flown at a predetermined target for distance.
Airplanes must be of a folded aerodynamic design. Crumpled wads of paper do not qualify.
Number of participants: 2 (required)

Approximate time: 90 minutes entire event (teams have no time limit). But don't put it off !

The competition:
1. Two sheets of plain 8.5" x 11" white paper and one small paper clip, approximately five centimeters of 3/4"
masking tape, and a pair of scissors will be provided. The team may build one or two planes. Each plane can
be built using one or two sheets of paper.

2. Planes flown in competition must be made on site, during the allotted time, using only the materials
provided.

3. Planes will be hand launched from behind a line on the floor.

4. Each team member will be allowed two tosses and the best toss will count towards the score in each event.

5. A student who competes in both Accuracy and Distance will have competed in TWO of the three allowed
events.
Scoring:
The length of the flight will be measured from the launch line to the point at which the plane first hits the
ground. Each team member will be allowed two tosses (the better of the two flights will be scored). Team score
will be determined by adding the best of each individual’s scores. The combined distances from the launch line
will become the school’s score for Distance.

(This image shows only one


of many possible designs.)

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Tower of Strength
(replaced Structures)

Description:
The student team will provided with a bag of materials with which they are to build a free-standing tower
capable of supporting a tennis ball. The objective is to build he highest free-standing tower capable of
supporting a tennis ball for 10 seconds.

Number of participants: 1 - 3

Maximum time: 25 minutes

The competition:
1. Each team will be given a bag of building materials containing:
10 straight pins 5 8.5" x 11" sheets of copy paper (16# or 20#)
20 plastic drinking straws 10 cm. (approx.) of 3/4" masking tape
5 jumbo paper clips 1 pair scissors
5 8 oz. waxed paper cups 1 tennis ball

2. The team has 25 minutes in which to construct a tower that is able to support a tennis ball for at least 10
seconds. The top of the tennis ball must be higher than any part of the structure.

3. The tower must be free-standing. It may not be attached to the table top, floor, wall, ceiling, or
anything else.

4. The students are to inform the judge when they finish their tower. They will then place the tennis
ball on top of the tower. The judge will then measure the tower to the top of the tennis ball.

5. Only the materials in the bag may be used. The bag itself and the section of straw that holds the pins
may NOT be used.

Scoring:
The tallest tower, measured to the top of the tennis ball will be the winner.

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Who Am I?
(Formerly What Went By?)

Description:
Students will be asked to identify and provide information about 20-30 different organisms or evidence of
organisms. They may be asked to interpret evidence, or to tell something about the organism represented.

Number of participants: 1 or 2

Maximum time: 25 minutes

The competition:
1. Each team will be given an answer sheet. Tables will be partitioned into the appropriate number of
stations. Each station and object will be numbered. The questions to be answered will be attached to
the table. Examples of possible stations are:
Animal footprint............................What kind of animal? Was the animal walking or running?
Footprint..........................................Is it the right or left?
Animal scat......................................What animal? What did it eat?
Chewed nut.....................................What animal did this? From what kind of tree did this nut come?
Leaf with holes................................How were the holes made?
Nest....................................................What made it?
Tick: .................................................What am I? What do I use for food?
Honeybee: . .....................................What am I? Tell two ways that I am helpful to people.
Grape leaf: . .....................................What am I?
My fruit can be eaten raw, or made into___ (answer: wine or raisins)
Redwood branchlet and cone......I came from a ___ tree. The olive-sized structure is used for ___.
(reproduction or seed production)
2. Teams will begin at separate stations and proceed to the next station at a signal from the officials.
Contestants must move on the signal and not before.
3. Forty-five seconds will be given for each station. The team will record the identity of the object on
the sheet and the answers to any questions.
4. Sheets will be collected at the end of the competition time period and scored for each team.

5. More than one team maybe in the room at a time, so teams should
keep their voices down.

Scoring:
One point is given for each correct identification and one point
for each correct answer.

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Materials List

Event Materials
1 piece heavy duty aluminum foil, 15cm x15cm
Barge Building
pennies (made after 1980) pan with water
2 Texas Instruments Explorer calculators
Calculator Contest
sheet with question pencil and paper

5 rubber bands (size 33) 3.5"x 1/8" 5 craft sticks (6" x ¾")
4 paper fasteners/brads (1") 2 straws 7" x ¼" approx.
1 nail (#16-D coated sinker) 5 jumbo paper clips
Catapult
1 m approx. masking tape (3/4”) 2 16 oz plastic cups
1 cube red clay (approx. 5/8" on a side) 1 pair scissors
1 lever arm (approx 12" x ¾" x 1/8", pine)

Categories 3 or 4 Category sheets pencils

One “model” made of approximately 15 Lego blocks of various shapes and colors,
Describe It, Make It glued together
A set of separate Lego blocks that corresponds to those used in the glued model

2 sheets 8.5" x 11" copy paper 1 small paper clip


Hit the Spot
5 cm approx. masking tape (3/4”) 1 pair scissors

Question/Performance task sheet Paper and pencil(s)


Investigations Materials appropriate for performing the task

Various objects for estimating measurement 12" Ruler (with metric scale)
Metric Measuring
Various objects to measure using tools meter stick
Mania
Paper and pencil(s) Graduated cylinder
10 sheets copy paper (8.5" x 11") 1 pair scissors
Naked Egg Drop
1 meter masking tape (3/4" wide)
Dry-erase marker or chalk, depending on room
Picture This
Cards with science terms to be drawn

Science Jeopardy Questions will be projected by an overhead projector.

2 sheets 8.5" x 11" copy paper 1 small paper clip


Taking Flight
5 cm approx. masking tape (3/4") 1 pair scissors
10 straight pins 20 plastic drinking straws
5 jumbo paper clips 5 8 oz. waxed paper cups
Tower of Strength
5 sheets copy paper (8/5" x 11") 1 pair scissors
10 cm approx. masking tape (3/4") tennis ball
Various specimens to be identified and about which students will answer questions
Who Am I?
Answer sheet, pencil, clip board
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Forms Information

 School Registration (See page i): Is done online at www.scoe.org. There is a $40 per team registration fee* for teams
that register on or before January 15, 2010. A school may register one or two teams by Friday, November 6, 2009.
There is a limit of 24 teams. If two teams from a school are registered by November 6, one will be considered registered
in the first round. The second will be considered part of the second round if space is available. Or a school may enter a
second team between November 6, 2009 and January 15, 2001.

If there is space available, teams may register "late" between Jan. 16 and Mar. 31, 2010. The late fee is $60 per team.

No refunds after January 8.

*We hope to find sponsors who will pay the registration fee (reimburse the school), but we can not promise this.
Please make checks payable to SCOE.

 Team Roster Form:


Please complete this online form at the SCOE Science Olympiad web site by Monday, April 5, 2010.

 Team Roster changes:


We will have name badges and certificates of participation for your students. I’m sure you understand that it is very
difficult for us to make changes in the last couple of days before the event, so PLEASE PROVIDE US WITH ANY
CHANGES AS SOON AS POSSIBLE.

In order for us to make name tags and certificates, we must have any changes at least 5 business days before the event.
Thank you for your cooperation!

 T-shirt Order Form:


Please complete this online form at the SCOE Science Olympiad web site by Monday, April 5, 2010 . We hope to find
sponsors who will reimburse schools for their shirts, but we can not promise this. Team coaches will be notified when
the shirts are ready and we will make arrangements for shirts to be picked up. Make checks payable to: SCOE.

 Photo Release Form:


Please return the signed forms to Jill McIntyre at SCOE by Monday, April 5, 2010 to 5340 Skylane Blvd., Santa Rosa,
CA 95403, or fax to 707-578-0220.

 Plaque:
We provide a participation plaque for each school. If your school participated in the past, please bring us your plaque
at least 2 weeks prior to the event. Plaques are due Wednesday, April 12, 2010. If we receive your plaque after the due
date, we can not promise to get it engraved before the Science Olympiad.

 Permission Slip (sample):


This is provided in case you need one. Your District probably has its own form. Do not return it to us…it is for
your use.

Questions?
Mike Roa: 707.522.3253 or mroa@scoe.org
Jill McIntyre: 707.524.2823 or jmcintyre@scoe.org

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T-shirt Order Form

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.
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Team Roster

p l e
s a m

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Permission Slip
(This permission slip is provided as a sample for the use of the schools.
Do not return it to the Sonoma County Office of Education)

I give my child permission to participate in the Sonoma County Elementary Science Olympiad at
Creekside Middle School, Saturday, April 24, 2010 from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Children should arrive at the school at 8:30 a.m. and meet with their coach for orientation. Parents are
encouraged to attend the Naked Egg Drop event and awards ceremony starting at 2:00 p.m., in the Creekside
Middle School Gym.

Pizza lunch will be provided free to team members.

It is recommended that parents’ health insurance information be listed along with the family doctor’s name.
It is understood that parents will not hold responsible or liable the school or any person(s) involved with the
Olympiad.

Child’s Name: ____________________________________________________________

Parent’s Name: ____________________________________________________________

Home Address: ____________________________________________________________

Home Phone: ____________________________________________________________

Work Phone: ____________________________________________________________

Insurance Company: ____________________________________________________________

ID Number or Code: ____________________________________________________________

Doctor’s Name and Number: ____________________________________________________________

Assist with transportation:  Yes, I can transport ________ students.


 No, I am unable to transport students.

Parent’s Signature: ___________________________________ Date: ______________________

Complete and return to teacher.

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Photo Release: English

Consent for Publication of Photographs


Please return this form to your child’s teacher within five school days.

School: _________________________________________________

Student’s name ________________________________________________________________________


(please print first and last name)

As the parent or guardian of the above-named student, I hereby give permission for the use of photographs or
videos taken of my daughter/son in any newsletter, brochure, newspaper, website, electronic publication or
other document that is published, distributed or issued by the Sonoma County Office of Education (SCOE) or
given by SCOE to the media.

I further agree to release SCOE, its officers, agents and employees from any and all claims, demands and actions
of any kind that I may have against them in regard to the publication of the photographs or display of videos.

Parent/Guardian signature _____________________________________________ Date _____________

Teacher, please fax to: 707.524.2734


Attention: Jill McIntyre
Sonoma County Office of Education
Science Olympiad

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Photo Release: Spanish

Permiso para La Publicación de Fotografías


Firme el PERMISO PARA TOMAR LA IMAGEN de su hijo y regreselo con su hijo a no mas tardar
de cinco dias.

Escuela: _________________________________________________

Nombre del estudiante __________________________________________________________________


(favor de escribir en letra de molde, el primer nombre y apellido)

Siendo el padre o el guardián del estudiante nombrado arriba, yo por la presente doy mi permiso para
la publicación de fotografías tomadas de mi hija/hijo en cualquier noticiero, prospecto, periódico, publicación
electrónica u otro documento publicado, distribuido o emitido por la Oficina de Educación del Condado de
Sonoma.
Además, acuerdo liberar la Oficina de Educación del Condado de Sonoma, sus funcionarios, agentes y
empleados desde cualquier y todo reclamo, demanda y las acciones de cualquier tipo que yo pueda tener contra
la Oficina de Educación del Condado de Sonoma, con respecto a la publicación de las fotografías.

Firma del Padre/Guardián _____________________________________________ Fecha ____________

Teacher, please fax to: 707.524.2734


Attention: Jill McIntyre
Sonoma County Office of Education
Science Olympiad

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Notes

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