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A Guide for the Aspiring

High School Trumpet Player


&
Marketing Plan

Honors Project by

Lily Szymanski
Submitted to the University Honors Program
at Bowling Green State University in partial
fulfillment of the requirements for graduation with

UNIVERSITY HONORS

Fall, 2012

HNRS 4990

Mr. Charles Saenz, Music Performance Advisor

Dr. Gregory Rich, Marketing Department Advisor


Marketing Plan for Trumpet Handbook
Introduction:
Executive Summary:
“The Guide for Aspiring High School Trumpet Players” is a trumpet handbook
developed by a trumpet student and music education major at Bowling Green State
University. It has been developed for the purpose of furthering the study of trumpet
and providing educational resources for high school music students. The handbook
is available online for high school trumpet players to access and will be promoted to
the 17 high schools listed in Appendix A. The product is free of charge and contains
exercises from different sources to develop a number of aspects of trumpet playing
at the high school level.

Business Challenge:
The business challenge of this product is to become a handbook of influence
among aspiring high school trumpet players in the Toledo and Bowling Green, OH
area. This handbook will be a compilation of a number of different methods aimed
at developing one’s trumpet playing. With the development of “The Guide for
Aspiring High School Trumpet Players,” students will no longer need to purchase
hard copies of multiple trumpet books and carry them around. This compilation of
exercises will be available for students to download online and accessible to them in
other ways as well. Practicing these exercises will help solve many problems high
school trumpet players may encounter.

Market:
Customers:
This trumpet handbook is a product for a selective audience. Exercises in
this book will be primarily for the average high school level or advanced junior-high
level trumpet student. High school students ages 14-18 desiring to develop their
trumpet playing will be especially interested in this handbook because it will be free
of charge to them. This will eliminate the prohibitive nature of spending a lot of
money on extra books in their course of study to do so. In addition, major targets
for this product are trumpet students that do not currently study with a private
instructor who would provide them with supplemental books.

SWOT Analysis:
 Strengths
One strength of this trumpet guide is that, rather than being a book designed
to teach a specific topic, such as Earl Irons’ “27 Groups of Exercises for Cornet or
Trumpet,” which focuses on lip flexibilities, it will contain exercises covering
different aspects of trumpet playing. Another strength is that this handbook is
designed for a small target market, therefore, it will be quite useful to students in
this market. In addition, the resources used to compile this handbook may lead
users to where appropriate additional resources may be found.
 Weaknesses
Because this guide is for a select audience of only high school trumpet
players, it may not reach as many people as a book of a wider range of exercises
such as “Arban’s Complete Conservatory Method for Trumpet” would. Another
weakness of the handbook is that it is not meant to be comprehensive in that it only
contains exercises that are a starting point for a student’s course of study. For
further study, additional resources must be acquired.
 Opportunities
One opportunity that exists for this project is the opportunity to grow and
expand my research in this area. I also have the opportunity of introducing myself
as a “trumpet teacher” to new band directors and trumpet students by marketing
and promoting the handbook.
 Threats
The threats that exist in completing this trumpet guide are the existing
popular method books that are already in use by students. These resources would
act as competition to the handbook I will be compiling. Private lesson instructors
that are hired to teach at schools or teach students individually may also serve as
threats to this project because students taking private lessons would already have
proper method books and resources from these private instructors.

Competition:
Existing competition in this market includes other method books and
resources students currently have. This product also faces the competition of
private lesson instructors who may promote the use of these other method books to
their students.

Business Climate:
 Political Climate
In his term, Obama and the Obama administration have been in favor of
supporting the arts and music. They have given money to schools in need to
continue these programs. This government support will hopefully continue, as
Obama was voted for another term.
 Economic Climate
Students would not have the money to spend on this product, however, it will
be made available for free to students. Because this product will be available to
students at no cost, the economy might help this product’s success, as people are
more likely to find ways to save money in the economy’s current state.
 Social and Cultural Climate
Today music and the arts have become less socially acceptable in schools.
Sports like soccer, football and volleyball have grown in popularity in the U.S.; more
students seem to be participating in these activities rather than music and the arts.
Also, less people are pursuing music as a career because culture now views higher
paying jobs in business, technology or the medical fields as the better career paths.
 Technological Climate
Because of advances in technology, students now have access to computers
and the Internet to find study tools and information. This handbook can be made
available on the Internet to students and will utilize the technology to its advantage.

Strategy:
Features and Benefits:
(For specific features and benefits see actual product attached Appendix C)
 Various types of exercises-This handbook will contain exercises to
develop different aspects of trumpet playing including tonguing,
articulation, finger technique and tone.
 Multiple sources involved-The handbook will combine a variety of
trumpet methods and contain a list of sources to cite these methods. The
book may introduce students to new methods and courses of study
available (see Works Cited App).
 Easy accessibility-Students can easily obtain this handbook online or
through their band director via email or other means.
 Free cost-The free cost will make this product affordable to students.

The Communication Plan:


NOTE: While the communication plan includes communicating via advertising,
personal selling, public relations, direct marketing and sales promotions, due to
budget constraints I will solely be focusing on direct marketing and personal selling.
 Advertising
-Internet advertisements can be utilized on music retail websites or
trumpet related pages such as the “International Trumpet Guild” website.
-Social media should be utilized for potential users to be contacted about
this product via email or social media websites such as Facebook.
-NOTE: All advertisements should say where the product could be found
online and downloaded along with the title and author of the handbook so its
name is associated with the advertisement.
 Personal Selling
-Presentations will be held in the schools to talk about this product. I will
communicate with both band directors and students to promote this product.
 Public Relations
-A thorough works cited page including some familiar method books would
promote the validity of this handbook. Including exercises from well-known
and used sources such as “Arban’s Complete Conservatory Method for
Trumpet” will make the source seem more reliable for both teachers and
students.
 Direct Marketing
-Emails can be sent to band directors at the 17 high schools listed in
Appendix A to contact their students about this handbook.
 Sales Promotions
-Flyers can be made telling students how they can access this handbook on
the web through the creation of a free website at Webs.com or through their
band director. These flyers can be passed out to the trumpet players in the
band.

Distribution Plan:
This trumpet handbook will be distributed to 17 high schools in the
Toledo/Bowling Green, OH area (see Appendix A). A PDF version of the handbook
can be sent to band directors to be distributed to students or flyers could be sent
home telling the students how they can access the book online. Flyers could also be
distributed to local music stores and private lesson instructors about how students
can access this handbook.

Budget:
Projected Costs:
This handbook will not have a selling price, as it will be made available for free.
Projected costs that will need covered are listed as follows:

Research and Development Costs


-Obtaining additional trumpet resources
Variable Costs
-Production Costs
-Materials
-Delivery & Distribution Costs
Communication
-Promotional Flyers
-Web
-Travel Fees
Other Expenses

Estimate Demand:
Promoting this trumpet handbook at 17 high schools in the Toledo/Bowling Green,
OH area, I would estimate the demand for this product to be about 50. After
speaking to one area band director, Krysten Moore, she explained she taught at 3
small schools and had an average of 4 trumpet players per year. I also gathered
information from my peers by asking them how many trumpet players were in their
high school bands; I found the average to be about 7 trumpet players per year.
Assuming there is an average of 7 trumpet players per high school, there would be
119 trumpet players total to promote to. Some of these students may be taking
private lessons and already have books to practice from. Other students may simply
not desire to practice on their own nor utilize this product. Therefore, I would
estimate just under half of the students would use the product and the demand to be
about 50 trumpet students.

Appendix A

List of High Schools: Band Director Name/Email:


Whitmer HS Ray Novak, novakrj2000@yahoo.com
Maumee HS Robert Cintron, Rcintron@maumeek12.org
Perrysburg HS Scott Schleuter, sschleuter@perrysburgschools.net
Rossford HS Bob O’neill, roneill@rossfordschools.org
Oak Harbor HS Travis Magoto, tmagoto@bcssd.com
Otsego HS Rich Dubler, rdubler@otsegoknights.org
Elmwood HS Justin Brinkman, brinj@elmwoodschools.org
Bowling Green HS Karen Smith, ksmith@bgcs.k12.oh.us
Cardinal Stritch Catholic HS Tyler Lentz, tlentz@katerischools.org
St. John’s Jesuit HS Xavier Smith, xsmith@sjjtitans.org
St. Francis Jesuit HS Carl Collier, ccollier@sfstoledo.org
Anthony Wayne HS Roy Young, ryoung@anthonywayneschools.org
Springfield HS Kathleen McGrady, kathymcgrady@slsmail.net
Sylvania Southview HS Staci Stroud, Stroud@SouthviewBand.com
Sylvania Northview HS Eugene Bohland, ebohland@sylvaniaschools.org
Findlay HS Tim Mattis, tmattis@findlaycityschools.org
North Baltimore HS Benjamin Pack, bpack@nbls.org
Appendix B

Works Cited

Arban, J.B. Arban’s Complete Conservatory Method for Trumpet. New, NY: Carl
Fischer, 1982. Print.

Clarke, H.L. H.L. Clarke: Technical Studies for the Cornet. New York, NY: C. Fischer, 1934.
Print.

Dalby, Cleon E. Trumpet Problems. Belwin Publishing Company. Print.

Goldman, Edwin Franko. Foundation to Cornet or Trumpet Playing: An Elementary


Method. New York, NY: Carl Fischer, 1914. Print.

Irons, Earl D. Twenty- Seven Groups of Exercises for Cornet and Trumpet. San
Antonio, Texas: Southern Music Co., 1952. Print.

Schlossberg, Max. Daily Drills and Technical Studies for Cornet and Trumpet. San
Antonio, Texas: Southern Music Co., 1952. Print.

Shook, Brian A. Basic Tone Production on the Trumpet. Brian A. Shook, 2011. Web. 20
Nov. 2012. <http://www.brianshook.com/resources/Basic-Tone-Production.pdf>.

Vizzutti, Allen. The Allen Vizzutti Trumpet Method: Book 1 Technical Studies. Alfred
Publishing Company, 1991. Print.

Williams, Ernest. The Ernest S. Williams Modern Method for Trumpet or Cornet.
Saugerties, NY: The Ernest Williams School of Music. Print.
Appendix C

A Guide for the


Aspiring High
School Trumpet
Player

By Lily Szymanski
Table of Contents
Foreward………………………………………………………………………………………………3

I. Lip Slurs
Irons, pg. 5……………………………………………………………………………....4
Schlossberg, pg. 5…………………………………………………………………….5
Schlossberg, pg. 18…………………………………………………………………..6
II. Tone Development
Irons, pg. 5………………………………………………………………………………6
Schlossberg, pg. 2…………………………………………………………………….7
Arban, pg. 242…………………………………………………………………………7
Cichowicz Flow Studies……………………………………………………………8
III. Finger Coordination
Clarke, pg. 8-9………………………………………………………………………….9
Vizzuti, pg. 66..………………………………………………………………………..11
IV. Intervals
Williams, pg. 86………………………………………………………………………12
Arban, pg. 13-14……………………………………………………………………..12
V. Articulation
Dalby, pg. 19…………………………………………………………………………..13
Goldman, pg. 43……………………………………………………………………...14
VI. Multiple Tonguing
Arban, pg. 155………………………………………………………………………..15
Arban, pg. 175………………………………………………………………………..16
VII. Scales………………………………………………………………………………………...17
VIII. Higher Range…………………………………………………………………………….18

Additional Resources…………………………………………………………………………19
FOREWARD

This book is a compilation of exercises from the sources listed on page

18. It is not my intention for this book to be a substitute for these other

sources, rather, it is my hope that students would find some of these exercises

of use to them and seek out the method books where these exercises are

drawn from. The exercises chosen for this book are only a starting point for

the student to begin a practice routine and develop his or her trumpet playing.

The exercises in this book will not seem helpful for the student unless the

student practices them with consistent and intelligent practice. With hard

work and dedication, students will experience positive results in their playing.
I. Lip Slurs

The tongue should raise and lower to achieve greater flexibility practicing the
lip slurs. For more flexibility exercises see Earl D. Irons book Twenty-Seven
Groups of Exercises for Cornet and Trumpet.

Irons, pg. 5
Schlossberg, pg. 5
Schlossberg, pg. 18

If there is difficulty getting the higher notes, start with the bottom line.

II. Tone Development

Irons, pg. 5

Tone should remain constant throughout the crescendo. Practice this exercise
with a tuner on different notes.
Schlossberg, pg. 2

This exercise can be practiced with a tuner. After descending a half step and
returning to the starting pitch, the pitch should be played with a good,
consistent tone.

Arban, pg. 242

Practicing simple melodies can also encourage tone development. More


melodies can be found in Arban’s Complete Conservatory Method for Trumpet,
pg. 191-245.
Vincent Cichowicz Flow Studies, from Brian Shook’s “Basic Tone Production on
the Trumpet”

As one’s range develops, notes can be added to continue ascending on this


exercise. Practice to get a consistent tone on the lower notes before
attempting to ascend up to the C on the last exercise. This exercise can be
transposed to different keys.
III. Finger Coordination

Clarke, pg. 8

Begin practicing slowly then speed up the tempo.


Clarke, pg. 9
Vizzuti, pg. 66
IV. Intervals

Williams, pg. 86

Focus on playing the upper notes of the intervals without strain. This exercise can be
transposed to other keys.

Arban, pg. 13

The top note of each exercise should be played consistently without strain.
Arban, pg. 14

For additional interval studies, see Arban’s Complete Conservatory Method


for Trumpet, pgs. 13-14.

V. Articulation

Dalbay, pg. 19
Dalby, pg 19

Goldman, pg. 43

Strive for consistent articulation throughout the entire register.


VI. Multiple Tonguing

Arban, pg. 155

Practice at a slow tempo single tonguing first, then speed up the tempo to
triple tonguing with the articulation sounding the same.
Arban, pg. 175
VII. Scales

The 12 major scales should be practiced with a metronome, maintaining a


steady tempo and quality tone.
VIII. Higher Range

To improve one’s higher range, one must practice playing in the upper

register. I included no exercises in this section, because all of the exercises

above could be extended to include upper register playing. For example, one

could take the Clarke study up an octave, extend the lip slur exercises up to

more partials, or ascend higher in the flow study. The major scales could also

be practiced in 2 octaves to get playing in the higher register. One’s higher

range will improve by playing to extreme ends of the register, both the upper

and lower register.


Works Cited

Arban, J.B. Arban’s Complete Conservatory Method for Trumpet. New, NY: Carl
Fischer, 1982. Print.

Clarke, H.L. H.L. Clarke: Technical Studies for the Cornet. New York, NY: C. Fischer, 1934.
Print.

Dalby, Cleon E. Trumpet Problems. Belwin Publishing Company. Print.

Goldman, Edwin Franko. Foundation to Cornet or Trumpet Playing: An Elementary


Method. New York, NY: Carl Fischer, 1914. Print.

Irons, Earl D. Twenty- Seven Groups of Exercises for Cornet and Trumpet. San
Antonio, Texas: Southern Music Co., 1952. Print.

Schlossberg, Max. Daily Drills and Technical Studies for Cornet and Trumpet. San
Antonio, Texas: Southern Music Co., 1952. Print.

Shook, Brian A. Basic Tone Production on the Trumpet. Brian A. Shook, 2011. Web. 20
Nov. 2012. <http://www.brianshook.com/resources/Basic-Tone-Production.pdf>.

Vizzutti, Allen. The Allen Vizzutti Trumpet Method: Book 1 Technical Studies. Alfred
Publishing Company, 1991. Print.

Williams, Ernest. The Ernest S. Williams Modern Method for Trumpet or Cornet.
Saugerties, NY: The Ernest Williams School of Music. Print.