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CONTENTS

( '

TAKE CARE page T94

EXTERNAL EXAM TRAINER page Tt<:>8

PRGNUNCIA"AON lAB page Tt24


WORKBOOK ANSWER ltEY f)age Tti6

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INTRCDUC:INIS P ULSE
Pulse is a four-level ESO course which contains a wide Reading
range of up-to-date, real-world material of genuine interest Pulse contains a rich variety of reading texts of interest to
to teenagers. With its fast-paced approach and use of teenage learners. A range of text types introduce students
authentic texts, topics and language, Pulse maximizes to different types of reading material in an appropriately
students' interest and provides sufficient challenge for graded, structured way.
twenty-first century learners.
Writing: Interaction and production
The main aims of Pulse are to ensure your students fully
Pulse takes a highly structured approach to writing. Students
develop their language competence, to teach tools and
first interact with model compositions, before following step-
strategies for lifelong learning inside and outside the
by-step tasks which emphasize that good writing requires
classroom, and to train students in exam skills, which will
planning, drafting and rewriting.
be valuable for ESO and beyond.

To achieve this, Pulse offers: Listening


Listening can be one of the most difficult skills to develop,
Linguistic content
so Pulse provides learners with the support they need
Vocabulary and grammar in context
before and during listening to aid comprehension and
Pulse takes an inductive approach to vocabulary, ensuring
improve confidence.
that new lexis is introduced gradually and practised
thoroughly. To ensure a challenging and meaningful Speaking: Interaction and production
learning experience, Pulse uses a variety of methods to Pulse gets students talking through Express yourself
present and practise vocabulary, including contextual activities, which provide frequent opportunities to interact
presentations. Vocabulary sets are recorded on the Class and exchange opinions.
Audio CD so that students can practise pronunciation.
The Integrated skills spread provides a fully-interactive
Grammar structures are presented in a range of speaking model in the Digital Course, which allows
authentic-style texts that provide the context essential for students to watch video clips of British people interacting in
understanding meaning. Clear grammar tables provide everyday situations. Through a series of step-by-step tasks,
students with easy-to-navigate reference. students are supported through production and practice of
their own dialogues.
Integrated skills
With its integrated approach to skills, Pulse encourages Lifelong learning skills
students to develop their receptive and productive skills Self-study and self-evaluation
in parallel. Each unit of the Student's Book features an Pulse promotes learner autonomy by encouraging
innovative Integrated skills spread which presents students to take an active role in their own learning.
fully-integrated practice of reading, listening, writing and
To this end, Pulse provides self-study reference and practice
speaking to improve students' communication skills in a
material in both the Student's Book and the Workbook.
real-world context. Receptive skills are developed through
The Self-study bank in the Workbook contains a wealth
an authentic reading text, followed by an engaging
of extension and consolidation activities to reinforce and
listening activity. The topical link continues with the
expand upon what students learn in class, plus Word lists,
coverage of productive skills: a videoed speaking model
Speaking reference and Pronunciation reference.
provides the basis for carefully-structured written and
spoken production. Students are encouraged to evaluate their own learning
through the Self-evaluation charts at the end of each
Workbook unit. Pulse also promotes group evaluation of
the Collaborative projects in the Student's Book.

Learning strategies
Pulse places high importance on developing learning
strategies. The Learning to Learn tips provide useful
learning ideas, while the Analyse boxes encourage .._
students to reflect on the differences between their own
language and English. In levels 3 and 4, Pulse also teaches
critical thinking.

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I
'

Socio-cultural and life skills Council of Europe and key


Pulse aims to equip students with the socio-cultural competences
awareness and skills they need to become more informed
Pulse has been developed following the legal guidelines
global citizens. Using a carefully-developed approach, the
set out by the Council of Europe, whose curricular
focus moves from cultural awareness (levels 1 and 2) to
objective is not just teaching a language itself, but
social awareness (level 3) to life skills (level 4). The Digital
teaching how to communicate through it. Following the
Course includes video clips of cultural and social footage
Council of Europe's Common European Framework of
designed to supplement the corresponding pages in the
Reference for Languages (CEFR), students must be able
Student's Book. These videos provide a window into the
to carry out progressive communication tasks in order to
culture and society of many English-speaking countries,
gradually develop their communicative competence in a
and are accompanied by worksheets in the Teacher's
foreign language.
Resource File.
The course contents of Pulse have been designed not only
Cross-curricular contents
to fulfil the linguistic and communicative competences
In levels 1 and 2 the Grammar in context activities in
identified below, but also to develop skills in all key
the Student's Book have a CLIL focus, each related to a
competences.
different school subject. In addition, the Teacher's Book
highlights links to other subjects on the school curriculum. CLC Competence in linguistic communication
In levels 3 and 4, the focus changes to literature. Each CMST Competence in mathematics, science and
activity is based on a different graded Macmillan Reader, technology
with extra information in the Teacher's Book for those DC Digital competence
who wish to use the Reader in class or as homework. sec Social and civic competences
Teachers can also find useful extra resources and CAE Cultural awareness and expression
information on how to exploit these and other Readers L2L Learning to learn
in class at www.macmillanreaders.com. SIE Sense of initiative and entrepreneurship

Digital competence
Pulse promotes digital competence in numerous ways. Support and solutions for teachers
These include searching the internet to complete Web Pulse has a full range of components to support teachers
quests, and using software packages and online tools for and offer solutions for classroom challenges.
productive tasks in the Collaborative projects. Students These include:
will expand their knowledge of web tools through the
Digital worksheets in the Teacher's Resource File. The
Student Website gives access to additional online practice
activities for language development. Students also have
access to interactive digital material, which trains them to
use digital learning tools independently.

Evaluation material for teachers


Pulse provides teachers with all the necessary resources
Teacher's Book Teacher's Teacher's
for continuous evaluation of linguistic skills and for
Resource File Resource File
evaluation of all the key competences. Learning outcomes
with Audio CD Multi-ROM
can be evaluated using the Tests and Exams Multi-ROM,
the CEFR Skills Exam Generator and the External exam
trainer section of the Student's Book and Workbook.

Pulse aims to equip students with the skills they need


for exam success by training them how to approach a
wide range of exam tasks covering all four skills. The
External exam trainer provides model answers and breaks
down exam tasks in a step-by-step way in order to build
students' confidence in exam situations.
COs Pack

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OVERVIEW DF CDMPDNENTS
Pulse Student's Book 2
The Student's Book includes: The Teacher's Digital Course features a fully-interactive
• A six-page starter unit version of the Student's Book, which is compatible with all
• Nine ten-page units devices including interactive whiteboards.
• Three Collaborative projects
• An External exam trainer focusing on listening and
speaking tasks

Vocabulary and Speaking Reading


The Think about it activity engages Reading texts present language in
students and encourages vocabul ,---.:..o:~~t.::_--:;; context and cover many real-world
recall. topics. Pulse uses a variety of text
types, from web articles to magazine
The first vocabulary set is presented
interviews. Reading texts are
using a variety of techniques including
recorded on the Class Audio CD.
photos and authentic contexts. They
are recorded on the Class Audio CD for
==:_: ---~-

pronunciation practice.

The Express yourself discussion feature _ _ _ __.


gets students talking and using topic
vocabulary.

Grammar Vocabulary and Listening


II
Grammar is presented through The second vocabulary set is
clear grammar tables at the start presented and practised.
of the page. Graded exercises help
An extended listening text develops
students practise what they learn.
listening skills while recycling target
The Analyse feature encourages language in context.
students to reflect on the differences
between grammar in English and
:= -
their own language. :==-
Each grammar section is linked
to pronunciation tasks in the
Pronunciation lab at the back of
the book.

Cultural awareness Grammar


0
The Cultural awareness reading text The second grammar page presents
highlights an aspect of life in different and practises the new language.
English-speaking countries. ---11n
All grammar presented in the unit
Each Cultural awareness page is practised through the extended
is linked to a culture video with ._...,...._~ Grammar in context activity. Each
footage of real life in the English- exercise has a CLIL focus, covering
speaking world. The videos are different subjects from the school
accompanied by worksheets. curriculum.

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Integrated skills
0
A short real-world reading text
engages students with the topic and
practises comprehension.
- -·-.,
. :;_ . ,
~ .... . . . . .
After listening to or watching the
dialogue, students write their own
dialogue.
~- ... .
Students listen to an authentic Working in pairs, students practise
functional situation and test their ·- --== ::-- speaking by acting out their new
·~~. =,~·- -- ~
understanding. ·=--- ·:-_-- dialogue.
~
Students then watch a videoed The Communication kit provides
dialogue of an everyday situation functional language for easy
such as asking for directions. reference .

Writing Study guide


The Writing page provides a model The Study guide is a useful reference
for different text types. of all language presented in the unit.

A specific language point is It also encourages learner autonomy


highlighted in the Writing focus box through the Learning to Learn tips.
,_-_ ==---
and practised. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -~_".::...:... ·=·

The Writing task guides students ~ : _ -:._


through the preparation and production l- - --=: ~~-

of their own text. ~;;;;;;;;;;!!!:=!!!~i'

Collaborative projects
These provide an opportunity for The Digital literacy feature gives
students to work collaboratively and students tips on improving their
develop their digital competence digital skills.
by creating a project using software
packages or web tools.

External exam trainer


On the Your exam preparation ---w1 On the Your exam practice page
page, students are presented with students get the opportunity to put
a typical exam task and prepare to their exam strategies into action.
answer it.
Exam tips give students advice and
The Model exam gives students a techniques to help them answer
clear example of a model question exam questions successfully.
and answer.

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Pulse Workbook 2
The Workbook includes:

• Practice activities testing all language presented in the The Workbook is available in three editions: English,
Student's Book Castilian and Catalan. The Teacher's Digital Course
• A full-colour Self-study bank including further practice, features a fully-interactive version of the Workbook,
extension activities and reference material. which is compatible with all devices including interactive
• Online audio whiteboards.

Vocabulary 1 Grammar 1
A variety of activities and tasks Clear, easy-to-follow exercises
ensure successful revision of the
vocabulary sets from the Student's
- · ·--
···
:::-
.~
: :.-~- ·
·- ~
... '-•· ---
· ~~~~?:-:::_
provide students with extensive
practice of all the grammar taught
Book. .:..:.... __:=-:_. ·!:':-~-- .. -- in Pulse.
1" • r ~~ - :-- ··-:.;:: ·

The activities are graded from one


star CJ to three stars CJCJ!;J· One star
indicates an easier activity type.

Express yourself activities provide


students with personalization
opportunities.
. ....................r~ o
Vocabulary 2 V-2

- -~ •!<::.=----··- Grammar2
·~
~; ~ ~;: ;; : jj
The second vocabulary set is The Grammar 2 page offers thorough
~;;::;::: :!
practised with a range of activities practice of the second grammar point
and tasks. presented in the Student's Book unit.
:====

1
·- -
·.. --
-

:~- :- ~ -~"~~~~~~
·- -
·----
:~~~~~-~~
·- --
"'
Reading Communication skills
A wide variety of texts on theme- A broad range of listening texts and
related topics and thorough practice tasks link thematically to the units.
of all question types.
Speaking activities test students'
recall of the functional language
~- :£- ··--
=-· :::::..- :=.. ·- presented in the Student's Book.
::: := ·r:=-==::
·--·- . .
·=-- .. .;....._;...,
·- ·-

Progress check Self-evaluation and
Extension
The Progress check provides an ___
........ .
.,_ ,. ___ _

in-depth test of all vocabulary and


grammar covered in the unit.

,., .., . _. ...... _


:::.:-=. ::::.:.~ ...
·---. -·
_.
,;;:::-- - ~· ·-
.·:.:-:---·~··"'"' ·=----· -·~--
.:.::=.. --..·-

·---------- ·--····-·

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


The Self-study bank includes:

• Grammar reference and practice • External exam trainer


• Vocabulary extension • Speaking reference
• Integrated skills • Pronunciation reference
• Writing reference and practice • Wordlist
• Irregular verb list

Grammar reference
The Grammar reference section Grammar practice exercises
provides extended grammar tables are provided directly opposite the
and explanations of all grammar relevant Grammar reference pages.
covered in level2 of Pulse. It is
available in three language versions:
English, Castilian and Catalan.

Vocabulary extension Integrated skills


Vocabulary extension pages use The Integrated skills pages feature
visuals to present a new lexical set reading, listening, writing and
related to the topic of each unit. speaking exercises that build on
The vocabulary is recorded so that the Integrated skills section in the
students can listen and then practise Student's Book through at-home
their pronunciation. practice.

Writing reference
An annotated model text linked to Writing tasks are broken down into
the unit topic shows students what steps to help students plan, prepare
they need to include in their own and produce their own writing texts
written work. at home.

:::~:;:::-~ ·=-:--=-==
·~

External exam trainer



The External exam trainer section On the Your exam practice page
covers Reading and Writing exam students get the opportunity to put
tasks typical of external exams. their exam strategies into action .

The Model exam gives students a Exam tips give students advice and
clear example of a model question techniques to help them answer
and answer. exam questions successfully.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Pulse Live! Digital Course
• Interactive video versions of the Student's Book
The Pulse Live! Digital Course is available in both teacher
model dialogues from the Integrated skills pages,
and student versions, providing tailored digital solutions
which allow students to see and hear real-life
which suit the technology available in all teaching
functional speaking situations
environments. The Pulse Live! Digital Course is compatible
• Culture videos and worksheets to accompany each
with all devices including interactive whiteboards.
unit of the Student's Book
The Teacher's Pulse Live! Digital Course is a complete • Vocabulary trainer to help students learn and
resource which groups digital versions of all Pulse practise core vocabulary from the Student's Book
teaching materials in one place for ease. • Teacher's Resource File materials
• Tests & Exams Pack materials
The course contains:
• Teacher's Notes
• Fully-interactive digital version of the Student's Book
• Audioscripts for all components
with integrated audio and video. Includes answers to
help correction in class Digital student versions of both the Student's Book and
• Fully-interactive digital version of the Workbook with Workbook are also available. All students using the print
integrated audio includes answers to help correction Workbook also have access to interactive digital materials.
in class
All of the Digital Courses link to the teacher's markbook to
• Markbook to keep track of students' marks and
make correction and evaluation easier.
progress throughout the year

Additional resources for students


Macmillan Secondary Student's Website Macmillan Dictionary Online
The Secondary Student's Website provides learners with The Macmillan Dictionary
hundreds of additional activities to practise the language -online is a free dictionary
presented in the Student's Book. These exercises cover and thesaurus. The website
grammar, vocabulary, reading, writing and listening. presents users with clear
Students can work at home or at school, and their results definitions, word sets and
www.macmillandictionary.com
will always be recorded in the teacher's markbook. The useful synonym boxes
website allows both students and teachers to monitor in addition to grammar
online work. www.macmi!!ansecondary~com information, example sentences, common phrases and
recorded British and American pronunciations.
The Macmillan Dictionary Online also offers innovative
tools and resources for teachers to use in class, including
e-lessons and language games.
Students can also use the website for self-study to
become more confident users of English. The website
features interactive language games to practise
irregular verbs and phrasal verbs which can be used to
complement classroom learning.
www.macmillandictionary com

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Pulse resources for teachers
Teacher's Book Teacher's Resource File
The Teacher's Book contains The Teacher's Resource File
everything you need to successfully PULSE
,. . ..............., 2 features a wealth of photocopiable
work with Pulse in class. worksheets and resources to

Each unit features a clear overview


of the contents and objectives with
~--# recycle and practise language,
develop skills and evaluate and
assess your students. These
full teaching notes, answer keys and ~~

include classroom diversity



PULSE
audioscripts. There are clear lesson 2
objectives, language and culture notes, • • • materials which link
and extra activities for fast finishers. • other areas of the curriculum
and worksheets to help students
The Teacher's Book also includes all
develop digital competence.
Student's Book reference materials
and the Workbook answer key.

Teacher's Resource File Multi-ROM Class Audio COs


The Multi-ROM includes all the Teacher's PULSE sE All the audio recordings from the
Resource File materials in editable Word 21 '-~
• .r ~ . Student's Book are included on
format. It also includes the accompanying -~~ .·.
+-f... -·-. t'r ..SE three audio COs, which come
audio recordings. , 2 I with complete track listings.
· rtt .. ~ft

Tests and Exams Pack


Tests and Exams Multi-ROM CEFR Skills Exam Generator
The Tests and Exams Multi-ROM is Multi-ROM
available on disk in editable Word format The Pulse Tests and Exams Pack
as well as PDFs. The material includes: includes the CEFR Skills Exam
Generator Multi-ROM, which gives
• A Key competences diagnostic test
teachers the opportunity to generate
which can be used to assess the
their_own skills-based exams. Covering
language level of students
CEFR levels A1+/A2, A2+ and 81/81+,
• Tests available at three levels: basic,
the exams include a range of reading,
standard and extra. Each level has:
writing and speaking tasks typical of
o one placement test
external exams.
o nine progress tests
o three end-of-term tests
o one end-of-year test
• Answer keys, audio and audioscripts for
all the tests and exams.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


...
Teacher's Book
The Teacher's Book contains a variety of different features and tasks to help teachers make the best use of all Pulse materials.

Each unit of the Teacher's Book Language notes provide extra


begins with an extensive double- information about pronunciation ,
page Overview of the unit. The vocabulary or grammar for teachers.
overview covers the following They may include a definition or the
categories: Unit objectives and Key =~ t -
phonetic script of a difficult word
competences, Linguistic contents, :: . =-~-==- or phrase, provide a more detailed
·~
- 1 -- --""'
Skills, Lifelong learning skills,
Evaluation, External exam trainer,
==- _)---
~=;;:J
grammar explanation or explain
idiomatic use of English.
Digital material, Digital competence,
The Culture note feature provides
Reinforcement material, Extension
additional cultural context for
material and Teacher's Resource File.
teachers. The boxes aim to give
Clear Lesson objectives are included --'~~!!! teachers useful information to answer
at the start of each lesson. These questions that students might have
provide a useful summary of the new about the people, places or events
language that will be presented in class mentioned in the Student's Book.
and tasks that students will perform.
The Extra activity boxes provide
Optional Warmer tasks are short and extra tasks for students who finish
practical, helping to prepare students ~~~~~~~~~=~~"·~ the Student's Book activities before
for the lesson ahead. their classmates. As such, this feature
helps with classroom diversity.

.
Teacher's Resource File
With 280 pages of photocopiable material, complete In addition , all materials are included on the Teacher's
answer keys and audioscripts, the Teacher's Resource Resource Multi-ROM in editable Word format, so that you
File provides all the worksheets and extra materials you can tailor them to the needs of your class.
need to ensure your students have a meaningful and
The Teacher's Resource File is divided into different
thorough learning experience with Pulse.
sections to ensure easy navigc;tion. The relevant answer key
is located after the worksheets at the end of the section.

Pulse Basics Vocabulary and Grammar


Consolidation and Extension
==·-
= ~ -

... .
~~ -
·:::--
--
-.- ..
- ..i
-- ...:J
...
· -~··· ...

. t~~:;::~ ~
--
·----·--··-··
~~.:~~~;.:-;:
--.-

-.
·=-.,.,...._,...
·---
:~ - --~- -;::~
..··-. ~ ---

. -----
'"~--. - t!
·--- -· --
-·--.:s:k~-----)~ ~·-·-- --, --........

A 65-page photocopiable workbook tailored to lower- Each unit has two Consolidation worksheets and two
level students- an ideal solution for classroom diversity. Extension worksheets. These provide revision and
It includes revision of key vocabulary and grammar in the extended practice of all vocabulary and grammar covered
Student's Book, as well as reading and writing skills work, in the Student's Book.
a language reference section and an answer key.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Translation and Dictation Evaluation rubrics

.......
·-- -
___ :;;:.:::. ----
--
--
..... --..
-
.. _-
·---

Translation and dictation exercises are The Evaluation rubrics can be used to assess students'
linked to each unit. skills work and their progress throughout the year.
Dictation exercises are recorded on the Covering reading, writing, listening and speaking, the
Dictations Audio CD. rubrics focus on specific learning outcomes covered
during the course, such as writing a formal letter or giving
a presentation. They include criteria for evaluation which
show what students are achieving successfully.

Key competences worksheets Culture and CLIL worksheets

·---- -

·---
..
--/
l
--~
-::::==:::;-- ' .... - -

·- ·-·- -
·---
~=h-- - .1
·---·
~----· _ , _ - - s 3 - ->

The Key competences worksheets provide further work There is one Culture and one CLIL worksheet per unit.
on skills with reading, writing, listening and speaking Culture worksheets are each based around a different
pairwork activities. Relevant competences are clearly city in the English-speaking world, with comprehension
indicated on each worksheet. activities focused on historical and cultural information.
CLIL worksheets link cultural topics with other areas of
the school curriculum. Teacher's notes provide ideas
for using the material in class.
Culture video worksheets

·=-- ·.. .:. .-.- - - ,_ __


Digital competence worksheets
__
,.,.,_. .........
·:~~~!~:;
::.::~-==:..~ - ~~~

---
·-- - ----·-
::.. ~
: :~ ~
·E.r:::=. ;----:=-
=--
~!':
- 1- -·- - - -·
Each Cultural awareness page in the Student's Book is Students can develop their digital competence while
linked to a related culture video with engaging footage learning English through the Digital competence
of real life in English-speaking countries. The videos worksheets, which teach them how to use free web tools
are accompanied by worksheets which test students' to create projects such as avatars, podcasts and online
comprehension of the audiovisual material during biographies. Each worksheet comes with Teacher's notes
and after watching the videos. The worksheets are which provide more information about the web tools and
accompanied by Teacher's notes which explain how to explain how to carry out the tasks successfully in class.
make the most of the worksheets in class.
-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-
VOCABULARY

• Celebrations • Dates • Question words • Clothes • Possessive adjectives


• Languages around the world • can /can't • be • Classroom language • Getting to know people

• Free time • Present simple • A magazine interview: • Ustening:


activities • Present continuous Urban sports: a teen A TV talent show: singing
• Skills and • Present simple and present perspective and dancing
abilities continuous
Cultural awareness • Pronunciation: Third
Grammar in context: Art Four teens' days out in person verb endings
the UK Intonation in questions

• literature • Past simple • A lftaiPine article: • Usteflini: An interview.


• Professions • ~/we~ The story of the mobile People who ehanpd tne
• could I couldn't phone novel world
Gramniar in context: literature ~ ...........
A quid< guide ttl the
• Pnlnundalfonz Past
simplt endings
t:dinburgh Fringe Festival /;)/

• Weather • Past continuous • A news report: Saved by • Ustening:


• Natural disasters • Adverbs an MP3 player! ATV programme: natural
• Past simple and past disasters
Cultural awareness
continuous
A natural disaster in New • Pronunciation: Weak
Grammar in context: Zealand forms: was lwazf and
Famous disasters were!WJ:!

• Geography a~d
landscape
• Compalatives and
surrlatlves
• a.taati• n• ¥tide:
Family wanted to live on
• Ustenlns: A dlswSsion:
Ap~
• Animals • a an, some. any an island
• Pronundatfon: /Q/ in
• mud!, many, a lot of
Cultural awareness ~mparatives and
Grammar In context: Thule Thula Wildlife superlatives
Nilturat sGien~e Reserve Offfitult sounds: lglard(~

LET'S • Science • will {'won'£ • A magazine article: • Ustening: An experiment:


EXPE!RIMEN11 • Science in the • Firstcondltional Six amazing predictions Science in the
page 52 classroom for the future! classroom
Grammar In context:
Science (ultural awareness • Pronunciation: Short
A day in the life of an form of will: s '//
astronaut

• Jobs and chore$ • begolhgto • An onfine message board: • Listening: Interviews


• Moneyand • will and be goii!!J to Tips for making money in the $tn!et: The Style
s~ oppfllg • Future time eJ(pressions Show
Cultural aWIA!fless
• wou/dlfke
A qulckgulde t9 • Pronunciation:
Grammar In context: seeond-hand shopping Diffici!Jlt sounds: /w/
Maths Difficult seunds: 1!11. at
the beginning of words

• Transport • Present perfect: affirmative • A feature article: Journey • Ustenlrig: A TV


• Verbs of and negative into the modern world programme: Electric
movement(t) • Present perfect: questions bikes
Cultural awareness
and short answers
Route 66 • Pronunciation: Difficult
Grammar in context: Transport sounds: /r/ and /i:/

• Sportand • Present perfect+ for and • An onU"' n~agulne arttc:te • Listening: A. mdio
competitions since Superstition iii s~ort f:JrQgr.!lllme~ $Uflerstltiens
• Verbs of • Present perfect and past
Cultural awaren~ • PronunGiation: linking
m\)vement(z) simple
Irish beliefs and words:finaiGansonant+
Grammar in context: History superstitions vowel sound

TAKE CARE • Personal issues • should I shouldn't • An information leaflet: • Listening: A phone

0 page 94 • Health • must I mustn't


• Tense review: present, past
and future
Cyberbullying and how to
deal with it
Cultural awareness
conversation: A
helpline
• Pronunciation:
Grammar in context: The Outback Survival Intonation:
PSHE (Personal, Social, Health Guide expressing feelings
and Economic Education)

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


DIGITAL ~ EXAM
COMPETENCE ..J.iiiiii.l

At an activity camp • A personal profile • Web quest: Urban sports


• Reading: An advert • Culture video: Museums and
Writing focus:
• Listening: A phone conversation galleries
because and so • CLIL task: Impressionist artists
• Writing & Speaking: Asking for personal
information

A visit to King Arthur's Labyrinth • Areview • Web quest: Research a writer


• Reading: An information leaflet • Culture video: Scotland
Wrlthls rvcus: • CUL task: Novels by Charles
• Ustenlng: Phone information olsoandtoo
• Writing & Speaking: Asking about an Dickens
experience

In the news • A fictional narrative • Web quest: If lightning strikes


• Reading: Newspaper headlines • Culture video: Charities
Writing focus:
• Listening: A weather report • CLIL task: A natural disaster
Sequencing words
• Writing & Speaking: Reacting to news and expressions

A day as a volunteer • A geesraphicat • w.b quest: A Scottish islaRd


• Reading: Aweb page dtscrfPtlon • Culture video: Animal$
• Ustening: CoJWe!Satfans • CUL task: Natural sdence
Wrft(ng focus:
• Writing & SpeafdRc: Expressing preferences Qrder of adjectives

Making a time capsule • An opinion essay • Webquest:


• Reading: How to make a time capsule Predictions about science
Writing focus: On the
• Listening: Classroom instructions about a time • Culture video: Technology
one hand and On the
capsule project • CLIL task: Science facts about
other hand
• Writing & Speaking: Making suggestions . the natural world

All about pocket money • Ar1 infonnalletter • Web quest: Part-time and
• Reading: A magaiine article temporary jobs
• Ustening: Radio programme • Wlture video: Shopping
• Writing a. Sp881cln!) Asking for a favour • • CIJL task: Maths

• Web quest: The Amish


• Reading: The Manchester Metrolink • Culture video: Transport
Writing focus:
• Listening: At the train station • CLIL task: History of transport
really and a bit
• Writing & Speaking: Asking for travel
information •

At the leisure centre • An email • Web quest: A famous athlete


• Reading: A timetable • Culture video: Ireland
Writing focus:
• Ustening: Announcements • CLILtask: History of
Using adjectives
• Writing a. Speaking: Making arrangements superstitions

All about holiday health • An instant message • Web quest: A Social networking
• Reading: A first aid kit site
Writing focus:
• Listening: Talking about a mobile app • Culture video: Australia
Using different tenses
• Writing & Speaking: Talking about health • Cllltask: PSHE (Personal,
Social, Health and Economic
Education)

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Vocabulary
Celebrations
1 ' Match the words in the box with
the pictures. Then listen and repeat. Which
celebrations can't you see?

birthday Christmas Easter wedding


• Easter and
New Year carnival
New Year are
not shown. 1 Christmas Day's
on the twenty-fifth
of December.
2 New Year's
Day's on the first
of January.
3 Christmas
Eve's on the
twenty-fourth of
December.
4 April Fool's

~~I.."__;;,)~-----....;~~·
I~"IJ!II!IIII·~~-
5
Day's
of on the first
April.
Valentine's
Day's on the
2 • listen and write the four celebrations Question words fourteenth of
' 1 wedding in your notebook. r-:::~--:------:----------1 February.
'. 2 birthday What do you eat on Christmas Day?
, 3 New Year 3 What other important celebrations are there in How do you celebrate Easter?
1
your country? Write two in your notebook. When do the school holidays start?
4 carnival
Where do you go on New Year's Eve?
Which don't yo u like?
Grammar 6 Copy and complete the questions with
Dates question words. 1 Which
2 When
4 Copy the dates into your notebook. Then say 1 ... month do you like best?
1 the sixteenth 3 What
them. 2 ...is your birthday?
of September 4 How
. nineteen 3 ... do you do on your birthday?
o2/os /o8 5 Where
' ninety-six 4 ... do you celebrate New Year?
2 the twenty- 2nd May 200o 5 ... would you like to go on holiday?
' eighth of e.t~ The s:econd of AAay, two th o u~and and eight.
February two &
I thousand
3 the first of
1 16/09/96
2 28/ 02 / 00
3 01/05/11
4 03 / 01 /os
f!JJ. XPRESS VO URSEL. F

7 Work in pairs. Ask and answer the questions


May twenty
eleven from exercise 6.
5 Work in pairs. Tell each other the dates.
4 the third of · Which month do you like bes:t ?
January two /-ja l/oween's: on the thirty-flrs:t of October.
thousand and / like July be!:t.
1 Christmas Day 4 April Fool's Day
five
2 New Year's Day 5 Valentine's Day
3 Christmas Eve

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Vocabulary
Celebrations • They work in pairs and practise the dates.
• Check answers as a class.
• Highlight the fact that we use the before the
ordinal number (eg the fourteenth) and we
"'W.lesson students will: use of before the month (eg of October).
• rtem lravfse·WORIS tGr diffe~Mt • Point out that for years in the first decade of
eelebratiEH1s the 21st century we say two thousand and
• reVise dates one, two thousand and two, etc. From 201 0
onwards, we say twenty ten, twenty eleven,
etc.
Warmer
Write the letter Jon the board. Tell students 5 • Explain the task. Read the example sentence
that three months begin with this letter. Invite aloud to the class.
students to come to the board to write the • Students work in pairs and tell each other the
correct spelling of the three mohths (January, dates.
June, July) . Do the same with A (April, August) • Check answers as a class.
and M (March, May). Elicit the remaining
months and write them on the board.

UK newspapers often have stories or adverts


1
on Aprils Fool's Day that are hoaxes. A hoax is
• Students match the words in the word pool
a trick in which someone says that something
with the pictures.
is true when it is not.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Play the CD. Students listen and repeat the
words chorally and individually.
Question words
6 • Make sure students understand all the
• Check answers as a class. Make sure
question words in the box.
students pronounce Christmas /'krrsmas/
• They choose one of the question words
correctly with a silent t.
to complete each sentence and copy the
2 questions into their notebooks.
• Tell students they will hear short extracts • They compare answers in pairs.
from four celebrations. • Check answers as a class.
• Play the CD. Students listen and write the XPRESS YOURSELF
four celebrations in their notebooks.
7 • Nominate two students to read aloud the
• They compare answers in pairs.
example question and answer to the class.
• Check answers as a class. Point out that
• Put students into pairs. They ask and answer
we say Many happy returns to congratulate
the questions from exercise 6.
someone who has a birthday.
• Listen to some pairs as a class.
3 • Explain the task.
Digital course: Interactive grammar table
• Students write two more celebrations from
their country in their notebooks.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Listen to their ideas as a class. 1 Woman: Congratulations! I hope you 'll be very
happy together!
2 Girl 1: Many happy returns!
Boy 1: Thanks! What's that?
Grammar Girl1: Open it and see!
Dates 3 Party people: 10 ... 9 ... 8 ... 7 ... 6 .. . 5 ...
4 ... 3 ... 2 ... 1 ... Happy New Year!
4 • Write today's date on the board in numbers, 4 Boy 2: I like your costume!
eg 14/ 10/14. Ask students how to say Girl 2: Sorry?
the date. Elicit that it is The fourteenth of Boy 2: I said I like your costume!
October, twenty fourteen. Girl 2: Oh thanks!
• Students copy the dates into their notebooks.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Vocabulary Grammar
Clothes Possessive adjectives
L·_-- :·;._ .. - ::_)!"Jj\C:Ct;\i-:· ~
- - - 4 • Fill in the first gap with the whole class as an
In this 11$80n students will: example (my).
• revi$e clothes vocaWiarY • Students work individually. They copy the
• revise pOssessive adjecUves table into their notebooks and write in the
missing possessive adjectives.
• Check answers as a class.
Warmer
5 • Explain the task.
Play a game to revise colours and clothes.
• Students work individually and complete the
Call out a colour, eg red. Those students
sentences using possessive adjectives from
wearing something red should stand up. If
the table in exercise 4.
they are wearing something red and they
• They compare answers in pairs.
don't stand up, they are out of the game.
• Check answers as a class.
Continue the game with other colours and
then with some basic clothes words, eg 6 • Students read the rules in the table for
jeans, shoes, trainers. possessive's.
• Highlight the example sentences in the table
1 and the position of the apostrophe after
• Explain the task. Students write the numbers plurals.
1-3 in their notebooks. • Explain the task and show how the
• Play the CD. Students listen and follow the apostrophe is used to indicate possession in
text in their books. the example sentence in exercise 6. Point out
• They write the correct names next to the that we say Mr Bean's face and never The
numbers. face of Mr Bean .
• They compare answers in pairs. • Students work individually and complete the
• Check answers as a class. exercise.
• Check answers as a class.
2 • Explain that the question What are you
wearing? refers to now/at the moment/today.
• Students work individually and write the
words for their clothes, using the words in Students write two more sentences like
blue from the text in exercise 1. sentences 1 and 2 in exercise 5 about their
• Check answers as a class. classmates, using a name plus 's and a
possessive adjective, eg Michelle's T-shirt is
3 • Make sure students understand the task.
yellow and her jeans are white.
• Set a time limit of one minute.
• Listen to students' ideas as a class. Make
a list of words on the board, eg shoes, Digital course: Interactive
..
gTa~m~~
.
. ,
t~bi~:·
.-- ..
trousers, coat, shorts, skirt, socks, hat.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


' -.····~.-> ~-.
students' own
2 What are you wearing? Name your clothes with Possessive 's
aAswers the words in blue.
We use '5 or ' to show possession.
We can use '5 for has.
3 Can you think of any more clothes words?
We can use '5 for is.
Write as many as you can in one minute. (!)
Stella's hair is blond.= Her hair is blond.
The boys' hats are new. = Their hats are new.
Grammar He's got brown eyes. = He has got brown eyes.
Adam's Scottish.= Adam is Scottish.
Possessive adjectives
6 Write ' in the correct place in the sentences.
4 Copy and complete the table. 1 The dOgs'
Mr Beans face is funny. coats are~ .
subject Mr 11ean's: face Is: funny 2 The gir1's got
pronoun old train~('S.
3 Jan(l'S
I happy.
you your
4 The boys'
he I she I it (2) ... 1her I (3) ... T-shlrts are eig.
we (4) ...
you your
they (s) ...

5 Complete the sentences with possessive


adjectives.
2 his
3 their 1 Lucy's dress is brown and ... sandals are brown.
2Chris's jeans are blue and ... jumper is grey.
4 my
3 Lucy, Chris and Nina are happy. They like ...
5 your
clothes!
4 I'm wearing a new jacket with ... jeans.
5 Do you like fashion? What are ... favourite
clothes?

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Vocabulary
Languages around the world
In which of the countries in the box is English the
first language of most people? In which one isn't
English is the
first language
English the main language?
of most people
in: Australia,
Australia the USA Scotland India
the USA, New Zealand Ireland Wales
Scotland,
New Zealand,
Ireland and 2 Look at the countries. Copy and complete the table
Wales. with the languages they speak there.
English isn't
the main
the Netherlands Spain Russia China France
language in Italy Poland Japan Germany
India.

Dutch

-ish
Spanish
Polish 3 Do the quiz in pairs. How much do you know about
-an English and other languages?
Russian
Italian
German
-ese
Chinese
Japanese
-ch
French

3 c
4 c
5 b

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Vocabulary
Languages around the world 3 • Students work individually and choose the
correct answer to each question.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

• revise countries cu:td languages


• do a language quiz about English and
other fanguages The ten most widely used words in English in
order from one to ten are: the, be, to, of, and,
a, in, that, have, I.
Warmer
Play a game to introduce the topic. Write the
letter A on the board. Ask students to give
you the name of a country beginning with
that letter, eg Argentina, Angola, Armenia.
box. Great Britain I'S the •..- ..-...·w..ii.Uif\111
Continue with other letters of the alphabet,
British Isles and contains m• ...:•llW.I!IJ•
eg 8 (Brazi0, C (Chile), 0 (Denmark) , etc.
Scotland and wale$ {with
islands like Anglesey, the Isle nl lil~Miilil
1 • Check students understand the task.
the Hebrides).
• Students compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

In Scotland, the number of speakers of Scets


Gaelic is just 60,000 (1.2% of the population).
In Ireland around 130,000 speak Irish Gaelic
(about 2% of the population). In Wales,
560,000 (around 20% of the population)
speak Welsh, a Celtic language completely
different from English.

2 • Explain the task. Students copy the table into


their notebooks.
• Students work individually and complete the
table with the words for the language of each
country. They compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

Words ending in -ese are stressed on


the final syllaiDie eg Chinese, Ja{!Janese,
Vietnam~se. Portugld_~~~-

.......

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Grammar
can I can't be
3 • Write on the board He is English. Ask
students to contract the verb. Elicit and write
on the board He's English.
In this le$ton students will:
• Students copy the table into their notebooks.
• re~ise lftl I tlitt't They then write the short forms of each verb.
• rtv'- Itt afftrmative, negative, question • Students compare answers in pairs.
fonns and ..... answers of tit
• Check answers as a class. Highlight that
• say wttet1ttey ftke ancl don't !&. doing the contractions aren't and isn't are used in
this course. Point out that are not can also
be contracted by 're not and and is not by 's
Warmer
not.
Write the phrase free time on the board.
Students work in pairs and discuss what they 4 • Explain the task. Read the example sentence
do in their free time. Listen to their ideas as a and correction to the class.
class and make a list on the board, eg watch • Students work individually and decide which
T\1, listen to music, play computer games, etc. statements are true. They rewrite the false
ones.
1 • Students read the information in the table • They compare answers in pairs.
about can I can't. • Check answers as a class.
• Remind students that we never use to after
can I can't.
• Students work individually and complete the
London is the biggest city in the UK. The
sentences with can or can't so that they are
second biggest is Birmingham. Manchester,
true for them.
Leeds and Liverpool are also big cities in the
• They compare answers in pairs.
UK.
• Listen to their answers as a class.

5 • Students read the questions and short


answers in the table.
In affirmative sentences with can, can is not
• Explain the task.
stressed, eg I can /kan/ ~~!'!!· In negative
• Students work individually and write true
sentences with can't, can't is stressed, eg I
short answers to the questions.
can't /ka:nt/ swim.
• Check answers as a class.

Highlight the example sentences and th9 use Highlight the example sentMces. Remind
of the -ing form after like, love and hate. students that we use there's I tflsl!l" isn't for
singular nouns and there ar.$ I there aren't for
plural nouns.
2 • Write /like ... and I don't like ... on the board.
Complete the sentences with activities that
are true for you. eg /like watching TV I don't 6 • Students work individually and write
like cleaning the house. sentences using There's I There are in the
• Explain the task and remind students to affirmative (3) and negative (7).
change the verb to the -ing form after /like • Check answers as a class. Point out that we
and I don't like. use some after There are and any after There
• Students work individually and write aren't.
sentences that are true for them.
• Students compare answers in pairs.
• Listen to students' answers as a class. Make
sure they are grammatically correct.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Grammar \aM~
can I can't 4 Are the sentences true or false? Correct the
false sentences. Use short forms of be.
can I can't+ verb Edinburgh is the capital of England. 2 False
Juan and Pilar
We use can I can't to show ability /lack of Edin burgh is:n't the c9p ital of England. It 's; th e aren't English
ability. After can I can't, we use the infinitive capital of~cotl9 n d. names. They're
without to. Spanish names.
I can speak English. 1 Great Britain is an island.
3 False
He can't speak Japanese. 2 juan and Pilar are English names. London and
3 London and Manchester are small cities. Manchester
4 British people's favourite drink is tea. aren't small
1 Complete the sentences about you with can cities. They're
or can't. big cities.
questions and short answers
I can't s:peak Chines:e. 4 True
Am I a teenager?
1 I ... play a musical instrument. Yes, I am. I No, I'm not.
2I ... count to 100 in English. Are we I you I they friends?
3 1... swim. Yes, we I you are. I No, we I you aren't.
4 I ... drive a car. Is he I she your teacher?
5 I ... make a cup of coffee. Yes, he I she is. I No, he I she isn't.

5 Answer the questions for you. Use short


answers.
like I love I hate +verb + -ing 1 Yes, it is. I
No, it isn't.
I like playing computer games. Is: this: your noteb ook? No, it is:n't.
2 Yes, they
Lisa loves eating chocolate! Is this your first English lesson?
1 are. I No, they
They hate getting up early! 2 Are your friends in your English class? aren't.
3 Are you on page 15 of th is book? 3 No, I'm not.
2 What activities do you like doing in English? 4 Is English your favourite subject? 4 Yes, it is. I
No, it isn't.
What don't you like doing? Write sentences.

/lik e re9ding books:.


there's I there are
I don't like learning gramm9r. There's a famous bridge in Sydney.
1 learn new words There isn't a royal family in the USA.
2 do grammar exercises There are some American programmes on TV.
3 watch DVDs There aren't any beaches in Madrid.
4 read magazine articles
5 listen to music
6 Write affirmative (v) ana negative (K)
6 write essays
sentences with There is and There are.
be lakes in Scotland. v
There are s:ome lakes: in ~c ot/a n d. some famous
affirmative
1 a White House in London. )( actors from
I am 15 years old. Wales.
2 famous actors from Wales. v
He I She I it's He I She I It is from Spain. 3 There aren't
3 kangaroos in the UK.)(
from Spain. We I You I They are Chinese. any kangaroos
4 a town called Boring in the USA. v in the UK.
You/ We/ negative
They're
Chinese. I am not from Italy.
negative He I She I It is not my best friend.
I'm not from
We I You I They are not in London .
Italy.
3 Copy the table into your notebook. Rewrite the
He/ She/ It
isn't my best sentences using the short form of be.
friend.
I'm IS ye9rs: old.
You I We I
They aren't in
London.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


1 Match 1-9 with words in the box. Use a
1 poster dictionary to help you with the words you don't
2 board know.
3 pencil case
laptop notebook board poster
4 schoolbag
schoolbag pen pencil rubber pencil case
5 pencil
6 pen
2 Which things in exercise 1 do you have in
7 laptop
class today? 5 1; Match the questions with the answers.
8 rubber Listen and check your answers. 1 c
9 notebook
3 ttdl1li) Look at the keyboard . Can you say 1 What does 'poster' mean? 2 d
the letters of the alphabet in English in 2 How do you say '/6piz' in English? 3 e
alphabetical order? Listen and repeat. 3 Can you write it on the board , please? 4 a
4 Sorry, I don 't understand. 5 b
5 What page are we on?
a) OK, I'll repeat it.
b) Page 18.
c) 'Cartel'.
d) Pencil.
4 Work in pairs. Ask and answer questions about e) Yes, of course.
the spellings of words from exercise 1.
6 Translate the instructions into your language.
l-4ow do you c;pe/1 'rubber'? Who usually says these things in class?
answers
R--u-b-e-r'7 1 Sit dOWil.
The teacher
No, that'<; wrontf Ti-y aefa in. 2 Turn to page 32.
3 Close your books.
I usually says
these th1ngs in
R-u-b-b-e-r?
4 Work in pairs. class.
Vee;, that'r: rtght 5 Look the words up in a dictionary.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Integrated skills
School lessons 4 • Nominate two students to read aloud the
model dialogue to the class.
• Put students into pairs. They ask and answer
questions about the spellings of the words in
In thi$leason students will:
the word pool in exercise 1.
• work dn aijl ff)ur skills
• Listen to some pairs as a class.
• .revise vocabvlary related te the etassroom
• ,.,_.~nm~~ 5
• toaconv~ • Explain the task. Students match the
• Write a peraenat~ed C!l~ questions and the answers.
• • QUt their dla~Qgue • Students compare answers in pairs.
• Play the CD. Students listen and check their
answers.
Warmer • Check answers as a class.
Ask students to read the information about
6 • Students work individually and translate the
Lucy in the speech bubble. Then write the
instructions into their language.
question What's your favourite subject? on
• They compare their translations in pairs.
the board. Students answer the question in
• Check answers as a class. Elicit who usually
pairs. Listen to answers as a class.
gives these instructions (the teacher).

1 • Students match the words in the word pool


• 1.05 Audioscript, exercise 3 - ·
with items 1-9 in the pictures.
• Students compare answers in pairs. A, B, C. D, E, F. G
H, I, J , K, L, M, N, 0 P
• They use a dictionary to look up the words
Q, A, S, T, U, V
they don't know.
W, X, Y, Z
• Check answers as a class.

2 • Explain the task.


• Students look at the words again and say
which of the items they have in class today.

Play a game Gf I spy. Start with I spy


something beginning with t. The student who
guesses the c0rrect answer (tae/e) continues
the game. Continue until many of the basic
classroom words have been covered (ehair;
door, window, light, etc}.

3
• Check students understand the task.
• Put students into pairs. Students take turns
to say the letters in English in the correct
alphabetical order.
• Play the CD. Students listen and repeat the
letters of the alphabet in alphabetical order
chorally and individually.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Integrated ski Is - continued
Getting to know people
7
• Ask students to look at the picture. Elicit
where the children are (outside schoo~.
• Play the CD. Students listen and fill gaps
1-3.
• Students compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

8 • Play the CD again. Students listen and repeat


each line of Chris and Lucy's dialogue.
• Note the main stress and falling intonation
in What's your f'J~f71_e?, What ye~r are you in_?
and Where do you l{v~?

9 • Students copy the questions in bold


from Chris and Lucy's dialogue into their
notebooks.
• Students write answers that are true for them.

Speaking: Me too and Me neither


Ask students to read the Skills builder box.
Highlight the example dialogue. To ~Practise,
say !like ice cream and elicit Me toot from
the class. Then say, I don't like Mondays and
elicit Me neither! from the class.

10 • Ask students to look at the Communication


kit: Getting to know people. Encourage them
to use these questions and the response
Nice to meet you in their dialogue.
• Students work individually and write their
dialogue, using the dialogue in the book as
a model.
• Monitor while they are writing and give help
if necessary.

11 • Students practise their dialogues in pairs.


• For extra practice, they swap roles in both
dialogues.
• Choose some pairs to act out their dialogue
for the class.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


GETT~NG ··
TOKNOW
r;_ ,-
I
'
PEOPLE

I'm Chris. Nice to meet you, Chris. What year are you in?
(1) ... . Me too! I'm in Mr Brown's class.
Cool. Where do you live? On (2) ....
Oh, I live near there. Shall we (3) ... together? OK, Let's go!
~----~----~------------~
7 ~, .r Listen to Chris and Lucy talking. 10 Write a new dialogue. Use the dialogue in
1 Year 9 Copy and complete 1-3. exercise 7 to help you.
2 Ash Road
3 walk home 8 Listen again and repeat. Practise your intonation. 11 Work in pairs. Take turn.s to practise your
dialogues.
9 Copy the questions in bold into your notebook.
Then write answers that are true for you. S:o, what's: your name?
My name's: ...

-SD4takllmc Me too and Me neither ON KIT


Me too and Me neither~o show that Getting to know people
smmetliling is also true for you. After
What's your name?
afiftrrnative statements use Me too, and
Nice to meet you.
aliter. megati~te statements use Me neither.
How old are you?
Where are you from?
f'm/4. What year are you in?
Me too! Whose class are you in?
I'm not from the UK. Where do you live?
Me neither'

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


. -- -· ---- .. -~ --

In this unit the student will learn ... In this unit the student will learn how to ...
• understand, memorize and correctly use • identify specific information in a magazine
vocabulary related to free time activities and article about urban sports CLC sec CAE
skills and abilities CLC sec CAE • look online for information about an urban sport
• understand and correctly use the present simple and share the information with a partner CLC DC
and the present continuous and know when to SCCCAESIE
use which, draw parallels to L1 and produce • identify specific information in a presentation
them in a short speaking activity CLC L2L about a TV talent show CLC sec CAE
• understand and correctly use the present simple • read an advert about an activity camp, listen to
or present continuous with time words CLC L2L a phone conversation about an activity camp
• about tourist attractions in the United Kingdom and learn how to ask for personal information
and compare with tourist attractions in their CLCSCCCAE
country CLC CAE sec • write a personal profile CLC SIE L2L
• about museums and galleries by watching a • prepare for and do a conversation activity exam
short video CLC DC CAE CLC SIE L2L
~-~
• •
· c ........
..... ,....., "'
-···-··
• j ~~· · -=-'·r
~~ .... ·--···
-·~~ ~;.: .::,~~~ L • •.• - ~~ \,'.- t=-··r--t ·~·
· ~ .·_ \. •
• ' ' ' '. -,• •"' , ',•"o-~1";.~. I 1.1' J''• ~.-. ..... •.•. i.~·r.t::· ·
, . . - 1 f - ~, ·'---~· • .. ~~
· : '-:••J ~:!"i,_~:
.~r; ~
~.~· , .r 1
' 11 ~r ''t11!':1~· .
-~ :
'
. .. :,.
. 'I • :
. . 1

. - ·' .. - ~- .. - -···· ..·. ._.1: .. :!U.----...._.
..... : , I I •
.•
Main vocabulary
• Free time activities: play computer • Read a magazine interview about urban sports
games, go for a run, watch a DVD, • Read a text about tourist attractions in the United
etc Kingdom
• Words that go with time • Read an advert about an activity camp
expressions: on Monday morning, • Read a personal profile
at the weekend, etc
• Skills and abilities: act, tell jokes,
• Write a personalized dialogue giving personal information
paint, etc
• Write a personal profile in three steps: plan, write, check
Grammar • Learn how to use the present simple, present continuous
• Present simple and because and so
• Present continuous
• When to use the present simple
• Listen to part of a TV talent show
and the present continuous
• Listen to a phone conversation about an activity camp
Functional language
• Phrases for asking for personal
• Exchange information about weekend activities
information
• Ask and answer questions using the present continuous
• Phrases for having a conversation
• Ask and answer questions about your skills and abilities
about a familiar topic
• Phrases for asking questions
• Prepare and act out a dialogue about asking for and
Pronunciation
giving personal information
• Third person verb endings
• Prepare and do a speaking conversation exam
• Intonation in questions

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


'

• Unit 1 End-of-unit test: Basic, Standard and Extra


Self-study and
• CEFR Skills Exam Generator
self-e aluation
• Study guide:
Student's book page 19
• Progress check and self-
evaluation: • Speaking: A cmnversation
Workbook pages 14-15
• Grammar reference and practice:
Workbook pages 84-85 Digital material
• Wordlist:
Pulse Live! Digital Course including:
Workbook pages 151-15 7
• Interactive grammar tables
Learning strategies • Audio visual speaking model: Asking for personal
and thinking skills information
• Giving your email address and • Audio visual cultural material: Museums and galleries
phone number Student's website

Cu:tt .w.rrl a lilareness


• Tourist attractions in the UK
• Comparing tou nist attractions in
the UK with tourist attractions
in students' own countries and
regions

c~~oss-curr·cular
C!O• ~'ents
• Art: a TV talent show: skills and
• Basic worksheets, Teacher's Resource File pages 5-1 0
abilities
• Vocabulary and Grammar: Consolidation worksheets,
• Language and literature: reading
Teacher's Resource File pages 3-4
and compiling a personal profile
• ICT: searching the interrnet for
infor.mation

• Fast-finisher activity: Student's Book page 11


• Extra activities: Teacher's Book pages T1 0, T11 , T16,
--- - ---- . - - - - -
T18
CLC Competence in linguistic
• Vocabulary and Grammar: Extension worksheets,
communication
Teacher's Resource File pages 5-6
CMST Competence in mathematics,
science and technology
DC Digital competence
Teacher's Flesour'ce File
sec Social and civic
competences
• Translation and dictation worksheets pages 2, 12
CAE Cultural awareness and
• Evaluation rubrics pages 1-7
expression
• Key competences worksheets pages 1-2
L2L Learning to learn
• Culture and CLIL worksheets pages 1-4
SIE Sense of initiative and
• Culture video worksheets pages 1-2
entrepreneurship
• Digital competence worksheets pages 1-2
• Macmillan Readers worksheets pages 1-2

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Vocabulary and
Speaking
Free time activities
1 1;~ look at the quiz. listen and
repeat the words in blue.

2 Now do the quiz and look at your score.


Do you agree with the description of you?

3 Match adjectives 1-3 with opposites a-c.


1 B 1 sociable a} shy
2 c 2 sporty b) unfriendly
3 b 3 friendly c) lazy

on Monday morning
011 Sunday evening
on Friday afternoon
at the weekend

. XPA ESS VOU RSE ,L F

4 What do you usually do at the weekend?


Copy and complete the diary.

morning morning
go ~hopping with Mum
afternoon afternoon

evening evening

5 Work in pairs. Ask and answer questions


about youi weekend activities from
exercise 4·
• What do you do on ::aturday mornint?
Ito c;hoppint with my mum.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Vocabulary and Speaking
Free time activities 2 • Students read the quiz again and choose the
best answer for each question.
• They check their score.
• Students compare their scores in pairs.
In this lesson •tudents wiJl;
• Listen to students' opinions of their
• team 1rt)vi$e ward$ related to free time descriptions as a class.
activities
• Check students understand sociable
• a8k and answer queetkms about what
/ 's~uf~bgl/ (a sociable person is friendly and
they do at the weekend
enjoys being with other people), shy (a shy
person is nervous and uncomfortable in the
company of other people, especially people
Warmer
they don't know) and switch off (demonstrate
Play a game of Hangman to introduce the
using a switch in the classroom). Elicit that
topic. Use dashes to represent the letters of
the opposite to switch off is switch on .
free time and write them on the board:
____ . Ask students to suggest letters of the 3 • Ask students to read the descriptions in the
alphabet. Continue until they have guessed score for the quiz again. They then match
the answer. adjectives 1-3 with their opposites a-c.
• Students compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

Students work individually and write down a Look!


list of their free time activities. They work in
Remind students that we use on with days Gf
pairs and compare their lists. They ask and
the week and at with the weekend.
answer the question. Listen to their answers
as a class.
X PRESS YOURSELF

4 • Students look at the diary page and copy it


1
into their notebooks without the example go
• Students look at the pictures. Elicit that they
shopping with Mum unless it is true for them.
illustrate the topic of the lesson (free time
• They work individually and fill in the diary
activities).
page using the activities in blue in exercise 1
• Elicit the words for the four activities in the
or any other ac;tivities they do, eg play tennis,
pictures and write them on the board (play
go to the cinema, go swimming.
computer games, go to a concert, go for a
• Monitor while they are writing and give help
run, go shopping).
if necessary.
• Students read the quiz.
• Play the CD. Students listen to the words in 5 • Nominate two or three students to answer
blue and repeat them. the example question What do you do on
• Make sure they pronounce hang out lhreiJ Saturday morning?
'aut! correctly with the stress on out. Check • Students work in pairs and ask and answer
they understand the meaning of hang out with questions about their weekend activities.
someone (spend a lot of time with someone). • Listen to their ideas as a class.

In phrases like go for a run, surf the internet, go Students look at the words in blue in the quiz
to a cafe, go to the gym, go to a concert, the and choose the three activities that they like
main stress in each phrase is on the last word, · the most. They work in groups of four. Each
eg surf the ifl.temet. In phrases with compound group has to agree on three activities that are
the most popular in their group.
nouns like computer games, text messages and
water sports, the main stress is on the first word
in the noun phrase, eg send t~xt messages.
J Vocabulary extension: Workbook page 102

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Reading
Text type: A magazine 4 • Give students time to think about their
interview answer and make a few notes.
• Students work in pairs and compare their
answers.
• Listen to students' ideas as a class.
In 1hls lesson students will:
• reao a magazine Interview
• read fer'speciflc Information
• express their opinion Ask fast finishers to make a list in their
notebooks of any other sports they can
think of.
Recommended web links
www.parkouruk.org
theiasc.org/

Focus on the pronunciation and meaning of


Warmer other vocabulary in the text, eg exciting
Write the word sport on the board. Put /Ik1sartig/, spare time (another expression for
students into teams of four. Ask them to tell free time). Use a board drawing to illustrate
you a sport beginning with a random letter, the meaning of over walls and down steps.
eg b. The first team to give a correct word,
eg basketball, gets a point. Continue with -
other letters of the alphabet. .Web quest .
If your ci~$Sroom has internet f~~~_[fies for the
1 • Students look at the pictures and answer the
class, stueents can be asked to ~the Web
question.
quest activities in class. If not, set them as
• Students compare answers in pairs.
homework tasks and ask them to compare
• Check answers as a class.
their answers at the start of the ne-xt lesson.
2 These activities help to develop competence
• Students read the sentences carefully first. in processing information and u$e of ICT.
• Play the CD.
Students find out three interestir!l@:l facts
• Students listen and follow the text in their
books. They decide if the sentences are true
about an urban sport. Highlight ttl• Web
quest tip.
or false and correct the false sentences.
• Students compare answers in pairs. 1 • Students choose an urban Sport.
• Check answers as a class. 2 • Ask students to open an int~rttet web
browser such as Internet E>'j:i>lorer.
3 • Students read the five questions first.
Students open a search engJ~e (eg
• They look in the text and find the answers.
Google) and type in the na!T)~ of their
• Students compare answers in pairs.
urban sport.
• Check answers as a class.
• Students find as much infon:l'lation as
they can, bookmarking relevant web
Word check
pages and taking notes. They choose
Make sure students understand all the words
1 three interesting facts.
and that they stress competitive /bm petitv/)
3 ·• Students work in pairs and swap their
correctly. Use picture b to clarify helmet.
facts with their partner.
• Ask some pairs to report baek to the
class.
Highlight the Did you know? box. The first Go
Skateboarding Day was on 21st June 2004.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


REPORTER First of all, what are urban sports?
JON Activities like skateboarding, BMX biking, scootering and
parkour (free running).
REPORTER Who does them?
JON Teenagers and people in their 20s, mainly. Most people
who do urban sports want to have fun with their friends and do
something active.
REPORTER Where do they practise?
JON Anywhere! You don't need any special facilities for urban
sports. You can jump or skateboard over walls, and cycle down
steps. Every city has these things- and they're free!
REPORTER Do you need any special equipment?
JON Depending on the sport, you need a skateboard, BMX bike or
scooter and a helmet. Parkour is the only urban sport that you can
do without any equipment.
REPORTER What do you wear?
JON We wear jeans or shorts, aT-shirt and trainers!
• REPORTER Are urban sports dangerous?
JON That depends. Accidents happen when people try to
do dangerous things. It's important to know what you can-
. and can't- do.
REPORTER Are there urban sport competitions?
JON Yes, there are.
REPORTER Do girls do urban sports?
JON Yes! Lots of girls are getting
interested in them now. They are D j0 Y0 J K 0
often as good as boys, or better!
urban facilities equipment helmet competitive

Reading 3 Read the interview again and answer the


questions.
A magazine interview 1 Four
(skateboarding,
1 How many urban sports does Jon mention?
BMX biking,
1 Look at the pictures. What are the sports? 2 Why do people do urban sports? scootering and
3 Why are urban sports-easier to practise than parkour).
:1 Read and listen to the interview. Are other sports? 2 To have fun
the sentences true or false? Correct the false 4 What makes parkour different from other with their
sentences. urban sports? friends and
False do something
Mainly teenagers and 25-year-olds don't do urban sports. 5 What clothes do people wear for urban sports?
1 active.
people in their 20s do
urban sports.
2 You can do urban sports in any city. 3 You don't need
4 Do you prefer doing competitive sports or
r True 3 You need a helmet for all urban sports. any special
non-competitive sports? Why? facilities.
4 Accidents happen for a reason .
. ~ False
5 You can take part in parkour competitions. I prefer doinf5 competitive r;portr; bec<>ur;e .. 4 You can do it
You don't need a without any
helmet for all urban 6 Boys are better at urban sports than girls.
equipment.
3ports.
5 Jeans or
.
4 True
5 True
False
w~~ .~'""': ~~~~.,;;;
.... ..., "'1.~. MfU,:f"tci~:'i··•f..~

Find out three interesting facts about an


i
-r ·m:Hml How many other sports
can you think of? Write
shorts. aT-shirt
and trainers.
When you research a sport,
-3irls are often as urban sport. a list.
search for professional
good as boys at urban 1 Choose an urban sport. associations or information
sports, or better! 2 Find some websites about your urban sport
about competitions and
on the internet. Choose three facts. tournaments in the sport.
3 Work in pairs. Tell your partner about your
urban sport.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Grammar \aillll'W
Present sim ple: affirmative, Present continuous:
negative and questions affirmative, negative and
questions
~~ji~~-:l 1 Copy and complete the table with the correct
form of like, play and live. affirmative
1 fikes
2 q9esn't play affirmative I'm run ning.
3 live I I We I You I They wear jeans or shorts. You I We I They're jump ing.
He I She I It (1) ... urban sports. He I She I It's rid ing a bike.
negative negative
I I We I You I They don't need special facilities. I (1) ... jeking.
He I She I It (2) ... football. We I You I They aren't com ing.
questions and short answers He I She I It (2) ... listen ing.
Do I I we I you I they (3) ... in a city? questions and short answers
Yes, I I we I you I they do. Am I going fast? Yes, I (3) ... !
Does he I she I it like parkour? No, he I she I it Are we I you I they practis ing? Yes, we I you I
doesn't. they are.

r..eiiJiili~ttl 2 Read the spelling rules on page 19. Then Is he I she wearing trainers? No, he I she (4) ....

1 does complete the sentences with the present


4 Copy and complete 1-4 with the correct forms
simple form of the verbs in brackets.
2 doo' thave of be. Use short forms where possible.
.a ffnfshes 1 Jenna ... (do) a lot of sport in her free time .
4 womes 2 We ... (not have) time to play that game now. 5 Write questions using the present continuous.
5 doesn't go 3 That Aim ... (finish) at lam! 1 you I feel/ hungry?
4 My dad ... (worry) when l come home late. 1 Are you
2 you I wear I jeans I today?
5 Jay ... (not go) to concerts very often. 3 your parents I work I at the moment?
feeling
hungry?
4 you I speak I English?

1 Do your
friends go to
3 Write the questions. Then write answers that
are true for you.
you I belong to I any clubs?
-
~

.:'
XPRESS VOURS ~LF
I
2 Are Y?U
weanng
jeans today?
3 Are your
the cinema?
Yes, they do. I Do you belong to any club<;? 6 Work in pairs. Ask and answer the questions parents
working
No, they Ve<;, I do. I belong to a tenni<; club. from exercise 5.
don't. at the
moment?
2 Does your 1 your friends I go I to the cinema? 7 Complete the dialogue with the present
school 2your school I organize I interesting trips? 4 Are you
continuous form of the verbs in brackets. speaking
organize 3 your parents I like I pop music?
interesting English?
trips? Yes, it 4 your town I have I a football team?
does. I No, it ..
doesn't.
3 Do your Tom: What (1) ... (you I do)?
parents like Anna: I (2) ... (look) at some photos.
pop music?
Tom: Did you take them?
Yes. thev do. I 2 'm looking
No, the'y Anna: Yeah. I (3) ... (study) photography.
3 'm studying
don't. Tom: Well, they (4) ... (not teach) you much! I
(s) ... (not joke) -these photos are bad! 4 aren't
4 Does your
teaching
town have Anna: What's wrong with this one?
a football 5 'm not joking
Tom: The sun (6) ... (shine), and you (7) ... (not
team? Yes, it 6 's shining
In English, the word order changes in stand) in the right place to take the photo.
does. I No, it 7 aren't
doesn't. present simple questions. Is this the same Anna: How about this one of my brother? He
standing
in your language? (8) ... (make) a funny face!
8 's making

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Present simple: affirmative , 3 • Nominate two students to read aloud the
negative and questions example question and answer.
• Check students understand belong to (if you
.._ • • • • • J ~· - J ~ ~ . -.: belong to a club, you are a member) .
-- -- - -
• They work individually and write the
In thf$ lesson students will:
questions and answers that are true for them .
• revise the present simp!~: affirmative,
• They compare answers in pairs.
n~ive, questions and ShOrt answers
• Check answers as a class.
• re\llse th$ ~nt oollltinuous: affirmative,
negative, questions aF!d short answers

Ask students to read the information about


Warmer word order in present simple questions in
Write the sentence You can do urban sports English and compare it with their language.
in any city on the board with the words in
the wrong order: sports city you do in any
can urban. Students work in pairs and write
Present continuous:
the sentence in the correct order. Write the affirmative, negative and
correct sentence on the board. questions
4 • Students read the three examples in the first
1 • Students copy the table into their notebooks.
part of the table. Remind them that this is the
• They complete the table with the correct
present continuous and that we use this tense
forms of like, play and live.
to talk about things that are happening now.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Students copy the tables into their notebooks.
• Check answers as a class.
• They complete gaps 1-4 using the correct
• Highlight the fact that the auxiliary verb do
form of be.
is used to form negative sentences and
• They compare answers in pairs.
questions in English.
• Check answers as a class. Point out that
2 • Ask students to look at the spelling rules on we usually use short forms in the present
page 19. Explain the task. continuous except in affirmative short
• Fill in the first gap with the whole class as an answers.
example (does).
5 • Do the first question with the whole class as
• Students work individually to complete the
an example (Are you feeling hungry?).
task.
• Students work individually and write present
• They compare answers in pairs.
continuous questions using the prompts.
• Check answers as a class. Remind students
• They compare answers in pairs.
that we use the present simple to talk about
• Check answers as a class.
habits, routines and permanent situations.
E XPRESS YOURSELF

6 • Students work in pairs and ask and answer
the questions from exercise 5.
Highlight the fact that does in exercise
• Listen to some answers as a class.
2 sentence 1 is the third person form of
the main verb do and is different from 7 • Students complete the dialogue individually.
the auxiliary verb do that is used to make • Check answers as a class.
questions and negatives. Elicit the question
form: Does Jenna do a lot of sport in her free
time? I
--····
.......
~

.
•••
Pronunciation lab: Third person verb
endings, page 124

Digital course: l~tera~ctly~ g~~m'!'!ar table

Study guide: page 19 \'

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Vocabulary and Listening
Skills and abilities 4
• Explain that students will hear talent show
·. ~ ;:- ' ' ~ ", ) .. ' I/ ' ' : -: judges talking to some of the contestants
- - - from exercise 2. They should listen and write
In this lesson stUdents will:
down the names of the contestants.
• learn some verbs related to skills
• Play the CD.
• listen for speoiffc infermation
• Check answers as a class.

5 • Give students time to read the six sentences


Warmer before they listen again.
Write musical instrument on the board. Elicit • Play the CD again. Students decide if the
examples of musical instruments from the sentences are true or false. They correct the
class and make a list on the board, eg piano, false sentences.
guitar; violin, drums, keyboards. • Students compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.
1
• Explain the task.
• Play the CD. Students listen and repeat the
words for the different skills chorally and
individually. Judge 1: Well ... you've certainly got your own
• Make sure they pronounce the words style of singing, which I like, but I think you need
correctly, especially joke /d.3;:}uk/ and to work on your voice. It's not strong enough at
the moment.
motorbike /m;:}Ut;:}baik/.
Judge 2: Yes, I agree with Donna. That's a
2 beautiful song, but at the moment you aren't
really expressing the feelings in it. Do you have
• Students read the information about the
singing lessons, Zak?
talent show contestants carefully first. Zak: Er, no.
• Play the CD. Students copy and complete Judge 2: Well, you should have some. We're
the introductions in their notebook using the not saying you haven't got talent. You have. But
words from the word pool in exercise 1. that's not enough on its own.
• They compare answers in pairs. Judge 1: So this time, you aren't successful ...
but maybe in a few months' time you'll be one of
• Play the CD again. Students listen and check
the winners. Don't give up and good luck!
their answers. Zak: Er, thanks. _
Judge 2: Well, Kelly and Jamie! That was a great
Look! , performance! You move well and you look good
together. Well done! Donna?
Highlight the expressions in the Look! box. Judge 1: Mmm, I agree. How many hours a
Point out that can I aan't -are followed by the week do you train, guys?
infinitive without to (dance) whilt gQOdat I Kelly: Two hours a day from Monday to Friday,
not very good at are fQIIc;,wed by the '-{ng and more on Saturdays and Sundays.
form. Point out the stress in I can dance.and Judge 1: Well, it shows. Just one thing, though
-try to relax more when you're dancing. You
I can't dance. looked very serious, as if you weren't enjoying
yourselves!
__,

* XPRESS YOURSEL :l"


Jamie: That's because we were nervous!
Judge 1: OK, fair enough. Anyway,
3 • Explain the task. congratulations! You go through to the next
• Students work individually and write a list of stage of the show!
things they can I can't do and things they are
good at I not very good at. Encourage them to
look at the word pool in exercise 1 for ideas.
• They work in pairs and compare their skills
and abilities.
• Listen to their ideas as a class.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Vocabulary and Listening
Skills and abilities
Listen and repeat the words in the box.

act sing dance PJaio.t Cil rtaw cook bake a cake play a musiGal instrument
write songs tell jokes ride a motorbike do tricks drive a car speak a language

Read and listen to the text. Copy and Listen to part of a TV talent show.
complete the introductions with words from Which contestants from exercise 1 are the contestant
3 sing exercise 1. Then listen and check your answers. judges talking to? hasn't got a
strong voice.
4 play a
musical
5 Listen again. Are the sentences true or false? 2 True
instrument Correct the false sentences. 3 False
I can't dance. He doesn't
5 write songs good I not very good at dancing. 1 The first contestant has got a strong voice. win this
6 tell jokes 2 Zak doesn't have singing lessons. part of the
3 He wins this part of the competition. competition .
XPAESS 4 The judges like Kelly and Jamie. 4 True
; . YOUR SELF
5 They don't practise every day. 5 False
3 Work in pairs. What skills and abilities have 6 They looked unhappy when they were They
practise
you got? Compare your skills and abilities. performing. every day.
0 I'm t oad at drawint. but I can't write poetry 6 True
1-iow about you?
0 lean ...

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


There are over so amusement
parks in the UK. The Blackgang
Chifle Park on the Isle of Wight,
which first opened in 1843, is
the oldest one in the UK!

Aquarium;
Beamish,
the Living
Museum of
the North;
Magic
Unicorn
Theme Park 2 Read and listen to the text. Which CULTURAL COMPARISON
2 Giant S'vving, attraction Is scary and very big?
Adrenaline 4 Answer the questions about an interesting tourist
Quarry
3 Beamish,
13 Read the text again and answer the questions. attraction in your country.
the Living 1 Which three attractions give you the chance 1 What is the most popular attraction for
Museum of to learn new skills? teenagers in your country?
the North; 2 Which place isn't suitable for young children? 2 What can you do there?
Giant Swing,
Adrenaline 3 Which two attractions are better than 3 Do you think there are more interesting
Quarry expected? attractions in the UK or in your country?
4 Blue Planet 4 Which tourist attraction is expensive?

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Cultural awareness
Tourist attractions in the CULTURAL COMPARISON

United Kingdom 4 • Students read the three questions.


• They work in pairs and discuss the answers.
L:::.::sort o·_:~~...:.-.t~\/~;.3 • Listen to their ideas as a class.
---- --- -~

In this lesson students will:


Culture video: Musuems and gal!eries
• read a text about amusem•nt J*'k$ and
theme . ...
• compare tourist attractiens in th' UK with
tourist attractiens in their eountry

Warmer
Books closed. Write the word Disneyland on
the board. Ask students what it is and where
it is in Europe. Elicit that it is an amusement
park and that it is in France, just outside
Paris. Ask students to read the Fact box
about amusement parks in the UK.

1 • Students look at the pictures.


• They work in pairs and say which attractions
look the most fun and why.
• Listen to their ideas as a class.

2
• Check students understand the task.
• Play the CD. Students follow the text in their
books.
• Students compare the answer in pairs.
• Check the answer as a class.

Alton Towers, 80 kilometres north-west of


Birmingham, is the most visited theme park
in the United Kingdom and the 9th most
visited in Europe.

3 • Students read the four questions carefully


first.
• They read the text again and find the
answers.
• Students compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

Word check
Check students understand the words. Make
sure they can pronounce them correctly with
the correct stress, especially old-fashioned,
traditional and rollercoaster.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Grammar
Present simple and present 3 • Students work individually to complete the
continuous exercise.
• Students compare answers in pairs.
L ·~-.:., ~ .- • Check answers as a class.

In thie lesaoo stud•rrts will: 4 • Make sure students understand they should
• contrast 1he prtsent simple and 1he use either the present simple or the present
presenteontinuou.s continuous to complete the dialogue, using
• read a text about art the verbs in brackets.
• Students work individually and then compare
answers in pairs.
Warmer • Check answers as a class.
Books closed. Write the gapped sentences
I T-shirts in the summer. and I'm
_ _ a jumper today. on the board,
Point out that some verbs are never used in
changing jumper as necessary so that the
the continuous form. They are usually verbs
sentence is true for you. Students work in
that describe states rather than actions.
pairs and suggest words to fill the gaps.
Examples are know, love, sound and believe
Check answers as a class (wear, wearing).
in the dialogue and belong in the previous
grammar lesson.
1 • Students read the example sentences in the
table and complete the rules.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Highlight the difference between habits
Grammar in context: Art
5 • This activity practises the difference
(things that we do regularly) and activities in
between the present simple and present
progress (things happening right now).
continuous and the correct position of
2 • Make sure students understand all the time time expressions.
words. Check their meanings by asking • Ask students to read the whole text before
students to translate them into their language. they choose the correct answers.
• Students complete the sentences with either • Point out that look forward to means to
present simple or present continuous. feel happy and excited about something
• Students compare answers in pairs. that is going to happen.
• Check answers as a class. • Students work indivtdually to complete
the exercise.
Look! • They compare answers in pairs.

Read the example sentences aloud to the 6


whole class. Point out that the words always, • Play the CD. Students listen and check
usually, often, sometimes and never go their answers to exercise 5.
before the main verb in affirmative sentences
in the present simple. Highlight that the other
time words and expressions in the table
Students use the internet to find the names
come at the end of the sentence.
of three other impressionist artists and the
name of a painting by each artist.

Point out that the verb be is an exception


to the first rule highlighted in the Look! box. ......
, •• :. Pronunciat ion rab: Intonation In
·· ·-:- questions, page 124
Always, usually, often, sometimes and never
go after the verb be in the present simple, eg
Digital course: Interactive grammar table
He's always late.
Study guide: page 19

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Gramma r aiD 1 Sam doesn't
usually go
Present simple and present 3 Copy and complete the sentences with the swimming
correct form of the verbs in brackets. Then on Monday.
continuous write the time expression in the correct 2 We're
playing
1 Study the table and choose the correct words to place.
tennis at the
complete the rules. In July, Jo ... (go) to the beach. every weekend moment.
3 My parents
b activities in
progress
present simple present _ ,....... - ·- 1
In July. Jo goes; to the beach every weekend.
Sam ... (not go) swimm ing on Monday.
don't rent
DVDs,
I usually hate We're enjoying th is trip but they
museums. today! usually sometimes
2 We ... (play) tennis. at the moment watch films
a) We use the present simple to talk about 3 My parents don't rent DVDs, but they ... on TV.
activities in progress I habits. (watch) films on TV. sometimes 4 I'm not
sending
b) We use the present continuous to talk about 4 I ... (not send) Matt a text message. now Matt a text
activities in progress I habits. 5 My brother ... (sing) in the shower! always message
now.
2 Study the time words table and complete the 4 Complete the dialogue with the present 5 My brother
1 present sentences with the correct tense. always
simple or present continuous form of the
continuous sings in the
words in brackets. shower.
2 present time words + present tense
simple Dan: Hi Kate. What (1) ... (you I do) ?
We use now, at the moment, today with the (1) ... .
Kate: I (2) ... (go) to the Chessington World
We use always, usually, often, sometime.s, never,
of Adventures. (3) ... (you I know) what
every clay, once a week I month I year with the 1 are you
it's like?
(~) ... . Dan: Yeah, my brother and I (4) ... (go I
doing
2 'mgoing
sometimes) there . It's amazing! 3 Do you
know
Kate: Wh at (5) ... (be) the best ride? 4 sometimes
Note the position of the time words and Dan: I (6) ... (love) the Dragon Falls. You go
~re$sions. (7) ... (get) wet at the end. 5 is
Kate: It (8) ... (sound) cool! Oh no! I (9) ... (not 6 love
i'rarry sometimes goes to theme parks. 7 get
l:farry is playing football at the moment. believe) it! It (to) ... (rain)! 8 sounds
9 don't
believe
Grammar in context: Art 10 's raining

5 Read the text and choose the correct answers.


c
2 B Art (1) ... my favourite subject. We (2) ... all aboutfamous
artists from the past and present and we (3) ... ourselves
3 B
too. Our teacher, Mr Brown, (4) ... us lots of different
4 A techniques, but we (5) ... them properlyl
5 B Today we (6) ... on a school trip to The National Gallery,
6 c which (7) ... one of the biggest collections of art in
7 c the world.
8 B We (8) ... Impressionism as part of our GCSE art course
9 A at the moment and I (9) .. . forward to seeing some of van
10 A Gogh's work. I (1 0) .. . his paintings.
• listen and check your answers.

: ut. TASK

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Teenagers looking for adventure
Are you 13-16 years old? Do you want to make new friends,
do some cool activities and have fun this autumn? If the
answer is yes!, then why not spend a weekend in September
or October at Greenwood Activity Camp? You'll enjoy two and
a half days of ad venture, doing your f<lllou rite activities and
learning amaz1ng new skills!
ACli'U'l1lnE:S 0~ OUR /i.Dl\ftftTUfl.!E WEftt£fNlS UliCI..UCJE;
swimming parkour singing
sailing painting creative writing
skateboarding photography ... and more!

Price of £150 includes accommodation in log cabins and


all meals. Visit our website www.g rc""rWP.)iJd U Hl'lp.com
and sign up today!

Step 2: List~!i~
1 Read the advert and answer the questions. 3 ~) ; Listen to a phone conversation about
1 Young parkour
the Greenwood Activity Camp. Which three
people from 1 Who can sign up for an adventure weekend?
activities does Owen mention?
13-16 years 2 When are the adventure weekends?
old. 3 Hovv !ong do they last?
2 September
4 Listen again and choose the correct answers.
4 How much do they cost?
or October. 1 Owen thinks the camp will be boring I
5 Where do the teenagers stay?
3 Two and a interesting.
half days. 2 Would you like to go on an adventure 2 joe likes I doesn't like sport.
4 £150. weekend? Why (not)? 3 joe thinks he won't like the people I
5 In log activities at the camp.
cabins.
4 joe likes photography I parkour.
5 Owen is looking at a website 1an advert
about the camp.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Integrated skills
At an activity camp 2 • Students work in pairs and discuss the
questions.
~ . ~ ; -:._·. \ l ~-~ . ..=..· ·_--;: ' ': ·=~: • Listen to their ideas as a class and
--~- "'----

encourage them to give reasons for their


In this lessen students will:
answers, eg I would like to go because I
• work on an four skills
enjoy sailing. I wouldn't fike to go because I
• read an advert about an aCtivity camp
wouldn't like to sfeep in a fog cabin.
• listen to someone registering for an
a(Nenture weekend
• w~ a personaltted dialogue
• act out.,. dialogue 3
• Check students understand the task.
Students listen and write down three
Warmer activities that Owen mentions.
Highlight the information about Chris in the • Play the CD.
speech bubble. Elicit answers to the question • Students compare answers in pairs.
Do you like adventures? as a class. Write • Check answers as a class.
the word activity camp on the board. Ask
4 • Explain the task.
students to work in pairs and write down
• Play the CD again. Students choose the
what they expect to do at an activity camp,
correct answers.
eg swimming, skateboarding, playing tennis,
• They compare answers in pairs.
etc. Listen to their ideas as a class and make
• Check answers as a class.
a list on the board.

Joe: Hi Owen. How's it going?


Students rank the activities at an activity
Owen: Fine. Listen, I've just seen something that
camp written on the board in order of
sounds really interesting.
preference. Joe: Oh yeah? What's that?
Owen: It's an advert for adventure weekends at
an activity camp for teenagers this autumn.
Step 1: Read .: Joe: Ugh, sounds boring ...
Owen: Why do you say that? You're into sport
r 1 • Explain to students that when we look at and stuff. It's just your kind of thing!
texts like this we usually have some idea Joe: But doing group activities with people you
of what we are looking for first. We do not don't like? Not me! We do that at school!
Owen: Oh, come on! How do you know you
usually begin at the beginning of the text and
won't like the other people? Anyway, you don't
read everything. We scan the text until we get the chance to do things like this at school.
find what we are looking for. Joe: Yeah? So, what kind of things?
• Students read the five questions carefully Owen: Sailing, photography, parkour ...
first. Joe: Parkour? Can you do parkour at this place?
• They look in the advert and find the answers Owen: Yeah. And not only that - I'm looking at
their website now and it says that one of the
to the questions.
tutors is a famous parkour expert.
• Students compare answers in pairs. Joe: Oh wow! It's starting to sound interesting
• Check answers as a class. Make sure now. Can you give me the website address, and
students understand log cabins (small, I'll have a look.
wooden houses).

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Integrated skills - continued
Asking for personal 8 • Ask students to look at the Communication
information kit: Asking for personal information.
Encourage them to use these questions in
5 their dialogue.
• Explain the task. Students listen to a • Students work individually and write their
conversation and complete the gaps. dialogue, using the dialogue in the book as a
• Ask students to look at the gaps and elicit model.
from them the information they need to listen • Monitor while they are writing and give help if
for (an address, a mobile phone number, an necessary.
email address, a date of birth).
• Play the CD. Students write the answers in Step 4: Communicate
their notebooks.
9 • Students practise their dialogues in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.
• For extra practice, they swap roles in both
6 • Play the CD again , pausing after each dialogues.
question or statement and each response for
10 • Choose some pairs to act out their dialogue
students to repeat as a class.
for the class.
• Note the main stress and the falling
• Make sure students say the email address
intonation in the wh- questions: What's your
and phone number correctly.
narp~? What's your adq~~~?
• Ask students to repeat the dialogue several
Integrated skills: Workbook page 111
times both chorally and individually with the
correct stress and intonation.
• Students practise the dialogue in pairs. They
then swap roles and practise the dialogue
again.

Giving your email address and phone


number
Ask students to read the information in the
Skills builder box. Highlight the use of at and
dot when we say email addresses. Point out
that in phone numbers we say individual
numbers. We say double or treble for
repeated numbers: 22 =double two and 222
=treble two.

Step 3: Write
7 • Students copy the questions in bold from the
dialogue into their notebooks and write their
answers.
• They read the advert again and choose two
activities that they would like to do.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Hello. I'd like to register for one of your OK, great! I just need a few details from you .
adventure weekends. 1 What's your name?
Chris Bradley. i And what's your address, Chris?
I

(1) ... . OK. What's your mobile phone number?


(2) ... . OK. Have you got an email address?
Yes, it's (3) ... . Can you spell that for me?
Yes. It's c·h·r·i·s at i·n·m·a-i-1 dot co dot uk. Great, thanks. Oh, I nearly forgot! What's your
date of birth?
(4) ... . OK, great. Here's a leaflet for you with more
information about the camp.

5 ·: Listen to Chris registering for an 8 Write a new dialogue. Use the dialogue in
adventure weekend. Copy and complete 1-4. exercise 5 to help you.

6 Listen again and repeat. Practise your 1-Je//o I'd like to regic;ter ...
3 eMs@
intonation. OK, greatl What£- your name'?
lnmall.ro.uk
· 4 The fourth of
Apri11999 Step 4: Communicate
Giving your email address and phone
number 9 Work in pairs. Take turns to practise your
In English, we say at for the @ sign and dot dialogues.
for the . mark.
~ 1-/e//o. I'd like to regic;ter ...
We write a phone number like this: 220785 .
We can say the phone number like this: OK. great! What£- your name'?
double two zero, seven eight five.
10 Act your dialogue for the class.

Step J: Write {:~c•tJi!fft.~U~~~cJ~:rcow t =


Asking for personal information
7 Copy the questions in bold and write your
What's your name? I What's your address?
answers. Then look at the advert again and
What's your date of birth?
choose two activities that you would like to do.
What's your mobile phone number?
Have you got an email address?

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Writing
A personal profile

Claire Edwards
Hi! My name's Claire Edwards and I'm 14 years old.
I'm from Cardiff in Wales. I live with my mum and
dad and my 12-year-old brother Sam, who's a big
computer fan. My best friends are Holly and Anita.
I love music. I listen to music all the time and I play
the guitar in a band with some of my friends. We're
called The Daisies and we play rock and pop music.
I write the songs, but I don't like singing because
I'm shy! I'm writing a new song at the moment.
I also love going shopping because I'm really into
fashion . My favourite colour is green, so I've got
lots of green clothes! I' m not very sporty, but I
sometimes go rollerblading in the park.

f Read and listen to the profile. 3 Copy and complete the notes about Claire.
1 Because she Then answer the questions. : Nationality
Nationality: Family members: Welsh
is shy.
Why does Claire ... Friends: Likes and dislikes:
2 Because Family
1 not like singing? · members
she's really 4 Read the Writing focus again. Complete the
2 love going shopping? Mum, dad,
into fashion.
3 have lots of green clothes? sentences with because or so. brother Sam
3 Because
her favourite 1 I'm an animal lover ... I've got lots of pets. Friends
colour is 2 look at the Writing focus. How do you say Holly and Anita
2 I like dancing ... it's fun .
green. because and so in your language? Likes and
3 I'm into sports ... I like riding my bike.
4 I don't go to pop concerts ... I'm too young.
I dislikes
' Likes: music,
shopping,
WRITING FOCUS green clothes,
students' own
because and sa
Writing task rollerblading
answers
We use because when we give a reason Write a personal profile. Dislikes:
for something. singing, sport
Plan Make notes like the ones in exercise 3
I also love going shopping because l'rn about you.
really into fashion.
We use so when we talk about the result Wr"ite Write your personal profile. Use your notes
of something. and the profile in exercise 1 to help you.
1 so
My favourite colour is green, so I've got Gtv··<:.w Check your writing. 2 because
lots of green clothes.
3 so
~ present simple ~ because and so
4 because
~ present continuous

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Writing
A personal profile
Write two pairs of sentences on the board:
Lesson objecttves
-- - - - It was sunny./ went to the beach. and It was
In this lesson students wifl: raining. I stayed at home. Ask students to
• re.o a pel'$onal preflfe combine the sentences in each pair in two
• u~e because and lQ tQ ~ve reasons and ways using so and because: It was sunny
link ideas so I went to the beach. I went to the beach
• write a ~nar p11>tile because it was sunny. It was raining so I
stayed at home. I stayed at home because it
was raining.
Warmer
Write music, free time activity, favourite
colour on the board. Ask students to guess Writing task
what your favourite things are in each
The aim of this activity is for students to
category.
produce a piece of guided writing that
includes the correct use of the present simple
1
and the present continuous. It also gives them
• Remind students that likes are things you like
practice in using because and so correctly.
and dislikes are things you don't like.
Ask the students to follow the stages in the
• Students read the questions.
Student's Book. Encourage them to use their
• Play the CD. Students follow the text in their
notes and the profile in exercise 1. At the
books and then answer the questions.
Check stage, ask them to swap notebooks
• Students compare answers in pairs.
and check each other's writing.
• Check answers as a class. Point out that if
you say you are into something, you like it
very much. •,
Writing reference and practice: Workbook page 120
2 • Students read the notes in the Writing focus
box.
• Check that they understand the words
reason and result and highlight the fact that
we use because with reasons and so with
results.
• Ask students to translate because and so
into their language.

3 • Students work individually and copy and


complete the notes about Claire.
• Students compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

4 • Ask students to read the Writing focus again.


They work individually and complete the
sentences using because or so.
• Students compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Study guide
Grammar, Vocabulary and Speaking
Tell the students the Study guide is an Vocabulary
important page which provides a useful • Tell students to look at the list of vocabulary
reference for the main language of the unit: the and check understanding.
grammar, the vocabulary and the functional • Refer students to the Wordlist on page 151
language from the Integrated skills pages. of the Workbook where they can look up any
Explain that they should refer to this page when words they can 't remember.
studying for a test or exam.
Speaking
• Check that students understand the phrases
Grammar to use for asking for personal information .
• Tell the students to look at the example • Tell students to act out a conversation in
sentences of the present simple: affirmative, pairs to exchange personal information such
negative, questions and short answers. Make as email addresses, dates of birth, etc.
sure they understand how to form the tense
and its usage.
• Then tell students to look at the example
Additional material
sentences of the present continuous: Workbook
affirmative, negative, questions and short • Progress check page 14
answers. Make sure they understand how to • Self-evaluation page 15
form the tense and its usage. Get students • Grammar reference and practice pages
to translate into their own language if 84-85
necessary. • Vocabulary extension page 102
• Tell students to look at the present simple • Integrated skills page 111
and present continuous example sentences • Writing reference and task pages 120-121
with time words. Make sure students
understand which time words are used with
each tense.
• Refer students to the Grammar reference
on pages 84-85 of the Workbook for further
revision.

• Basics section pages 5-1 0 • Unit 1 End-of-unit test: Basic, Standard and
• Vocabulary and grammar consolidation Extra
pages 3-6 • CEFR Skills Exam Generator
• Translation and dictation pages 2, 12
• Evaluation rubrics pages 1-7
• Key competences worksheets pages 1-2
• Culture and CLIL worksheets pages 1-4
• Culture video worksheets pages 1-2
• Digital competence worksheets pages 1-2
• Macmillan Readers worksheets pages 1-2

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Study guide

Present simple: affirmative, Vocabulary


negative and questions Free time activities
chat online hang out with your friends
affirmative
do water sports listen to music
1/ We I You / They wear casual clothes. go for a run play computer games
He I She /It watches films. go shopping play volleyball
negative go to a cafe send text messages
1/ We I You I They don't study art. go to a concert surf the internet
He I She / It doesn't play (Ugby. go to the gym watch a DVD
questions and short answers
Do 0 VOlJ I we l they 'live in a house? Skills and abilities
Yes, I do. f No, I don't. act paint
Does he / she I it like to sing? bake a cake play a musical instrument
Yes he I she I it does. / No, he I she I it doesn't. cook ride a motorbike
dance sing
We use the present simple to talk about habits,
do tricks speak a language
routines and permanent situations.
draw tell jokes
Present continuous: affirmative, drive a car write songs
negative and questions
affirmative Third person spelling rules
I'm dancing. • For most verbs, add -s to the infinitive
We 'I You I They're cooking. draw-+ draws cook-+ cooks
He /' She / It's watch ing a DVD.
negative • For verbs that end in-s, -sh, -ss, -ch, -x, or-o
add -es
I'm not talking to Jane.
do -+ does watch -+ watches
We I You /'Tney_ aren't listen ing.
He I She I It isn't swim ming. • For verbs that end in consonant+ -y, omit
questions and short answers the -y and add -ies
fly-+ flies study-+ studies
Am I golngJast? Yes, I am!
Are we Ly,au I they eat ing? Yes, we are. • Irregular verbs don't follow the rules!
Is he I she I it pJaying the guitar? No, he isn't. have-+ has be-+ is
We use the present continuous to talk about things
that are happening now.
Speaking
Present simple and present Asking for
continuous personal information
present simple What's your name? I What's your address?
I usually send text messages to friend s. What's your date of birth?
What's your mobile phone number?
present continuous
Have you got an email address?
We 're geing to the cinema tonight!

time words + present tense


We use now, at the moment, today, tonight with
the present con tinuous. Don't use the same adjectives again and again
We use always, usually, often, sometimes, in your writing work. Find other adjectives that
never, every day, once a week I month I year have a similar meaning. This makes your work
with the present simple. more interesting to read.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


- ---- - -- - ----·-

In this unit the student will learn ••• In this unit the student will learn how to ••.
• understand, memorize and correctly use • identify specific information in a magazine
vocabulary related to literature and professions article about the mobile phone novel CLC DC CAE
CLC CMST SCC CAE V look online for information about their favourite
• understand and correctly use the past simple writers, write a short biography and exchange
CLC L2L information with their partner CLC DC CAE SIE
• understand and correctly form questions and • identify specific information in a presentation
complete a text using was I were and could I about people who changed the world CLC sec
couldn't CLC L2L CMSTCAE
• about the Edinburgh Fringe festival in Scotland • read information about King Arthurs labyrinth, listen
and compare with festivals in their country CLC to someone phoning for information and learn how
SCCCAE to ask about an experience CLC CAE sec SIE
• about Scotland by watching a short video CLC • write a review of an interesting place CLC SIE L2L
CMSTDCCAE • prepare for and do a matching key information
exam CLC SIE L2L

Main vocabulary
• Read a magazine article about the mobile phone novel
• Literature: autobiography,
• Read a text about the Edinburgh Fringe festival
biography, detective story, etc
• Read an information leaflet about a tourist attraction
• Professions: pilot, painter,
• Read a review
comedian, etc

Grammar
• Write a personalized dialogue about an experience
• Past simple
• Write a review in three steps: plan, write, check
• was I were
• Learn how to use a/so and too
e could I couldn't

Functional language
• Listen to an interview about people who changed the
• Phrases for asking about
world
experiences
• Listen to someone phoning for information
Pronunciation
• Past simple verb endings
• Exchange information about books you would like to read
• /;J/
• Ask and answer questions using could

• Prepare and act out a dialogue about an experience

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


~. 11

. 1 ' .) ' evaluation


I • • • \

• Unit 2 End-of-unit test: Basic, Standard and Extra


Self-study and
• CEFR Skills Exam Generator
self-evaluation
• Study guide:
Student's Book page 29
• Progress check and self-
evaluation :
• Listening: Matching key information
Workbook pages 22-23
• Grammar reference and practice:
Workbook pages 86-87
Digital material
• Wordlist:
Workbook pages 151-15 7 Pulse Live! Digital Course including:
• Interactive grammar tables
Learning stra egie
• Audio visual speaking model: Asking about an
and thinking skills
experience
• Using what, why, where and how
• Audio visual cultural material: Scotland
for past simple questions
Student's website
Cu tural awareness
• A quick guide to the Edinburgh
Fringe Festival
• Comparing festivals in Scotland
with festivals in students' own
countries and regions

Cross-curricular
contents
• Literature: Charles Dickens,
festivals
• Readfng and writing a review
• ICT: searching the internet for
information

• Fast-finisher activity: Student's Book page 21


CLC Competence in linguistic • Extra activities: Teacher's Book pages T26, T28
communication • Vocabulary and Grammar: Extension worksheets ,
CMST Competence in mathematics, Teacher's Resource File pages 9-10
science and technology
DC Digital competence
sec Social and civic Teacher's Resource Ftte
competences
CAE Cultural awareness and • Translation and dictation worksheets pages 3, 13
expression • Evaluation rubrics pages 1-7
L2L Learning to learn • Key competences worksheets pages 3-4
SIE Sense of initiative and • Culture and CLIL worksheets pages 5-8
entrepreneurship • Culture video worksheets pages 3-4
• Digital competence worksheets pages 3-4
• Macmillan Readers worksheets pages 1-2

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


kind of books do you like?
3 autobiography
4 travel guide
Vocabulary and Speaking Do you prefer fiction or
non-fiction?
5 adventure Literature
story
6 biography Look at the literary genres. Listen and repeat the words.
7 science fiction
adventure story autobiography biography comic novel cookery book detective novel
novel
fairy tale historical novel poetry book romantic novel science fiction novel thriller travel guide
My Side and
Steve Jobs:
The man who 2 · ~ Complete the comments with words from exercise 1. Which two books are
thought different
about real people? Listen and check.
are about real
people.

home best sellers

This is a (4) ... about


sorne great places
in Europe. There is
information about lots of
interesting things to see
and do in Europe,
Jess, 15

3 Match the definitions with words from exercise 1. 5 Make notes about a book you enjoyed reading.
1 A story about trying to solve a crime . Title: Age whenyou re<Jd it:
novel 2A traditional story about magical events.
Author: Why you liked it
I2 fairy tale 3 A book that helps you to make food.
3 cookery book 4 An exciting story, often about danger or crime. Kinct of booK:
4 thriller 5 A fiction book about people and events in the
5 historical past. 6 Worl< in pairs. Ask and answer questions about
novel
your books from exercise 4.
XPRESS 'lfOii.JlRS ELF
!Nhatl: the title? When did you read it ?
11\thol: the author? • lM!y did you like it?
What kind of book is: it?

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


THE STORY OF THE MOBILE PHONE NOVEL
A few years ago, a 19-year-old Japanese girl started writing a
novel about her life in a small town. She finished it in just three
weeks and gave it the title Dreams Come True. Akiko wasn 't an
experienced writer and didn't expect anyone to be interested in
her tale. Yet when it came out a few months later, the romantic
novel was a great success. It sold over 200,000 copies.
It's an incredible story. The most amazing thing about it,
thaugtl, is the fact that Akiko wrote the no~elon j-rer mobile
phoJ"Ie! As she wrote, she posted It, chapter ey chapter, on a
webs1te where readers coult'l dowolead it immediately. She
worked on it whenever she could -mostly while she was
relaxing at home. She didn't think too much about the story and
she didn't rewrite anything!
Akiko was one of the first of a new generation of novelists in
Japan who write novels as 11 the_y are writing a text message.
They wnte in a simple, chatt.Y.style and use lots et abbreviations
ana 'e~t~oticons' . They know how to tell a good story, but they
don't worry too much about grammar and spelling.
Some people we~e cri ti~al of mobile Rhon~ novels at first
They thought they,were a bad influence on teenage girls,
who preferr~ thefl'i to 'proper' literature. However, they are
now popular With peQple of ell I ages. Many of ·t~e best-selling
paperback books In J!lpan were orlgma!ly moblte ph'one novels!

post download chatty abbreviation emoticon influence paperback

Reading 3 Read the article again and choose the correct


answers. 1b
A magazine article 2 b
1 Akiko wrote her novel very ...
1 Look at the picture. What is the girl doing? a) slowly. b) quickly. 3 a
She's texting. I How much time do you spend doing this 2 Akiko ... experience of writing books. 4a
She's writing a activity per day? a) had b) didn't have 5 a
text message. I 3 People were first able to read Dreams Come
She's sending
a text
2 {> ii Read and listen to the article. Answer True on ...
message. the questions with yes or no. a) the internet.
students' own b)their mobile phones.
1 Was Dreams Come True about true
answers 4 Mobile phone novelists write ...
experiences?
a) the way people speak.
2 Did readers like Dreams Come True?
b) in long sentences. _
3 Did the author write the novel on her
5 In Japan, mobile phone novels are ...
computer?
a) very successful.
1 yes 4 Is the language in a mobile phone novel
b) only read by teenage girls.
2 yes always correct?
3 no 5 Do mobile phone novels sometimes become
4 no paper books?
5 yes Would you like to read a mobile phone
novel? Why (not)?
I would lite I wouldn't like to read a mobile
phone novel because ...

Find out about one of your favourite writers.


Make notes about their:
' Name Nationality • Titles of books web page for their latest
Date of birth • Kind of books news and biography.
Write a short biography.
~ Work in pairs. Tell your partner about your writer. Ask and answer questions.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


We form the
affirmative past Past simple affirmative
simple tense of
regular verbs
She finished the novel in 19 days.
1 Look at the affirmative examples of the past
by adding -ed. She wrote the novel on a phone.
simple in the table. Which verb is regular and
negative
which is irregular?
They didn't like mobile phone novels.
2 How do we form the affirmative past simple They didn't think about the story.
tense of regular verbs? questions
Did you enjoy the book?
3 Complete the rules.
Did you find that website?
a) To make negative past simple sentences, we short answers
use ... followed by the infinitive form of the
went Yes, I did.
verb.
liked No, I didn't.
b) We begin questions in the past simple tense
saw
with ....
got 6 Complete the book review with the past simple
started 4 Write the past simple form of the verbs in the form of the verbs in brackets.
read box in your notebook. Which verbs are regular?
started
1said THE
go like see get start read say wish loved
wished
come hate HUNGER GAMES didn't want
came
thought
hated My bntta.' [1 Jf1J111$ ~)rna The
liked. started. 5 Correct the sentences about the writer Suzanne Hunger Gena~ Suzanne Colna. had

wished and Collins. Use the words in brackets. for my ~ I (2) ... (nat.Chink}l found
hated are V«JUUd Ilks it, but as soon as I (3) ..• wanted
regular.
She liked dancing when she was 11. (reading) (stat) raadi1g it, I (4) ... lb'a) il l stayed
~he didn't like dcmcintf when >he wa,; II. ~he liked (5) ... (not want) it tD end!
didn't like
reading. I (6) ... (thinij 1t1e stay. which takes plaCs in
12 said
the f\Dn, was vary Cll'i(pl. This IJcxM f7) ...
1 She lived in New York for 18 years. (16 years) (have) an iJriJaual tfani. I [8) ... (find} Chi main
1 She qldn'llive in
2 She grew up in the same place. (different
New Yo~k for 18 ctlaracl'-. Katnias Ewrdaan. wry baliauable
years. Sl'fe lived places) and I reatJ (9) ... (wn) her to win the Hunger
in New York for 3 She started writing for children's television in Games compatitiQn. lhi" 8lDf'y was so i!K*ing
16 years. 1992 . (1991) that I (10) ... (stay} up Ill i91t to finish it!
2 She didn~t grow 4 Her books The Hunger Games Trf/ogy were Some people (11) ... (not like) the lxlokbecause
up in the same successfu l in one country. (lots of ~ountries) they (12) ... (say) there was tuo much~
place. S~e grew in it, tu I disagree. I can't wait to r8ad the next
up in different 5 She wrote a boo k about a cha rac ter ca lled
pl a~;:es. Gregor and his little brother. (little sister) book in the Sll'ies!
3 She didn't
start writing 7 Rewrite the sentences so they are true for you.
for children's Change the time expressions in bold.
televison in
1992. She 1 I sent her a text message two minutes ago.
started writng 2 I had something to eat half an hour ago.
for children's 3 I tidied my bedroom a few days ago.
television in 4 I saw a good film two weeks ago.
1991.
5 I bought so1·ne new shoes one monih ago.
4 Her books The
Hunger Games
Trilogy weren't
successful in
one country. In English, ago comes after time expressions.
Her books The That book came out two years ago.
Hunger Games I sent you an email a few minutes ago.
Trilogy were
successful in
Is the word order the same in your language?
lots of countries.
5 She didn't write
a book about a
character called
Gregor and his
little brother.
She wrote a
book about a
character called
Gregor and his
little sister.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Vocabulary and Speaking
Literature 2
• Check students understand the task.
j ., :_ r...... , ' · : - '_ • • Students work individually and complete the
comments using words from exercise 1.
In this lesson ·studei'd$ wilt
• They decide which two books are about real
• '""" I reviSe wems rer.ted to tltenlture people.
• ask ana an$wer questlon$ about Vie _ • Students compare answers in pairs.
bco
. . ...!'R
r...... th4U m- - ..dl
.. .Y'J -··~ ng
• Play the CD for students to listen and check
their answers.
• Check answers as a class.
Warmer
Books closed . Write book, author and title on
the board with the letters in the wrong order,
eg kobo, hotaur and ettli. Explain that the David Beckham was born in London,
three words are all connected with the topic England in 1975. He is the first English
of literature. Ask students to work in pairs footballer to win league championships in
and write the letters in the correct order to four different countries (England, Italy, the
spell the words. USA and France). He played 115 times for
the English national team. He is married to
Victoria, who was 'Posh Spice' in the 1990s
all-girl pop group, The Spice Girls, and is
Students work individually and answer the now a fashion designer.
questions. They compare answers in pairs.
Get feedback from the whole class.
3 • Ask students to read the definitions.
• Students work individually and find the words
1 in exercise 1 that match the definitions.
• Students look at literary genres. • They compare answers in pairs.
• Play the CD. Students listen to the words in • Check answers as a class.
the word pool and repeat them.
PRESS YOU RSELF
• Check students understand the difference
4 • Read the example sentence aloud to the
between an autobiography (a book someone
class.
writes about their own life) and a biography (a
• Students read _the questions and answer
book about a person's life written by another
them individually.
person).
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Make sure they pronounce biography
• Listen to their ideas as a class. Make sure
/bar'ografr/ correctly with the stress on
they give reasons.
the second syllable in autobiography and
biography. 5 • Explain the task. Make sure they understand
kind, meaning literary genre, eg thriller, travel
guide, etc.
• Students work individually and complete the
Point out that in compound words where
information.
both words are nouns, the first word usually
carries the main stress, eg adv_~ture story, 6 • Read the five questions aloud to the class
pgetry book. In compound nouns where the and ask students to repeat them chorally.
first word is an adjective, the second word is • Put students into pairs to ask and answer the
usually stressed, eg comic l]gx_el, historical questions.
novel. • Listen to some pairs as a class.

Vocabulary extension: Workbook page 103

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Reading
Text type: A magazine
article Mobile phone novels are typically very short
and some only have 70 to 100 words. The
l_ J~ ~
• :.. l; ' ' '- : ' • - t" I ,'
biggest website for mobile phone novels has
In this lesson students will: 3.5 billion visits a month. The mobile phone
• read a magazine artiele novel Mika was made into a film.
• read for specific;: Information The word emoticon is a blend of the words
emotion and icon. It's often thought that
emoticons are a product of the computer
Recommended web links : age but, in fact, they were used in letter
; www.handyroman. net/indexeng .html# 1 writing in the nineteenth century when

i they were commonly used in casual and


www.goodreads.com/group/show/1 03377-
humorous writing.
textnovel-cell-phone-novel-movement

litreactor.com/columns/app-tacular-writing-
3 • Students read the five questions and the
on-phones-smart-phones-and-tablets
different possible answers.
• They read the article again and choose the
correct answers.
Warmer
• Students compare answers in pairs.
Write the word mobile phone on the board.
• Check answers as a class and highlight the
Ask students to work in pairs and make a list
information in the Did you know? box.
of things they can do with a mobile phone.
Listen to their ideas as a class and write the
activities the board , eg send a text message,
call friends, take pictures. Ask fast finishers to answer the question and
make a list of reasons why or why not.
1 • Students read the two questions.
• They look at the picture and answer the
questions.
• Students compare answers in pairs.
Students find out about one of, heir favourite
• Check answers and get feedback from the
writers. Highlight the Web quest;'tip.
whole class.
1 • Students choose one of th~lt favourite
2
writers.
• Students read the questions carefully first.
• Ask students to open an internet web
• Play the CD. Students listen and follow the
browser such as Internet E~plorer.
article in their books.
Students open a search engine (eg
• Students compare answers in pairs.
Google) and type in the name of the
• Check answers as a class.
writer they have chosen.
• Stuelerrt-s find as much information as
Word check
they can and make notes.
Make sure students understand the words. Ask
2 • They write a short biography about their
them to translate them into their language.
chosen writer using the information they
have found.
3 • Students work in pairs. Th$y tell their
partner about their writer ane ask and
answer questions.
• Ask some students to pres.nt their
biography to the class.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Grammar
Past simple
Suzanne Collins was born in Connecticut,
the USA in 1962. She is a writer for children's
In this lesson students will: television and author of The Under/and
• learn I revise the past sJmple of regular Chronicles (a series of five books published
and irregular vert)s between 2003 and 2007) and The Hunger
• use the pa$t simple wmt time •xpressions Games Trilogy (published between 2008 and
wlth ago 201 0).

6 • Explain the task.


Warmer
• Students read the text carefully first.
Write the sentence Akiko wrote a novel on her
• They work individually and complete the
mobile phone on the board with the words in
book review with the past simple form of the
the wrong order: wrote Akiko novel phone her
verbs in brackets.
on a mobile. Students work in pairs and write
• Students compare answers in pairs.
the sentence in the correct order. Write the
• Check answers as a class.
correct sentence on the board.
7 • Explain the task. Rewrite the first sentence as
1 • Read the two affirmative sentences aloud to an example. Make the sentence true for you,
the class. eg I sent her a text message five hours ago.
• Ask Which verb is regular and which is • Students complete the exercise individually.
irregular? and elicit that finished is regular • Get feedback from the whole class.
and wrote is irregular.

2 • Ask How do we form the affirmative past


....._Analyse
simple tense of regular verbs? and elicit that Students read the information. Ask them
it is formed by adding -ed. to translate the example sentences and to
compare the word order in English with the
3 • Students work individually and complete the
word order in their language.
rules.
• They compare answers in pairs.

......
.....
• Check answers as a class.
. ...... Pronunciation lab: Past simple
4 • Students complete the exercise individually. ... endings, page "124
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class. Digital course: Interactive grammar table
• Point out that regular verbs ending in -e (eg
Study guide: page 29
like, hate, etc) form the past simple by adding
-d.
• Highlight the pronunciation of the present
simple read /ri:d/ and the past simple read
/red/.
5 • Students look at the pictures. Elicit who the
writer is (Suzanne Collins) and what famous
books she wrote (The Hunger Games Trilogy) .
• Students work individually and correct the
sentences using the words in brackets.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Vocabulary and Listening
Professions 6 • Ask students to read the questions. Check
that they understand all the vocabulary,
1
L.(~ssa )jj :J '-:'Jf ")\~c•v:::.\s especially admire (feel respect for someone).
-·-- --
• Play the CD. Students listen and answer the
In this lesson students will:
questions.
• learn vocabulary for different C!JeGupatiens
• Students compare answers in pairs.
• listen f~ specific informat1on
• Check answers as a class.

Warmer
Write job on the board. Put students into Presenter: Tonight we're talking about important
pairs and ask them to write a list of all the people in modern history and I'll be introducing
tonight's guests in just a moment. First of all, we
jobs they know in two minutes. Listen to
sent our reporter, Sam Jenkins, out and about to
their ideas as a class and make a list on the see what you had to say on the subject.
board, eg doctor, teacher, driver, actor. Sam: Sorry to bother you - do you mind if I ask
you something?
1 Woman: No, of course not.
• Explain the task. Sam: Which person in modern history do you
admire the most?
• Play the CD. Students listen and repeat the
Woman: Oh! That's a difficult question.
words in blue chorally and individually. Sam: We're doing a survey to find out what
• Elicit the names of any of the people that people think.
they know, eg 12 Barack Obama. Woman: I see. Can it be anyone?
• Check that students understand all the Sam: Yes- a politician, a painter, an athlete ...
different professions. whatever. Someone that you think has made a
difference to the world.
2 • Students match the names with the Woman: Well then, for me it's the musician John
descriptions in the timeline. Point out that if Lennon. He was a talented singer and wrote
some really beautiful songs. He believed that
they don't know, they should guess.
people should live in peace.
• Students compare answers in pairs.
Sam: OK, great! Thanks a lot for your time.
• Listen to their ideas as a class but do not Woman: No problem.
check the answers at this point. Sam: Hi there - have you got a minute? I just
want to ask you a quick question.
3 Boy: Go ahead.
• Play the CD. Sam: We're trying to find_out which famous
• Students listen and check their answers from person from modern history people admire. Who
exercise 2. would you choose?
• Check answers as a class and elicit the Boy: Well the only person I can think of is the
guy who invented Facebook ... what's his name?
names of the people shown in the pictures.
Sam: Mark Zuckerberg?
4 • Students work individually and choose one Boy: That's right. I'll choose him because I think
Facebook was a really clever idea. I mean, it's
of the people from exercise 2 or a person of
completely changed the way people communicate.
their choice. They write three questions they
Sam: Right. Thanks! Er, are you two together?
would ask them. Girl: Yes.
• They compare their choice of person and Sam: OK, so can I ask you the same question?
their questions in pairs. Girl: Yes, sure. I don't agree with Jason because I
• Listen to their ideas as a class. don't think Facebook is such an amazing invention.
Sam: OK ...
5 Girl: For me it has to be someone who really
• Explain that students will hear an interview in gives people hope. Like that runner, Mo Farah.
which they will hear some of the names from He moved to the UK from Somalia when he was
a boy and became a really successful athlete. He
exercise 2.
won two gold medals at the London Olympics.
• Play the CD. Students write down the names I think he's amazing because he shows that
from exercise 2 that they hear. anything is possible when you try hard.
• Check answers as a class. Sam: Great. Thanks a lot! Well, we're going back
to the studio now ...

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


. . .( ; :.·.~

1 c
2 g
3
4 a
5
1 • look at the timeline.listen 3 listen and check your answers.
6 d and repeat the words in blue. Do you
7 m know who any of the people are? 4 Which person from exercise 2 or the past
8 would you most like to meet? What three
9 k 2 Match the names with the descriptions questions would you ask him or her?
10 e in the timeline.
11 f 5 ~ ·\~ listen to a reporter interviewing
a) Charlie Chaplin
some people. Which names from exercise 2
12 b b) Sa rack Obama
do they mention? 2 John Lennon.
13 h c) Charles Babbage
3 It was a really
Pablo Picasso, d) Carmen Amaya 6 listen again and answer the questions. clever idea and it's
Carmen Amaya, e) Mark Zuckerberg comp letely changed
Mark
f) J.K. Rawling 1 What does the woman think of the the way people
Zuckerberg, reporter's question?
g) Pablo Picasso communicate.
JK Rowling,
2 Who does the woman admire?
Barack Obama h)Mo Farah 4 Mo Farah . He's
and Mo Farah i) John Lennon 3 What is the boy's opinion of Facebook? originally from
are shown in the j) Roald Amundsen 4 Who does the girl admire? Where is he Somalia.

k) Tim Berners·Lee originally from? 5 That anything is


5 What does she say the person shows? possible when you
I) Amy Johnson try hard.
m) Neil Arm strong

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Cultural awareness Fact box
Edlnburuh and Glasgow have a lot
fHestivalsl There are film festivals,
1 look at the pictures. Which of the two performances would
you like to watch?
t..O many kinds of music festivals.
Read and listen to the guide. Which famous person
was once in the Edinburgh Fringe Festival?

What is it?
It's the biggest festival of theatre. comedy, music and dance in the world. Every
year there are thousands of different performers from all over the world!
Who pczrforms in it?
Lots of young actors, comedians, musicians and dancers.
Whczn did it start?
In 1947- the same year that the Edinburgh International Festival started.
Why was it spczcial?
There were rules about who could and couldn't perform at the International
Festival. However, at the Fringe Festival anybody could put on a show!
Who hos oppczorczd at thcz Nstiv11l?
Many famous people began their careers at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival. For
example, Rowan Atkinson, the actor who plays Mr Bean, appeared in a play
there when he was a student at Oxford University.
Whczrcz doczs it takcz placcz?
All over Edinburgh. Performances don't always take place in theatres, however.
You can watch them ou1side on the street in cafes and in people's homes. Once
there was even a show on a moving bus!
1 False
The Whczn doczs it takcz placcz?
International Every August for three weeks.
Festival and How much do tickczts tost?
the Fringe Most tickets cost under ten pounds, but many
Festival performances are free.
began in the
same year, What doczs it offczr for young pczoplcz?
1947. Lots! In the 2012 festival, for example, many
2 True events were for teenagers. They included a
youth circus workshop and a musical comedy
3 False
performed by American high-school pupils.
Rowan
Atkinson,
the actor
who plays 3 Read the guide again. Are the sentences true or
Mr Bean, false? Correct the false sentences. CULTUAAL COMPARISON
appeared
in a play at 1 The International Festival began after the 4 Think of a festival in your country and answer
one festival Fringe Festival. the questions.
when he was 2 You don't need any experience to take part in
a student 1 Where is it?
the Fringe Festival. 2When is it?
at Oxford
3 There was a Mr Bean show at one festival.
University. 3 Who takes part in it?
4 Performances are sometimes in strange
4 True 4 How much do tickets cost?
places.
5 The Fringe Festival isn't just for adults.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Cultural awareness
Festivals in Scotland Word check
Make sure students understand the words,
i '----~ ~s,·:.·J ~~··: ~~-~\~~, ,,_-\:-. especially take place (happen). Ask them to
- - - --- .
translate them into their language.
In this lesson students wUI:
• read about festivals in Scotland CULTURAL COMPARISON

• talk about a festival in their country 4 • Students read the four questions and make a
note of their answers.
• They work in pairs and discuss the
Warmer questions.
Write Edinburgh and Glasgow on the board. • Listen to their ideas as a class.
Focus students on the Fact box. Elicit
from the class that Edinburgh is the capital Culture video: Scotland
of Scotland and any events or places to
visit students know about in Edinburgh or
Glasgow, eg Edinburgh: The Military Tattoo,
Edinburgh Castle, Edinburgh Zoo; Glasgow:
the Glasgow Jazz Festival, Kelvingrove Art
Gallery and Museum, the Mackintosh House,
etc.

1 • Students look at the pictures.


• They work in pairs and say which of the
performances they would like to watch and
why, eg I would like to watch the drummers
because /like all kinds of music.
• Listen to their ideas as a class.

The Edinburgh Fringe is the world's largest


arts festival and about 2,000,000 tickets are
sold for Fringe events every year. There are
around 3,000 shows of which over a third are
comedy shows.

2
• Explain the task.
• Play the CD. Students listen and follow the
text in their books.
• They compare the answer in pairs.
• Check the answer as a class.

3 • Students read the sentences carefully first.


• They read the guide again and decide
whether the sentences are true or false. They
correct the false sentences.
• Students compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Grammar could I couldn't
was I were 3 • Students study the table.
• They choose the correct words to complete
L.t..\ '.3-:~C~J. '):·_~j~- (:1; .}: :·:--- the rules.
- -~ -~-~

• Students compare answers in pairs.


In this less&n students will:
• Check answers as a class. Highlight that could
• team I revise was I we,. and •ld I
refers to both ability and possibility in the past.
couldrc't
• ask and iil.ll$Wer question$. using could 4 • Encourage students to read the whole
• revise the jD8St simple cf regular and dialogue first before they begin the activity.
irregu~ Verbs • Students work individually and complete the
• read a text about Charles Diekens conversation using could or couldn 't.
• Check answers as a class.

5 • Demonstrate how the prompts are used to


Warmer
make the question with Could you and were .
Write the sentence There was a performance
• Students work individually to write the full
on a moving bus on the board with the words
questions.
in the wrong order: bus on was a performance
• They compare answers in pairs.
there a moving. Students work in pairs and
• Check answers as a class.
write the sentence in the correct order. Write
• Remind students that the short answers are
the correct sentence on the board.
Yes, I could. and No, I couldn 't.
• Students work in pairs and ask and answer
1 • Students read the example sentences in the
the questions.
table.
• They copy and complete 1-3 in their
notebooks. Grammar in context:
• Students compare answers in pairs.
Literature
• Check answers as a class. Highlight the
6 • This activity gives further practice in the
contractions wasn 't (was not) and weren 't
past simple of regular and irregular verbs.
(were not) and their pronunciation wasn't
• Ask students to read the whole text before
/wAz~nt/ (two syllables) and weren't /w3:nt/
they complete the text with the past
(one syllable).
simple form of the verbs in brackets.
2 • Do the first example with the class to • Students work individually to complete
demonstrate the task (Were the Harry Potter the exercise.
films good? Yes, they were. I No, they • They compare answers in pairs.
weren't.).
7
• Students work individually to complete the
• Play the CD. Students listen and check
questions and write short answers.
their answers.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

the novels were written by


Sherlock Holmes first appeared in a story by
(Bleak House, Great I::XJJec:tati'OtlJU•..;<tane,
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in 1887 and featured
was written by Charlotte t"lmlnn•l, al'lln
in four novels and fifty-six short stories.
was written by Jane Austen .

.... .::
.......
........... Pronunciatio n lab: I'JI , page 124
Read the two example sentenc~ aloud to
the class. Point out that we t:an contract the - • Y,~-~-:-'""::lli ...----r..~J!--.T~.

Digital course: Interactive ~mmar ta~le l


present simple form there is to there but that s
we cannot do this with the past simple form, . Study guide: P,~ge ~9 -~

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Grammar QliMi~
was I were could I couldn't
1 Study the table. Copy and complete 1-3 with 3 Study the table. Choose the correct words to
was, wasn't and were. complete the rules.

affirmative affirmative
He was a student in Madrid. You could watch unknown performers.
Many events (1) ... for teenagers. negative
negative They couldn't perform at that festival.
It (2) ... a good play. questions
They weren't from Scotland. "
Could she sing?
questions short answers
(3) ... I I he I she I it a famous actor?
Yes, she could . I No, she couldn't.
Were we I you I they in the show?
short answers a) The infinitive I past simple form of the main verb
follows could.
No, I I he I she I it wasn't.
b) We use could and couldn't to talk about ability
Yes, we I you I they were .
and possibility in the present I past.
1 Were the Harry 2 Complete the questions with was or were.
Potter films 4 Complete the conversation with could or couldn't.
Then write short answers.
1 good? Yes, 1 couldn't
they were. I Jenny: Was the play good last night?
Were you interested in books five years ago?
No, they John: Yes, but I (1) ... see very well. We (2) ... get 2 couldn't
No, I wasrit.
weren't. seats near the front. 3 Could
2 Was Sherlock 1 ... the Harry Potter films good? ... jenny: (3) ... you understand it, though? I think 4 could
Holmes a real 2 ... Sherlock Holmes a real person? ... Shakespeare's difficult. 5 could
person? No,
3 ... any of Shakespeare's plays comedies? ... John: Yes, we (4) .... This play was in modern
he wasn 't.
English so we (s) ... easily follow it.
3 Were any of
Shakespeare's
5 Write questions with could. Then work in pairs
plays there's I there are --7 there was I there
comedies? and ask and answer the questions.
Yes, they were.
were
you ride
There's a film festival this week. read I when / four? a bicycle
There was a film festival last week. Could you read when you were four? when you
were six?
1 ri de a bicycle I when I six?
2 Could
2 use a com puter I when I eight? you use a
Grammar in context: 3 speak English / when I ten? computer
2 was 4 cook I when l 12? when you
Literature
I! lived
wrote 6 Complete the text with the past simple Who (1) ... (be) a... Dlclc8n8'l
were eight?
3 Could you
speak
5 did he form of the verbs in brackets. He (2) .. . (be) an English writer who (3) ... (five)
write English
I from 1812 to 1870. He (4) ... (write) 15 novels, including A when you
6 were Christmas Carol and Oliver Twist. were ten?
7 didn't have
1 listen and check your answers. Wliallll ... ,.,..,.....,
4 Could you
8 didn't think
A !at of his books t8) ••• (be) about IIIQCif peaple. 1lwt (7) ... cook when
K (not tlfMt)., easy Ire In .. 191h ~ Dtckens (B) ••• you were
9 tried
(not 1111'114 . , . .thc:luld lille In bad condllfcns 8Ait he
Which of these novels were written by 12?
10 did people l9) ••• t'Jy) to make. people'** abol,lt1he8a probfema.
like Charles Dickens? .... (1CJt ... pople , ... his boalca?
11 had Jane Eyre Bleak House Emma Because they (11) ••• (have) exciting siDrtes 81d int818st111Q
12 loved Great Expectations characlera. Everyone (12) ..• (love) them - even people
13 couldn't
who (13) ... (can not) read! They (14) ... (pay) other people
to read the books to them!
14 paid

· ~-~111110 Pronunciation lab: .';J/, page


- -=:::-.--
.
...•::..:
":(' 122t ••• •

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


into the past to the times of
King Arthur at one of the most
~'fYJi~ILial tourist' attractions in Wales.
13mt who was King Arthur?
He was a legendary king from medieval
times. He was a hero who won many
battles and even fought dragons!
King Arthur's Labyrinth isn't a museum:
it's an underground adventure! First, you
descend underground into a large cave.
Then, you can explore the cave with a
guide, who tells you the story of King
Arthur and his exciting life.
The experience is interactive. You don't
just hear about the tale of King Arthur-
you can see and hear his adventures too!
And you might also see a Welsh dragon
... but don't be scared!
Don't forget to wear comfortable shoes
for walking. This attraction is suitable for
all the family. It's lots of fun for children,
teenagers and adults.

Step 1: R~t!d · Step 2: Li~en


1 Read the information about King Arthur's 3 ) Listen to someone phoning for information
1 5pm
Labyrinth. Then answer the questions. about King Arthur's Labyrinth. Copy and complete
1 In Wales. 2 £:5.95
the notes.
2 He was a 1 Where is King Arthur's Labyrinth? 3 £:8.95
legendary 2 Who was King Arthur? 4 online
king from 3 Who can you explore the cave with? King Arthur\; Labyrinth
medieval 5 cafe
4 What might you see in the cave? Open evay day lOam to (1) •.
times.
5 What must you wear? Ticket<::: Children (2) £.. Adult<:: (3) £ ...
3 A guide.
6 'vV~10 is ihe attraction suitable for?
4 A Welsh Where to buy tickets:: at the Laby1·inth or (4) _
dragon. Food available at the. (5) •.
2 Would you like to visit King Arthur's
5 Comfortable
Labyrinth? Why (not)? Give reasons for
shoes for
your answer. 4 Listen again and answer the questions. 1 Next
walking.
weekend.
6 All the I would really lik e to vi<::it King Arthur~ 1 When is the boy going to visit King Arthur's 2 His younger
family.
L<Jbyrinth becaus:e .• Labyrinth? sister and
2 Who is he going with? his parents.
3 How is he going to travel there? 3 By car.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Integrated skills
A visit to King Arthur's • Play the CD. Students complete the notes
Labyrinth with the missing information.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

tn thi$ tessc~n Sftldems will: 4 • Students read the three questions carefully
• work on all fo!Jf' lkilts first.
• read about a touriSt attraction • Play the CD again. Students write the
• listen to someene fl)honlng tor information answers.
• write a persooalized dialogue • They compare answers in pairs.
• aet out their dialogue • Check answers as a class.

Warmer
Focus on some of the vocabulary in the
Ask students to read the information about
dialogue, eg in advance (before a particular
Chris in the speech bubble. Then write the
event or time in the future) and brilliant
question What did you do at the weekend?
lbnlj~nt/ (meaning fantastic or wondetfu~.
on the board. Students answer the question
in pairs. Listen to answers as a class.
·.• _ 1.33 Audloscr)pt, exercise 3 · -~ ~~~
Step 1: Read ' Woman: Wales Tourist Information. How can I
help?
1 • Remind students that when we look at texts Boy: Oh hello. I'd like some information about
like this we usually have some idea of what King Arthur's Labyrinth, please.
we are looking for first. We do not usually Woman: OK. What would you like to know?
Boy: Well, I'm interested in visiting next
begin at the beginning of the text and read
weekend. Can you tell me the opening times?
everything. We scan the text until we find Woman: Yes, it's open from 1Oam until Spm
what we are looking for. every day.
• Students read the six questions carefully first. Boy: Great. And how much are the tickets?
• They look in the text and find the answers to Woman: Well, how old are you?
the questions. Boy: I'm fourteen and I'm coming with my
younger sister and my parents.
• Students compare answers in pairs.
Woman: OK, well our children's tickets are £5.95
• Check answers as a class. Make sure and our adults' tiskets are £8.95. You can buy
students understand cave (a large hole in the them at the Labyrinth on the day, or you can buy
side of a hill or under the ground) and dragon them in advance online.
(a mythical animal that breathes out fire). Boy: Great, thanks. Is there anywhere we can
buy something to eat?
2 • Students work individually and think about Woman: Yes, you can eat at the cafe. It's also
their answers to the questions. open all day.
• They compare answers in pairs. Boy: Brilliant! Oh, I nearly forgot ... We'll be
travelling by car- is there a car park?
• Listen to students' ideas as a class. Make
Woman: Yes, there is.
sure they give reasons . Boy: OK. Thanks very much for your help.
Woman: You're welcome.
Step 2 : Listen t Boy: Bye.

3
• Check students understand the task. Elicit
the type of information they should listen for
(a time in gap 1 , a price in gaps 2 and 3, a
place in gaps 4 and 5).
• Students copy the notes into their
notebooks.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Integrated skills - continued
Asking about an experience - Jt ~""'-=--
Step 4: Comtr~unicote ~
5
9 • Students practise their dialogues in pairs.
• Students look at the picture. Check that they
• For extra practice, they swap roles in both
understand the situation and the task.
dialogues.
• Play the CD. Students write the answers in
their notebooks. 10 • Choose some pairs to act out their dialogue
• They compare answers in pairs. for the class.
• Check answers as a class. • Students raise their hand if another pair
has the same tourist attraction as the
6 • Play the CD again, pausing after each
tourist attraction they have chosen. This will
question or statement and each response for
encourage them to listen carefully to their
students to repeat as a class.
classmates.
• Note the main stress and the falling
intonation in the wh- questions: What did you
Integrated skills: Workbool< page 112
c}Q there? Why was it so much fun_? What did
you enjoy IJlQ§l?
• Ask students to repeat the dialogue several
times both chorally and individually with the
correct stress and intonation.
• Students practise the dialogue in pairs. Then
swap roles and practise the dialogue again .

What, Why, Where and How for past


simple questions
Read aloud the four questions beginning
with the wh- words. Ask students to translate
the sentences into their language. Highlight
the importance of these key words in
communication.

Step 3: Write
7 • Students choose a tourist attraction they
have visited.
• They copy the phrases and questions in bold
from the dialogue into their notebooks.
• They write their own answers to the
questions.

8 • Ask students to look at the questions and


responses in the Communication kit: Asking
about an experience. Encourage them to use
these expressions in their dialogue.
• Students work individually and write their
dialogue, using the dialogue in the book as a
model.
• Monitor while they are writing and give help if
necessary.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


So, did you have a good time in Wales? Yes, thanks. It was amazing!
What did you do there? We went to King Arthur's Labyrinth in the (1) .... It
was really exciting!
Really? Why was it so much fun? We went underground and explored a cave with a
(2) ... . He was so funny!
That sounds great! What did you enjoy most? Well, I really liked hearing about King Arthur's
adventures, but I thought the interactive parts
were best. Look at this photo of me with a (3) ... !
It looks quite (4) ... ! I'm glad you enjoyed it, though. You should go one day!

' listen to Chris telling Nina about his Step 4: Communicate


trip to King Arthur's Labyrinth. Complete 1-4 in
your notebook. 9 Work in pairs. Take turns to practise your
dialogues.
6 Listen again and repeat. Practise your intonation.
• !;o, did you have a good time in (a t ... ?
Ve,, thank-'. It wa' ...
Whot, Why, Where and How for past
simple questions 10 Act your dialogue for the class.
What did you do?
Wh.y was I wasn't it fun? GO
Where did you go?
Asking about an experience
How did you get there?
Did you have a good time in I at ... ?
It was amazing I interesting I awful I boring.
Step 3: Writ~ What did you do?
What did you enjoy most?
I'm glad you enjoyed it.
7 Think of a tourist attraction you have visited.
It's a pity you didn't enjoy it.
Then copy the phrases and questions in bold
and write your answers to the questions.

8 Write a new dialogue about visiting your tourist


attraction. Write both parts. Use the dialogue
in exercise 5 to help you.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


1 Last weekend my fami ly and
I visited the Sherlock Holmes
Museum in London. It's small
but interesting. It's got a shop for
visitors too.
!;! The museum is like the home of
Sherlock Holmes, the main character
from the famous detective stories. You could look around
the different rooms. You could see lots of his possessions
too. You could also meet characters from the books- but
they were really actors!
3 My favourite thing was the museum shop, which was
3 Read the review again. Find more examples of
very good value. There were also some good books to buy.
sentences with also and too. You could
The only problem was that the museum was very busy. see lots of his
We waited half an hour to buy tickets! p6ssessions
4 Rewrite the second sentences using the words too.
in brackets. There were
also some
1 You could have a drink. You could have a good books to
Read and listen to the review. In which meal. (also) buy.
paragraph does Penelope ••• 2 Young children will enjoy it. Teenagers will
enjoy it. (too)
a) give details about what you can do at the
3 The tickets were expensive. The cafe was
c 1 museum?
expensive. (also)
b) say what she liked and didn't like about the
4 We enjoyed exploring the castle. We enjoyed also have a
museum? meal.
exploring the gardens. (too)
c) give some general information about the
2 Teenagers
museum? will enjoy it
too.
2 Read the Writing focus. How do you say too Writing task
3 The cafe
and also in your language? Write a review of an interesting place you was also
visited recently. expens1ve.
Pl.a!'lChoose an interesting place and 4 Weenjayed
WRITING FOCUS exploring the
make notes. gardens too.
also and too W>"itP Write your review. Write there
We use also and too to give more information
paragraphs. Use your notes and the review
about something.
in exercise 1 to help you.
We use also after the verb be, but before main
verbs. r· ~.. h Check your writing.
You could look around the different rooms. You
could also meet characters from the books. ~ also and too
We use too at the end of sentences. ~ past simple verbs
It's small but interesting. It's got a shop for ~ could I couldn't
visitors too.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Writing
A review
Write I play tennis. and /like watching films .
t_, · _ ·_ ~'I CJ J: ;\-:~'\'~._; -
- - - - on the board. Ask students to write two more
In this lesson students will: sentences beginning with I play and /like
• read a review using too and a/so, eg I also play basketball.
• use a/so and toe to give addfttonal /like playing computer games too.
information
• write a review of a place
Writing task
The aim of this activity is for students to
Warmer
produce a piece of guided writing that
Tell students that you have written the name
includes the correct use of also and too. It
of a famous fictional character on a piece of
also gives them practice in using the past
paper. They should try to guess what you have
simple and could I couldn't correctly. Ask the
written by asking questions. You can only
students to follow the stages in the Student's
answer yes or no, eg Is it a man? Yes. Is he a
Book. At the Check stage, ask them to swap
detective? Yes. Is it Sherlock Holmes? Yes!
notebooks and check each other's writing.

1
• Students read the three questions carefully Writing reference and practice: Workbook page 122
first.
• Play the CD. Students follow the text in their
books.
• They read the text again and find the
answers.
• Check answers as a class.

2 • Students read the notes in the Writing focus


box.
• Ask students to translate also and too into
their language.
• Highlight the fact that also comes after be
but before main verbs and write two example
sentences on the board , eg He CI(§Q speaks
French. She is also a dancer.
• Highlight the position of too at the end of
sentences.

3 • Students read the review again.


• They work individually and find more
examples of sentences with also and too.
• Students compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

4 • Do the first question with the whole class as


an example (You could also have a meaD.
• Students work individually to rewrite the
second sentences using the words in
brackets. Encourage them to look at the
Writing focus box help them.
• Students compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Study guide
Grammar, Vocabulary and Speaking
Tell the students the Study guide is an Speaking
important page which provides a useful • Check that students understand the phrases
reference for the main language of the unit: the to use for asking about an experience.
grammar, the vocabulary and the functional • Tell students to act out a conversation in
language from the Integrated skills pages. pairs asking each other about a recent
Explain that they should refer to this page when exciting experience.
studying for a test or exam.

Additional material
Grammar
Workbook
• Tell the students to look at the example
• Progress check page 22
sentences of the past simple: affirmative,
• Self-evaluation page 23
negative, questions and short answers. Make
• Grammar reference and practice pages
sure they understand how to form the tense
86-87
and its usage.
• Vocabulary extension page 103
• Then tell students to look at the example
• Integrated skills page 112
sentences of was I were and could I couldn't
• Writing reference and task pages 122-123
(affirmative, negative, questions and short
answers). Ensure they know when to use
each set of words.
• Refer students to the Grammar reference
on pages 86-87 of the Workbook for further
revision.

Vocabulary
• Tell students to look at the list of vocabulary
and check understanding.
• Refer students to the Wordlist on page 151
of the Workbook where they can look up any
words they can't remember.

Teacher's Resource File Tests and Exams


• Basics section pages 11-17 • Unit 2 End-of-unit test: Basic, Standard and
• Vocabulary and grammar consolidation Extra
pages 7-10 • CEFR Skills Exam Generator
• Translation and dictation pages 3, 13
• Evaluation rubrics pages 1-7
• Key competences worksheets pages 3-4
• Culture and CLIL worksheets pages 5-8
• Culture video worksheets pages 3-4
• Digital competence worksheets pages 3-4
• Macmillan Readers worksheets pages 1-2

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Study guide
Grammar
Past simple Vocabulary
Literature
affirmative adventure story historical novel
I read the book in class. autobiography poetry book
They enjoyed the autobiography. biography romantic novel
negative comic novel science fiction novel
I didn't see the film adaptation. cookery book thriller
They didn't want to read the ending. detective novel travel guide
fairy tale
questions
Did I finish the book? Professions
Did you like the main character? astronaut musician
short answers athlete painter
Yes, I I you I he I she I it I we I they did. comedian pilot
No, I I you I he I she I it I we I they didn't. dancer politician
engineer scientist
We use the past simple for finished actions in the past.
explorer writer
inventor
was I were
affirmative
He was an actor.
Many events were free. Speaking
negative Asking about an experience
Did you have a good time in I at ... ?
It wasn't a good performance.
They weren't in the show. It was amazing I interesting I awful I boring.
What did you do?
questions
What did you enjoy most?
Was I I he I she I it an explorer? I'm glad you enjoyed it.
Were we I you I they critical about the novel? It's a pity you didn't enjoy it.
short answers
No, I I he I she I it wasn't.
Yes, we I you I they were.

could I couldn't
affirmative
-
You could visit many places.
negative
We couldn't see the stage.
questions
Could they perform?
short answers
Yes, they could . I No, they couldn't.

~ c R '' ' "'C T ~; ~~"icU\i


Make a list of irregular past simple verbs in
r your notebook. Everytime you learn a new one,
add it to the list.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


In this unit the student will learn .•• In this unit the student will team how to ...
• understand, memorize and correctly use • identify specific information in a news report
vocabulary related to weather and natural about lightning CLC CMST sec
disasters CLC CMST SCC CAE • look online for information about what you
• understand and correctly use the past should and shouldn't do if lightning strikes CLC
continuous CLC L2L CMSTDCSIE
• understand and correctly use adverbs CLC L2L • identify specific information in a presentation
• understand when to use the past simple or the about natural disasters CLC CMST sec
past continuous, draw parallels to L1 and use • read short news paper reports, l~sten to a
them in a short speaking activity CLC sec SIE L2L weather report and learn how to react to news
• about a natural disaster in New Zealand and CLCCMSTSCC
compare with natural disasters in their country • write a fictional narrative about an eventful day
CLC CMST SCC CAE CLC SCC SIE L2L
• about charities by watching a short video CLC • prepare for and do a speaking exam discussing
SCCDCCAE a topic CLC CMST L2L SIE

•I - ~-
-

" I ' •

•:_ • -. •• •• · : . , • .____.. - ' I

Readir1g
Main vocabulary
• Read a news report about lightning
• Weather: sunny, stormy, cloudy,
• Read a text about an earthquake in New Zealand
etc
• Read news reports about differentkinds of weather
• Activities that go with different
• Read a fictional narrative
kinds of weather
• Words for natural disasters: f'itlng !nteractlon and production
earthquake, hurricane, etc • Write a personalized dialogue about how to react to a
news story
Grammar
• Write a fictional narrative in three steps: plan, write, check
• Past continuous
• Learn how to use sequencing words and expressions
• Adverbs
• Past continuous and past simple t 1s 1:<:> ·-~~ 19
• Listen to a lV programme about natural disasters
Functional language
• Listen to a weather report
• Phrases for reacting to news
• Phrases to use when discussing a
topic in an exam • Ask and answer questions about activities and weather
• Phrases for activities and weather • Exchange information about an emergency you have
in an exam context experienced

Pronunciation Spoke·P preduction


• was and were • Prepare and act out a dialogue about how to react to
news
• Prepare and do a speaking exam where you discuss a
topic
-FOR PERSONAL USE .ONLY-
Evaluation
• Unit 3 End-of-unit test: Basic, Standard and Extra
Self*study and
• CEFR Skills Exam Generator
self*evaluation
• End-of-term test, Units 1-3: Basic, Standard and Extra
• Study guide:
Student's Book page 39
,. : J ' • - ' • •

• Progress check and self-


evaluation:
Workbook pages 30-31 • Sl!leakimQ: Discussing a t0pic
• Grammar reference and practice:
Workbook pages 88-89
• Wordlist: Digital material
Workbook pages 151-157
Pulse Live! Digital Course including:
Learning strategies
• Interactive grammar tables
and thinking skills
• Audio visual speaking model: Reacting to news
• Matching headings with
• Audio visual cultural material: Charities
paragraphs
Student's website
Cultural awareness
• A natural disaster in New Zealand
• Comparing earthquakes in New
Zealand with earthquakes in
students' own countries and
regions

Cross-curricular
contents
• Natural disasters, famous
disasters, a natural disaster in
New Zealand
• Basic worksheets, Teacher's Resource File pages 17-22
• Language and literature: reading
• Vocabulary and Grammar: Consolidation worksheets,
news reports and reacting to news
Teacher's Resource File pages } 1-12
• ICT: searching the internet for
information

• Fast-finisher activity: Student's Book page 31


• Extra activities: Teacher's Book pages T31, T33
• Vocabulary and Grammar: Extension worksheets,
communication Teacher's Resource File pages 13-14
CMST Competence in mathematics,
science and technology
DC Digital competence Teacher's Resource File
sec Social and civic
competences • Translation and dictation worksheets pages 4, 14
CAE Cultural awareness and • Evaluation rubrics pages 1-7
expression • Key competences worksheets pages 5-6
L2L Learning to learn • Culture and CLIL worksheets pages 9-12
SIE Sense of initiative and • Culture video worksheets pages 5-6
entrepreneurship • Digital competence worksheets pages 5-6
• Macmillan Readers worksheets pages 1-2

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


What kind of weather do you
Vocabulary and Speaking like ~st?
H0w does it make you feel?
Weather
1 , Listen and repeat the different kinds of weather. What's the weather like today?

sunny rainy windy snowy stormy cloudy damp icy foggy warm wet dry
thunder and lightning blizzard heatwave hailstones

2 Look at the pictures. What's the weather like in ...


I Possible London? Tokyo? Sydney? Athens? Madrid? New York?
answers In London it~ cold .'lnd fo(j(jy
In Tokyo it's
stormy.
In Sydney it's Today 11om
hot and sunny.
In Athens it's
warm and
cloudy.
In Madrid, it's
wet and rainy.
In New York
it's cold and
snowy.

3 In which city ... XP RESS YOURSELF


1 Sydney 1 is there a heatwave?
2 Tokyo 4 Read about the weather in Sydney, Australia. Then change the red
2 could you hear thunder
3 New York
words to make the sentences true for your country.
and see lightning?
3 could you get caught in a In spring it's usually sunny and dry. ln summer it's very hot ilnd windy.
blizzard? In autumn it's sometimes rainy and Foggy.
In winter it's warm , but often stormy.

5 In what kind of weather do you do these activities? Ask and answer


in spring in summer in pairs.
iri autumn in winter
go windsurfing go skiing play volleyball play computer games

• When do you (jo winds:urfin(j?


I (jo winds:urfin(j on windy d.'lys:.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Vocabulary and Speaking
Weather • Check answers as a class. Point out that
because the last four expressions in the list
of words in exercise 1 are nouns, if we use
these expressions we must use There is I
In this lessen students WIU:
There are with them, eg There is a heatwave.
• learn I t'8Vi$e woma related to weather
There are hailstones.
• revise the se&IK)ns
• write abaut the weather in their CC>untry
• ask and answer questions about the
weather W dfffef9trt activitieS Fog is now relatively rare in London, but in
the 19th and first half of the 20th centuries a
combination of damp winter weather and the
Warmer burning of fossil fuels in millions of houses
Write weather on the board. Students work in often produced thick fog, called pea soup.
pairs and write down all the words they know In 1952, there was a particularly thick fog
that are related to weather, eg hot, cold, rain, and up to 4,000 people died from respiratory
sun. Listen to their ideas as a class and make diseases. This led to the Clean Air Act of
a list of relevant words on the board. 1956, which controlled the burning of fossil
fuels in London and some other large towns
and cities in the UK.

Students work individually. They read the


3 • Students read the questions carefully first.
two questions and write their answers. They
• They look at the pictures and find the
compare ideas in pairs. Get feedback from
answers.
the whole class.
• Students compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.
1
• Write the question What 's the weather like
L kl .. - ' . . ·~
00 . ~. :'
today? on the board . Elicit the meaning.
Make sure students remember the- words for
• Play the CD. Students listen to the words and
the four seasons of the year. Remind them
repeat them chorally and individually.
that autumn is pronounced !''J:trml/ and that
• Make sure they pronounce icy / msr/ correctly.
the final n is sil~nt. Highlight the use of \h~
• Elicit the answer to the question.
preposition in with the seasons.

~l:XPAESS YOURSELF
We use the question What is ... like? to ask
4 • Check students understand the task.
about whether something is good or bad in
• Nominate a student to read aloud the
some way, eg What's London like? It's a very
sentences about Sydney.
interesting city. It can also be used to ask
• Students work individually and change the
about people, eg What's Helen like? She 's
very friendly. The word like in these questions I red words to make the sentences true for
their country.
is a preposition and has no connection with
• Listen to their ideas as a class.
the verb like.
5 • Check students understand the task. Make
2 • Ask students to look at the pictures. sure they pronounce skiing lski:riJ/ correctly.
• Students write about the weather in the • Students work in pairs and ask and answer
different cities using the information in the the questions.
pictures and the vocabulary from exercise 1. • Listen to some pairs as a class.
• Students work individually to complete the
task. Vocabulary extension: Workboolc page 104
• They compare answers in pairs.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Reading
Text type: A news report Wora check
Make sure students understand the words. Ask
! •' ~ J- ' ·~; •, ._·i
... ~ ''! ' .... ' I I them to translate them into their language.
- - . -.
In this lesson students Wflk 4 • Students read the questions and work
• read a news rePOrt individually to think of their answers.
• read for gist • They discuss their answers in pairs.
• A1aCit for specific information • Listen to their ideas as a class.

Recommended web links


Ask fast finishers to think what other kinds of
www.metoffice.gov.uklweatherluk/advicel
weather are sometimes dangerous and why.
lightning.html

www.mcofs.org.ukllightning.asp

Focus on some of the other vocabulary


Warmer
in the text, eg unexpected, strike I struck,
Ask students to work in pairs and say which
underneath. Make sure students understand
types of weather they like and why, eg /like
the words and can pronounce them. Check
sunny weather because /like going to the
understanding by asking them to translate
beach. /like snowy weather because /like
into their language.
winter. Listen to their ideas as a class.

1
·Web quest . ;
• This exercise gives students practice in ' .
listening and reading for gist - to get the Students find out about what yQu should I
general idea of a piece of text from key shouldn't do if lightning strikes. Highlight the
words. This is an important skill for effective Web quest tip.
listening and reading, especially when
1 • Ask students to open an internet web
listening to or reading longer pieces of
browser such as Internet ~plorer.
authentic text.
Students open a search engine (eg
• Students look at the pictures.
Googl~) and type in the suqiect of their
• Ask what students think happened to the girl.
sear:ch.
Elicit ideas from the class.
• Students find as much information as
• Play the CD. Students listen and follow the
they tan.
text in their books.
• They make notes on three things you
• They compare answers in pairs.
should do and three things YQIJ
• Check the answer as a class.
shouldn't do if lightning strikes.
2 • Students read through the five events 2 • Students work in pairs and eompare
carefully first. tt~eir information.
• They read the report again. ] • Students make a class fact sheet about
• Students work individually and put the events lightning.
in the correct order.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

3 • Students read the six questions first.


• They look in the text and find the information
to answer the questions.
• Check answers as a class and highlight the
information in the Did you know? box.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Sophie Frost, a schoolgirl from stopped and took them to hospital.

SAVED England, felt very lucky when her


grandmother gave her an MP3
player as a present. She didn't know
just how lucky she was, however.
Sophie had some burns on her chest
and l ~gs . She also had some damage
to her eyes and ears, but fortunately
she quickly recovered.

BY When an unexpected accident


happened a few days later, the MP3
player probably saved her life!
How did Sophie's MP3 player prevent
her from having serious injuries?

AN
When the accident happened, she
14-year-old Sophie was going for wasn't listening to music on the player,
a walk with her boyfriend, Mason but was wearing it around her neck.
Billington, when it started raining. Doctors believe that the lightning

MP3
The young couple took shelter from travelled through the wire of the MP3
the rain under a tree and were sitting player instead of through Sophie's
together when lightning struck. The body. Even tho~h she was luc~y this
lightning hit th em both and they lost time, one thing'S'for sure. The next
consciousness. Then Mason woke up time there's a storm, she and her

PLAYER! and carried Sophie to the nearest


road in order to get help. A car
boyfriend won't sit underneath a tree!

Word check
take shelter consciousness burn damage recove r injury wi re

b!':1 v ·~-~ ~·i·~·.'l! ..•


lightning can travel at
150,ooo km per second!

3 Answer the questions.


1 An MP3
1 What did Sophie's grandma give her? player.
2 Where were Sophie and her friend when
2 Under a tree.
lightning struck?
3 By car.
Her MP3
3 How did Sophie go to hospital?
4 Sophie's
player 4 Where was Sophie hurt?
chest, legs,
probably 5 Where was Sophie's MP3 player when the eyes and
saved her accident happened? ears were
life when she 6 What part of the MP3 player did the lightning hurt.
was struck by
lightning. I Her go through? 5 Around her
neck.
MP3 player
probably saved Reading 4 Have you ever been in a very bad storm? What 6 The wire.
her life when A news report happened?
lightning hit her.
Ve-'. I have. My mum and I were in the car and it
1 ~-~ look at the pictures. What do you think
s:tarted raining ...
happened to the girl? Read, listen and check.

2 Read the report again and put the events in order. ·~:~ ;FINiSHED?
. .
d
a) It started raining. What other kinds of weather are sometimes
Sophie's
grandmother b) Sophie went to hospital. dangerous? Why?
gave her a c) Sophie and her friend went for a walk. Foggy weather iJ: dangerous: becaus:e it
present. d) Sophie's grandmother gave her a present. caus:eJ: car accidents;.
2 c e) An accident happened.
Sophie
and her
boyfriend
went for a
walk. Search the internet to find out what you should I shouldn't
3 a When you a search engine to find
do if lightning strikes.
It started information, just enter the main words
raining. t Find three things you should do and three things you
the search bOx- don't write words like
4 e shouldn't do.
the or
An accident a Work in pairs. Compare your information.
happened. i1 Make a class fact sheet about lightning.
5 b
Sophie went
to hospital.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Past continuous 5 Complete Tom's email with the past continuous
2 wasn 't
listening form of the verbs in brackets.
3 Was it affirmative
raining? Hi Emma! 2 was raining
I I He I She I It was going for a walk.
Something really strange happened to me 3 were they
We I You I They (1) •.. under a tree. coming
today. I (1) ... (walk) home from school and
negative suddenly lots of apples started falling out 4 wasn't
I I He I She I It (2) ... to music. of the sky. I couldn't believe it! It (2) ... (rain) telling
We I You I They weren't stand ing in the rain. apples! Where (3) ... they ... (come) from? 5 were
watching
questions I went home and told my mum and brother,
but they said I (4) ... (not tell) the truth. 6 wasn't lying
(3) ... it ... ?
However, that evening, my mum and dad
Were we I you I they talking?
(5) .. . (watch) the news on TV and they
short answers heard the story. Nobody knows why the
doing Yes, it was. apples fell out of the sky, but they did. I
lying
No, we I you I they weren't. (6) .. . (not lie)!
See you soon,
getting
1 Copy and complete the table with the past Tom
coming
continuous form of rain, sit and listen.
running

2 Read the table and choose the correct words to Adverbs


complete rules a) and b).
1 Were they a) We use the past continuous to talk about
swimming in We use adJectives to tell us more about nouns.
actions in progress I completed actions in
the sea? No,
the past.
We use adverbs to tell us more about verbs.
they weren't.
b) We form the past continuous with was I were It was a brfsht, sunny day.
They were
swimming in +the ·ing I infinitive fo rm of the verb. lhe sun was shining brightly.
a pool.
2 Was she 3 Read the spelling rules on page 39· Then write 6 Look at the Study guide on page 39- Then copy
I sleeping? the -ing form of the verbs in the box. and complete the table with the adverbs of the
No, she regular (-/y)
wasn't. She tell do lie get come run adjectives in the box. badly
was reading. carefully
3 Were they ooisy bad easy hard careful good regular (-i/y)
fighting? No, 4 What were they doing? Write complete easily
they weren't. questions and answers. regular (-ly) Iregular (-ily) irregular irregular
They were
playing. he ski I ice-skate Inoi>ily hard
well
4 Was it lying Wa> he >kiint" No, he wa>n't l-ie wa> ice->katinB.
on the
bed? No, 1 they swim in the sea I swim in a pool 7 Choose the correct words to complete the advice.
it wasn 't. It 2 she sleep I read 1 The roads are icy. Drive
was lying on 3 they fight I play
the sofa. careful I carefully!
4 it lie on the bed I lie on the sofa 2 It was raining hard I hardly
5 Was he 5 he watch TV I play computer games 1 ~refully
watching yesterday. 2 hard
TV? No, he 6 she go windsurfing I play volleyball
3 There's a storm. Come 3 quickly
wasn't. He inside quick I quickly!
was playing 4 brightly
computer 4 The sun was shining very
5 warmly
games. In English, we usually use the past bright I brightly today.
6 easily
6 Was she continuous to talk about temporary 5 It's snowing! Dress warm I
going situations. When do you use it in your warmly!
windsuriing? language? 6 When it's foggy you want drivers to see you
No, she
easy I easily. Wea r bright clothes!
wasn 't. She
was playing
volleyball.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Grammar
Past continuous
l. r: ~~ s .:-' ., \~)I:;:.-.) c: ~ ' I '\ :, Students read the information. Ask them
- - - - ·- - ~ .
to compare the usual use of the past
In this lesson stt:Jclents will:
continuous in English to talk about temporary
• learn I reVi~ the past continuous
situations with when they use the past
• learn I revise a - of adverbs
continuous in their language.

5 • Students read the whole email first.


Warmer
• They work individually and fill the gaps using
Write the sentence Sophie was wearing an
the past continuous form of the verbs in
MP3 player around her neck on the board
brackets.
with the words in the wrong order: around
• Students compare answers in pairs.
Sophie an neck was MP3 player wearing
• Check answers as a class.
her. Students work in pairs and write the
sentence in the correct order. Write the
correct sentence on the board.
Adverbs
Look!
1 • Students copy the table into their notebooks.
Focus students on the Leok! !lox. Highlight
• They read the example sentences.
that adjectives tell us mare about nouns, and
• Students work individually and complete the
adverbs tell us more about verbs. Read the
table with the past continuous form of rain,
example sentences aloud to the elass.
sit and listen.
• They compare answers in pairs.
6 • Students look at the Study guide on page 39.
• Check answers as a class.
• They copy the table into their notebooks.
2 • Explain the task. • Students work individually to write the
• Students look at the table again and choose adverb forms of the adjectives in the correct
the correct words to complete the rules. column in the table.
• Check answers as a class. • They compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

7 • Explain the task. Students choose the correct


Point out that the present continuous refers words to complete the different pieces of
to actions in progress in the present and the advice.
past continuous refers to actions in progress • They complete the exercise individually.
1
in the past. • Check answers as a class.

3 • Students read the spelling rules on page 39.


• They complete the exercise individually. ' Hard is the irregular adverb form of the
• Students compare answers in pairs. adjective hard. It can be used to modify
• Check answers as a class. Make sure they . various verbs, eg work hard, study hard,
understand the two meanings of lie, eg lying rain hard. The word hardly does exist but it
in bed and lying (not telling the truth) as these means almost not, eg It was so foggy I could
are both used in later exercises in the lesson. hardly see.

4 • Nominate two students to read aloud the


example question and answer. ....!:. Pronunciation lab: Weak forms: was
• • • • • • 9:t

• Students work individually to write questions ····F lw-:Jz! and were lwaW, page 124 -~----~
and answers for each of the situations. -. -...- '- ;---· -

• They compare answers in pairs. Digital course: Interactive gra111mar table


• Check answers as a class. Study guide: page 39

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Vocabulary and Listening
Natural disasters 5
• Play the CD.
• Students check their answers from exercise 3.
• Students compare answers in pairs.
• learn sorne vocabulary related Ill ttatural • Check answers as a class.
dtsasters
6 • Students read the questions carefully first.
• listen for spectfic InfOrmation
• Play the CD again. Students write the
answers.
• Check progress. If necessary, play the CD
Warmer
again.
Play a game of Hangman to introduce the
• Check answers as a class.
topic. Use dashes to represent the letters
of disaster and write them on the board:
________. Ask students to suggest
letters of the alphabet. Only accept letters Focus on some of the vocabulary in the
that are pronounced correctly. Continue until audioscript, eg crashing down, occur; behave,
students have guessed the word. cry, special abilfty. Make sure students
understand the words and can pronounce them.
1
• Play the CD.
• Students listen and repeat the words chorally
tl: 1.42 Audioscript, exercise 5 _· '·
and individually. Presenter: Hello and welcome to Mysteries of
the Earth. This week we're talking about natural
• Students work individually. They answer the
disasters. Did you know that there are some
question and complete the explanations
areas of the world where more natural disasters
using the words in the box. happen than others? For example, 75% of
• Students compare answers in pairs. Listen to volcanoes are in the countries on the Pacific
their ideas but do not correct them at this stage. Ocean - like Japan and New Zealand. Most of
the world's big earthquakes also happen here.
2 And the USA has more tornadoes than any other
• Play the CD. country - over a thousand a year!
• Students listen and check their answers to Some natural disasters happen more often than
exercise 1. you think. For example, there's actually one
earthquake every thirty ~econds somewhere in
• Point out that a landslide is when a large
the world -that's two a minute! However, most
amount of earth falls down a mountain of these earthquakes are so small that we can't
and a famine happens when people can't feel them.
grow enough food to eat. Highlight the Unfortunately, sometimes one disaster can
pronunciation of drought /draut/. cause another one. For example a tsunami
sometimes happens after there is an earthquake
3 • Check students understand the task. in the middle of the sea. And a wildfire on a
• Students do the quiz individually and mountain can sometimes cause a landslide. We
compare answers in pairs. know that trees can stop landslides happening.
That's because trees help to keep the earth
• Listen to their ideas as a class but do not
in place. But when there aren't any trees, the
correct them at this stage.
earth can move more easily - and it can come
4 • Explain the task. Read the example crashing down onto a town or city.
The big problem with many natural disasters
sentences aloud to the class.
is that nobody knows when they will happen.
• Students work individually and write about a However, some people believe that animals can
disaster in their country. feel when a disaster is about to occur. There are
• They compare answers in pairs. many stories about animals behaving unusually
• Listen to their ideas as a class. just before a volcano or an earthquake - dogs
cry and birds stop singing, for example. Why
does this happen? Who knows! Maybe they
have a special ability, which human beings don't
have, to understand how nature works!

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Vocabulary and Listening
Natural disasters

2 wildfire
3 flood
4 Write three sentences about a
4 volcano 1 '- · ' listen and repeat the words in the box. Which
disaster that happened in your
5 earthquake two words can't you see in the pictures? Complete the
country. Use words from exercise 1.
6 tsunami explanations 1-8.
7 drought There w"' " flood in C6rdobi:l. ~ome
volcano earthquake avalanche hurricane
8 tornado people lo't their home,. My fi:l mily <:lnd
flood wildfire tornado tsunami landslide
Landslide and I were 'afe.
drought famine
famine are not
shown in the 5 ~ listen to a TV programme
pictures. 2 f Listen and check your answers. about natural disasters and check
your answers to exercise 3·
3 What do you know about natural disasters? Look at the quiz.
Are the sentences true or false? 6 Listen again and answer the 1 Volcanoes
questions. and
2 True earthquakes.
3 True
1 Which two kinds of disaster often
2 Because
4 True
happen near the Pacific Ocean? they are too
1 Most of the world's volcanoes are in Europe.
2 Why don't we always feel small.
2 There are over 1,000 tornadoes in the USA every year. earthquakes? 3 In the middle
3 An earthquake happens somewhere in the world 3 Where do some tsunamis start? of the sea.
every 30 seconds.
4 What can stop a landslide? 4 Trees.
4 Landslides can happen because of wildfires. 5 What do birds sometimes do 5 They stop
before a disaster? singing.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


New Zealand is a country in the
Pac;ific Ocean 1,500 km east of
Au$ttalia. Many earthquakes
happen there. New Zealand also
has more than so volcanoes!

A few years ago, a terrible earthquake


happened in the ctty of Chri~Jtchurch in
NeW Zealand. It kWed 185 people, but Jay
Watson bad a lucky escape.

What were you doing 'Nhen the GgJi!'il Were you hun?
earthquake happened? At first I thought I was seriously injured,
I wasn't at school that day because I but I actually only had a few scratches and
was sick. I was sitting on my bed when bruises on my back. I was really lucky!
I heard a terrible noise and the whole mm:mD How did you feel?
house started shaking.
Scared! And not just because of the fall.
~ What did you do? Lots of bricks fell on top of me while I
I realized it was an earthquake so I was lying on the ground. Our next-door
quickly got down on the floor between neighbour, who's a firefighter, pulled
my bed and the wall. I thought that was me out from under the bricks. My mum
the safest place. At school, we often couldn't believe that I was alive!
have earthquake drills, so we know GgJi!'il How did your life cnange because of the
what to do in an emergency. earthquake?
GmB What happened next? fl) Well, we had to move to a new house
W Suddenly the wall of my bedroom because there was so much damage to our
collapsed and I fell out of the house! I old one. It's in a different area, but I still go
fell about ten metres, from the second to the same school. And it's only got one
floor of the house into the front garden! floor, so I feel a bit safer!

1 Look at the pictures of Jay and his house after


an earthquake. Can you guess where he was
when the earthquake happened?

Read and listen to Jay's story. Check


your answer to exercise 1.

3 Read the interview again and choose the


correct words.
1 protect
himself jay ...
2 through a 1 tried to escape I protect himself.
wall 2 fell out of a window I through a wall.
3 not badly 3 was badly I not badly hurt in the
4 someone he earthquake.
knew CULTURAL COMPARISON
4 was helped by someone he knew I a team of
5 lives in the firefighters.
same area 4 Answer the questions.
5 no longer lives in the same area I goes to
the same school. 1 Do earthquakes ever happen in your country?
2 When and where was the most recent earthquake?
3 Do earthquakes happen more in some places?

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Cultural awareness
A natural disaster in
New Zealand
Christchurch is the largest city in the South
LP:=:so:l '-· ~-:.:-;::·;i ·Jc~~,; Island of New Zealand, with a population
.. · - p • - --~

of 375,000. On February 22nd 2011, it was


In this lesson students will:
struck by an earthquake of a magnitude of
• read about a natural disaster in New
6.3 on the Richter scale, killing 185 people
Zealand
and destroying numerous buildings. The cost
• talk about earthquakes in their country
of the damage to the New Zealand economy
has been estimated at around £20 billion.

Warmer
Write New Zealand on the board. Focus COMPARISON

students on the Fact box. Students work in 4 Students read the three questions and make
pairs and discuss any other information they a note of their answers.
know about this country. Listen to their ideas They work in pairs and discuss the
as a class and make a list on the board, eg
They speak English there. It's made up of two
large islands and many smaller ones. They are
sometimes called 'The Shaky Islands '.

1 • Check students understand the task.


• They look at the pictures and answer the
question.
• Students compare their ideas in pairs.
• Listen to their ideas as a class but do not
correct them at this stage.

2
• Play the CD. Students follow the text in
their books and check their answer to the
question in exercise 1.
• Students compare their answer in pairs.
• Check the answer as a class. Make sure
students understand next-door neighbour
(someone who lives in the house next to
yours).

3 • Students read the questions carefully first.


• Students look in the text and choose the
correct words to complete the sentences.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

Word check
Make sure students understand the words and
can pronounce them correctly, especially bruise
/bru:z/. Ask them to translate them into their
language.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Grammar
Past simple and past • Ask students to read the whole text
continuous before they choose the correct words and
t1n$wer the questions.
• Students work individually to complete
tilt exercise.
In this leaeon students will~
• "They compare answers in pairs.

.,.
cotlbael the UBI Gf 1he put a1mple and
6
• ask and answer questions aboUt an • 'ray the 00. Students listen and check
emergency tt'ilir answers to exercise 5.
• read a quiz aboUt historical events

Students use the internet to a


Warmer
question.
Write hit, say, lie, sit, put, come, hope, run,
die, have on the board. Put students into
Digital course: Interactive grammar table
pairs to write the -ing form of the verbs
without referring to the spelling rules on page Study guide: page 39
39. Invite students to the board to write the
answers (hitting, saying, lying, sitting, putting,
coming, hoping, running, dying, having). Dinosaurs were living on Earth when they
suddenly disappeared. Many scientists believe
that a natural disaster killed them. How many
1 • Students look at the table and complete the years ago did it happen?
rules with when and while. a) 5 million, b) 15 million, c) 65 million.
• Students compare answers in pairs. The answer is c) - it happened 65 million years
• Check answers as a class. Highlight the ago.
use of when with the past simple (the single In the year 79 AD, there was a terrible volcanic
eruption near an Italian city. Many people were
action) and while with the past continuous
trying to escape when they died. Where was it?
(the action in progress). a) Rome, b) Pompeii, c) Venice.
2 • Students work individually to write full The answer is b) - the volcano was near
Pompeii.
sentences from the prompts.
In September of this year, London was burning!
• Students compare answers in pairs. The fire started by accident and it quickly
• Check answers as a class. destroyed large areas of the city. What was the
year?
3 • Students complete the email individually. a) 1444, b) 1555, c) 1666.
• They compare answers in pairs. The answer is c) - the Great Fire of London was
• Check answers as a class. in 1666.
On 1st November 1755, a terrible disaster
- ,"'' XPAESS YOURSELF
destroyed the beautiful city of Lisbon in Portugal.
4 • Students work in pairs and ask and answer However, the people rebuilt their city and made it
questions about an emergency they have beautiful again. What was the disaster?
experienced. a) an earthquake, b) a tornado, c) a flood.
The answer is a) -there was a terrible
• Listen to their ideas as a class.
earthquake in Lisbon.
On 15th April 1912, a ship was crossing the
Grammar in context: Atlantic Ocean to the USA when it suddenly hit
an iceberg. The ship sank. What was the ship's
Famous disasters name?
5 • This activity gives students more practice a) The Golden Hind, b) The Titanic, c) The Santa
Marfa.
in the difference between the past
The answer is b) - the ship was called the
continuous and the past simple and also
Titanic.
practises adverbs.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Grammar in context:
Grammar Famous disasters
Past simple and past
continuous 5 Read the text and choose the correct words.
Then answer the questions.

1 Look at the table. Then copy and complete the


rules with when and while. c 65 million
3 when
past continuous and past simple b Pompeii
I was silti.ng on my bed when I heard a noise . 4 was
I heard a noise white I was sitting on my bed . 5 quickly
a) We usually use the past simple after .... c 1666
b) We usually use the past continuous after .... 6 rebuilt
a an
2 Make sentences about Jay's family using the earthquake
past simple and past continuous. 7 suddenly
was eating His mum I cook I when I she I hear a shout
when the
lights went 1-Ji' mum WCJS.' cookint when 'he heCJrd CJ ' hout
to ~fetnber 9f tliis
out. 1 His brother I eat I when I the lights/ go out. year. london (4) was I
2 His dad 2 His dad I walk down the street I when I the \'11818 bumir:~g! The file
was walking
ground I move. stdfled by accident
down the
3 Jay's sister I talk to her friends I when I Or:lQ · (5) quick I
street when
the ground somebody I shout 'Earthquake! ' quicj(ty, destroyed
Iorge areas of the
moved. 4 His grandparents I watch TV I when I
dly. What 'MOIS. tl:le
3 Jay's sister everything I Fall off the shelves.
was talking
';!30(?
to her o) 1444 b) 1555
3 Copy and complete the email with the correct
friends when c) 1666
someone
form of the verbs in brackets.
shouted
'Earthquake! ' !SZl Sene! <:o Reply

grand parents
Hi Ingrid!
We're having lots of adventures on our
n
were watching holiday. While we (1) ... (stay) at a campsite
TV when
near a river, we (2) .. . (have) a terrible
everything
fell off the experience. There (3) ... (be) a flood while
shelves. we (4) ... (sleep). When we (5) ... (wake up),
we (6) ... (be) wet. On 15th Apn119-l2, a ship was crossing~ J
1
Hope you're having a good summer! Atfantic Ocean to the USA when ~ ~7) suaaen 1
suddenly hit an iceberg. The ship sank What
Jack
was the shipis name?
a) The ($oi(Jen t:lind b) The Titan~
c) The Santo Marfa
XPA ESS VOURSE!LF

4 Work in pairs. Think of an emergency you have


experienced. Ask and answer the questions.
What were you doing when it happened?
What did you do next?
How did you feel while it was happening?
What did you do afterwards?

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


It's so cold here at the moment!
Do you prefer hot or cold weather?
I definitely prefer hot weather!

0 Smdenrs and reachers at Gl\lnge econdary choul in the viJ L1ge


of Hepworth near Ou.ndec wer.e u nable ro get home last night 0
bea1~1 se heavy snow IVliS bloeking rhe roads. ' We had. to lecp Icy conditions were ~till causing problems
on rhe Aoor - i t wasn't very contformbl c,' said t3-yca r-olcl Jamie all over the country today. However in
Banks. But it wasn't all bad. 'The teachers let us play games on the norl~ of England some students :Vere
belebrohng when the ir school was closed
the school computers,' Jamie added.
Necause o f lhe bod weath er. 'Tilis is great I
ow_I con ,go and ploy snowballs wil h .
mydfnends, said Jessica Wa tson, a Year 8
f) A student from Mortime stu ent from Durham .
come first in a national rhSchool, Coventry, has
14·year·old Lucy Presto p ot~graphy competition.
ta ke her w inning phot n ~sef her mob ile phone to
What is she oojng d
0 0
.~ rozen lake in winter. Step 2: Listen,~
10
going to use It to buy o WI her £500 prize? 'I'm
a camera!' she laughed. 3 I Listen to a weather report. Write ..,....,.,·~·
1 Wales
~
missing words and phrases 1-7 in your
notebook. 2 one and a
1 Unlucky
half metres
students
spend night
in classroom
Step 1: R~pAJ 3 dangerous
4 trains
2 Schools 5 icy
close as 1 Match the headlines with newspaper
6 sports
blizzards articles 1-3. Today it is very cold in Scotland, th!i! north and
centre
continue south of England, and in (I) .... Snow is falling
7 get better
3 Local girl's and there is deep snow lying in some parts of the
photo country. It is more than (2) ... deep in some places.
success Matching head in~ with paragraphs There are blizzards in the south of England.
When ttwlng to match headings with The heavy snow has made conditions on the roads
paragtll~hs, look for words that have very (3) ... , and many (4) ... are not running. Some
shnfiar meanings. roads are blocked by snow, while other roads are
ph:Gto suece-ss = has won very (5) .... The police have asked people not
1 Jamie Banks to travel by car if their journey isn't important.
2 Lucy Twenty people spent the night in a local (6) ...
Preston 2 Read the articles and answer the questions.
when blizzards on the M25 motorway closed
3 Jessica Who ...
the road.
Watson
1 said he had fun in a difficult situation? The weather will (7) ... tomorrow, but it will
4 Lucy Not to travel
Preston
2 won something?
3 felt happy when she heard some news?
remain very cold until the weekend.
I by car if their
journey isn't
5 Jessica
4 plans to spend some money? , important.
Watson 4 Listen again. What have the police asked
5 didn't expect to have a holiday?
people to do?

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Integrated ski Is
In the news
step 2: Lista
Lesson objectives
3
In this lesson students will: • Students read the whole weather forecast
• work on all four skills first.
• read short newspaper articles • Play the CD. Students write the missing
• listen to a weather report words and phrases in their notebooks.
• write a personalized dialogue • Check progress. If necessary, play the CD
• act out their dialogue again.
• Check answers as a class.

4 • Check students understand the task.


Warmer
• Play the CD again . Students follow the
Revise some of the weather vocabulary from
weather report in their books.
the first lesson in this unit. Write blizzard,
• Students answer the question.
thunder, lightning, foggy, stormy, heatwave
• They compare the answer in pairs.
on the board with the letters in the wrong
• Check the answer as a class.
order: zdrazilb, derunth, nngithlig, gofgy,
mortys, wvehatea. Students work in pairs and
write the words with the correct spelling.

Step 1: Read J
1 • Highlight Lucy's speech bubble. Elicit
answers to the question from the class.
• Students read the headlines carefully.
• Make sure they understand unlucky
(unfortunate).
• Students read the short articles and match
them with the headlines.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

Matching headings with paragraphs


Focus students on the Skills builder box.
Elicit the phrases in article 3 that show the
girl was successful (come first, winning
1 photo). Point out that it is an important skill

to recognize key words and to use extra


information such as headings or headlines in
I order to get the general idea of the context of
a text and understand it.

2 • Students read the questions carefully first.


• They look at the articles again and find the
answers.
• Students compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Integrated skills - continued
Reacting to news
5 9 • Students practise their dialogues in pairs.
• Students read the dialogue first. • For extra practice, they swap roles in both
• Play the CD. Students listen and choose the dialogues.
correct words.
10 • Choose some pairs to act out their dialogue
• They compare answers in pairs.
for the class.
• Check answers as a class.
• Students raise their hand if another pair has
6 • Play the CD again, pausing after each the same news story as the news story they
question or statement and each response for have chosen. This will encourage them to
students to repeat as a class. listen carefully to their classmates.
• Note the main stress and the falling
intonation in the wh- questions: What
t}Ep_pened? What was it?
• Ask students to repeat the dialogue several
times both chorally and individually with the
correct stress and intonation.
• Students practise the dialogue in pairs. Then
swap roles and practise the dialogue again.

Step 3: Write:~
7 • Students work individually.
• They choose a news story from exercise 1 or
choose a news story of their own.
• They copy the questions and phrase in the
box into their notebooks.
• They write answers to the questions and
complete the phrase.

8 • Ask students to look at the questions


and responses in the Communication kit:
Reacting to news. Encourage them to
use these expressions when writing their
dialogue.
• Students work individually and write their
dialogue, using the dialogue in the book as a
model and their notes from exercise 7.
• Monitor while they are writing and give help if
necessary.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Hi Chris! Guess what happened (1) yesterday I
last night during the storm?
Well, I was watching TV when I heard a loud noise ... What was it?
A huge tree fell down in our (2) road I street! No way! That's (3) terrible I bad news. Was
It fell in our garden. anybody hurt?
No, luckily everybody was OK. We were all Great, I'm really pleased about that.
inside because of the awful weather.
Well, I've got some good news too! A reporter Wow, that's (s) amazing I fantastic! I'm definitely
from the local TV station came and interviewed going to watch it.
us about what happened. I'm going to be on TV
(4) tonight I tomorrow!

5 · • Listen to the dialogue. Choose the Step 1,: Commun~cote


correct words.
2 street 9 Work in pairs. Take turns to practise your
6 listen again and repeat Practise your intonation.
3 terrible dialogues.
4 tonight
I-Ii ~CJra ! G u e~~ what hClppened _9
5 amazing StepJ: Write I don't know. what happened?

7 Choose a news story from exercise 1 or use 10 Act your dialogue for the class.
your own ideas. Then copy the questions and
phrase in the box. Write answers and complete COMMUNti C.A:'Tl'ON ,K IT
the phrase.
Reacting to news
What happened? When did it happen? What ... ?
Why did it happen? How did it happen? Where ... ?
That's ... ! When ... ?
Why I Why not?
No way! I I can't believe it!
8 Prepare a new dialogue. Write both parts. Use
That's amazing I great I terrible news!
your notes from exercise 7 to help you.
I'm really sorry I pleased.
Congratulations!
Well done!

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Writing
A fictional narrative

(1) ... my friend Rosie and I decided to go for


a walk in the mountains. The sun was shining
when we set off, but (2) ... the weather
changed. It was very foggy and we couldn't
see where we were going. (3) ... we were lost.
We didn't know what to do. (4) ... I
remembered I had my mobile phone in my bag!
I tried to phone my dad, but my phone wasn't
working. (5} ... it was getting dark and we were
cold and frightened.
Suddenly we heard the sound of a helicopter.
We couldn't believe our luck! It was coming to so she sat
rescue us. down to
have a rest. I
Everything was alright (6} ... -but we learned She was
our lesson. Next time, we'll check the weather soon tired
4 Rewrite the sentences with the words in
forecast before we go for a walk in the so she sat
the correct position. More than one answer down to
mountains! is possible. have a rest.
1 She soon was tired so she sat down to 2 Sam didn't
1 I Read the story. Complete it with the words want to
have a rest. go on the
1 One day and expressions in bold in the Writing focus. Then 2 Sam didn't want to go on the trip, but trip, but in
2 later listen to check your answers. he in the end enjoyed it. the end he
3 Soon 3 I was feeling by then hungry because it enjoyed it./
Sam didn't
4 Then was lunchtime.
want to
5 By then WRITING FOCUS 4 It went cloudy and it started then go on the
6 in the end Sequencing words and expressions raining. trip, but he
We use the following words and expressions to show enjoyed it in
the end.
the order in which events happened.
One day Sam woke up early and went swimming ...
Writing h>rSbf. 3 By then I
Write a fictional narrative about an was feeling
Soon it was time for breakfast. hungry
Then he went back to the campsite. eventful day trip. because
By then his family were eating. P an Think of an idea for your story. it was
Later they all went to the beach. Then make notes: lunchtime. I
• who it is about- you or somebody I was feeling
In the end they stayed at the beach untilw p.m. hungry
else? by then
2 look again at the Writing focus. How do you say the • how will the story begin and end? because
words and phrases in your language? it was
1Nr'fe Write three paragraphs- an lunchtime.
3 Read the story again and answer the questions introduction, the main part of the story, 4 It went
about sequencing words and phrases. and the end. cloudy
1 One day and then
2 In the end 1 Which phrase often goes at the beginning of a Check your writing. it started
story? raining. / It
3 Bythen
2 Which phrase often goes at the end of a story? ~ past simple and past continuous went cloudy
4 the past and it then
simple 3 Which phrase is often followed by the past verbs
started
continuous? 0 sequencing words raining.
4 What tense do we usually use with the other words?

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Writing
A fictional narrative
The expression in the end is used to mean
Lesson objectives
finally or after a period of time or thought.
In this lesson students will: The expression at the end cannot be used in
• read a short narrative this way. It must be followed by of, eg at the
• use sequencing words and expressions end of the lesson, at the end of the film and
• write a fictional narrative refers to a specific point of time.

Warmer
Write the word mountains on the board. Ask
The aim of this activity is for students to
students to look at the picture and tell you
produce a piece of guided writing that
why mountains can be dangerous. Elicit
includes the correct use of the past simple
some possible answers from the class and
and the past continuous. It also gives
write them on the board, eg You can lose
them practice in using sequencing words
your way. You might fall. The weather can
appropriately. Ask the students to follow the
change very quickly.
stages in the Student's Book. At the Check
stage, ask them to swap notebooks and
1
check each other's writing.
• Students read the information in the Writing
focus box first. Check students understand
Writing ~ference and
the term sequencing word (a word that helps .. . . practl~~;
. -·· 'workbo~k'
..... . .--:ge~":f-
'
the story have a logical order).
• They read the text and use the words and
expressions in bold to complete the text.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Play the CD. Students check their answers.

2 • Students look at the sequencing words and


expressions in the Writing focus box.
• They translate them into their language.

3 • Students read the questions and find the


answers in the text.
• They compare answers in pairs .
• Check answers as a class.

4 • Explain the task. Make sure students


understand that the sequencing words and
expressions are in the wrong position in the
sentences.
• They work individually to rewrite the
sentences in the correct order. Encourage
them to refer back to the story and to the
Writing focus box to help them.
• Students compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Study guide
Grammar Vocabulary and Speaking
Tell the students the Study guide is an Speaking
important page which provides a useful • Check that students understand the phrases
reference for the main language of the unit: the to use for reacting to news.
grammar, the vocabulary and the functional • Tell students to act out a conversation
language from the Integrated skills pages. between two people who are discussing an
Explain that they should refer to this page when interesting piece of recent news.
studying for a test or exam.

Additional material
Grammar
Workbook
• Tell the students to look at the example
• Progress check page 30
sentences of the past continuous: affirmative,
• Self-evaluation page 31
negative, questions and short answers. Make
• Grammar reference and practice pages
sure they understand how to form the tense
88-89
and its usage.
• Vocabulary extension page 104
• Then tell students to look at the example
• Integrated skills page 113
sentences with adverbs. Ensure they
• Writing reference pages 124-125
understand how to use adverbs in sentences.
Get students to translate into their own
language if necessary.
• Tell students to look at the example
sentences with when and while. Make sure
they understand that we usually use the past
simple after when and the past continuous
after while.
• Refer students to the Grammar reference
on pages 88-89 of the Workbook for further
revision.

Vocabulary
• Tell students to look at the list of vocabulary
and check understanding.
• Refer students to the Wordlist on page 151
of the Workbook where they can look up any
words they can't remember.

Teacher's Resource File


• Basics section pages 18-22 • Unit 3 End-of-unit test: Basic, Standard and
• Vocabulary and grammar consolidation Extra
pages 11-14 • CEFR Skills Exam Generator
• Translation and dictation pages 4, 14 • End-of-term test Basic, Standard and Extra
• Evaluation rubrics pages 1-7
• Key competences worksheets pages 5-6
• Culture and CLIL worksheets pages 9-12
• Culture video worksheets pages 5-6
• Digital competence worksheets pages 5-6
• Macmillan Readers worksheets pages 1-2

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Study guide
Grammar
Past continuous Vocabulary
Weather
affirmative blizzard rainy
1/ He I She /It was talking with friends. cloudy snowy
We I You I They were doing their homework. damp stormy
negative dry sunny
1/ He I She /It wasn't tidying her room . foggy thunder and lightning
We I You I They weren't eating lunch. hailstones warm
heatwave wet
questions
icy windy
Was it snowing?
Were we I you I they walking? Natural disasters
short answers avalanche landslide
Yes, it was. drought tornado
No, we I you I they weren't. earthquake tsunami
famine volcano
We use the past continuous to talk about things
flood wildfire
that were in progress in the past.
hurricane
Adverbs
It's cold. Dress warmly!
It's foggy. Drive carefully!
Speaking
It's raining hard today. Reacting to news
I can easily do this exercise. Wh at ... ?
She speaks English well. Where ... ?
Whe n ... ?
Past simple and past continuous Why I Why not?
past continuous and past ....... No wa y! I I can't believe it!
That's amazing I great I terrible news!
His mum was cooking dinner when she heard a
I'm really sorry I pleased .
shout. Congratulations!
Lots of brick fell on me while I was lying on the Well done!
ground.

-~
Past continuous spelling rules }.. ~AftNJNf~ TQ .L~A~N I
• For most verbs, add-ing to the infinitive Practise weather vocabulary by keeping a
go~ going play~ playing weather diary. Write a short description of the
• For verbs that end in -e, omit the -e and add weather every day.
-ing
come~ coming give~ giving
• For one syllable verbs that end in vowel+
consonant (except w, x or y), double the
consonant and add -ing
• For verbs that end in -ie, omit the -ie and add
-ying
die~ dying lie~ lying

Progress check: Workbook page 30.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Giving a talk

Work in groups of three to prepare and give a When you give a talk, remember to:
talk about a famous person in history. • plan the talk and make a list of the
equipment you will need.
• be creative- use search engines to look
for different photos and vi deo cli~s to
make your talk more attractive.
1 Look at the materials for giving a talk below. • check the pronun ciation of diffic
Find ... words in an online dictionary.
1 a picture of the person
2 a video clip
3 an overview of the talk
4 questions for the people listening to the talk
5 quotes by the famous person

2 Look at the equipment for giving a talk


in the box. What are the advantages and
disadvantages of each item?

computer internet connection DVD player


board projector spea kers poster
photoco pies

£:8lly 'Ride- wm; the fir't American wom8n in 'pace.. ~ow much
do you know about her?
Whae wa' 5;he, born'7
~~~ jo!11ed NA9. (North American ~pace Agency) In JC175.
questions for f.low many people ~w the advert In li'le new~paper slid
the people applied to join the- 'P8Ce- programme"
listening to the
talk When wa' her fir't ' pace flight'7
£:8lly wa' an actronaut and phy, icict. What d'e did 'he do9
Which ofthe'e award' did 'Ride win'7

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Collaborative project 1
Giving a talk 2 • Students work in pairs and discuss the
advantages and disadvantages of using each
Lesson objectives
piece of equipment for giving a talk.
In this lesson students will: • Listen to students' ideas as a class.
• prepare and give a talk about a famous • Point out the importance of knowing how to
person in history use any equipment selected for a talk.
• read information about a talk and answer
questions about it
• listen to a group planning a talk
• read and complete a conversation extract

Warmer
Ask students to work in teams. Tell them
to write a name of a famous person from
history for each letter of the alphabet, eg
A (Jane) Austen, B (Napoleon) Bonaparte,
C Cleopatra, D (Charles) Darwin, E (Albert)
Einstein. Elicit answers from the class and
write all the names on the board. The team
with the most names wins. Elicit one or two
facts about each person, eg why they are
famous, what they achieved, etc.

Read the task with the class and check


students understand.

1 • Briefly discuss giving a talk with the class.


What makes a talk interesting? What types
of information can you include? What
equipment could you use?
• Read the list of items students have to
identify and help with any vocabulary.
Remind students that a quote is something a
person says.
• Ask students to read the information and find
an example of each item.
• Check answers as a class. Ask if there are any
other items which could be included in the list.
• Read the Digital literacy box with the class
and check students understand. Discuss
why it is important to plan the talk and what
equipment you need.
• Point out that talks are more interesting when
you include photos and video clips and that
it is important to check the pronunciation of
difficult words.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


8 • Look at the evaluation grids with the class.
3
• Read through the different options and help
• Ask students to read the questions carefully.
with any vocabulary as necessary.
• Play the CD. Students listen and answer the
• Students complete their self-evaluation. Give
questions.
help if necessary.
• Check the answers as a class.

4 • Students read the sentences carefully first.


• Play the CD again .
In pairs, students write an interview with
• Students decide if the sentences are true or
a famous person from history. They can
false and correct the false sentences.
practise and act out their interview.
• Students compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.
'• 1.48Audioscript, exercise :t . ·: ~-·;; >'~;.~~
5 • Students read the conversation extract and
complete it in pairs. Sonia: OK, so we decided to do our talk about
Sally Ride, the astronaut who was the first
• Play the CD of the whole conversation again.
American woman in space. We're all looking for
Students listen and check their answers. information. Shall I check all the facts and write
• Check answers as a class. Students practise a plan? Then I can write the overview, too.
the converstion extract in groups. Edu: We have to participate equally. We can all
write a plan. Sonia, you can check the facts and
6 • Read the Useful language box with the class then I can organize the information.
and help with any vocabulary. Practise as Mario: I can write the overview, find photos and
necessary. quotes ... and look for a good video clip.
• Elicit other examples of each phrase, eg We Edu: But we're not giving a Powerpoint
need a computer with an internet connection presentation ... We can't show a video clip.
Mario: What about putting the video clip on a
for our talk. Instead of a poster, let's draw a
DVD? We can use a projector for the photos.
cartoon. Edu: So we need a DVD player and a projector.
• Students work in groups of three and plan I'm not sure. I think that's too much equipment.
their talks. Sonia: But we want the talk to be creative and
interesting!
Edu: Wait a minute! We don't need lots of
equipment to make the talk interesting.
7 • Read the three steps with the class to give Mario: That's true. We can make a poster with
students a clear idea of what they have to do. the photos and quotes, and write the overview
on the board.
• Monitor while they are working and give help
Sonia: I've got an idea. Instead of a video clip,
if necessary. we can write an interview with Sally Ride and act
Share information it out. What do you think?
Edu: That's brilliant! And what about writing a
Students share their information in their groups.
quiz? We can divide the class into teams and
They discuss their work and how to improve it. give them a photocopy of the questions. They
They check for errors . listen to the talk and then answer the questions.
Sonia: Yes, I love that idea. We can have a prize
Create the talk for the best team. Do you agree?
Each group creates their talk. Encourage them Mario: Yes, I think that's a good idea. So our talk
to be creative and try to make the talk as includes an interview, a photo with quotes and a
interesting as possible. Remind them to use fun quiz.
their own words and to check for errors. Edu: And we only need the board and some
photocopies. We don't need any other equipment!
Show and tell Mario: OK, so shall we write the plan?
Each group gives their talk. Allow time for the
other students to ask questions. If you like, the
class can vote for their favourite talk.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Listen and plan )
3 •: Listen to Sonia, Mario and Edu 6 Work in groups. Plan your talk. Use the Useful
doing the task about the items in the box in language box to help you.
exercise 2. Answer the questions. • Choose a famous person in history to do your
connection
2 a poster, the 1 Which two items don't they mention? talk about.
board and 2 Which items do they decide to use? • Decide how to structure the talk and what
photocopies equipment you need.
4 Listen again. Are the sentences true or false? • Decide how to share the work. Make sure
Correct the false sentences. everyone contributes.
1 False 1 They don't participate equally because Sonia • Decide when to meet again to share your
They do does all the work. information.
participate
equally.
2 False
2 They are all happy to use lots of different
equipment for the talk.
3 They make a poster with photos and some
J1QD Create )
They aren't
all happy to
use lots of
equipment
quotes.
4 They decide not to show a video clip of an _
7 Follow the steps to create your talk.
(" _,,.,_ .
interview with Sally Ride. ' Share information
for the talk.
Read and listen to each other's work. Discuss
3 True 5 Complete the conversation extract with the your work. Check these things.
4 True words in the box. Listen again and check your • Is it in your own words?
answers. • Have you got all the information you need?
• Have you got photos, video clips, etc?
minute idea instead true yes
1 need • Is the grammar and vocabulary correct?
brilliant need
2 minute • Is the spelling and punctuation correct?
3 true Create the talk
4 Instead \ 1 Plan the talk and what information you will
5 brilliant include. Decide what equipment you will
6 idea Edu: So we (1) ... a DVD player and a projector? need. Add your photos and video clips. Then,
7 Yes I'm not sure. I think that's too much check the grammar, vocabulary, spelling and
equipment. punctuation.
; Sonia: But we want the talk to be creative and
interesting! Show and tell
Edu: Wait a (2) ... ! We don't need lots of
equipment to make the talk interesting.
Mario: That's(3) .... We can make a poster with
the photos and quotes, and write the
overview on the b.oard.
8 Now ask your teacher for the group and
Sonia: I've got an idea. (4) ... of a video clip, we individual assessment grids. Then complete
can write an interview with Sally Ride and the grids.
act it out. What do you think?
: Edu: That's (s) ... ! And what about writing USEFUL LANGUAGE
a quiz? We can divide the class into
What equipment (do we need)?
teams and give them a photocopy of the
We need (a DVD player).
questions. They listen to the talk and then
That's true.
answer the questions.
I've got an idea. Let's (play some music). What
Sonia: Yes, I love that (6) .... We can have a prize do you think?
for the best team. Do you agree? That's brilliant! I Yes, I love that idea. I OK.
Mario: (7) ... , I think that's a good idea . So our talk That's boring. I I don't really like that idea.
includes an interview, a photo with quotes Instead of (a video clip), let's ...
and a fun quiz.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Unit objectives and key competences

In this unit the student will learn ... In this unit the student will learn how to ...
• understand, memorize and correctly use • identify specific information in an online news
vocabulary related to geography, landscape and article about a Scottish island CLC CMST DC CAE
animals CLC CMST sec • look online for information about Scottish
• understand and correctly use comparatives and islands CLC CMST DC CAE SIE
superlatives CLC L2L • identify specific information in a dialogue about
• understand and correctly use countable and a project CLC CMST sec
uncountable nouns CLC L2L • read a web page about a day as a volunteer,
• about safaris in South Africa and compare with listen to conversations about volunteering and
animals in their country CLC CMST CAE sec learn how to express preferences CLC CMST sec
• about animals by watching a short video CLC CAE
CMSTSCC DC • write a geographical description CLC CMST SIE
L2L
• prepare for and do a listening exam with
multiple-choice answers CLC L2L SIE

Main vocabulary
• Geography and landscape: • Read an online news article about a small Scottish island
canyon, desert, forest, etc • Read a text about safaris in South..Africa
• Animals: butterfly, gorilla, owl, etc • Read a web page about a day as a volunteer
• Read a geographical description
Grammar
• Comparatives and superlatives
• Countable and uncountable • Write a personalized dialogue about expressing
nouns preferences
• VVrite a geographical description in three steps: plan,
Functional language
write, check
• Phrases for expressing
• Learn how to order adjectives correctly
preferences

Pronunciation
• Listen to a dialogue about a project
• IW in comparatives and
• Listen to short conversations about volunteering
superlatives
• Difficult sounds: /g/ and /d3/
• Exchange information about natural wonders

• Prepare and act out a dialogue about preferences

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Evaluation
• Unit 4 End-of-unit test: Basic, Standard and Extra
Self-study and
• CEFR Skills Exam Generator
self-evaluation
• Study guide:
Student's book page 51
• Progress check and self-
evaluation:
Workbook pages 38-39
• Grammar reference and practice:
Workbook pages 90-91
Digital material
• Wordlist:
Workbook pages 151-157 Pulse Live! Digital Course including:
• Interactive grammar tables
Learning strateg!es
• Audio visual speaking model: Expressing preferences
and thinldng s~ti.U~!
• Audio visual cultural material: Animals
• Scanning a text when reading
Student's website
-,,...u~·w·.,.,l a Na~·f.l',. rness
'"'

• Thula Thula Wildlife Reserve


• Comparing wild animals in South
Africa with wild and endangered
animals in students' own countries • Web quest: Scottish islands
l'"""r•~c·~~.~ ~ . " • Digital competence worksheet: Audioblogs
t,."" ..... ...?-~• .. .;.A:Jla"inDUt~·

contents
• Natural science, endangered
Reinforcement material
animals, safaris in South Africa
• Language and Literature: reading
• Basic worksheets, Teacher's Resource File pages 23-28
and writing a geographical
• Vocabulary and Grammar: Consolidation worksheets
description
Teacher's Resource File pages 15-16 '
• ICT: searching the internet for
information

Extension material

• Fast-finisher activity: Student's Book page 43


• Extra activities: Teacher's Book pages T43, T50
Competence in linguistic
• Vocabulary and Grammar: Extension worksheets
communication
Teacher's Resource File pages 17-18 '
CMST Competence in mathematics
'
science and technology
DC Digital competence
Teacher's Resource File
sec Social and civic
competences
• Translation and dictation worksheets pages 5, 15
CAE Cultural awareness and
• Evaluation rubrics pages 1-7
expression
• Key competences worksheets pages 7-8
L2L Learning to learn
• Culture and CLIL worksheets pages 13-16
SIE Sense of initiative and
• Culture video worksheets pages 7-8
entrepreneurship
• Digital competence worksheets pages 7-8
• Macmillan Readers worksheets pages 3-4

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Vocabulary and Speaking
Geography and landscape
1 , • Look at the information about seven places.
Listen and repeat the words in blue.

1 THE GRAND CANYON, USA


This canyon in the middle of a desert is nearly 2 km deep! You can
go rafting down the Colorado River at the bottom of the valley.
2 THE GREAT BARRIER REEF, AUSTRALIA
In the Pacific Ocean, near the coast of Queensland, this coral reef
has over 1,500 different kinds of fish!
3 THE AMAZON RAINFOREST, ECUADOR
The world's biggest forest is full of plants and animals, which are
disappearing as people cut trees down.
4 THE DEAD SEA, JORDAN
This is a lake of salty water which you can float in. On the beach,
there is a special kind of mud which people put on their bodies!
5 THE NIAGARA FALLS, CANADA
At Niagara there are three different waterfalls. About 5 million
litres of water go through them every second!
6 TABLE MOUNTAIN, SOUTH AFRICA
This mountain, which is flat on top, has steep cliffs you can
climb, and all kinds of wildlife.
7 THE BLUE CAVE, GREECE
Inside this cave on the Greek island of Kastelorizo the water
is a beautiful deep blue.

3 Which place in the list do you most I least want


to visit?
The names of mountains, rivers, etc have a
I'd love to vis:it the DeCJd 5;:eCJ becCJus:e it~ CJmCJzin/5-
d1p>italletter.
Table Mountain, Everest, the Mississippi 1don't WCJnt to vir:: it the JViCJ!'tCJm FCJIIr:: becCJus:e -·
: forest
beach 2 Copy and complete the table with the blue . XPAESS VOURS •EL il';
mountain words from exercise 1.
4 Write a list of natural wonders in your country.
cliffs
cave Iland
cCJnyon
I~ater
nver
I The TCJbernCJs: Des:ert
island
5 Work in pairs. Talk about your list of natural
water wonders.
ocean
reef Adjectives to describe places •;· Montr::errCJt is: more beCJutiful thCJn the
I
lake beautiful dangerous amazing unusual TCJbernCJs: Des:ert.
waterfalls baring interesting No, I don't CJtree. I think ..

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Vocabulary and Speaking
Geography and landscape
Lesson objectives
- - -· The surface of the Dead Sea is 438 metres
In this lesson students will: below sea level. With 33.7% salinity, it is
• learn I revise words relat&Q to g$ography one of the saltiest lakes in the world. Table
and landscape Mountain, which overlooks the city of Cape
• say why they would like to visit a ptace Town, is just 1,084 metres high but the climb
• discuss natural wonders in their country up from the city is steep and the paths are
narrow. Fortunately, there is also a cable car
to take you to the top!
Warmer
Write Everest, Amazon, Sahara on the
board with the letters in the wrong order:
reveste, zomana, hasaar. Tell students that
• Focus students on the list of adJectives
one of these is a well-known desert, one
to describe places and check that fuey
an enormous river and one a very high
understand them.
mountain. Students work in pairs and write
the correct spelling for each word.
3 • Students read the question carefully.
• They work individually and write their
answers.
Students work in pairs and discuss the • Students compare answers in pairs.
questions. Get feedback from the whole class. • Listen to their ideas as a class.

XPRESS YO URSELF

1 4 • Explain the task. Point out that the Tabernas


• Students read the text. Desert is one example of a natural wonder.
• Play the CD. Students repeat the words in Others might include mountains, lakes,
blue chorally and individually. caves, etc.
• Make sure they pronounce island l'adand/ • They work individually and write their lists.
correctly and point out that the s is silent. • Monitor while they are writing and give help if
necessary.

5 • Students work in pairs and talk about their


In two-syllable nouns, the stress usually falls list of natural wonders.
on the first syllable, eg canysn, desert, river, • Listen to their ideas as a class.
valley, Qcean, forest, [!lQY[ltain, i§_/and.
____. I Vocabulary extension: Workbook' page·ios ~·
- .,.,... ·- I

features like mountains, rivers, oceans,


deserts, etc have a capital letter in English.

2 • Students copy the table into their notebooks.


• Explain the task. Students sort the words in
blue from exercise 1 into two columns.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Reading
Text type: An online news
article
:.__r ~. :; :..~.): · -; . .. jr_::.:;·;) ·_:~~·· ~
3 • Explain the task.
- -- - - -. - • Students look at the positive and negative
In this lesson students will: aspects already listed . Check that they
• read an online news article understand wildlife (animals and birds).
• read for specmc information • They read the text again and add two more
positive things and two more negative things
to the lists.
Recommended web links • Students compare answers in pairs.
www.isleofmuck.com/ • Check answers as a class. Note that there
are several possible answers.
www. visitscotland .com
4 • Students work individually and write three
differences between their town or city and
Warmer the island in the article.
Write the word island on the board. Students • Students compare answers in pairs.
work in pairs and write the names of as many • Listen to their ideas as a class.
islands as possible in two minutes. Listen to
their ideas as a class and make a list on the
board. Ask what is good about living on an
Ask fast finishers to read the article and
island and what is not so good.
the two comments again and decide which
comment they agree with and why.
1 • Students look at the pictures.
• They guess what country the island is in
(Scot/and). oilr..r ...... ~-.,,.......,~_,. _ _ ~~ ~ ..... ~• . , . ~~, -· • ,· .--:~.

Extra ,actiVIW··. '. 0 ., ··• .• ·~• • ·.


• Ask students to give reasons for their r ' • o 'I I •'!. -- • 1 i ~ y -

answers, eg The dancers are wearing kilts. Focus on some of the vocabulary in the text,
• Highlight the information in the Did you eg attractions, seabirds, attend. Make sure
know? box. that students understand the words and that
they can pronounce them correctly.
2
• This exercise gives students practice in
listening for key information .
• Students read the notes. They copy them
Students find out information about another
into their notebooks.
Scottish island. Highlight the Web quest tip.
• Check that they understand facilities {things
in a place that people can use such as t • Students work in pairs and choose one
shops, schools, transport, entertainment). of the Scottish islands.
• Play the CD. Students listen and follow the 2 • Ask students to open an internet web
text in their books. browser such as Internet Explorer.
• They complete the notes. Students open a search engine (eg
• Students compare answers in pairs. Google) and type in the subject of their
• Check answers as a class. search.
• Students find as much information as
Wo rd check they can.
Make sure students understand the words. Ask 11
They make notes about: the climate, the
them to translate them into their language. population, the history, the typical food
and getting to the island.
3 • They present their findings to the class.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


The owners of a small Scottish island are looking for a new family
to live there. The Isle of Muck, which is only 4 km long, is one of
the smallest islands in Scotland. It's only got 16 houses and a
population of 30 people!
Life on the island is quieter than in most places. There aren't many
facilities: there's no post office on the island and there's only one
shop. As for entertainment, tl1ere's one cafe, but it isn't open in the
evenings! Technology lovers might have a problem because there
isn't any electricity between 11am and 5pm. Its location also means
it isn't easy to use your mobile phone. COMMENTS:
I can't think of anything worse than
The Isle of Muck has other attractions, however. It's the most
living on a small island. Imagine seeing
beautiful place you can imagine, with white sandy beaches and clear the same people all the time! And what
sea. There's lots of wildlife, Including seabirds and dolphins. It's also do they do there in the evenings?
possibly the friendliest and safest place in the world. The last crime ci boy
happened here in the 1960s, and nobody locks their doors!
It's true that islands are more boring
The residents of Muck hope that the chosen family will play an active than cities, but city people aren't as
part in island life. The most important thing, however. is that they friencUy as island people, Island life is
have children, so that they can attend the island's primary school. It's also healthier than city life!
only got eight pupils at the moment and they'd like it to be bigger! Lara/7

010 YOU KNOW?


There are 787 islands in
Scotland.
owner facilities location sandy wildlife dolphin lock

3 Write two positive things and two negative things about


Read ing living on the Isle of Muck.
An online news article
Pos tt1ve (:;;; Ne..ga:t1Ve. ® Positive
1 look at the pictures. Can you guess : I becalttiful p~ce ) 1'\Q:t r:r.a~ {~~lU~s {I white sandy
what country this island is in ?
2 IQ:r,:. Q.f W\\QIIfe. ~ nat much en-terta nme.n-t ~ beaches

2 !toJf:~~ Read and listen to the 1 .:,:_, ~ clear sea


article. Then copy and complete the & ... friendly
1 the Isle of
Muck notes.
2 Scotland no crime
4 Compare your town or city with the Isle of Muck. Write three
3 4 km long differences. Negative
4 30 no post office
Name. of lsla.nd : (D ... There CJre CJ lo t of >:hop>: in my town.
5 cafe only one shop
c _o untn,r (2) '"
cafe closed in
Srz...e. : (5) ... the evenings
Numbe.( of pe.ople.: (4) ... no electricity
Read the article and the comments again.
~a.cili-tie.s: shop, (')) ... , between 11 am
Which comment do you agree with? Why?
and5pm
I agree with cityboy becaur;e ...
not easy to
use a mobile
phone

Find out information about another Scottish island.


You can use an online
~ Decision making: in pairs, choose one of these Scottish islands.
encyclopaedia to find
• Orkney • Skye • Mull • Lewis
information about most
· Make notes about: the climate, the population, the history, the typical fOQd
things.
and getting to the island.
'J Share your knowledge with the rest of the class.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Grammar \MiW
Comparatives and superlatives
affirmative comparative euperlatlve
Sentence b)
compares small smaller the smallest
one thing with big bigger the biggest
another thing . friendly friendl ier the friendliest
Sentence a) interesting more interesting the most interesting
compares good better the best
one thing wtth
many other bad worse the worst
lhings.
1 Study the table. Then copy and complete the
sentences.
a) It's ... (beautiful) place you can imagine.
1 Spain is b) Island life is ... (healthy) than city life.
hotter than
Scotland . 2 Which sentence in exercise 1 compares ...
2 Cities are
busier than one thing with another thing?
villages . one thing with many other things?
3 ?wimming
1s more 3 Write sentences using the comparative form of the 5 Order the words to make superlative
1 enjoyable adjectives in brackets. sentences. 1 Tokyo is the
biggest city in
J than
running. the Mediterranean I the Atlantic (cold) wettest I is I England I place I the I in I The
the world.

4 Winter is The Atlantic i!: colder than the Mediterranean. Lake District. 2 Bondi Beach
is the most
worse than
1 Spain I Scotland (hot) The Lake Di>trict i!: the wette-;t place in popular beach in
summer.
2 cities I villages (busy) England. Sydney.
5 Iceland is
colder than 3 swimming I running (enjoyable) 1 city I the I Tokyo I world I biggest I the I
3 The Maldives
is the flattest
Egypt. 4 winter I summe r (bad) in I is. country in the
6 The 5 Iceland I Egypt (cold) 2 in I popular I most I is I Sydney I the I world .
Mississippi 6 the Mississippi I the Thames (long) beach I Bondi Beach . 4 Loch Ness is the
is longer
than the 3 the I the Maldives I country I flattest I the I most famous
lake in Scotland.
Thames. is I world I in.
4 in I lake I famous I most I the I Loch 5 Vatican City is
We also use as ... as+ adjective to compare things.
the smallest
Scotland is as beautiful as England. (they are Ness I Scotland I is . country in the
equally beautiful) 5 country I the I smallest I world I is I world.
Islands aren't as dirty as cities. (cities are dirtier) Vatican City I in I the .
isn't as hot
as Spain.
6 Compete the questions with the superlative
2 Villages
4 Rewrite the sentences from exercise 3 in your form of the adjectives in brackets. Then ~!Ell!
aren 't as
busy as notebook using isn't I aren't as ... as. answer the questions about your country.
cities .
The Mediterranean i-;n't a!: cold a-; the Atlantic.
3 Running
isn't as longest river?
enjoyable as
(1) ... (high) mountain? 3 What is the
swimming. In ~nglls h, we use than to compare two things. biggest lake?
4 Summer The Atlantic is colder than the Mediterranean. (2) ... (long) river? 4 What is the most
isn't as bad
Reading is more interesting than watching TV. (3) ... (big) lake? beautiful beach?

I
as winter.
How do you compare two things in your language? 5 What is the
5 Egypt isn't (4) ... (beautiful) beach?
as cold as nearest island?
Iceland.
(5) ... (near) island? 6 What is the most
(6) .. . (expensive) city? expensive city?
6 The Thames

Digital course: t~teiacti;l'

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Grammar
Comparatives and 3 • Read the example sentence aloud to the class.
superlatives • Students work individually and complete the
sentences using the comparative form of the
l.._~· : _·:~~. : G!:'Jj::c.:~: ·J~··:; adjectives in brackets.
- -- - . -- - -
• They compare answers in pairs.
In this lesson students will:
• Check answers as a class. Point out that
• learn I revise comparatives and
with short adjectives ending in vowel +
supertat•ves
consonant, eg hot, the consonant is doubled
• write about geographical features in their
in the comparative and superlative forms, eg
country
hotter, the hottest.

Warmer
Write the sentence Muck is the safest place in Highlight the use of as ... as to compare
the world on the board with the words in the things that are equal and not as ... as to
wrong order: safest world the in place Muck show that something has less of a po$itive Qr'
the is. Students work in pairs and write the negative quality than something else. Reaa, .
sentence in the correct order. the two example sentences aloud to the ela$$.

1 • Students work individually. They study the


4 • Students read the example sentence from
table and copy and complete the sentences
exercise 3 again and compare it with the not
using comparative and superlative forms.
as .. . as example sentence in exercise 4.
Encourage students to look back at the text
• Students work individually and complete the
in the previous lesson to help them.
sentences using isn't I aren't as ... as.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.
• Check answers as a class.
• Point out that two-syllable adjectives ending
in -y change to -ier in the comparative form
and -iest in the superlative form.
• Highlight the use of more and the most with Students read the information. Ask them how
long adjectives (more than two syllables). they compare two things in their language.
Emphasize that we always use the with the
superlative form.
5 • Students look at the picture. Ask students to
• Highlight the irregular forms of good and bad.
guess the place.
• They read the example sentence. Elicit that
the photo shows the Lake District in England .
Two-syllable adjectives usually form their • Students work individually and order the
comparative forms by adding -er and their words to make superlative sentences.
superlative forms by adding -est. There are • They compare answers in pairs.
exceptions to this rule, however. In particular, • Check answers as a class.
two-syllable adjectives ending in -ful form
6 • Students work individually to write the
their comparatives and superlatives like long
questions and answer them.
adjectives, eg careful, more careful, most
• They compare answers in pairs.
careful.
• Check answers as a class.

Pronunciation lab: /'J/ in comparatives


2 • Students work individually and answer the
and superlatives, page 124
questions.
• They compare answers in pairs. Digital course: lnteractlvi gr~;y,mar1 tabl~,
• Check answers as a class.
: -. , , , t.TI. t4, n•
~ ..... ~ .. ~

Study guide: ~.age s.1~;

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Vocabulary and Listening
Animals 5
• Explain the task. Make sure students
Lesson obj~ctl\.:t-:s understand that the first time they listen they
only have to answer this one question.
In this lesson students will:
• Play the CD. Students listen and write the
• learn the words for different animals
answer in their notebooks.
• listen for specific information
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Check the answer as a class.

Warmer 6 • Students read the five questions carefully first.


Write animal on the board. Students work in • Play the CD. Students write the answers in
pairs and make a list of all the animal words their notebooks.
they know in English in two minutes. Listen • Check progress and if necessary, play the
to their ideas as a class and make two lists CD again.
on the board - domestic and wild animals. • Students compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.
1
• Check students understand endangered
species (a type of animal that may soon Chris: Which endangered animal are you going
disappear from the world). to do your project on?
• Play the CD. Students repeat the words Lucy: Whales, I think. I found this article about
chorally and individually. Make sure they them on the internet and they're really amazing
1
pronounce rhinoceros /rar nDS;}f;}S/ , giraffe animals, you know.
Chris: What's so amazing about them?
/c!);} 1ra:f/ and penguin l'pengwrn/ correctly
Lucy: Well, first of all, they're really intelligent.
and with the correct word stress. For one thing, they've got their own language.
• Check the answer to the question as a class. Chris: What do you mean? Fish can't talk!
Lucy: They aren't fish! Honestly, Chris, don't you
2 listen to anything in biology? They're mammals!
• Students copy and complete the descriptions Chris: OK, if you say so!
with the animal words from exercise 1. Lucy: Anyway, whales make sounds under
• They compare answers in pairs. the ocean in order to communicate with other
• Play the CD. Students listen and check their whales.
Chris: Really? I didn't know that!
answers.
Lucy: Yes, and they're v~ry friendly animals too.
When people go whale watching, the whales
swim near the boats and look at the people!
Chris: Wow! I'd love to see a real whale.
We sometimes use the definite article with
Lucy: Me too. But soon there might not be any.
the names of animals to refer to the species, Chris: Why not? Whale hunting isn't allowed any
eg The tiger lives in India. The plural form more, is it?
can also be used with the same meaning, eg Lucy: No, but they still do it in some countries.
Tigers live in India. Another problem is ships.
Chris: Ships?
Lucy: Yes, sometimes ships hit whales and kill
3 • Ask students to translate the headings into
them by mistake.
their language. Chris: That's terrible!
• Point out that mammal, reptile and insect are Lucy: I know. Anyway, what are you doing your
all stressed on the first syllable. project on?
• Students copy the table into their notebooks. Chris: Er, I haven 't decided yet. Maybe snakes.
Lucy: Snakes? They aren 't an endangered
4 • Students work individually and write the species, are they?
animal words from exercise 1 in the correct Chris: No, but I know a lot about them. My
column in the table. brother's got a pet snake, you see.
Lucy: You're joking! Yuk!
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


rhinoceros
polar bear
giraffe
tiger
reptile
crocodile
snake
turtle
bird
owl
penguin
insect
butterfly
bee

Vocabulary and Listening


He thinks
.:-":"{~~·'""!''
Animals whales are
.··~'--"-~;, fish.
1 f~ Listen and repeat the animals. 4 Copy and complete the table with the animals in
owl
Which four animals do you think aren't exercise 1.
snake
endangered species?
giraffe 5 "'"'.: · " Listen to Chris and Lucy talking about
bee a project they have to do. What mistake does
gorilla elephant crocodile owl whale
rhinoceros polar bear snake turtle butterfly Chris make?
giraffe penguin tiger bee
6 Listen again and answer the questions.
1 butterfly 2 They swim
2 gorilla 2 •~ 't Copy and complete the descriptions 1 Why does Lucy think whales are intelligent? near the
2 What do whales do when people watch them boats and
3 polar bear with words from the box. Then listen and check. look at the
4 turtle from boats? people.
5 tiger 3 Look at the headings in the table. How do you 3 What does Chris say people aren't allowed to
3 Hunt whales.
6 whale say the words in your language? do any more?
4 They hit
7 rhinoceros 4 Why are ships dangerous to whales? them and
mammal reptile bird insect 5 Which animals does Chris want to write about? kill them by
8 penguin
gorilla mistake.
9 crocodile
5 Snakes.
10 elephant

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


awareness
When people visit South Africa,
------- ----- .
most of them hope to see some
wild animals. The most popular
ones are the elephant, the
IHVI6 IHVL~ WII..I.IFE IEIEIVE rhinoceros, the lion, the buffalo
and the leopard.

Thula Thula is a private wildlife reserve and hotel. Thula Thula


means 'peace' in Zulu, the language of a famous South African tribe.
Thula Thula is in Kwazulu Natal province in South Africa. This is
where the Zulu tribe comes from.
WILDLIFE MEALS
The area is home to hundreds A lot of guests say the food is the
of species of animals, including best thing at Thula Thula! Don't
rhinoceros, leopards, crocodiles forget to try a traditional African
and giraffes. 'braai' (barbecue).
RESCUED ANIMALS ACTIUITIES
In 1999, the owner of Thula Thula, Local guides, who have a lot of
Lawrence Anthony, rescued a herd knowledge about the area, take
of seven elephants and brought groups of guests on safaris. You
them to his wildlife reserve. Since can also go on organized walks
then, the family has grown to and learn about unusual plants
25 elephants! The story of his that only grow in South Africa.
experiences with the elephants WHEN TO UISIT
is the subject of his book, The Thula Thula is open all year.
Elephant Whisperer. In winter (April-August) the
The owners of Thula Thula temperature is usually warm in the
adopted Thabo, a baby rhino, in day and cool at night. In summer
2009 when he was just a few days (September-March)
old. He now lives on the wildlife the days are hot
gnu
reserve. and the nights
giraffes
ACCOMMODATION are warm.
zebra
Guests stay in luxury tents with
antelope beds and showers. There are
rhinoceros some outdoor showers too if you
elephants don't mind monkeys watching you
.....___,_...-..,,........ frOm the traesl
Word check
wildlife reserve rescue herd adoet
rhinoceros
leopards
crocodiles 1 Look at the pictures. Which animals can you 3 A lot of guests ...
giraffes name? a) like the food. b) don't like the Food.
elephants 4 Guests can observe wild animals ...
monkeys 2 tJ Read and listen. Which animals live a) on their own. b) with other people.
at Thula Thula? 5 The hottest time of the year at Thula Thula is ...
a} the winter. b) the summer.
3 Read the text again and choose the correct
1 a answers. CULTURAL COMPARISON
2 a 1 'Thula Thula' is ... 4 Answer the questions.
3 a a) a Zulu word. b) a South African tribe
4 b 2 Lawrence Anthony wrote a book about ... 1 Think of three kinds of wild animals in your
a) elephants. b) his wildlife reserve. country.
5 b
2 Where do they live and are they endangered?

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Cultural awareness
Safaris in South Africa
CULTURAL COMPAAJSON
Lesson o!:::j0ctiv2s
--~-- 4 • Students read the two questions and make a
In this lesson students will: note of their answers.
• read about safaris in South Africa • They work in pairs and discuss their
• talk about wildlife in their country answers.
• Listen to their answers as a class.

Warmer
Draw a map of Africa on the board. Ask
students to tell you the name of the country
at the bottom of the continent (South Africa).
Highlight the Fact box and the pronunciation
of buffalo l'bAfgl;m/ and leopard l'lepgdf.
Ask students what other information they
know about South Africa.

1 • Students look at the pictures.


• They use the animal words from the Fact box
and from exercise 1 of the previous lesson to
identify as many of the animals in the pictures
as possible. Give help with vocabulary (gnu,
zebra, antelope) if necessary.

2
• Explain the task.
• Students listen to the CD and follow the text
in their books.
• They write the answer to the question in their
notebooks.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Check the answer to the question as a class
and make sure students understand monkey.

3 • Students read the questions and the different


possible answers carefully first.
• They read the text again and choose the
correct answers.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

Word check
Make sure students understand the words. Ask
them to translate them into their language.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Grammar 4 • Students look at the picture.
a I an, some, any • Explain the task. The sentences contain
factual errors (see the picture).
Lesson objectives • Students work individually to correct the
----- - - - . -

sentences.
In this lesson students will:
• They compare answers in pairs.
• learn I revise rules for countable and
• Check answers as a class.
uncountable nouns
• read a short text about natural science
Grammar in context:
Natural science
Warmer
Write animal, tent, guests on the board. Then 5 • This activity gives students more practice
write the indefinite article a to the left of the in comparatives and superlatives and in
words on the board. Ask students which using a I an, some, any, a lot of, many and
of the three words we can use a with. Elicit much.
that it is tent. Ask which word can go before • Students read the information about four
animal. Elicit the other indefinite article form different vertebrates.
an. Check that students understand why we • They work individually to choose the
say an animal (because animal begins with a correct words.
vowel sound). Ask why we cannot use a with • They compare answers in pairs.
guests. Elicit that it is because guests is plural.
6
• Play the CD. Students listen and check
1 • Students study the example sentences in the
their answers to exercise 6. Make sure
tables carefully.
students understand actually as it may be
• They copy and complete the rules for some
a false friend. In English actually means in
and any.
fact.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

2 • Complete the first sentence with the class as


an example to demonstrate the task (some).
• Students work individually to choose the
correct words to fill the gaps.
• They compare answers in pairs.
....
.... ...

. Pronunciation lab: Difficult sounds: / g/
and 1ct31, page 125-
• Check answers as a class.

much, many, a lot


3 • Students read the example sentences in the
table carefully.
• They choose the correct words to complete
the rules.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

We very rarely use many and much in


affirmative sentences. There are some
examples, such as Many people say ... or
Much of the time ... but the best advice for
students is to use a lot of instead of many
and much in affirmative sentences.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Grammar Qil~
a I an, some, any 4 look at the picture. Then correct the sentences.
Use a lot of, many and much.
1 Study the table and copy and complete the rules.
cream.
countable nouns
b any ;2 She hasn't
He wrote a book. That's an elephant! i got many
It's home to some rescued animals. mosquito
bites.
I haven't got a camera.
3 There isn't
There aren't any lions. much space
Is that a crocodile? Are there any giraffes? in the room.
uncountable nouns 4 There are
a lot of
Try some traditional African food . mosquitoes.
She hasn't got many clothes.
There wasn't any time to go on a safari.
~he ha ~ go t a lot of clothe ~.
Did you see any wildlife?
1 She hasn't got much sun cream.
a) In affirmative sentences, we use ... with plural
2 She's got a lot of mosquito bites.
countable nouns and uncountable nouns.
3 There's a lot of space in the room .
b) In negative sentences and questions, we
4 There aren't any mosquitoes.
use ... with plural countable nouns and
uncountable nouns.

2 Copy and complete the sentences with a I an, Grammar in context:


1 some some or any. Natural science
2 an 1 I'd like ... information please. 5 Read the text about four different vertebrates
3 a 2Is there ... airport near the wildlife reserve? and choose the correct answers.
4 any 3 Shall I bring ... camera?
5 any 4 Willi see ... wild animals? What is a vertebrate? It's (1} a I
5 Do I need ... warm clothes? an animal with a backbone. Read a
about these four different types of has
much, many, a lot of vertebrates. a lot of
3 Study the table. Then choose the correct words 1 Dolphin: this animal looks like (2) the I a fish, 6 much
to complete rules a-c. but it is actually (3) a I an mammal. 7 a
a a lot of
2 Penguin: this animal (4} doesn't have any I 8 most
b many
countable nouns has feathers and it spends (5) much I a lot of 9 oldest
c much time in water.
There are a lot of th ings to do. 10 as
3 Human being: although -this animal doesn't
We didn't see many wild animals. have (6} much I many hair on its body, it is
How many endangered species live there? (7) any I a mammal. Scientists believe it is the
uncountable nouns (8) more I most intelligent animal on Earth I
4 Crocodile: this reptile is one of the (9) older I
We had a lot of fun on holiday.
oldest animals on Earth. It appeared on this
There isn't much wa ter in the river. planet as early (1 0) than I as the dinosaurs,
How much tim e will we have? more than 200 million years ago!

a) In affirmative sentences, we use much I


a lot of with plural countable nouns and
uncountable nouns.
b) In negative sentences and questions, we use
many I much with plural countable nouns.
c) In negative sentences and questions, we use
a lot of I much with uncountable nouns.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Step1: Read Step 2: Lis _, .. 2 Be a friend
to a blind
1 Read the web page and answer the questions. 3 !!I'.EIJW Listen to three short conversations. teenager
1 Be a friend Which of the activities from the web page are 3 Work with
Which activity or activities lets you ...
to a blind the teenagers doing? wildlife
1 help another person?
teenager
2 do something positive for the environment?
2 Clean a 4 Listen again and answer the questions.
beach!
3 care for animals?
Help some Conversation 1
insects 2 Which activity do you think sounds the most 1 What does the boy want to do? 1 Have a
interesting? Why? 2 vVhat does he see? break.
3 Work with
wildlife Conversation 2 2 Some cans.
3 Where will the girl and boy get off the bus? 3 Oxford
Street.
Reading: Scanning a text
4 What will they do there?
Conversation 3 4 Go to a cafe.
When reading a web page, you don't need 5 Some
to read all of the information. Learn how to 5 What food is the boy giving the giraffes?
carrots.
S<!: an a text, in other words, to read a text 6 Where are the people going next?
C!!Uickly to find out what the main ideas are.
l'his will save you a lot of time.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Integrated skills
A day as a volunteer 4 • Students read all the questions carefully first.
• Play the CD again.
~
'\ - -- {'

\ .. . .
' \-
.,... -- . ' .
_...
'
' • Check progress. If necessary, play the
recording again.
rn tl'tl$ le5son student$ wilt; • Students compare answers in pairs.
• work on all four skiK$
• Check answers as a class.
• teaQ a we~ p•
• ll&ten to tf1'" sttert ~n~rsation$
• w.nte a persenalized C!ial~we
• aet om their dralogue Conversation 1
Boy 1: The sand looks much cleaner now! Can
we have a break? It's hot!
Girt 1: We can soon, but there's still plenty of
Warmer rubbish to pick up!
Write the word wildlife on the board. Ask Boy 1: Oh yeah, there are some cans over there
students to discuss in pairs or small groups ... Let's go and get them. Bring the rubbish bag
what they can do to help wildlife in their over here, Tina!
country and around the world. Listen to their Conversation 2
ideas as a class. Girt 2: We're getting on the bus now, John.
Careful! That's it. One to Oxford Street, please.
Boy 2: And one ticket to Oxford Street for me
Step 1.: Read -:~ too, please.
·I
Driver: There you go.
1 • Highlight Lucy's speech bubble. Girt 2: Thanks. Let's sit here.
• Students read the questions carefully first. Boy 2: What are we going to do now?
• They read the text and find the answers. Girl 2: I'm going to take you to my favourite
• Students compare answers in pairs. cafe. It's got the best sandwiches in London! Are
you hungry?
• Check answers as a class.
Boy 2: Yes!
2 • Explain the task. Conversation 3
• Students work individually and think about Woman: Right, Anthony - here's the food for the
their answers. They write notes in their giraffes. You can feed it to them by hand if you
notebooks. like.
• They compare answers in pairs. Boy 3: OK. Like this?
Woman: Yes. Don't worry- they're very friendly.
• Listen to their ideas as a class.
They're enjoying j:hose carrots! Right, in a minute
we're going to go over to the elephant house.
The elephants like playing with water, so you
might get a bit wet!
Reading: Scanning a text Boy 3: Sounds fun!
Ask students to read the information in the Woman: Yes, it is! Here, I've got this waterproof
Skills builder box. Highlight the importance of jacket for you.
learning how to scan a text when reading a Boy 3: Great. Thanks.
web page.

Step 2: Listef!~
3
• Explain the task.
• Play the CD. Students listen and match
conversations 1-3 with the activities from the
web page.
• Students compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Integrated skills- continued
Expressing preferences
5 9 • Students practise their dialogues in pairs.
• Students read the dialogue first. • For extra practice, they swap roles in both
• Play the CD. Students listen and choose the dialogues.
correct words. • Choose some pairs to act out their dialogue
• They compare answers in pairs. for the class.
• Check answers as a class.
10 • Students raise their hand if another pair has
6 • Play the CD again, pausing after each the same activity as the activity they have
question or statement and each response for chosen. This will encourage them to listen
students to repeat as a class. carefully to their classmates.
• Note the main stress and the rising intonation
in the yes I no questions: Could I feed the
an_imals? Could you please fill in this form ?
• Ask students to repeat the dialogue several
times both chorally and individually with the
correct stress and intonation.
• Students practise the dialogue in pairs. Then
swap roles and practise the dialogue again.

Point out that I'd rather and l'r;J prefer to


mean the same thing. Highlight the difference
in form with to following prefer.

Step 3: Write
7 • Students work individually.
• They choose one of the activities.
• They make a list of reasons why it is better
than the other activities.
• Monitor while they are writing and give help if
necessary.

8 • Ask students to look at the Communication


kit: Expressing preferences. Encourage them
to use these expressions when writing their
dialogue.
• Students work individually and write their
dialogue, using the dialogue in the book as a
model.
• Monitor while they are writing and give help if
necessary.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Great! Do you want to help in the zoo That's a (2) nice I great idea, but I want to help
(1) gift shop I ticket hall? wildlife. I'd rather do something with the animals.
OK. How about cleaning the penguin pool? Well, I (3) do I don't mind cleaning, but I don't
really like water! Could I feed the animals?
Yes, maybe that's a better idea for you. You Thanks! That sounds more interesting than the
can help one of the zookeepers feed the other (5) tasks I activities.
(4) elephants I giraffes.
No problem! Do you need any details from me?
Yes, could you please fill in this form? OK!

5 • Listen to the dialogue and choose the 8 Write a dialogue to sign up for a volunteer
1 gift shop correct answers for 1-5. day activity. Use the dialogue in exercise 5 to
2 nice help you.
3 don't
4 elephants
5 activities Step 4: Communicate~
We use I'd rather+ infinitive.
l'q rather help animals. 9 Work in pairs. Take turns to practise your
We use I'd prefer+ to+ infinitive. dialogues.
I'd prefer to help a person.
• 1-/e//o. I'd like to >itn up for the volunteer day
Great! Do you want to work with people?

10 Act your dialogue for the class.

7 look again at the web page on page 48. Which


volunteer day activity is best for you? Make a
COfl-11 UNICA.TlON IKl"r
list of reasons why one activity is better than the Expressing preferences
others.
I'd like to ...
I prefer to work with people. It's a nice idea but ...
I'd rather ... I I'd prefer to ...
/ like flo were; and plant>. but I'm >cared of in>ect>.
I don't mind ...
Maybe ... is a better idea.
That is I sounds more interesting I fun I than ...

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


g#' eoal(tf'j:
Grce.e.c.e. is a small coon-tr'j in southem
Europe . I-t has a popula-tion of abou-t
10 million. Man'j -toons-rs visi-t G-re.ece
ever'j 'jear because. of i-ts warm clima-te,
beaU-tiful .scener'j and friendl'j people.
I ...
G-reece has long dr'j summers and shor-t
win-ters. Jul'j and Augus-t are the ho-t-tes-t :, ...
mon-ths of the 'jear, bu-t -tempera-tures Athens, the capi-tal of G-reece, is
are warm from Ma'j -to Oc-tober. famoos for i-ts amaz...ing ancien-t
?.. ... monumen-ts, bu-t the blands are the
G-re.ece has hundreds of islands, which best place -to go if 'jCXJ ~us-t wan-t -to
have beau-tiful sand'j beaches and relax. In win-ter, 'jou can go walk.ing,
clear blue sea. However, a lot of people climbing and even sliing on MCXJn-t
don'-t k.now -tha-t G-reece also has Oi'jmpus, which according -to legend was
man'j fores-ts and moon-tains wi-th a lo-t of the home of the gods!
wildlife. E!eni, \4

Writing 3 Rewrite the sentences with the adjectives in


brackets in the correct places. There is a
A geographical description t There is a cave that you can only reach by
big white
cave that
boat. (white, big) you can only
1 Read and listen to the description.
2 There aren't many hotels. (ugly, modern) reach by
Match the subheadings with paragraphs 1-3. boat.
3 You can explore the streets. (narrow, old)
Landscape Places to visit Climate 4 It is famous for its restaurants, where you can · 2 There aren't
many ugly
eat fish . (fresh, delicious)
modern
2 Read the Writing focus. Find four examples of hotels.
two adjectives together in the description. 3 You can
Writing task explore the
narrow old
Write a description of your country. streets.
, beautiful sandy WRITING FOCUS Plan Use the paragraph subheadings from 4 It is famous
clear blue Order of adjectives exercise 1. Make notes about what you will for its
When we use two or more adjectives together, restaurants,
amazing ancient include under each subheading. where you
we use the following order: can eat
opinion size age shape colour origin 'Nd tr.' Write your description. Use your
delicious
material+ noun notes and the description in exercise 1 to fresh fish .
a picturesque little village (opinion, size) help you.
a long sandy beach (shape, material) ; · .,., ~.: Check your writing.

~ layout- paragraphs with


subheadings
~ order of adjectives

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Writing
A geographical description
For further practice of adjectival order, write
Lc.-;son objr-:c:iv(·<
-· - ~~ ---- these phrases on the board: a ~ittle, beautiful)
In this lesson students will: town; an (old, interesting) picture; a (brown,
• read a deScription leather, big) suitcase. Students write the
• study adjectival order adjectives in the correct order. Check answers
• write a ~ription of their country as a class (a beautiful little town; an interesting
old picture; a big brown leather suitcase).

Warmer 1' - --,. - - :: • • -----..-_ --- ~

Write Greece on the board. Put students Writing ~as.k ,. ~ ··


into pairs and ask them to discuss what they
The aim of this activity is for students to write
know about this country. Listen to their ideas
a short description that includes the correct
as a class, eg It's got a lot of islands. There
use of paragraphs with subheadings and
are a lot of classical buildings. The capital city
adjectival order. Ask the students to follow
is Athens.
the stages in the Student's Book. At the
Check stage, ask them to swap notebooks
1
and check each other's writing.
• Explain the task. Check students understand
landscape (geographical appearance of a
place). Writing reference and practice: Workbook page 126
• Play the CD.
• Students listen and follow the text in their
books.
• They match the subheadings with the
paragraphs.
• Students compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

2 • Make sure students understand the task.


They should find four places where there are
two adjectives together.
• Students complete the task individually.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.
• Read aloud to the class the information in
the Writing focus box. Tells students that we
usually only use two or three adjectives in a
row but, in theory, it is possible to use more.
• Point out that this order is very useful as a
reference when they are writing a description.

3 • Students work individually to complete the


exercise.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Study guide
Grammar, Vocabulary and Speaking
Tell the students the Study guide is an Speaking
important page which provides a useful • Check that students understand the phrases
reference for the main language of the unit: the to use when expressing preferences.
grammar, the vocabulary and the functional • Tell students to act out a conversation
language from the Integrated skills pages. between two people expressing preferences
Explain that they should refer to this page when about a place to visit at the weekend.
studying for a test or exam.

Additional material
Grammar
Workbook
• Tell the students to look at the examples
• Progress check page 38
of comparative and superlative adjectives.
• Self-evaluation page 39
Make sure they understand the spelling rules.
• Grammar reference and practice pages
• Then tell students to look at the example
90-91
sentences of a I an, some, any, much, many
• Vocabulary extension page 105
and a lot of. Ensure they understand when
• Integrated skills page 114
to use each item correctly with countable or
• Writing reference page 126-127
uncountable nouns. Get students to translate
into their own language if necessary.
• Refer students to the Grammar reference
on pages 90-91 of the Workbook for further
revision.

Vocabulary
• Tell students to look at the list of vocabulary
and check understanding.
• Refer students to the Wordlist on page 151
of the Workbook where they can look up any
words they can't remember.

Te and Exa
• Basics section pages 23-28 • Unit 4 End-of-unit test: Basic, Standard and
• Vocabulary and grammar consolidation Extra
pages 15-18 • CEFR Skills Exam Generator
• Translation and dictation pages 5, 15
• Evaluation rubrics pages 1-7
• Key competences worksheets pages 7-8
• Culture and CLIL worksheets pages 13-16
• Culture video worksheets pages 7- 8
• Digital competence worksheets pages 7-8
• Macmillan Readers worksheets pages 3-4

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Study guide
Grammar
Comparatives and superlatives . Vocabulary
Geography and landscape
adjective comparative supertative beach desert ocean
fast faster the fastest canyon forest reef
hot hotter the hottest cave island river
funny funn ier the funn iest cliff lake valley
coast mountain waterfalls
expensive more expensive the most
expen sive
Animals
good better the best bee gorilla snake
bad worse the worst butterfly owl tiger
crocodile penguin turtle
a I an, some, any elephant polar bear whale
giraffe rhinoceros
countable nouns
He climbed a mountain.
There's an elephant!
There are some great bea ches. Speaking
I haven't got a car. Expressing preferences
There aren't any animals on the island. I'd like to ...
Is that a waterfall? It's a nice idea but ...
Are there any owls? I'd rather ... I I'd prefer to ...
uncountable nouns I don't mind ...
I need some information about volunteering. Maybe ... is a better idea.
That is I sounds more interesting I fun I than ...
There isn't any clean water in some countries.
Did yo.u try any special food?

much, many, a lot of


countable nouns Think about word order when translating
There are a lot of volunteering projects. from your language to English as this can be
I didn't go to many boring places. different in both languages.

How many people were there?


uncountable nouns
We had a lot of time to explore the city.
There isn't much rain in summer.
How much food will we nee d?

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


.
'__; ' . ' : - . ~ . .' '
- - .

In this unit the student will learn ... In this unit the student will learn how to ...
• understand, memorize and correctly use • identify specific information in a magazine
vocabulary related to science and science in the article about predictions for the future CLC CMST
classroom CLC CMST SCC CAE
• understand and correctly use will I won't, and • look online for predictions about science CLC
use them in a short speaking activity CLC L2L SIE CMSTDCSIE
• understand and correctly use the first • identify specific information about science and
conditional CLC L2L a classroom experiment CLC CMST SIE
• learn about a day in the life of an American • read information about making a time capsule,
astronaut and compare US space exploration listen to classroom instructions and learn how
with space exploration and astronauts in their to make suggestions CLC CMST L2L CAE
country CLC CMST CAE SCC SIE • write an opinion essay CLC L2L SIE
• about technology by watching a short video CLC • prepare for and do a speaking exam describing
CMSTDC a photo CLC SIE L2L

I ~~: - ~. • I ' ~ • ; -:. ' - • •- • - - • • '

.0 ,_,·l~. - , • • ""• •. . - • _.''.~-if• '~ I-~~. ' •I ... ~·-·, •• • ~ •• ' • ·• '

Reading
Main vocabulary
• Read a magazine article about predictions for the future
• Science: DNA, clone, vaccine, etc
• Read a text about a day in the life of an astronaut
• Science in the classroom: test
• Read about making a time capsule
tube, pressure, etc
V Read an opinion essay about the future
Grammar
ViritinfF t.1teract10n .and production
• will I won't
• Write a personalized dialogue about making suggestions
• First conditional
• Write an opinion essay in three steps: plan, write, check
Functional language • Learn how to use on the one hand and on the other hand
• Phrases for making suggestions
Ustenh>£l
• Phrases for describing a photo in
• Listen to a science teacher carrying out an experiment in
an exam
class
Pronunciation • Listen to a teacher giving classroom instructions about a
• Short form of will: 'II time capsule

• Ask and answer questions about science in the future


• Ask and answer questions about your life in the next ten
years

(..3puk&n pr eduction
• Prepare and act out a dialogue about a time capsule
• Prepare and do a speaking exam about describing a
photo
-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-
Evaluation
• Unit 5 End-of-unit test: Basic, Standard, and Extra
Self-study and
• CEFR Skills Exam Generator
self- evaluation
• Study guide:
Student's Book page 61
• Progress check and self-
evaluation:
Workbook pages 46-4 7
• Grammar reference and practice:
Workbook pages 92-93
Digital material
• Wordlist:
Workbook pages 151-157
Pulse Live! Digital Course including:
Learning strategies • Interactive grammar tables
and thinking skills • Audio visual speaking model: Making suggestions
• Learn how to listen to instructions • Audio visual cultural material: Technology
Student's website
Cultural awareness
• Space exploration
• Comparing space exploration
missions in the US with missions
in students' own country

Cross-curricular
contents
• Science, space exploration,
predictions about the future Reinforcement material
• Language and literature: reading
• Basic worksheets, Teacher's Resource File pages 29-34
and writing an opinion essay
• Vocabulary and Grammar: Consolidation worksheets,
• ICT: searching the internet for
Teacher's Resource File pages 19-20

Extension material

• Fast-finisher activity: Student's Book page 53


communication • Extra activities : Teacher's Book pages T58
CMST Competence in mathematics, • Vocabulary and Grammar: Extension worksheets,
science and technology Teacher's Resource File pages 21-22
DC Digital competence
sec Social and civic
competences Teacher's Resource File
CAE Cultural awareness and
expression Translation and dictation worksheets pages 6, 16
L2L Learning to learn • Evaluation rubrics pages 1-7
SIE Sense of initiative and • Key competences worksheets pages 9-1 0
entrepreneurship • Culture and CLIL worksheets pages 17-20
• Culture video worksheets pages 9-1 0
• Digital competence worksheets pages 9-1 0
• Macmillan Readers worksheets pages 3-4

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


In your opinion, what is the
Vocabulary and Speaking best scientific invention?

Science
1 Read the museum guide. Then listen
and repeat the words in blue .

. --
: WBOAMI?
1 Find out how your DNA
: makes you different from
I other people and how a
; scientist would make a
l clone of you! JOUBNEY IliJTO SPACE
Experience space in 30 in our amazing
IMAX cinema! Travel by spacecraft to
FOOD OF THE the planet Mars and see the view from a
FUTUllE satellite flying round the Earth .
Millions of people
around the world go --- -- --- ~ ----~

hungry every day.


But are genetically
modified crops
really the answer?

THE SECRETS OF MEDICINE . . . .


How does a scientist find a
cure for a disease? And how
can a vaccine stop you getting
ill? Learn the answers to these
questions and more.

PR ESS YOURSELF
space
planet
4 What do you want to know about science in the
3 Copy and complete the table with the correct future? Write one question for each of the three
satellite
words from exercise 1. subheadings in exercise 3·
medicine
DNA space medicine environment Will people live on other planet.::?
clone <::pacecraft
cure 5 Work in pairs. Ask and answer your questions
disease from exercise 4·
vaccine
'ft< Will people live on other planet<::?
environment
Ve<::. I think <:: o. I No, I don't think <::a.
genetically
modified crops
wind turbine
solar panel
battery

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Vocabulary and Speaking
Science 2 • Students work individually and answer the
questions.
~ :: - ..: ~ . .~_ ::; ~ :: -.:.'..' : -: • They compare answers in pairs.
- - ~ - - - - - - - ~""'-

• Listen to their ideas as a class.


In th•s lesson students will:
• learn I revise words related to $pac;e, 3 • Explain the task.
medicine and the environment • Students copy the table into their notebooks.
• ask and answer questions abQut ~ience They sort the words in blue from exercise 1
into three categories and write the words in
the correct columns.
Warmer • They compare answers in pairs.
Play a game of Hangman to introduce the • Check answers as a class.
topic. Use dashes to represent the letters
6 x .PAESS YOURSELF
of museum and write them on the board: "*
4 • Explain the task.
_ _ __ __ . Ask students to suggest letters
• Give students a couple of minutes to think
of the alphabet. Continue until students
about their questions and to make a few
have guessed the word. Make sure they
notes.
pronounce museum /mju: zi:~m/ correctly.
1

5 • Put students into pairs to ask and answer


their questions from exercise 4.
• Listen to questions from different pairs and
Students work individually and write elicit answers from the class.
down what they think is the best scientific
invention. They compare answers in pairs. Vocabulary extension: Workbool~ page 106
Get feedback from the whole class.

1
• Students read the museum guide.
• Play the CD. Students listen to the words
in blue and repeat them chorally and
individually.
• Make sure they pronounce the words
correctly with the correct stress, especially
disease /d!'zi:z/, vaccine l'vreksi:n/ and
turbine l't3:bam/.

In abbreviations like DN6, the main stress


falls on the final letter. Other examples are
GM_, 88(1., US6 and E{/._.

The Science Museum in London was


founded in 1857. It contains over 300,000
exhibits, including the world's oldest steam
locomotive and the world's first jet engine.
More than 2.7 million people visit the Science
Museum each year.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Reading
Text type: A magazine 3 • Read the example sentence aloud to the
article class.
• Make sure students understand the task.
~ ::- :__ ~ '~ -l'" 1 , _,; _) j -:_..' ~· {;'I ,-~l: • They work individually and write answers to
- - - - --

the questions in their notebooks.


In this lesson students will:
• They compare answers in pairs.
• read a magazine article
• Listen to their ideas as a class.
• read for gist
• read for specific infonnation

Recornmen ded w ·e b 11:nks questions.


www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-243311 06

www. wfs.org/node/920

www.futuretech nology500.com/
i Students find three more predictions by
i. .. --- - - - --·-··--- -- --···- -·-·--- - --···-·-----<- -
scientists about the future. Highlight the
Web quest tip.
Warmer
Write spacecraft, satellite, planet, Mars on the 1 • Ask students to open an internet web
board with all the letters removed apart from browser such as Internet Explorer.
the first and last letters: s_ ___ ____ t, Students open a search engine (eg
s_ ____ __ e, p ____ t, M __ s. Tell Google) and type in the subject of their
students they all refer to space. Students search.
work in pairs and complete the words. Invite • Students find three more predictions by
students to come to the board and write in scientists about the future.
the missing letters. • They write down the three predictions
and add one of their own that is
1 extremely improbable, eg People will live
• Explain the task. Students read the five under the sea.
topics carefully first. Point out that there 2 • Put students into pairs . They guess
are six predictions so one of the topics is which three of their partner's predictions
mentioned twice. are scientific and which one is
• Play the CD. Students listen and follow the improbable.
text in their books. 3 • Students tell the class about their
• Check answers as a class. Point out that the predictions.
ability to get the gist of a piece of text quickly
by recognizing key words, eg the predictions
about travel and transport include the words
cars, space, is an important skill when
reading efficiently.

Word check
Make sure students understand the words. Ask
them to translate them into their language.

2 • Students read the six questions carefully first.


• They work individually and find the answers
in the text.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Will the world be very different 20 years from
now? Futurologist Mark Mann gives us his view
of life in the future.
1 Many people who ore born in the 2040s will live until
they are 150! That's because there will be vaccines for
most serious diseases, including cancer.
2 Cars will drive themselves! Our cars will take us wherever
we want to go, safely and easily- and we'll be able to
relax and enjoy the ride!
3 Learning a second language won' t be necessary. We'll
be able to buy tiny computers that fit in our ear and
trenslote what we hear into our e:>wn language.
4 There wi ll be genetically modified crops that ore very
healthy. For example, sweets will have vitamins in them !
We' ll also be eble to buy square fruit and vegetables that
fit in the fridge more easily.
s People will g9 0n holiGiay to space. Thousands of us will
work in sp(lc~ stotiens, whkh will hove hotels, restaurants
and sports stadiums.
6 We'll be able to ploy videe games just by thinking! The
games will be advanced ~nough ta 'understqnd' whet
m0ve we want to mC!Ike. It will rneke the l'fiOVe fc:>r us - we
won't need to h:luch anything!

Reading
A magazine article
1 biD) Read and listen to the article. Which
a 2,5 predictions are about ...
b 1 a) travel and transport? d) eating?
b) medicine? e) education? 3 Do you disagree with any of the predictions in
c 6
c) entertainment? the article? Which one(s)? Why?
d 4
e 3 I don't think gen etically modified crop s: will be
2 Read the article again and answer the
healthy becaus:e they aren't natura l.
questions about the future.
1 What age will people live to?
2 Why won't people learn to drive?
.· De you think the future will be better than
3 How will computers help people who can't
2 Because tlie present? Why (not)?
cars will speak foreign languages?
drive 4 How will fruit and vegetables be different?
themselves. 5 Where will people stay on a space station?
3 They will 6 What won't people have to do when they play
translate video games?
what we
hear into
our own
wea
4
language.
They will be
c~ues1·
Find three more predictions by scientists about the future.
·i f*%llill
square. And more English·
· Go online and find the predictions. Write them down. Then add one
'5 In hotels. Language websites by
prediction of your own that is unlikely to happen!
J6 Touch searching websites with
< Work in pairs. Look at each other's lists. Can you say which are the three
i anything.
scientists' predictions and which one is the unlikely one?
;(o.uk In the address.

3 Tell the class about your predictions.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


4 Read the advert. Then complete the sentences
with will or won't. Use short forms where
Copy and complete the table with short forms possible. 2 'II
of will and will not. What form of the verb do 1 You ... drive it. 3 'II
we use after will? 2 It ... be good for the environment. 4 will
2 won 't
affirmative 3 It ... be intelligent. 5 won't
3 won't
Sweets will have vitamins . 4 Lots of things ... fit in it. 6 won't
the infinitive
We (t) ... be able to relax and enjoy the ride! 5 It ... be expensive.
without to
6 You ... have an accident in it.
negative
Learning a second language (2) ... be necessary.
questions THE CAR OF THE FUTURE .
Will the world be very different in 20 years from • will have lots of space.
now? • won't need a driver!
short answers • will undeJStond what you say.
Yes, it will. I No, it (3) ... . • won't cost a lot of money.
• won't use petrol.
,IJiil~~ 2 Complete the sentences with will or won't to • wiH · but safe !
~ make predictions about the future.
students' own
answers 1 People ... stop smoking.
2 Trees ... disappear completely.
3 E·books ... replace paper books.
4 Crime ... increase.
5 Computers ... become cheaper.

.In English, we use will I won't to talk


about future events. Can you translate this
rneaning of will I won't in your language?

3 Order the words to make questions about your


1 Will I get up day tomorrow.
early?
2 Will the XPRESS YOURSELF
weather be
good? 5 What will happen in your life in the next ten
3 Will we have years? Write sentences about topics 1-4.
an English
test? /'//learn another language
4 Willi play I won't s:tudy s:cience at univers:ity
computer
games? 1 go to university
5 Will anyone 2 get married
send me 3 learn Chinese
a text 4 travel round the world
message?
1 get up I I I Will I early ?
6 Work in pairs. Ask and answer questions
2 weather I good I be I Will I the ?
about topics 1-4 from exercise 5·
3 English test I have I we I Will I an?
4 Will I computer games I play I I? "'~ Will you go to univers:ity?
5 anyone I me I send I text message I Will I a ? Ves:, I will.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Grammar 3 • Write the question Will it rain tomorrow? and
highlight that we use questions beginning with
will I won't will when we are not sure what will happen.
• Students work individually and put the
I ._. ,- - ''' ' J • • - ~ " •_' : . '

- - -· - words in the correct order to make questions


In thi$ lesson students will: beginning with will.
• learn I revise will I won't to make • They compare answers in pairs.
predictions • Check answers as a class.
• talk about their ltfe in the next ten years
4 • Students read the advert carefully.
• They work individually and complete the
sentences with will or won 't.
Warmer
• Encourage them to refer back to the table in
Write the question Will people go on holiday
exercise 1 if necessary.
to space? on the board with the words in the
• Student compare answers in pairs.
wrong order: will holiday people space go
• Check answers as a class.
to on ? Students work in pairs and write the
question in the correct order. Invite a student XPRESS YOURSELF

to come to the board to write the question . If 5 • Students read the example sentences and
there are errors, invite other students to come topics 1-4.
to the board and correct them. • Remind students that won't is the contracted
form of will not.
1 • Students copy and complete the table in • Students work individually and write
their notebooks with short forms of will and sentences about topics 1- 4 beginning with
will not and answer the question . either I'll or I won 't.
• They compare answers in pairs.
6 • Focus on the question form Will you .. . ? and
• Check answers as a class. Point out that will
point out that we use this to ask another
is often contracted to 'II in the affirmative,
person to predict what will happen to them in
especially in spoken English .
the future.
• Emphasize that we do not contract the
• Put students into pairs to ask and answer
affirmative short answer, Yes, I will.
questions about topics 1-4 from exercise 5.
• Highlight the fact that won 't is the
Remind them to answer using Yes, I will or
contracted form of will not. Point out that
No, I won 't.
we usually say won 't in negative short
• Listen to some pairs as a class.
answers and not will not.

2 • They read the five sentences carefully first.


• They work individually and complete the
Add some extra topics to topics 1-4 in
sentences using will or won 't.
exercise 5, eg become a scientist; buy a
• They compare answers in pairs.
house; have children; visit Australia; learn to
• Check answers as a class. Note that both will
play the violin I piano I guitar; do a parachute
and won't are possible in all the sentences.
jump. Students write sentences using I'll, I
The answers depend on personal opinions.
won't.
• Find out which sentences most students
agree about. Are there any they do not
agree about?
....... . . Pronunciation lab: Short form of wDI: 'II
..
::.: .:· page125

read the information and answer


the question.
Study guide: page 61·
·..

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Vocabulary and Listening
Science in the classroom 4
• Make sure students understand the task.
I_PS:: r; ;""' O~:··jCCti'.'C!."". • They look at the five pictures carefully first.
- -·a• - ~ -- ---- - ~~

• Play the CD.


In this lesson students will:
• Students put the steps in the correct order
• learn a set of words related to science
1-5.
• listen fE>r specific information
• Check progress. If necessary, play the CD
again.
• Check answers as a class.
Warmer
Write the lesson heading Science in the 5 • Students read the sentences carefully first.
classroom on the board. Elicit from the class • Play the CD. Students decide if the
examples of different kinds of science that sentences are true or false.
you can study and make a list on the board, • Play the CD again. Students correct the false
eg chemistry, physics, biology, botany, sentences.
zoology, geology. • Check answers as a class.

1
• Play the CD. Students listen and repeat the Mr Marston: If you turn a glass of water upside
words chorally and individually. down, what happens?
• Make sure they pronounce the words Simon: It goes all over the floor.
correctly with the correct stress, especially Mr Marston: That's right. Thank you, Simon.
thermometer /83: 1momrtg/, pressure l'preJg/ And why does it go all over the floor?
Ruby: Because water is heavier than air.
and liquid l'hkwrd/.
Mr Marston: Exactly. And gravity makes the
• They read the list of words and say which water fall. But that doesn't always happen.
words are pieces of equipment that a Here's a glass. Tom, can you fill it with water
scientist uses. from the jug for me, please?
• They compare answers in pairs. Tom: Yes, Mr Marston. Here you are.
• Check answers as a class. Mr Marston: Thank you, Tom. So, we have the
jug and the glass. The only other equipment I
need is this piece of cardboard. Now, I'm going
to put this cardboard on top of the glass of water
and turn it upside down. Then I'll take my hand
Words ending in -ometer are usually stressed
away, but none of the water will go on the floor.
on the o, eg, ther[!J_gmeter, bargmeter. Do you believe me?
Students: No!
Mr Marston: OK, watch. Now this is the difficult
2 bit. When I put the cardboard on top of the
• Explain the task. glass, I have to make sure no air gets inside. If
• Students fill the gaps in the instructions using there are any air bubbles in the water, it won't
words from the word pool in exercise 1. work. Right, I think that's OK. Now watch! Look.
• They compare answers in pairs. I've taken my hand away and the water has
• Play the CD. stayed in the glass! Amazing, isn't it?
Students: Mmmm.
• Students listen and check their answers.
Mr Marston: OK. So, can anyone explain why
3 • Students read the sentences carefully first. that happened? Why didn't the water go all over
my feet? I'll give you a clue. It's to do with air
• They complete the sentences about the
pressure. Yes, Emily?
experiment with the words in the box. Emily: Well, because there was no air inside the
• Check answers as a class. Point out that fizz glass, the air pressure from outside the glass
is what happens when you shake a bottle of was greater than the pressure of water inside the
lemonade or cola. glass. That's why the water stayed where it was.
Mr Marston: Exactly! Well done, Emily! Did you
all get that? The reason the water stayed in the
glass was because ...

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Vocabulary and Listening
Science in the classroom
1 • listen and repeat the science words in the box. laboratory test tube
Which words are pieces of equipment that a scientist uses? thermometer explosion
pressure jug gas liquid gravity
2 Complete the instructions for a chemical experiment temperature air bubbles acid
with words from the box. Then listen and check. chemical reaction

In the r;chool (i) ... you c<:Jn try thir; fun experiment!
3 temperature
4 liquid
'lou will need the fo llowing equipment:
n
e~
r~ 2 Wa rm water Vinegar
A p!ar;tic bat with a zip A mear;ur 1nb ···
5 gas
6 bubbles
7 explosion

Firr;t. put 100 ml of warm Qufc'l:ly clore the ba.J wfth


rhe zfp. Watch ar; a ~) "
L~ .
water and 200 ml of
calfed C3rbon d. .d - Now ilerel; the fun bJtl The
vinet5ar into the bag. The lOX/ e {s; b 66 d
(3) .• of the water r;houldn't ---~~~~---. produced inr;ide the ba bag will get iooer an I
be higher than 60 oc.
Can you r;ee the {6) ... ;f bigger until there rc; an (7) -··

3 Complete the sentences about 4 : listen to a science teacher carrying out a classroom
the experiment with the words
in the box.
... experiment. Put the steps in order.

~a
2 bubbles
3 gas bubbles thermometer
4 laboratory laboratory gas reaction
5 thermometer 1

2
If you mix vinegar and baking
soda, there is a chemical ....
The mixture of vinegar and
.Uo
baking soda fizzes and
produces ....
1 False
3 A ... like carbon dioxide needs Tom fills the
a lot of space. glass with
4 Experiments like these water.
should be done in a safe 2 False
environment such as a .... He makes
5 Check the temperature of sure there is
5 listen again. Are the sentences true or false? Correct the false no air inside
water with a .... the glass.
sentences.
3 True
1 The teacher fills the glass with water.
4 True
2 He makes sure there is air inside the glass.
5 False
3 The water doesn't come out of the glass. Em11y's
4 The experiment is successful. explanation
5 Emily's explanation is wrong. is correct.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Cultural awareness
The International Space
What problems do you think astronauts have with washing Station (ISS) was built so
and eating when they go to space? that people could live and
do research in space. It is
' Read and listen to the blog post. Were your answers 354 km from Earth and it
They can't from exercise 1 correct? takes two days to get to it. It
have showers travels around the Earth at a
because they speed of 28,ooo km per hour,
use too much so it goes round the Earth 16
water. Nothing
times a day!
tastes very
nice in space
and they aren't
allowed any Hi! I'm Serena Hughes and I'm 3.00 PM: I spend half an hour on the exercise bike.
fresh fruit an American astronaut on the You don't use your muscles in space because
because it International Space Station, everything is weightless. If I don't do daily exercise,
makes the This is my day. my body will become very weak.
whole space 8.00 am: I wake up to the 4.00 PM: I go to the laboratory to check on on
station smell. sound of one of my favourite experiment we' re doing. We're trying to see if w e
songs. Mission Control Center can grow vegetables in space!
in Houston plays a different 7.00 PM: I have dinner, then I send some emails to my
song for each crew member friends and family on Earth. They'll worry about me if
every morning! they don't hear from me!
8.1S AM: I get up and have a wash. We have to 10.00 PM: It's bedtime! I get into my sleeping bag and
transport water from Earth to the space station. This lie down in my little cabin. There will be another day
means we can't have showers because they use too in space tomorrow!
much water. If we use too much water for washing,
we won't have enough to drink!
8.30 AM: I have breakfast with the rest of the crew.
Today it's pancakes. Usually I love pancakes, but
nothing tastes very nice in space!
9.00 AM: I try to 'fly' to my work station to switch
on my computer. Everyone is weightless in space
because there is no gravity, so moving around is
difficult!
1.00 PM: It's lunchtime and I'm hungry! I'd love
some fresh fruit, but it isn't allowed. If someone
eats a banana, the whole space station will smell of
bananas!
2.00 PM: Now it's time for some housework! In
Because space, we have to take the rubbish out- just like we
everyone is do at home! We load it into a spacecrah, which will
weightless.
take it down to Earth.
2 They load
it into a Word check
spacecraft, gravity housework muscles weightless sleeping bag
which will
take it down
to Earth.
3 Because if 3 Read the blog post again. Then answer the
CULTURAL COMPARISON
she doesn't questions.
do daily 4 Answer the questions.
exercise, 1 Why is it difficult to get from one place to
her body will another inside the space station? 1 Has there been a space exploration mission
become 2 Where do astronauts send their rubbish? from your country?
very weak. 3 Why does Serena do exercise? 2 What are the names of some astronauts from
4 She sends 4 How does Serena communicate with people your country?
emails.
she knows on Earth?

( uturev1
l 'd 1i h [
eo: ec noogy .~
'
~... ·~·:!"'t·t.·-··- _,, ___
.• • ;;-.
<=l'>l·•r.c,.;;.~- .,.r~;'fi"·'o'•]'.y ~,.,. r..,..,
.,,..,,..~
~~~ _...j,_.,._ ..: _..;:_:.~G:\.··~

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Cultural awareness
Space exploration cuLTURAL COMPARJSON

4 • Students read the two questions and make a


~ - . _- . ·: 1 ' ( • ~ ...
1 . ....... : =: ·'- \ _- note of their answers.
- - - - -

• They work in pairs and discuss their answers.


In this lesson students will:
• Listen to their answers as a class.
• read about the International Space Station
• talk about their country's involvement in . ~

Culture video: Technology ~


space exploration missions

Warmer
Books closed. Write the words orbit and
Earth on the board. To check the meaning
of orbit, draw a picture to show something
orbiting the Earth. Elicit from the class
different things that orbit the Earth, eg
the Moon, communications satellites, the
International Space Station .

1 • Students read the information in the Fact


box. Point out that go round is another way
of saying orbit.
• Explain the task. Students work individually
and answer the question with their ideas.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Listen to their ideas as a class.

2
• Play the CD. Students listen and follow the
blog post in their books.
• They check whether their answers from
exercise 1 were correct.
• Check the answer as a class.

3 • Students read the questions carefully first.


• They read the blog post again and find the
answers.
• Students compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

Word check
Make sure students understand the words
and can pronounce them correctly, especially
muscles /'mAs;)lz/. Ask them to translate them
into their language.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Grammar
First conditional 3 • Students copy the sentence beginnings into
their notebooks.
LessD~l objr-.;ctivc:s • They use their own ideas to finish each
~ .. 4 ---'- -"- - --

sentence.
In this lesson students will:
• Encourage students to refer back to the table
• learn I revise the first eonditie>ruil to talk
to help them choose the correct form of the
about possible aetlcns In the future amJ
verb in each clause.
their results
• Students work individually to complete the
• read some $hQft dialogues at:iout science
task.
• Listen to their ideas as a class. Correct any
errors in the use of present simple in the if
Warmer
clause and will I won't in the result clause.
Write water, banana, moving around on the
board. Ask students to say what the problem
is with each of these in space. Elicit answers Grammar in context:
from the class, eg There isn't enough water Science
for showers. You can 't eat bananas because
they will smell. Moving around is difficult
4 • Do the first example with the whole class
because everyone is weightless.
(mix). Explain that this is the if part of the
sentence so the present simple must be
1 • Check students understand the task.
used.
• Students read the headings and the example
• Check students remember lightning (the
sentences in the table.
flash you see during an electric storm) and
• Ask students to translate the example
thunder (the sound you hear during an
sentences into their language.
electric storm) from Unit 3.
• They answer the questions.
• Students complete the exercise
• Students compare answers in pairs.
individually.
• Check answers as a class. Emphasize that
• They compare answers in pairs.
we never use will I won't in the if clause.
5
• Play the CD. Students listen and check
their answers to exercise 4.
Highlight the use of the comma when we
write the if + conditional situation first.

Students use the internet to find f ee other


2 • Do the first example with the whole class science facts about the natural wo lo.
to demonstrate the activity (If you go to the
space station, the journey will take two days.).
• Highlight the use of the comma and point out
that all the sentences begin with /f.
I: . ' . ...
• Students work individually to match the . ' page
Study guide: - - ~-
sentence beginnings and endings.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

j S~udents rewrite the sentences beginning


w1th a-e and matching them with 1-5.
Remind students that there is no comma if
the second part of the sentence is the clause
beginning with if.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Grammar \&• Grammar in context:
First conditional Science
~ ·.-

situation result 4 Penny is testing Matt about science.


we won't have enough mix
If we use too much Complete the dialogues with the correct
water for washing, to drink! forms of the verbs in brackets. 2 will/ 'II
make
result situation
3 won't
They'll worry about me if I don't keep in touch make
with them! 4 Will it
make
5 won't die

When we write If+ conditional situation first, 6 cut

we use a comma bet~een the two parts of the 7 will happen


sentence. 8 will/ 'II
become
Matt If you (1) ... (mix) red and yellow, it
(2) ... (make) purple. 9 strikes
1 Look at the sentences in the table. In first Penny No, it (3) ... (not make) purple! 10 will/'ll
conditional sentences, what tense do we use ... hear
a the present Matt (4) ... (it I make) orange?
11 Will you
simple a) after if to talk about a conditional action? Penny Yes, it will!
~ee
b the will I b) to talk about the result of the conditional
won't form action?
of the future

2 Match 1-5 with a-e to make sentences. Don't


forget to use a comma!

1 c 1 If you go to the space station


2 e 2If you miss your family
3 a
3 If you drink too much water
4 If you feel sick Matt A worm (s) ... (not die) if you (6) ...
4 b
5 If you go on the exercise bike (cut) it in half.
5 d Penny What (7) ... (happen)?
a) you won't have enough for later. Matt It (8) ... (become) two worms!
b) the doctor will give you some medicine. Penny Good!
c) the journey will take two days.
d) your muscles will stay strong.
e) you'll be able to send them emails.

3 Copy and complete the sentences with your


own ideas.
1 If I live to the age of 150, I ...
2We'll travel to other planets if ...
3 If someone buys me a smartphone, ... Matt If lightning (9) ... (strike), you (to) ...
4 Everybody will use bicycles if ... (hear) thunder.
5 If I have my own robot, I ... Penny OK. (11) ... (you I see) the lightning
before or after you hear the thunder?
Matt Before.
Penny That's right!

5 1 Listen and check your answers.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Here's how to make a time capsule. Choose
some everyday things, put them in a box and
leave them in a secret place for someone in
the future to find! The person who finds the
box will learn about what life is like now by
looking at the things.
You will need:
• five to six things ~ a plastic bag
a paper, a pen and • strong lope
some pencils • a permanent marker
• a box pen
! Choose five to six things that show what lite
is like now. Avoid things that need electronic
equipment to work. Don't forget, CD players
and computers will be very different in the
future!
2 Write a letter to the finder of the time capsule.
:3 Put the things and the letter in a box.
4 Put the box in a plastic bag and seal it with
strong tape. Step 2: List"eif ..1
5 Write your name, today's date and the date you
want the box to be opened on the bag. Use a 3 Listen to a teacher talking to her class
permanenl marker pen so that people will be about a time capsule project. How many time
able to read l1 in 50 years' time! capsules will the class make?
nMake a hole in the garden and bury your time
capsule.
7 Draw a map to show where your time capsule
is. Keep it somewhere safe.
UStenlng to instructions
These time words and phrases will help you
6 Now try to forget about it!
u.nder~ta(ld the order of instructions.
first then next in a minute finally

Step1: Read 4 Listen again and choose the correct answers.

1 Read the information about making a time 1 The students will work ... 1 b
1 What life is a) alone. 2 a
like now. capsule. Look at the pictures. Which thing
wouldn't you put in a time capsule? Why not? b)in pairs. 3 a
2 A letter.
2 They will ... 4a
3 A plastic
2 Read the text again and answer the questions. a) talk together and write two things. 5 b
bag.
b)write lots of interesting things.
4 Today's date 1 If you make a time capsule, what will it show
and the date 3 The homework task is for ...
people in the future? a) Monday.
you want the
box to be 2 What will you put in the box with your chosen b) Wednesday.
opened. objects? 4 The class will put ... things in the box.
5 So that 3 What will you put the box into? a)6
people will 4 What two dates will you write on it? b)16
be able to 5 Why will you need a special kind of pen to
read it in 50 5 The students are going to bury the time
years' time.
write on it? capsule on ...
6 How will people in the future find the time a) Monday.
6 From a map.
capsule? b) Wednesday.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Integrated skills
Making a time capsule
l_c. :'~'=·:---~ c'~j<:::ci.i\·c~- Listening to instructions
~ ---·- . -- -- Focus on the information in the Skills builder
In this lesson students will:
box. Highlight that recognizing time words
• work on all four skills
and phrases will help students understand
• read a set of instructions
the order of instructions.
• Hsten to a conversation between a
teacher and her students
• write a personaltzed dialogue ·4 • Students read the sentence beginnings and
• ~ out their dialogue the different possible endings.
• Play the CD again. Students choose the
correct answers.
Warmer • They compare answers in pairs.
Highlight Nina's speech bubble. Elicit • Check answers as a class.
answers to the questions from the class.

Step 1: Read ·~ Teacher: Right, for this week's project we're


going to make a time capsule. First, can you all
1 • Students read the first paragraph of the text. remember what a time capsule is? Come on,
Check that they understand time capsule . everyone, we talked about time capsules last
• They read the rest of the text. lesson. Yes, Lizzie?
Girl: It's when we put some things in a box and
• Students look at the pictures. They decide
hide it somewhere so that people in the future
which item they would not put in a time can find it
capsule and think of a reason. Teacher: That's right. The idea is that many
• They compare answers in pairs. years from now people will find what we put in
• Listen to their ideas as a class. the box and learn more about our life now, at the
beginning of the 21st century. So in a minute,
you're going to work in pairs. In your pairs,
you're going to talk together about the things
The world's first time capsule is believed to you think would show people what life is like
today. And then each pair is going to write down
be the one created at Oglethorpe University,
the two best things from the ones you have
Atlanta, Georgia in 1936. It was called the discussed. Then your homework is to find one
Crypt of Civilization and was intended to be of the things you-chose together and to bring
opened in the year 8113! it to the next lesson on Monday. You'll have to
decide together who is going to bring what, so
that you don't both bring the same thing! Then
2 • Students read the questions carefully first. on Monday we'll choose the six most interesting
• They ~ead the text again and find the answers. things and we'll put them in our time capsule.
• They compare answers in pairs. Boy: Will we bury it somewhere, miss?
• Check answers as a class. Teacher: Yes, but not on Monday. On Monday,
we'lllook at the things you bring in, choose the
six most interesting, and put them in the box.
Finally, in Wednesday's lesson, we'll bury our
time capsule. That will be something else for
Make sure students understand the vocabulary
you to think about - the best place to bury our
in the text, eg sea/, tape, hole and bury. time capsule. But don't worry about that at the
moment. OK. Now, you've got 15 minutes to talk

Step 2: Liste,D about and decide on your two things. You can
make notes if you want, but you don't have to.
3
• Students read the question.
• Play the CD. Students write the answer in
their notebooks.
• Check the answer as a class.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Integrated skills continued
Making suggestions
5 9 • Students practise their dialogues in pairs.
• Students read the dialogue first. • For extra practice, they swap roles in both
• Play the CD. Students listen and follow the dialogues.
text in their books. They write answers 1-5 in
10 • Choose some pairs to act out their dialogue
their notebooks.
for the class.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Students raise their hand if another pair has
• Check answers as a class.
the same two items as they have chosen.
6 • Play the CD again, pausing after each This will encourage them to listen carefully to
question or statement and each response for their classmates.
students to repeat as a class.
• ,'1. -T Tr ~ -p-'-.:t1
1
• Ask students to repeat the dialogue several Integrated skills: -~Jrkbot:~k"~~&.;1!~~
times both chorally and individually with the
correct stress and intonation.
• Students practise the dialogue in pairs. Then
swap roles and practise the dialogue again.

Step 3: Write .
7 • Students work individually. They copy the
phrases in bold into their notebooks.
• Give them a few minutes to think about the
items they would put in a time capsule.
• Encourage them to use the phrases in bold
to write suggestions, eg What about a photo
of our class? Make sure they also give
reasons.
• Monitor while they are writing and give help if
necessary.

8 • Ask students to look at the Communication


kit: Making suggestions. Encourage them
to use these expressions when writing their
dialogue.
• Students work individually and write their
dialogue, using the dialogue in the book as a
model.
• Monitor while they are writing and give help if
necessary.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


How about a (1) ... ? Then people in the future will
know what kind of music we listened to.
But people in the future probably won't be able to Yes, you're right. I didn't think of that.
(2) ... . There won't be CD players then.
I know! What about a (3) ... from a restaurant? What's interesting about that?
It'll show people in the future (4) ... we ate. That's a good idea! Maybe they won't have (5) ...
in so years' time!
Exactly! We could also put in a copy of today's newspaper
so people can see what happened in the world.
Great! That's two things, now let's think of one
more.
I
How about a photo of us?

~------------------------------~

5 Read and listen to the dialogue. Step 4: Comm~picofij


1 CD
Complete 1-5 in your notebook.
2 play COs 9 Work in pairs. Take turns to practise your
6 Listen again and repeat. Practise your
3 menu dialogues.
intonation.
4 what food
5 pizza
e WhCJt s:ha/1 we put in the time caps:ufe?
1-/ow about CJ mobile phone? Then people in
Step 3: Wrjt~~ the future will ...

7 Copy the phrases in bold. What two things 10 Act your dialogue for the class.
would you put in a time capsule? Write your
suggestions and the reasons why you think they COI'MV! .JJ"~lt.:;;ft.1'10N Kn·
will tell people in the future about life now.
Making suggestions
8 Write a new dialogue. Write both parts. Use the
What shall we ...?
dialogue in exercise 5 to help you.
What I How about a ... ?
Why don't we ... ?
Let's ...
Maybe we could ...
Then ... will ...

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Writing
An opinion essay
1 Read and listen to the essay. Do you agree with the opinion in paragraph B or C?

, or.. 2

2 Look at the Writing focus. How do you 4 Copy and complete the notes for paragraphs B and C of
say On the one hand and On the other a different essay with your own 'yes' and 'no' reasons.
hand in your language?
'Will computers ever think like human beintJs?'
B Ves, ma.':ibe the.':! will C No, the.':! probab~ won't
WRITING FOCUS because ... because ...
On the one hand and 1 the.'j are a/read.':! ver.':l 1 the.':! don't have feelinjs.
On the other hand
intell\<jent. 2 ...
In an opinion essay, we ca n make the
2 .. . 3 ...
two possib le opinions clear with the
phrases On the one hand and On the 3 ...
other hand. We often use them at the
beginnin g of paragra phs.
On the one hand, computers are already Writing task
very inte//igent. Write an essay with the title:
On the other hand, they haven't got Will computers ever think like human beings?
feelings like human beings. Plan First decide what your opinion is. This will be the
main point of your conclusion. Then plan your two middle
3 Look at the essay again. In which paragraphs, using your ideas from exercise 4·
1 c paragraph does the writer ...
Write Write four paragraphs: your introduction with a
2 B 1 give reasons why people probably question, your two middle paragraphs with the two possible
3 D won't live on the Moon? opinions with reasons, and your conclusion with your
4 A 2 give reasons why people might live on personal opinion. Use the essay in exercise 1 to help you.
the Moon ? Chf'K:k Check your writing.
3 give a personal opinion on the
subject? ~ layout - introduction, two main paragraph s,
4 ask a question? conclusion
On the one hand and On the other hand
the opinions are clear

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Writing
An opinion essay 4 • Check that students understand the task.
Highlight the fact that paragraph B is a
_c ~. ~~ Q•l ();..] j 2c-.:: l\t42 -: positive response to the question Will
- - ~- -- -·
computers ever think like human beings? and
In this lesson students will:
paragraph C a negative response.
• read a short essay
• Students work individually to write more
• use on the one hand and on the other
reasons.
~d t0 ,how contrasting opinion$
• They compare answers in pairs.
• write a shOrt essay
• Listen to their ideas as a class.

Warmer
Write The Moon on the board. Ask students
The aim of this activity is for students to write
if they would like to travel to the Moon and to
a short essay with an introduction, two main
say why or why not.
paragraphs and a conclusion that includes
the correct use of On the one hand and On
1
the other hand, and that makes the opinions
• Students read the question first.
of the writer clear. Ask the students to follow
• Play the CD. Students listen and follow the
the stages in the Student's Book. At the
text in their books.
Check stage, ask them to swap notebooks
• They compare answers in pairs.
and check each other's writing.
• Listen to their answers as a class.

2 • Focus on the information in the Writing Writing reference and, practice: \¥orkbook page u8 ;
, . ~T. .. " ~· r. .- :r## ·' .
focus box. Highlight the use of On the one
hand and On the other hand to introduce
contrasting ideas.
• Students translate On the one hand and On
the other hand into their language.

3 • Explain the task.


• Students work individually and match the
questions with the paragraphs.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

The first manned Moon landing took place


on 20th July 1969, when the American
spacecraft Apollo XI landed on the Moon.
The astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz
Aldrin were the first people to walk on the
Moon's surface. Between 1969 and 1972
there were a total of six manned flights to the
Moon and a total of 12 people have walked
on the Moon's surface. The last person to
walk on the Moon was Eugene Cernan on
14th December 1972.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Study guide
Grammar, Vocabulary and Speaking
Tell the students the Study guide is an Speaking
important page which provides a useful • Check that students understand the phrases
reference for the main language of the unit: the to use for making suggestions.
grammar, the vocabulary and the functional • Tell students to act out a conversation
language from the Integrated skills pages. between two students making suggestions.
Explain that they should refer to this page when The two students ' homework is to think in
studying for a test or exam. pairs of a simple scientific experiment for
their next science class.

Grammar
• Tell the students to look at the example Additional material
sentences of will I won't. Make sure they
Workbook
understand how to form the affirmative,
• Progress check page 46
negative, questions and short answers. Get
• Self-evaluation page 47
students to translate into their own language
• Grammar reference and practice pages
if necessary.
92-93
• Then tell students to look at the example
• Vocabulary extension page 106
sentences of the first conditional. Ensure they
• Integrated skills page 115
understand how to use the first conditional
• Writing reference and task pages 128-129
correctly.
• Refer students to the Grammar reference
on pages 92-93 of the Workbook for further
revision.

Vocabulary
• Tell students to look at the list of vocabulary
and check understanding.
• Refer students to the Wordlist on page 151
of the Workbook where they can look up any
words they can't remember.

Teacher's Resource File 'Te •ndExams


• Basics section pages 29-34 • Unit 5 End-of-unit test: Basic, Standard and
• Vocabulary and grammar consolidation Extra
19-22 • CEFR Skills Exam Generator
• Translation and dictation pages 6, 16
• Key competences worksheets pages 9-1 0
• Evaluation rubrics pages 1-7
• Culture and CLIL worksheets pages 17-20
• Culture video worksheets pages 9-1 0
• Digital competence worksheets pages 9-10
• Macmillan Readers worksheets pages 3-4

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Study guide
Grammar
will I won't Vocabulary
Science
affirmative
battery planet
Robots will work for humans. clone satellite
We will be able to do more things we enjoy! cure solar panel
negative disease spacecraft
Learning a second language won't be necessary. DNA vaccine
genetically modified wind turbine
questions
crops
Will humans be able to fly?
short answers Science in the classroom
Yes, they will. I No, they won't. acid jug
air laboratory
First conditional bubbles liquid
chemical reaction pressure
first conditional: order of verbs explosion temperature
We use the first conditional to talk about gas test tube
possible actions in the future and their results. gravity thermometer
We can put the possible action first in the
sentence and the result second, or we can put
the result First and the action second.
Speaking
situation result Making suggestions
If scientists continue to we will find cures for What shall we ... ?
e.xperirnent, more diseases. What I How about a ... ?
Why don't we ... ?
result situation
Let's ...
There will be more if we aren't careful with Maybe we could ...
explosions in our the chemicals! Then ... will ...
science class

LEAR I G 0 LEARN

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


:_; ~ 0 --:_ ' :· : l 0 ' .. ~ 0 I ~ '- ' ·,~ '• . _:- -, -.- 0 0 :~ # ~ :--0 I

--·-- - --- - -- -- ~-- - - - -- - - - -

In this unit the student will learn ... In this unit the student will learn how to ...
• understand, memorize and correctly use • identify specific information in an online
vocabulary related to jobs and chores and message board about tips for making money
money and shopping CLC CMST sec CLCSCCDC
• understand and correctly use be going to, draw • look online for information about part-time and
parallels to L1 and use it in a short speaking temporary jobs in students' country CLC DC
activity CLC L2L SIE CMSTSIE
• understand and correctly use will and would like • identify specific information in a street interview
CLC L2L CLCSCC
• how to form phrases using future time • read a magazine article about British teenagers
expressions CLC L2L and money, listen to a radio programme about
• about second-hand shopping in the United pocket money and learn how to ask for a favour
Kingdom and compare second-hand shopping CLC SCC CAE CMST
in the United Kingdom with second-hand • write an informal letter CLC sec SIE L2L
shopping in their country CLC sec CAE • prepare for and do a listening exam about
• about shopping by watching a short video CLC completing a table CLC SIE L2L
SCCDC

Main vocabulary nHadJng


• Jobs and chores: wash cars, Jay • Read an online message board about tips for making
the table, etc money
• Money and shopping: buy, sell, • Read a text about second-hand shops in the UK
earn, etc • Read a magazine article about British teenagers and
money
Grammar
• Read an informal letter
• be going to
• will and be going to VVdti,··r, !>"'1tt.t:l :,u .\ i~;!"'J .and productiOn
• Future time expressions + will, • Write a personalized dialogue about asking for a favour
when + will and would like • Write an informal letter in three steps: plan, write, check
• Learn how to use pronouns correctly
Functional language
• Phrases for asking for a favour
• Listen to a street interview
• Listen to a radio programme about pocket money
Pronunciation
• Difficult sounds: /w/
• Difficult sounds: /s/ at the • Exchange information about chores you can do
beginning of words • Ask and answer questions using be going to

• Prepare and act out a dialogue about asking for a favour

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Evaluation
• Unit 6 End-of-unit test: Basic, Standard and Extra
elf-study and
• CEFR Skills Exam Generator
self-eval ation
• End-of-term test, Units 4-6: Basic, Standard and Extra
• Study guide:
Student's Book page 71
• Progress check and self-
evaluation:
Workbook pages 54-55
• Grammar reference and practice:
Workbook pages 94-95
• Wordlist:
Digital material
Workbook pages 151-157

Learning strategies Pulse Live! Digital Course including:


and thinking --,,. . ms • Interactive grammar tables
• Expressing numbers as • Audio visual speaking model: Asking for a favour
percentages or fractions • Audio visual cultural material: Shopping
Student's website
Cult ural "J:v.rru·en9ss
• A quick guide to second-hand
shopping
• Comparing second-hand
shopping in the UK with second-
hand shopping in students' own
countries and regions

Cross-curricular
contents
• Maths, charity shops, Reinforcement material
percentages and fractions
• Language and literature: reading • Basic worksheets, Teacher's Resource File pages 35-40
and writing an informal letter • Vocabulary and Grammar: Consolidation worksheets,
• ICT: searching the internet for Teacher's Resource File pages 23-24
information

Extension material

• Fast-finisher activity: Student's Book page 63


• Extra activities: Teacher's Book pages T62, T70
communication • Vocabulary and Grammar: Extension worksheets,
CMST Competence in mathematics, Teacher's Resource File pages 25-26
science and technology
DC Digital competence
sec Social and civic Teacher's Resource File
competences
• Translation and dictation worksheets pages 7, 17
CAE Cultural awareness and
• Evaluation rubrics pages 1-7
expression
• Key competences worksheets pages 11-12
L2L Learning to learn
• Culture and CLIL worksheets pages 21-24
SIE Sense of initiative and
• Culture video worksheets pages 11-12
entrepreneurship
• Digital competence worksheets pages 11-12
• Macmillan Readers worksheets pages 3-4

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Wllo does which chores in your
house?

Vocabulary and Speaking


Jobs and chores

1 listen and repeat the jobs and chores.


Which jobs are the most enjoyable? Which are the least enjoyable?

wash cars babysit pet sit deliver newspapers take dogs for walks do the ironing
clean the windows do the washing·up lay the table tidy your room make the beds
do the gardening

Co mun·ty
noticeboard

Animal Lover
wanted to {2) .•• and
c.u-t t'ne. gr a.s.s (S) •.• when we go on
a.ra wa.-te.r t'r.e holiday. Comact Mr
-flctAJe.(s? 1\~o Briggs on Hepworth
proO:em - I ca.n 233856
(\) foe '-"\OU I
Cali Alex ;r,

17 -year-old girl who loves childr.s:n


wants to (6) ... 2-3 evenings a week.
Ring Mandy on 87220996
1 do the
gardening
2 pet sit
@ixPRESS YOURSELF
--1:"
3 take dogs
for walks
4 Think about the chores you do at home.
Complete the sentences.
4 deliver
newspapers
I alway,; lay the table.
5 make the
beds 1 I always .. . 3 I sometimes ...
6 babysit 2 Complete the adverts with words from 2 I usually .. . 4 I never ...
Alex and exercise 1. Which two people are looking
Mandy are for work? 5 Work in pairs. Ask and answer questions about
looking for the chores you do.
work.
listen and check your answers.
*' Do you do the wa,;hing-up?
Ve,;, ,;ometime,;.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Vocabulary and Speaking
Jobs and chores
! ~.l ..._ · - . ~ "' 0 r::· i ~ • ~: ~ •.' , :
- - - • - - - ~ ~- -- ~ ------=--.c- - ,._.____._ Ask the class which of the activities they
In this lesson students will: think young people do for money and which
• leam I revise words related to jobs and they do to help around the home. Listen
chores to their ideas as a class. (In the UK, young
• 8$k and answer questtons ~:$out chores people often wash cars, babysit, pet sit and
they do at home deliver newspapers for money.)

2 • Students work individually and use words


Warmer
from exercise 1 to complete the adverts on
Write the word jobs on the board. Put the
the Community noticeboard.
students into pairs and ask them to make a
• They answer the question.
list of all the jobs they know. Set a time limit
• Students compare answers in pairs.
of two minutes. Listen to their ideas as a
class and make a list of jobs on the board. 3
The pair with the most correct words wins. • Play the CD. Students listen and check their
answers to exercise 2.
• Check the answer to the question Which two
people are looking for work? as a class and
Students work individualy and answer the elicit that Alex and Mandy are looking for
question. They compare answers in pairs. work.
Get feedback with the whole class.
XPRESS YOURSELF

4 • Students work individually and complete


1 the sentences using the vocabulary from
• Explain the word chore (an ordinary job that exercise 1.
must be done regularly, eg washing-up).
5 • Nominate two students to read aloud the
• Play the CD. Students repeat the words
example question and answer.
chorally and individually.
• Put students into pairs.
• Make sure they pronounce the words
• They ask and answer questions about the
correctly with the correct stress, especially
chores they do~
ironing f'aygmiJ/.
• Listen to some pairs as a class.
• Students work in pairs and discuss their
answers to the questions.
Vocabulary extension: Workbook page 107
• Listen to their ideas as a class.

Highlight that in the three-word expressions


beginning with a verb and ending with a noun,
the main stress falls on the noun: do the
ironing, clean the w.Lndows, lay the @ble, tidy
your CQQf!l, make the Q~cj~, do the g§lrdening.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Reading
Text type: An online Word check
message board Make sure students understand the words.
Ask them to translate them into their language.
L (_ ol._..J ~ ·.~I i 1 f:-t-l :<-· 0t • \/(-.. ~.: You could also check auction (a sale when
- - --- ~ -- things are sold to the people who offer the
In tl'll$ lesson students wi1l:
most money for them- an example of an online
• read an ~nline message board
auction is eBay).
• read trJr gist and for specific information
4 • Read the example sentence aloud to the
class.
Recorr,mended web links • Students work in pairs and discuss what they
www.hse.gov.uk/youngpeople/law/ think is the best tip and why.
• Listen to their ideas as a class.
www.adviceguide.org.uk/england/work_e/
work_young_people_e/young_people_and_
employment.htm

Students work in groups of 3-4 and think of


· more tips for saving money. Listen to their
Warmer
ideas as a class. Which group has the best
Write the word money on the board. Put I

students into pairs. Set a time limit of two


i ideas for saving money?

minutes for them to make a list of the money


that is used in different countries. Listen to
their ideas as a class and make a list on the
board (euro, pound, dollar, peso, etc). Students find out information aQ,out a
part-time or temporary job in their country.
1 Highlight the Web quest tip.
• Explain the task. Check students understand
t • Ask students to open an internet web
the question. Point out that this exercise
browser such as Internet Explorer.
gives students practice in getting the gist
Students open a search engine (eg
(general idea) of a text from listening to it for
Google) and type in the subject of their
general meaning and I or reading it quickly.
search.
• Play the CD. Students listen and follow the
" Students find information about a job
text in their books.
they would like to do.
• They compare answers in pairs.
2 ~ Students make notes about the pay,
• Check the answer as a class and highlight
working hours and duties.
the information in the Did you know? box.
3 " Students work in pairs and tell each
2 • Students read the questions carefully first. other about their jobs.
• They read the text again and find the • Ask some students to report on the
answers. They note down the answers in information they have found to the class.
their notebooks.
• Students compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

3 • Students read the questions carefully first.


• They read the text again and find the
answers. They note down the answers in
their notebooks.
• Students compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


tip pocket money sort out second -hand apply bargain
On average, UK teenagers receive
£6 every week from their parents.

Reading 3 Read the text again and answer the questions.


1 smartAJec
1 Who suggests Pennyless sells some things?
An online message board 2 Who is planning to do a temporary job? 2 owen99
3 How can Penny less advertise herself? 3 By putting
1 ~ Read and listen to the message board. an advert
Who doesn't suggest a way of maki ng money? in a shop
4 Which do you think is the best tip? Why? win€low.
2 Answer the questions . I think the bes:t tip is: to do chores: in the hous:e
1 Why does Pennyless need some money? becaw;e it's: an eas:y way to make money
1 To buy a 2 What kind of jobs does Ci nderella do?
smartphone. 3 What is owen99 going to do in August?
2 Chores 4 How can Pennyless help the environment? Can you thin~ of more tips for saving money?
around the
house.
5 Where does TrendyGirl go shopping? Walk or cycle ins:tead of us:inf5 public trans:port.
3 Go on
holiday.
4 By selling E
and Search for a website with adverts for part-time and temporary jobs in your c:ountry.
recycl ing her fh pairs and share
old things. 1 Look for a job that you would like to do.
your tasks for the web
5 At markets Read the information about the job and make notes about the pay, working tiours quest. This helps to
and in and duties.
second- save fime and focuses
hand shops. ) Work in pairs. Tell each other about your jobs. your search even more.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Grammar '-MAW
be going to XP RESS YOURSEL F

affirmative 4 Work in pairs. Ask and answer the questions


from exercise 3. ·
I 0,) ... going to work in a hotel.
negative Are you going to go c;hopping on ~aturday?
You (2) ... going to find work easily. No, I'm not I'm going to take my dog for a walk.
questions
(3) ... you going to be free this summer?
will and be going to
short answers 5 Copy and complete the rules with be going to
Yes, I am. I No, I'm not. or will. a will
a) We use ... to talk about future predictions b be going to
or decisions we make at the moment of
We ll!ie be.geing to to talk about future plans speaking.
and intentio!'ls. I'll do the washing-up!
I'm going t'6 tidy !flY·room tomorrow. b) We use ... to talk about future plans and
intentions.
I'm going to buy a new jacket.
Copy and complete the table with the correct
form of be.
6 Complete the sentences with the correct form
of be going to or will.
2 Complete the sentences with the correct form
of be going to and the verbs in brackets. 2 's going to
1 Adam ... (not go) to university. 3 'II
2 He and his best friend ... (design) 4 're going to
2 are going to
computer games. 5 'II
design
3 They ... (sell) them to big companies.
3 're going to
sell
4 His parents ... (not be) happy.
4 aren't going
5 Adam thinks he ... (make) lots of money!
to be
5 's going to
make

3 Write the questions using be going to.


2 Is anyone 1 you I go shopping on Saturday?
going to give 2 anyone I give you money for your birthday?
you money 3 you I save your pocket money?
for your
birthday?
4 your parents I let you get a job?
5 you I be a millionaire in the future?
3 Are you
going to
save your
pocket
money? In Eng ·ish, the going to part of be going
4 Are your
to never changes form depending on the
parents person who is speaking. Is this the same in
going to let your language?
you get a
job?
5 Are you
going to be
a millionaire
in the
future?

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Grammar
be going to
l.(;SSQtl 0~-+:ct·'ic_··:; Ask students to read the information about
~- -- - -- ~ ----- ~--
the going to part of be going to in English
In this lesson students will:
and compare it with their own language.
• learn I revise be going ro fQr future plans
and intentions
~~XPAESS YOURSELF
• contrast will and be going to
4 • Nominate two students t o read the example
question and answer aloud to the class.
• Students work in pairs and ask and answer
Warmer
the questions. They give answers that are
Write the word weekend on the board. Put
true for them.
students into pairs and ask them to discuss
• Listen to some pairs as a class.
their plans for the coming weekend. Listen
to their ideas as a class. At this stage, don't
correct them if they make errors with be
going to as this is the subject of this lesson. Ask fast finishers to write answers that are
not true for them to each of the questions in
1 • Students copy the table into their notebooks. exercise3.
• They read the example sentences and
complete the table using contractions if
possible.
will and be going to
• Check answers as a class. Point out that 5 • Students copy the rules into their notebooks.
going to doesn't change in different persons • They use be going to and will to complete
in the affirmative, negative and question the rules.
forms but that the verb be does. • They compare answers in pairs.
• Highlight the short answers and emphasize • Check answers as a class.
that we do not use going to in the short
6 • Explain the task.
answers.
• Students work individually and use the
correct forms of be going to and will to fill the
gaps. Remind them that they will need to use
Highlight the use of be going to to talk Q~Out the correct form of be in the sentences with
future plans and intentions and read the be going to.
example sentence aloud to the class. • They compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

..........
2 • Do the first sentence with the whole class as
........
......... Pronunciation lab: Difficult sounds:
an example (isn't going to go).
• Students copy the sentences into their
.. /w/, page 125
notebooks.
• Students work individually and complete the
sentences using the correct form of be going . ,...,.~

to and the verbs in brackets.


Study_gurde:. page z1•
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

3 • Do the first question with the whole class


as an example (Are you going to go shopping
on Saturday?) .
• Students complete the exercise individually.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Vocabulary and Listening
Money and shopping 6 • Students read the questions carefully first.
• Play the CD again. Students listen and
L~ f _· :_ ~ :_ ·, ... :· r : c, ~- ~l ( •, ~ t·· \, : · ~- · choose the correct words.
- . - ~-~ .
• They compare answers in pairs.
In this lesson students will:
• Check answers as a class. Point out that
• learn a set of verbs related to money
another word for used is second-hand.
• listen for specific information

Warmer Reporter: Hi and welcome to The Style Show.


Write spend money on the board. Ask This week, we're coming to you live from Camden
students to work in pairs and discuss the Market, where some of the most fashionable
three things they spend most money on people in London do their shopping! Let's talk to
each week. Listen to their ideas as a class a few of them ... Hi! What's your name?
Anna: Anna.
by asking them to report back on what their
Reporter: Do you live in London, Anna?
partner said, eg Sara spends a lot of money Anna: No, I'm on holiday here. I've come to
on DVDs. David buys a lot of clothes. Camden today to visit the market because I want
to buy some presents for my friends in Poland.
1 Reporter: And have you bought anything yet?
• Play the CD. Students listen and repeat the Anna: Yes, I have. These earrings.
Reporter: How much did you pay for them?
words in the word pool.
Anna: They were only three pounds.
• Make sure they pronounce the words Reporter: Well, I hope you find lots more
correctly, especially earn /3:n/. bargains!
• Check students understand all the words Anna: Thanks!
by asking them to translate them into their Reporter: Hi there. Can I talk to you for a minute?
language. Boy: Sure.
Reporter: Do you often come to Camden?
• Students answer the question. Make sure they
Boy: About once a week. Yeah, I love this area.
understand that when you lend money, you It's really lively. And the market sells really
give it to another person and when you borrow interesting things.
money, you take it from another person. Reporter: Tell me something about your style.
Do you always wear black?
2 • Students work individually and fill the gaps in Boy: Most of the time, yeah. I don't like bright
the text using the words from exercise 1 . colours.
• They answer the question. Reporter: What have you got in your bag?
• Students compare answers in pairs. Boy: A T-shirt. I bought it from that stall over
there. And yes, it's black!
3 Reporter: Excuse me?
• Play the CD. Students listen and check their Girl: Yeah?
answers from exercise 2. Reporter: We're from The Style Show. Can I ask
you a few questions?
• Check the answer to the question as a class
Girl: OK.
and elicit that Clare prefers to spend money. Reporter: I love your look. Do you spend a lot of
money on clothes?
4 • Students read the questions carefully first.
Girl: No, I don't. I haven't got much money
• They work individually and think about their
because I'm a student. I buy most of my clothes
answers. from second-hand shops. Sometimes I borrow
• They compare answers in pairs. clothes from other people too.
• Listen to their ideas as a class. Reporter: That's a great jacket. Did it cost a lot?
Girl: I don't know. A friend of mine lent it to me.
5 Reporter: Cool! Thank you. Right, now we've
• Explain the task. got an interesting report on a new ...
• Play the CD. Students listen and note down
the answer to the question.
• Students compare answers in pairs.
• Check the answer as a class.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Vocabulary and Listening
Money and shopping
1 ~~ Listen and repeat the money words in the box. Do you ever lend or borrow money?

buy sell cost spend save earn pay for borrow lend lose swap win collect

I really like these bags!


How much does this
(5) ... ,please?

2 R~ad the text and complete it with words from Listen to a reporter interviewing people
ekercise 1. Does Clare prefer to spend money or in the street for a TV programme. What's the
1 save
to save it? name of the programme?
2 buy
3 sell 3 ~Jj) Listen and check your answers to 6 Listen again and choose the correct words.
4 spend exercise 2 .
5 cost
1 Anna comes from london I Poland.
2 Anna's earrings were cheap I expensive. 1 Poland
6 pay for 4 Think about a shop or market in your town and
3 The boy prefers black I bright colours. 2 cheap
7 ear.n answer the questions.
4 He's got a new bag IT-shirt. 3 black
8 eollect What's the name of the shop?
1 5 The girl usually buys new I used clothes. 4 T-shirt
9 borrow 2 What does it sell? 6 She has bought I borrowed a jacket. 5 used
She prefers to 3 How often do you go shopping there?
spend money. 6 borrowed
4 What's the last thing you bought there?
5 How much did it cost?

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Fact box
There are about 7,ooo charity
shops in the UK!

A QUlC:( GUJOE T SECOND-HAND SHOPPING


Even if you haven't got lots of money to spend, you can still go shopping!
1 \~~~~~~~;:;:~~~R~ea~d~o;:;,n.:to~find out where to find the best bargains.

Why do people in Britain like shopping in charity shops? First, because of


the low prices, and second, because when you buy something, the money
is used to help people in need. For example, Oxfam, which has shops all
over the UK, works to stop poverty in countries around the world. What
can you find in a charity shop? Used clothes, shoes, books, toys, DVDs
and kitchen equipment. It might take a while to find what you want, but
1t's fun looking!

What do British people do with their old or unwanted possessions? Take


them to a car boot sale! Every Saturday and Sunday, people all over
Britain fill the boot of their car with things they don't want and take
them to one of these sales. Car boot sales attract hundreds of people,
so get there early for the best bargains. You never know what you might
find. Recently, someone bought an old picture frame at a car boot sale
for one pound and later found it was worth £500,000 I

Do you want to get some new clothes without spending any money? The
answer is a swap shop! Swap shops are events where you and other
people can exchange clothes that you don't want. The clothes have to
be good quality and look new. You can then choose clothes of the same
value that other people have brought to the swap shop. Swap shops are
popular with fashionable people who have lots of nice clothes that they
never wear. Swapping clothes is also better for the environment than
buying new ones I
• ~ .. • t
Word check
. . ,_:_ ·-~
charity poverty Frame exchange good quality value
1 They use
it to help
people in
1 Do you like shopping? Why (not)? COMPARISON
need.
2 Oxfam.
2 ~ Read and listen. Where can you shop 4 Answer the questions about your country.
3 Things they forfree?
don't want. 1 Do people like buying second-hand things?
4 One pound . Why (not)?
3 Read the guide again and answer the
5 Good quality 2 Are there any charity shops in your town or
questions.
clothes that city?
look new. 1 How do charity shops use the money they 3 What do people do with things that they don't
Ia You don't make? want any more?
spend any 2 Which charity has a lot of shops? 4 Can you go shopping on a Sunday? If so,
money and 3 What do people sell at car boot sales?
swapping
where?
clothes is 4 How much did a valuable picture frame cost 5 Do young people ever swap clothes with each
better for the at a car boot sale? other?
environment 5 What kind of clothes can you find at swap
than buying shops?
6 What are two advantages of swapping?

Cullurevldeo:Shopplng
1

.
•· -.
L - It
1
• •• ' -

.- ..
~.
1
I I
... "'iT•'. •,:,; .. -, .. -
-- - - • ! •
1

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Cultural awareness
The United Kingdom Word check
Make sure students understand the words.
Ask them to translate them into their language.
Other words you could check include kitchen
In this lesson studerrts will:
equipment and car boot (the part of a car where
• read about charity shops, ear baat sales
you put your luggage).
and swap shops
• talk about shopping habits in their co~ntry CULTURAL COMPARISON

4 • Put students into pairs and ask them to


discuss the questions.
Warmer • Listen to their ideas as a class.
Highlight the information in the Fact box
Culture video: Shopping ·
and write charity on the board. Check that
students understand the meaning (a charity
is an organization to which you give money
so that it can give money and help to people
who are poor or ill, or who need help and
support). Elicit from the class different
charities, eg the Red Cross.

1 • Students work in pairs and ask and answer


the questions.
• Listen to their ideas as a class.

2
• Check students understand the task.
• Play the CD. Students listen and follow the
text in the books.
• They write the answer in their notebooks.
• Check the answer as a class.

Oxfam was originally founded in Oxford,


in 1942 as the Oxford Committee for
Famine Relief. Today, Oxfam has the largest
network of charity shops in the UK. Items
donated to Oxfam chartiy shops are sold or
recycled, to make money for development
and campaigningwork to help improve lives
around the world.

3 • Students read the questions carefully first.


• They look in the text and find the answers.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class .

._

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Grammar
Future time expressions Grammar in context:
Maths
In thtslesson $tudertte Will: 5 • Students work individually and choose the
• learn ~ Mt of Mure th'l'le txpressions correct answers.
• learn !.revile would /Ike I wouldn't lll<e • They compare answers in pairs.
• read a short text about maths Jlrol!>lems
6
• Students work individually and solve the
three maths problems.
Warmer
• They compare answers in pairs.
Write the sentence It will grow a lot on the
• Play the CD. Students listen and check
board with the words in the wrong order:
their answers. (The answers are also given
lot it a grow will. Students work in pairs and
at the bottom of the page.)
write the sentence with the words in the
correct order. Remind students that will can
also be contracted.

1 • Students read the information in the table


and answer the question .
• They compare answers in pairs. .....:..
.- ~!~~::~· Pronunciation lab: Difficult sounds: lsi

• Check the answer as a class. Point out that


we never use will after when .
. at the beginning of words. page 125
----~-__.

Digital course: Interactive grammar table


2 • Complete the first sentence with the whole
class to demonstrate the activity (When we 're Study guide: page 71
in Paris, we 'll go shopping .).
• Point out that not all the sentences contain • 2.33 Audioscript, exercise 6
when so the present simple is not always Boy: Problem A. Bananas are 1.20 euros a kilo,
the correct form of the verb. Highlight that all apples are 2.50 euros a kilo, and pears are 2.20
the sentences are predictions about a trip to euros a kilo. You are going to buy half a kilo of
Paris. bananas, a kilo of apples, and a kilo of pears. Will
• Students work individually to complete the a five-euro note be enough to pay for them?
Girl: No, five euros won't be enough to pay for
sentences with the correct form of the verbs
the fruit. Half a kilo of bananas cost 60 cents. The
in brackets. cost of all the fruit is 60 cents plus 2.50 plus 2.20
• They compare answers in pairs. equals 5.30 euros.
• Check answers as a class. Boy: Problem B. Sue gets 100 euros for her
birthday. She's going to spend 36.99 euros on a
3 • Students complete the task individually. camera and 12.50 euros on a DVD. How much
• They compare answers in pairs. change will she have?
• Listen to their ideas as a class. Make sure Girl: Sue spends 36.99 plus 12.50 which equals
they use I'll. 49.49 euros. Her change from a hundred euros
is a hundred minus 49. 49 which equals 50.51
euros.
would like Boy: Problem C. You're going to go on holiday
4 • Students read the information in the table to the USA and you'd like to change 200 euros
into dollars. 1 euro equals 1.5 dollars. How many
and the example sentences.
dollars will you get when you change this number
• Explain the task. A tick means an affirmative of euros?
sentence and a cross means a negative Girl: When you change 200 euros into dollars,
sentence. you'll get 200 times 1.5 which equals 300 dollars.
• Students work individually to complete the
exercise.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Grammar ~IIW
Future time expressions Grammar in context:
Maths
time expressions + will, when + will
When we make predictions about the future with will, 5 Read the maths problems and circle the
we often use time expressions like: correct answers for 1-8.
tomorrow next week this summer one day soon
I'll be rich one day! A Bananas are 1.20 euros a kilo, apples
We use phrases with when like this: are 2.50 euros a kilo, and pears are 3 'sgoing to
When I go shopping, I'll buy some new shoes. v' 2.20 euros a kilo. You are going 4 will she have
~. 1 '/lbuyse me-tte~. >C (1) a buy I to buy I buying half a kilo of 5 're going to
bananas, a kilo of apples, and a kilo of go
1 Study the table. In sentences about the future, pears. Will a five euro note 6 like to
which tense do we use after when? (2) it is I it be I be enough to pay 7 will you get
for them?
2 Copy and complete the sentences with the correct 8 change
B Sue gets 100 euros for her birthday.
form of the verbs in brackets. She (3) will to I going to I 's going to
1 When we ... (be) in Paris, we ... (go) shopping. spend 36.99 euros on a camera and
12.50 euros on a DVD. How much
1 When we're 2I ... (try) lots of different clothes on, but I ... (not
change (4) she will have I will she
in Paris, buy) them all! have I will have she ?
we'll go 3 When we ... (feel) tired, we ... (find) a cafe.
shopping. c You (5) going I going to go I 're going
4 I ... (have) a drink and a sandwich. to go on holiday to the USA and you'd
2 I'll try lots
(6) like /like to I would like change
of different 3 Make predictions about your future. Use these 200 euros into dollars. 1 euro = 1.5
clothes on, phrases to help you.
but I won't dollars. How many dollars (7) will you
buy them all! get I you'll get I will get when you
get a job go to university buy a car (8) will change I are going to change I
3 When we
travel round the world get married learn to drive change this number of euros?
feel tired,
we'll find a
cafe. 1 When I'm 18, I .. . 3 When I'm 25, I ...
4 I'll have a 2 When I'm 20, I .. . 4 When I'm 30, I .. .
drink and a
sandwich. would like
would like + Infinitive
We use would like to mean want. We use the infinitive
with to after it.
affirmative and negative 6 Can you_solve the three maths
I'd like to borrow your pen. problems? Listen and check your
answers.
Tom wouldn't like to miss the concert.
questions and short answers SJEIIOP oo£ = S ·~ Xooz :)
Would you like to take the dog for a walk? som~ ~s·os = (oS·zt + 66·g£)- oat :a
·sam~ o£·S = oz·z + os·z + og·o S!
Yes, I would. I No, I wouldn't.
)JnJJ ay) JO JSOJ ~Yl'SOJn~ og·o JSOJ seueueq
4 Study the table. Write sentences using would like JO 011~ e JIEH · 4llnou~ aq ),uoM soma aAy 'ON :v
1 He wouldn't (II) or wouldn't like (X'). SJaMSU'If

like to have I I Forget your birthday X'


short hair.
I wouldn't like to forget your birthday
2 Sarah would
like to play 1 He I have short hair X'
the guitar. 2 Sarah I play the guitar II
3 Mrs Smith 3 Mrs Smith I go on a rollercoaster X'
wouldn't like 4 Neil and Liz I get married II
to go on a
rollercoaster.
4 Neil and Liz
would like to
get married.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


• Parents and neighbours pay some children to do
'odd jobs'. These are chores such as doing the ironing,
cutting the grass or washing the car.
•• Many British children over the age of thirteen have
got Saturday jobs in places like shops or sports centres.
HOW DO THEY SPEND THEIR MONEY?
Boys and sirls spend two-thirds of their
pocket money on sweets and chocolate.
2 Girls buy more clothes, magazines and
cosmetics than boys.
3 Boys buy more food and drink, computer
"' Saturday jobs" r presents games, DVDs and CDs than girls.
e odd job earnings· • parents 4 Girls spend 50% more on mobile phones than b0ys.

·, ' SKiLLS BUIL.D ER


Expressing numbers as percentages or
ft'adlons 3 • Listen to a radio programme about·
Amounts tlan be given as percentages. pocket money. Who doesn't get money from
Percentages can be expressed in the following his or her parents?
.ways.
"tG%'<= a tenth so%= (a) half 4 Listen again. Copy and complete the table in
2.5qtt. == a quarter 75% =three-quarters your notebook.
JJ.J:% =a third 100% =all
1 False way of -what he I she
Many name age making does with way of
teenagers making
money money
have
Saturday
Step 1: Re,gJJi Ben buys sweets
money
Ben: does
jobs. and computer chores around
2 False 1 Look at the magazine article. On what day of the the house
games
Children week do some teenagers work? Lily: works in a
over the age Lily 16 restaurant
of 13 have 2 Are the sentences true or false? Correct the what he I she
part-time does with
false sentences.
jobs. money
Harry does odd
3 True 1 Teenagers only get money from their parents. Lily: buys
jobs for clothes
4 False 2 Children aged 11 and 12 have part-time jobs.
people Harry: saves it
More 3 Teenagers spend most of their pocket money
boys buy on sweets and chocolate.
computer
4 More girls buy computer games than boys.
games than
girls. 5 Boys spend less money on mobile phones
5 True than girls.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Integrated skills
All about pocket money Step 2: Listen ~1
3
• Play the CD. Students listen and write the
answer in their notebooks.
• work on all four skins
• Check the answer as a class.
• Jead a magazine artiele
• nsten to a radio programme about ~~~ket 4 • Students copy the table into their notebooks.
mEJney • Play the CD again. Students listen and
• write a peraonattzed dialogue complete the table.
• act out their diatf.lgue • Students compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

Warmer • 2.36 Audioscript, exercise 3


Ask students to look at the pictures of what Presenter: Hi and welcome to the Money Show!
teenagers in the UK spend their money on. This week we're talking about pocket money-
Elicit as much vocabulary from the class as how much you get, how you get it and what you
possible to describe the items in the pictures spend it on. We're going to take some calls from
and write the words on the board (sweets, listeners now and, to start with, I think we've got
Ben on line 1. Hi Ben.
a computer game, nail polish, shoes) . Ask
Ben: Hi.
students what other things they think British Presenter: You're 13 years old, right?
teenagers spend their money on and write Ben: Yeah.
their suggestions on the board. Presenter: Do you get any pocket money from
your parents?
Ben: Yes, I do. But my mum and dad also pay me
for doing chores around the house sometimes.
Presenter: I see. What do you spend your
Expressing numbers as percentages or money on?
fractions Ben: Sweets and computer games mainly. My
Focus on the information in the Skills builder parents buy all my clothes.
box. Highlight that amounts can be given Presenter: OK. Thanks a lot, Ben. Let's go to
as percentages or fractions. Books closed. line 2 now, where we've got our next caller-
Lily, who's 16. Do your parents give you pocket
Write 25%, a half, three-quarters, 10% on
money, Lily?
the board. Ask students to express the Lily: No, they don't. But I have a Saturday job in
percentages as fractions and the fractions as a restaurant and I get £20 a week from that.
percentages (a quarter; 50%, 75%, a tenth). Presenter: Do you save your money or spend it?
Then ask them what 20% and 33.3% are in Lily: Spend it - on clothes usually.
fractions and elicit a fifth and a third. Presenter: So you don't put any money in the
bank?
Lily: No!
Presenter: OK. Now we've got another caller
Step :z: Read . · on line 3. Harry, you're 15 years old and you've
found a great way to earn money in your free
1 • Students read the question carefully first. time. Can you tell us about it?
• They read Lucy's speech bubble and the Harry: Yes. I do odd jobs for other people -
text. They find the answer to the question. shopping, posting letters ... that kind of thing.
• Check the answer as a class. Presenter: What made you start doing odd jobs?
Harry: My parents didn't give me enough pocket
2 • Students read the sentences first. money!
• They look in the text and decide if the Presenter: I see! Do you spend the money you
statements are true or false . earn?
• They compare answers in pairs and correct Harry: No, I don't. I save it.
Presenter: Very sensible! Now it's time for some
the false statements.
music .. .
• Check answers as a class.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Integrated skills - continued
Asking for a favour

5 9 • Students practise their dialogues in pairs.


• Students read the dialogue first. • For extra practice, they swap roles in both
• Play the CD. Students listen and follow the dialogues.
text in their books. They write answers 1-4 in
10 • Choose some pairs to act out their dialogue
their notebooks.
for the class.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Students raise their hand if another pair has
• Check answers as a class.
the same thing they want to buy as the item
6 • Play the CD again, pausing after each they have chosen. This will encourage them
question or statement and each response for to listen carefully to their classmates.
students to repeat as a class.
• Note the main stress and the rising intonation Integrated skills: Workb~~k pag~ ~~ •
in the yes I no questions: Can I ask you a
favour? Could you lend me three pounds?
• Note the falling tone in the wh- questions:
What@. it? Why don't you eaf!J. the money
instead?
• Ask students to repeat the dialogue several
times both chorally and individually with the
correct stress and intonation.
• Students practise the dialogue in pairs. Then
swap roles and practise the dialogue again.

Step 3: Write .
7 • Students work individually. They copy the
phrases and questions in bold from the
dialogue into their notebooks.
• They think of something they want to buy
(not a CD) and a different way of earning
money.

8 • Ask students to look at the Communication


kit: Asking for a favour. Encourage them
to use these questions when writing their
dialogue.
• Students work individually and write their
dialogue, using the dialogue in the book as
a model.
• Monitor while they are writing and give help if
necessary.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Hi Dad. Can I ask you a favour?
Could you lend me (1) ... , please? Why?
I want to buy a (2) ... How much does it cost?
(3) ... , but I've already got 10. I've got an idea. Why don't you earn the money
instead?
How can I do that? I'll pay you three pounds to (4) ....
OK, it's a deal! I'll do it when I finish my Great! Thanks.
homework.

5 ·~~ Listen to Lucy talking to her dad. Step 4: Communicate


Complete 1-4 in your notebook.
9 Work in pairs. Take turns to practise your
6 Listen again and repeat. Practise your
dialogues.
intonation.
• I-ii ... Can I ar;:k yo u a favour'?
OK. What is: it'?
Step 3: Wr{!i;,.
10 Act your dialogue for the class.
7 Copy the phrases and questions in bold in your
notebook. Then think of something else you
COMMUNICATION KIT
want to buy and another way of earning the
money to buy it. Asking for a favour
Can I ask you a favour?
8 Write a new dialogue. Write both parts. Use the
Could I Can you ... ?
dialogue in exercise 5 to help you. Is it OK if I ... ?
I-ii ... C<1n I <lS:k you a favour'? Would you mind doing I cleaning I helping me
with ... ?
OK. Wh<l t is: it'?

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Writing 3 'Qennett Road
'Qolton
An informal letter 'QL7 4'PJ
Friday IS April

Dear Grandma and Grandad.


Thank you very much for my birthday present! I love my new trainers. I'm
wearing them right now! They fi t me perfectly.
I'm going to have my birthday p.arty tomorrow because Its ~aturday.
First. ten of my·friends are coming to my hc:m~ In the afternoon. Then,
we're going to go to the bowling alley In the town centre. My brother lst1't
going to come b~use he hates bowling - I think that's: because he Isn't
very good at ltll'lllnvlte him to join us later though. We're going to eat at
my favo(lrlte burger stall. In the evening. we'll probably watch a fllm at my
hot,tse. Mum and Dad bought me some great new DVDs fur my birthday,
Paul and ten so I'd like to watch one of them.
of his friends I'll see you next month! ThanKs again for the present.
are going to a
bowling alley in Love from,
the afternoon. 'Paul
Then they're
going to eat
at a burger 4 Change the words in blue to subject or object
bar. In the 1 Read and listen to the letter. What is
1 them
pronouns.
evening they're Paul going to do for his birthday party?
probably going 1 If I find some cheap DVDs, I'm going to buy
2 it
to watch a the DVDs. 3 he
film at Paul's 2 Look at the sentences from the letter. What or 4 her
2 Lucy doesn't like football because she isn't
house. who do the words in blue refer to?
very good at football.
1 I'm wearing them right now! 3 I want to buy a CD for Tim's birthday, but 1
2 I'm going to have my birthday party don't know what music Tim likes.
tomorrow. 4 Amy didn't know where to go swimming, but
1 Paul's new 3 He isn't very good at it! someone told Amy about the new sports
trainers
4 I'll invite him to join us. centre.
2 Paul 5 We'll probably watch a film .
3 bowling 6 I'll see you next month!
4 Paul 's Writing task:
brother 3 Copy and complete the sets of pronouns in the Write an informal letter.
5 Paul, ten of Writing focus.
his friends Plan Imagine that it was yotu birthday
and Paul's yesterday and you're writing to thank a
brother relative for their birthday present and tell
6 Paul's WRITING FOCUS them about your birthday party. Decide what
grandmother Using pronouns present they bought you and think of three
and
grandfather We use pronouns to avoid repeating names and plans for your party.
nouns. W:nte Write an informal letter to your
Subject pronouns: relative to thank them and tell them about
i you (1) ... she it we (z) ... your plans. Write three paragraphs.
Object pronouns:
C heck Check your writing.
me (3) ... him her (4) ... us them
Molly hates shopping. She prefers playing ~ su bject and object pronouns
computer games. ~ use of future verb form s
That's a nice t-shirt. Why don't you buy it? ~ 'Dear .. .' at the start, your name at
the end

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Writing
An informal letter
Write these sentences on the board: 1 Lucy
is my best friend. I'm going to buy Lucy a
present. 2 Peter wants to buy a new bike.
• read an informal tetter He doesn't know where to buy ~ bik~..
• ~t~se pronouns to avoid repeating names 3 I watched a good film last night. The film
and nouns was really scary. Students rewrite the second
• write an informal letter sentences using pronouns (her, it, It).

Warmer
Write birthday party on the board. Elicit from
Writing task
the class ideas of things to do for a birthday The aim of this activity is for students to write
party, eg going to a concert. Write students' an informal letter with Dear .. . at the start and
suggestions on the board and ask them to vote the writer's name at the end that includes the
for their favourite suggestion. correct use of subject and object pronouns
and future verb forms. Ask the students to
1 follow the stages in the Student's Book.
• Read the question aloud to the class. At the Check stage, ask them to swap
• Play the CD. Students listen and follow the notebooks and check each other's writing. r
text in their books. I
• Check the answer as a class.
-
Writing reference and practice: Workbook page 130
--
. . .\-.' .._ ""·- ~ . -
2 • Explain that this exercise focuses on
pronouns and how we can use them to avoid
repeating names and nouns.
• Students read the sentences, look in the text
and say what or who the pronouns refer to.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

3 • Read the example sentences in the Writing


focus box aloud to the class and highlight
that we use pronouns to avoid repeating
names and nouns.
• Students work individually and complete the
sets of subject and object pronouns.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

4 • Explain the task.


• Students change the words in blue to subject
or object pronouns.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Study guide
Grammar, Vocabulary and Speaking
Tell the students the Study guide is an
• Tell students to look at the list of vocabulary
important page which provides a useful
and check understanding.
reference for the main language of the unit: the
• Refer students to the Wordlist on page 151
grammar, the vocabulary and the functional
of the Workbook where they can look up any
language from the Integrated skills pages.
words they can't remember.
Explain that they should refer to this page when
studying for a test or exam. Speaking
• Check that students understand the phrases
to use for asking for a favour.
Grammar
• Tell students to act out a conversation
• Tell the students to look at the example
between two people who are asking each
sentences of be going to. Make sure they
other for a favour.
understand how to form the affirmative,
negative, questions and short answers.
• Then tell students to look at the example Additional material
sentences of will and be going to. Ensure
Workbook
they understand when to use each structure.
• Progress check page 54
Get students to translate into their own
• Self-evaluation page 55
language if necessary.
• Grammar reference and practice pages
• Tell students to look at the example sentence
94-95
for time expressions with will and the
• Vocabulary extension page 107
example sentence for when + will. Make
• Integrated skills page 116
sure students understand how to use time
• Writing reference and task pages 130-131
expressions with will and how to use when +
will to make predictions about the future.
• Tell students to look at the example
sentences of would like and make sure
they understand the meaning of would like
and how to form the affirmative, negative,
questions and short answers.
• Refer students to the Grammar reference
on pages 94-95 of the Workbook for further
revision.

Vocabulary

• Basics section pages 35-40 • Unit 6 li:nd-of-unit test: Basic, Standard and
• Vocabulary and grammar consolidation Extra
pages 23-26 • CEFR Skills Exam Generator
• Translation and dictation pages 7, 17 • End-of-term test: Basic, Standard and Extra
• Evaluation rubrics pages 1-7
• Key competences worksheets pages 11-12
• Culture and CLIL worksheets pages 21-24
• Culture video worksheets pages 11-12
• Digital competence worksheets pages 11-12
• Macmillan Readers worksheets pages 3-4

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Study guide
Grammar
be going to Vocabulary
Jobs and chores
affirmative babysit lay the table
I'm going to buy a magazine with my pocket clean the windows make the beds
money. deliver newspapers pet sit
negative do the gardening take dogs for walks
We aren't going to go on holiday this year. do the ironing tidy your room
do the washing-up wash cars
questions
Are you going to get a part-time job? Money and shopping
short answers borrow lend spend
Yes, I am. I No, I'm not. buy lose swap
collect pay for win
will and be going to cost save
earn sell
We use will to talk about future predictions or
decisions we make at the moment of speaking.
I'll take the bus home!
We use be going to to talk about future plans Speaking
and intentions.
I'm going to the cinema with lack tomorrow. Asking for a favour
Can I ask you a favour?
time expresslens + will, when + will Could I Can you ... ?
tomorrow next week this summer one day Is it OK if I ... ?
soon Would you mind doing I cleaning I helping
I'll see you tomorrow! me with ... ?
When I go on holiday, I'll buy some souvenirs.

would like LEARNtN<~ ·r o LEARN


would like + infinitive Study with a friend and practise the role-plays
We use would like to mean want. We use the on the Integrated Skills pages. Try inventing
infinitive with to after it. your own dialogues too.
affirmative
I'd like to visit Canada.
,,
negative
Jess wouldn't like to babysit.
questions
Would ygu like to go shopping at the wee kend?
short answers
Yes, I would . I No, I wouldn't.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Making a poster
When you make a poster, remember to:
• include images to make your poster.
Work in groups of three to make a poster look interesting.
about endangered animals. • use different fonts and co lou .s.
• look up words in an online d'iGtionary.

2 Read the task. Which information would you


include in a poster about endangered animals?
1 Look at the poster below. Find ...
1 a photo • links to organizations that protect
2 facts about an endangered animal endangered animals
3 a description of an endangered animal • facts about endangered animals
4 a map • facts about zoos
5 a link to more information • reasons why the animals are in danger
• photos of endangered animals
• maps
• a list of endangered animals

• They are a kind of wild cat. • They are 90-240 em long and they can weigh 450 kg.
• The head and body are 85-110 em long . • They live in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans,
They weigh 9-13 kg. and in the Mediterranean Sea.
There are only about 300 lynx now. • Turtles can live for 67 years.
• They are yellow and they have got brown • They eat plants and fish -they are omnivorous.
spots. • They come onto the land to have babies. They lay eggs.
• They eat meat.
Why ~re they in Janger?
• They live in Spain.
• Humans kill turtles for their shells
Why are they ir: danger? and their eggs.
• Many lynxes die from hunger. They eat • Tourists disturb the turtles when
rabbits, but there aren 't as many rabbits they are laying their eggs.
now. Many baby turtles die before they
• People kill them . get to the sea.
• People build houses and farms. They are • Many turtles die in fishing nets .
destroying many of the places where the
lynxes live.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Collaborative project 2
Making a poster 2 • Check students understand all the items.
• Briefly discuss the advantages or
disadvantages of using each item, eg links
to organizations that protect endangered
animals would enable people to find out
• make a poster about endangered animals
more information after reading the poster.
• read a poster and answer questions
about it
• listen to a group planning a poster
• read and complete a conversation extract

Warmer
Play a guessing game with the class. Tell
students you are thinking of an animal. They
have to ask questions to find out what it is,
but you can only answer yes or no. Elicit
examples of questions and write them on the
board, eg Has it got a tail? Does it live in a
hot country? Does it walk on four legs? Does
it live in the sea? Is it an insect? After playing
a few rounds as a class, students continue
the game in pairs or groups.

TASK
ReaCif the task with the class and check
students understand.

1 • Briefly discuss making posters with the class.


What makes a poster interesting? What types
of information can you include? What things
can you include, eg photos, graphs, maps?
How can you organize the information?
• Read the list of items students have to
identify and help with any vocabulary.
• Ask students to read the information and find
an example of each item.
• Check answers as a class. Ask if there are
any other items which could be included in
the list.
• Read the Digital literacy box with the class
and check students understand.
• Point out that posters are more interesting
when you include different types of
information and that it is important to make
the poster look attractive and edit the
material carefully.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


7 • Look at the evaluation grids with the class.
3
• Read through the different options and help
• Ask students to read the questions carefully.
with any vocabulary as necessary.
• Play the CD. Students listen and answer the
• Students complete their self-evaluation. Give
questions.
help if necessary.
• Check the answers as a class.

4 • Students read the conversation extract and


complete it in pairs.
In pairs or groups, students make a wordmap
• Play the CD again. Students listen and check
of vocabulary related to endangered animals.
their answers.
They discuss how to organize the vocabulary
• Check answers as a class. Students practise
and what vocabulary to include. They then
the conversation in groups.
make a poster of the wordmap.
5 • Read the Useful language box with the class
and help with any vocabulary.
• 2.39 Audioscript, exercise 3
• Practise as necessary. Elicit other examples
of each phrase, eg How shall we find Edu: OK, let's choose an animal each. I'd like to
write about the Javan rhinoceros.
information? Let's put the information in
Sonia: I'd like to do the giant panda.
speech bubbles from the animals.
Mario: And the western lowland gorilla for me.
• Students work in groups of three and plan Sonia: OK. What information shall we include?
their posters. Ask one or two groups to report Mario: Let's give some facts about each animal.
back to the class to explain their plans. Edu: Good idea! And let's give reasons why
each animal is in danger. What do you think,
Sonia?
Sonia: Yes, that's a good idea. Let's include
some facts about zoos and the work they do.
6 • Read the three steps with the class to give Mario: No, that's too difficult.
students a clear idea of what they have to do. Sonia: OK. What about adding photos of the
• Monitor while they are working and give help animals? And we can have maps to show where
if necessary. they live.
Mario: Great idea! So, we've got three tasks -
Share information finding facts about animals, finding reasons why
Students share their information. They look at they are in danger, and finding photos and maps.
the original sources and check they haven't Edu: How shall we share the tasks?
Mario: I can find some fects about the three
copied any information directly. They discuss
animals.
if they need to change anything and how to Sonia: I know- why don't we do each task for
improve their work. They check they have our own animal? Then the work is equal.
everything they need and they check for errors. Mario: Yes, I think that's more interesting. Do
you agree, Edu?
Create the poster Edu: OK, let's do that.
Each group creates their poster. Encourage Sonia: OK, so when shall we meet to share our
them to be creative and try to make the poster information?
as interesting as possible. Remind them to use Edu: Tomorrow?
their own words and to check for errors. Help
as necessary.

Show and tell


Each group shows their poster to the class. Allow
time for the other students to ask questions. If you
prefer, a few groups can show their posters over
several different classes or you can display all the
posters on the class walls as an exhibition. If you
like, the class can vote for their favourite poster.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


5 Work in groups. Plan your poster.
• Choose which endangered animals you want
• Listen to Sonia, Mario and Edu doing to make your poster about
the task. Answer the questions. • Decide what information to include and how
to organize it.
Western Lowland Gorilla Iberian lynx • Make a list of tasks and decide how to share
Siberian tiger loggerhead turtle giant panda the work.
western Javan rhinoceros • Decide when to meet again to share your
lowland information.
gorilla
2 They decide 1 Which three animals do they choose?
to Include 2 Which items from exercise 2 do they decide
facts about to include?
endangered 6 Follow the steps to create your poster.
animals, 4 Complete the conversation extract with the
reasons
why the words in the box. Listen again and check.
Share information
animals are
in danger, ( think idea shall great let's what ) Read or listen to each other's work. Discuss
your work. Check these things.
photos of
endangered • i '~t 1~l I 't t'e . ~ .·l I • What can you improve?
animals and \. • Have you got all the information you need?
• Have you got photos, maps, etc?
• Is the grammar and vocabulary correct?
• Is the spelling and punctuation correct?

Create the poster


Put all your information on the poster. Add
any photos or maps. Decide the final layout.
Then check the grammar, punctuation and
spelling again.

Show and tell


• Show the rest of the class your poster.
Answer any questions.

7 Now ask your teacher for the group and


individual assessment ~ids.

USEFUL LANGUAGE
What do you think?
I think ...
Yes, that's a good idea. /
No, that's too diffi<wlt '/ bori r:~g.
What (facts) shall we inclucte?
How shall we (share the,tasks)!
Let's (give some faCts) .
Why don't we (add a Video Gllp)?
When shall we (meet)?

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


In this unit the student will learn ... In this unit the student will learn how to •••
• understand, memorize and correctly use • identify specific information in a feature article
vocabulary related to transport and verbs of about Amish teenagers CLC CAE sec
movement (1) CLC CMST sec • look online for information about the Amish and
• understand and correctly use the present share with the class CLC DC CAE SIE
prefect and ask questions and give short • identify specific information in a presentation
answers using the present perfect and produce about electric bicycles CLC CMST sec
a short speaking activity CLC L2L SIE • read information about trams in Manchester, listen
• about journeys in the USA and compare with to short dialogues about transport and learn how
journeys in their country CLC sec CAE CMST to ask for travel information CLC CMST sec CAE
• about transport by watching a short video CLC • write a blog post CLC DC SIE L2L
CMSTSCCDC • prepare for and do a speaking exam about a
prepared topic CLC SIE L2L

Main vocabulary Reading


• Transport: bicycle, plane, shop, • Read a feature article about Amish teenagers
etc • Read a text about Route 66
• Verbs of movement (1 ): sail, climb, • Read information about trams in Manchester
fly, etc • Read a blog post
Grammar Writing: Interaction and production
• Present perfect: affirmative, • Write a personalized dialogue about asking for travel
negative, questions and short information
answers • Write a blog post in three steps: plan, write, check
• Learn how to use really and a bit
Functional language
• Phrases for asking for travel t istening
information • Listen to a TV programme about electric bicycles
• Phrases for answering questions • Listen to short dialogues about journeys
about a prepared topic

Pronunciation • Ask and answer questions about different forms of


• Difficult sounds: /1/ and /i:/ transport you use
• Exchange information about activities you have done

Spoken pr"oduction
• Prepare and act out a dialogue about asking for travel
information
• Prepare and do a speaking exam talking about a prepared
topic
-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-
Evaluation
• Unit 7 End-of-unit test: Basic, Standard and Extra
SeH~ :::rhJ ·cly a n.d
• CEFR Skills Exam Generator
SHl f~ ev<:l .lua ti nn
• Study guide:
Student's Book page 83
• Progress check and self-
evaluation:
Workbook pages 62-63
• Grammar reference and practice:
Workbook pages 96-97 Digital material
• Wordlist: Workbook pages
151-157 Pulse Live! Digital Course including:
• Interactive grammar tables
t .e·a rning strategies
• Audio visual speaking model: Asking for travel
f:Jl1n rd +hinking skills
information
• Listening for key words
• Audio visual cultural material: Transport
C u Hural al.r-vareness Student's website
• Journeys in the USA- Route 66
• Comparing long car journeys in
the USA with long car journeys in
students' own country

Cross·-curricuiar
c ontents
• The Amish, electric bikes,
Route 66
• Language and literature: reading
and writing a blog post
• ICT: searching the internet for
information

CLC Competence in linguistic • Fast-finisher activity: Student's Book page 75


communication • Extra activities: Teacher's Book pages T82
CMST Competence in mathematics, • Vocabulary and Grammar: Extension worksheets,
science and technology Teacher's Resource File pages 29-30
DC Digital competence
sec Social and civic
competences Teacher's Resource Fi e
CAE Cultural awareness and
• Translation and dictation worksheets pages 8, 18
expression
• Evaluation rubrics pages 1-7
L2L Learning to learn
• Key competences worksheets pages 13-14
SIE Sense of initiative and
• Culture and CLIL worksheets pages 25-28
entrepreneurship
• Culture video worksheets pages 13-14
• Digital competence worksheets pages 13-14
• Macmillan Readers worksheets pages 5-6

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


your favourite form of
transport? Why?

Vocabulary and Speaking


Transport
1 ~\DID Listen and repeat the different forms of transport. Which do you use the most?

bicycle motorbike plane ship horse and carriage coach tram lorry yacht
caravan the Underground helicopter ferry hot-air balloon

These Irish travellers live in a (51 ... In t ondon, the quickest way to get se people like travelling by m...
and take it with them wherever around is on (61 ... , which is also because it's cheap and healthy.
they go! called the Tube.
1 horse and
carriage 2 Read and listen. Complete the
PRESS YOURS ELF
2 tram sentences with words from exercise 1.
3 yacht 4 Which form of transport do you use in these
4 hot-air 3 Answer the questions.
situations? Write sentences.
balloon Which form or forms of transport ...
5 caravan 1 carries large, he avy things from one place to I go to s:chool by bicycle.
6 the another? 1 go to school
Underground 2 go shopping
2 transports people by air in an emergency?
7 bicycle 3 is a fast) noisy vehicle for one or two people? 3 go to the beach
4 carry people and cars on short journeys 4 visit your friends
across the sea? 5 go on holiday
5 takes large groups of passengers on long
journeys by road? 5 Work in pairs. Ask and answer questions about
1 lorry the different forms of transport you use.
2 helicopter
1fJ I-f ow do you go to s:chool?
3 motorbike
I love travelling by ship. I go to s:choo/ by bicycle
4 ferry
My mum goes to work by bus.
5 coach

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Vocabulary and Speaking
Transport 3 • Students work individually and answer the
questions using the words from exercise 1.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class. Note that a coach
In 1hlj lesson students will:
is used for long-distance journeys while a
• learn I revise wards related to transport
bus is used for short journeys and journeys
• •k lAd answer queetiOM about which
within a city.
forma tttransport.., •
Look!
Warmer Ask students to read the example senteflCII
Write the word transport on the board. in the Look! box. Highlight that we use the
Students work in pairs and make a list of all preposition by with fonns of transpQrt: by
the forms of transport they know. Set a time car, by plane, etc. Point out that the Mly
limit of two minutes. Listen to their ideas as a exception to this is on foot, which Is usec:l to
class and make a list on the board (car, bus, mean walk, eg I go to school on foot.
train , etc).
-~
XPAESS YOU RSELF

4 • Students work individually and write


sentences.
Students work in pairs and discuss the
questions. Get feedback from the whole 5 • Nominate two students to read aloud the
class. example question and answer.
• Students work in pairs and ask and answer
the questions in exercise 4.
1
• Listen to some pairs as a class.
• Students read the words in the word pool.
• Play the CD. Students listen to the different
Vocabulary extension: Wor!tbook page 108
forms of transport and repeat them.
• They answer the question.
• Listen to their ideas as a class.

The Underground almost always refers to


the London underground railway. Other
cities around the world (eg Madrid, Paris,
Moscow, Budapest) have a metro. The New
York underground railway system is called
the subway. In British English a subway is
a passage for pedestrians under a road or
Irailway line.

2
• Students work individually.
• Play the CD. Students listen and follow the
text in their books.
• They complete the sentences using the
words from exercise 1 .
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class. Note the
pronunciation of yacht /jot/.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


eading
Text type: A feature article Word check
Make sure students understand the words. Ask
them to translate them into their language. Note
that in this context get on is used to talk about
In this lesson students will:
how well someone has done a particular activity.
• read a text about the Amish people of the
Unitefii States 2 • This exercise gives students practice in
• scan the text and then read for specific reading to locate specific information .
information. • Students read the beginnings of the notes
and copy them into their notebooks.
• They look in the text and find the information
Recommended web links to complete the notes.
www.channel4.com/programmes/living-with- • Students compare answers in pairs.
the-amish • Check answers as a class.

www.bbc.co.uklreligion/religions/christianity/ 3 • Students read the sentences carefully first.


subdivisions/amish_1.shtml • Students look in the text and decide whether
the sentences are true or false. They correct
the false sentences.
Warmer • Students compare answers in pairs.
Write on the board What's the quickest form • Check answers as a class.
of transport from London to Paris? Elicit from
4 • Explain the task. Read the example sentence
the class possible forms of transport between
aloud to the class.
the two capital cities from the previous lesson.
• Students work individually and write five
Students discuss the answer to the question
sentences about how Andrew is different
in pairs. Listen to their ideas as a class. Then
from most teenagers.
explain that it's quicker by train. If you go by
• Listen to their ideas as a class.
plane, you have to travel a long way to the
airport, then you have to check in and wait to
board the plane. The train goes from central
London to central Paris. Encourage fast finishers to write three or four
sentences to answer the questions about
1 Andrew's visit to Britain. They should begin
• Students look at the picture of the people. by using the prompt in the book.
• Listen to students' ideas about who the
people in the photo are.
• Play the CD. Students listen, follow the text
in their books and check their ideas.
Students find out more information about the
• Check the answer as a class.
Amish. Highlight the Web quest tiJ:).
!! Focus on the Did you know? box. Make sure

students understand rol/erblades and the 1 • Ask students to open an internet web
phrasal verb get around. Here it means to browser such as Internet Explorer.
move from one place to another. Students open a search engine (eg
Google) and type in the subject of their
search.
• Students find information about the
Highlight that Great Britain (England,
Amish and make notes.
Scotland and Wales) is often referred to as
~ .. They work in pairs and make a list of
Britain. Remind students that the UK (the
information they have found.
United Kingdom) includes England, Scotland,
• They present their findings to the class.
Wales and Northern Ireland.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Reading
A feature article
1 fiDF) Who do you think the people in the picture are? Read and listen to check your ideas.

WHO ARE THE AMISH? or listen to rock music. He prefers


The Amish are a group of people hunting with his bow and arrow and
in the USA who live very simply, ice-fishing. Andrew has lived in the
often on farms, far away from state of Mississippi all his life and
big cities. They prefer the old- hasn't been to a big city before. He's
fashioned way of life and avoid never been to school either. His father
using a lot of modern gadgets. taught him at home with his 12
They don't have cars and brothers and sisters.
usually travel around by horse
THE TRIP
1 18 Along with four other Amish First, Andrew is going to stay in
and carriage. Amish teenagers teenagers, Andrew is about to go
2 Mississippi London. He'll stay with the family of
spend most of their time with on ajourney to Britain which will
3 father, 12 a British teenager who is interested
their families. Girls do a lot of change his life forever. Andrew's
brothers and in fashion and rap music and likes
sisters household chores, like cooking curious to find out what life in playii)Q video games. During the
and cleaning, while the boys help Britain is really like. 'I've read about
4 hunting with rest of his stay in Britain, Andrew will
his bow and their fathers with jobs outside. the history of England in books, but have the chance to visit a sports dub,
arrow and MEET ANDREW MILLER I've heard terrible things about the go to a musl" festival and tiy some
ice-fishing Andrew IS lB. tile's never I:JSed a English; he says. When he goes back traditional ~h~.
5 to find out
what life in
Britain is
really like
orqwnedamoi*phone..He
~ ....
CC!MI)Utel, had • 1V In his home home. fiewll deddeWhelha' f1( not
heRIIS ~ ~-
WllllllaCitiiiiMI4 ....., ....

2 Copy and complete the notes about Andrew.


-------
Name: Andrew M~ ------.
AgB=Q)_.• - -
Comes from: (2)~_:::.. _ _ _ _ _ _,
2 False ~mi~~l . ,___ ----~---;
Amish
people
1-lobbles: ~-
- _ -- -
usually travel ~n ft visit['og 'Britain: (51.~
- - - ---; 4 How is Andrew different from most teenagers?
answers

around by He's never


Write five differences. used a
horse and
carriage and 3 Read the text again. Are the sentences true or computer.
1-/e does::n't lis::ten to rock mus::ic.
lots of Amish false? Correct the false sentences. 2 He's never
teenagers had a TV in
1 Amish children help their parents at home. :':::; FINISHED?
use his home.
rollerblades. 2 Amish people don't use any transport. Do~ think Andrew will enjoy his trip to 3 He's never
3 False 3 Andrew likes watching TV. Britain?Why (not)? owned
Andrew has 4 Andrew has been to Britain before. a mobile
never had I t111nt he wtlf ~njoy h/i; trip to 1kttain becau!;e - phone.
a TV in his
5 Andrew is going to stay with a British family.
4 He doesn't
home. wear
4 False fashionable
Andrew has WEB QUEST clothes.
never been
to Britain Find out more Information about the Amish.
Wftln you find a
before. 1 Make notes about:
Wlllilfl with Interesting
5 True • The history of Amish ~ople • Interesting facts llll'omlarton, add It to
• Population • Their homes J1Uf favourites.
2 Work in pairs. Share yaqr Information with the rest of the class.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Grammar Ill 5 Complete the paragraph with the
present perfect form of the verbs in brackets.
Present perfect: affirmative Then listen and check.
and negative 3 hasn't been
use of the present pe~ 4 has just
LIVING WJTH THE arrived
We use the present perfect to talk about things
in the past, when we don't say exactly when they ~ . AMISH .~ 5 havecome
6 has left
happened.
Charlotte is an 18-year-old student 7 hasn't
affirmative brought
from Devon in England. A TV
I've read about England in books. producer (1) . .. (choose) her and
He I She I It's had lessons at home. fi ve other British teenagers to take
You I We I They've lived all their life in the USA. part in a programme called Living
negative with the Amish. Charlotte (2) ...
(live) away from hom e before, but
I haven't visited a big city.
she (3) ... (not b e) to the USA.
He I She I It hasn't used a computer.
She (4) .. . (j ust I arrive) at
You I We I They haven't travelled by plane.
the airport in Ohio and
is very excited! Some
1 Look at the table and answer the questions.
members of the Amish
a) What are 've and 's short for? family that she will be
b) What do we add to the end of regular verbs in staying with (5) ...
the present perfect? (come) to meet her.
Charlotte hasn't
2 Read the spelling rules on page 83 and look at go t much luggage
the Irregular verbs list on page 126. Then write with her. She (6) ...
gone
the past participles of these verbs. (leave) herfashionable
made
clothes, her laptop
seen go make see do laugh come give computer and her
done want think mobile phone at home.
laughed She (7) .. . (not bring)
come 3 Read the sentences about Andrew Miller and her make-up with her
given choose the correct words. either because Amish
wanted women don't wear
1 His parents has I have allowed him to go to make-up.
thought Britain.
2 He've I He's tried English food.
3 He hasn't seen I saw a football match.
4 He isn't I hasn't called his parents in the USA.
1 have 5 His fam ily are sad be cau se they've I they's 6 What have you done in your life so far? What
2 He's missed him! haven't you done? Write sentences.
3 seen
4 hasn't I've wa tched an Entfli<:h film.
5 they've Andrew has gone to Britain. (He's still there.) I haven't been abroad.
Artttrew has been to Britain. (He went there 1 go abroad 4 meet a famous
!rr the past, but he isn't there now.) 2 eat Chinese food person
3 travel by plane 5 ride a motorbike
4 Complete the sentences with gone or been.
1 gone 1 Fiona isn't here . She's ... for a walk.
We don't use the present perfect with past
2 been 2 I haven't ... to Paris, but I'd love to go!
time expressions like yesterday and last
3 been 3 We've ... in a hot-air balloon . It was great!
year. What about in your language?
4 gone 4 Scott hasn't ... to school yet. He's still here.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Grammar
Present perfect: affirmative 3 • Point out that the correct sentences use the
and negative present perfect form.
• Students choose the correct words
individually.
• They compare answers in pairs.
In this lesson students wfll:
• Check answers as a class.
• team I revise the present perfect
affirmative and ~ve
Look!
• cempare the use of gone and been In the
present perfect Students read the information in the LQGid
box. Highlight the difference between gone
and been by writing Andrew has gone te
Warmer Britain on the beard. As!< where he le W
Write the sentence Andrew has never used a elicit that he is in Britain. Write Andtsw ,_
computer on the board with the words in the been to Britain on ttlf board. ASk where ht
wrong order: computer Andrew never a used isn't now to elicit that he isn't IRBritain.
has. Students work in pairs and write the
sentence in the correct order. Invite students
4 • Students complete the sentences using gone
to come to the board and write the correct
or been.
sentence. If there are any mistakes, invite
• They compare answers in pairs.
other students to correct them. Point out
• Check answers as a class.
that we can also used the contracted form:
Andrew's never used a computer. 5
• Point out that some of the verbs in this
1 • Students read the information and the exercise have irregular past participles.
example sentences in the table. • Students work individually to complete the
• Students work individually and answer the paragraph.
questions. • They compare answers in pairs.
• They compare answers in pairs. • Play the CD. Students listen and check their
• Check answers as a class. answers.

6 • Read the example sentences aloud to the


class.
Highlight that we use the present perfect to • Students work-individually to write sentences
talk about past experiences when we do not about what they have and haven't done in
say exactly when they happened. Compare their lives so far using I've or I haven 't.
He's been to Paris (at some point in his life) • Listen to their sentences as a class.
and He went to Paris in 2013 (a specific time
is mentioned so the past simple is used). f!l Analyse
Ask students to read the Information abgut
2 • Remind students that some verbs in English !English and compare it with their own
have irregular past participle forms, eg read, language.
read, read; have, had, had.
• Elicit the past participle form of a regular
verb, eg visit, visited and highlight that the ...
.......
......... Pronunciation lab: Dtfficult S0Uf1(1s: /JI
past simple and past participle of regular ......
.- ~·
. and /1:/, page 125
verbs are the same.
• Students work individually. They read the Digital course: Interactive grammar table
spelling rules and look at the Irregular verbs
Study guide: page 83
list. They then write the past participle forms.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Vocabulary and Listening
Verbs of movement (1) 6 • Ask students to read the questions carefully
first.
t_( ::- -·~ ,-·. : ·~~ ~ \ ,', • Play the CD again. Students write their
........ ----- ----- --- - --
answers.
In this lesSE)n students will:
• They compare answers in pairs.
• learn some verbs of m~vement
• Check answers as a class.
• listen tor specific information
~ • ... 2.48 Audioscript, exercise 5
Warmer Now, I'm not very fit and I don't really like cycling.
Write car and bicycle on the board. Ask So what am I doing on a bicycle? Well, this isn't
a normal bicycle. It's actually an electric bicycle,
students to think of a verb or verbs that can
or a-bicycle for short. It's got a battery, and can
go with each word. Elicit answers from the go up to 25 kilometres an hour. And although you
class and write them on the board, eg drive a can use your own power, just as you can for a
car, ride a bicycle. normal bicycle, if you're feeling tired - or, like me,
you're just a bit lazy- you can relax and let the
1 bicycle do the hard work.
Now in China, electric bicycles are really popular,
• Play the CD. Students listen and repeat the
with about 125 million of them on the road. In
verbs of movement. Europe, however, it's a different story. People
• Students look at the list of verbs. still prefer to use their cars to get around, even
• They write down which of the verbs they can though they're more expensive to buy and run
do without any equipment. and are very bad for the environment.
• They compare answers in pairs. But are electric bicycles really as easy to use as
they sound? Today I'm going to find out. I've left
• Listen to their answers as a class.
my car at home and am on my way to work in
2 • Explain the task. the centre of London on an a-bicycle! Well, it's
a bit scary riding any kind of bicycle in central
• Students work individually and complete the
London with all this traffic. Oh, there's a hill
sentences using the verbs from exercise 1. coming up now- I'm going to switch the power
• They compare answers in pairs. on. This is great - I'm overtaking all the other
cyclists now! I bet they think I'm really fit! If I was
3 on a normal bicycle, I would definitely have to
• Play the CD. Students listen and check their get off it and push it up the hill now. Right, here
answers to exercise 2. we are. I made it to work! Phew!
Well, I definitely think ele;ctric bicycles are a
great invention and they really make cycling
possible for everyone. It doesn't matter how old
Situated about 100 kilometres south-west of you are or how fit you are, e-bicycles are a great
Tokyo, Mount Fuji is the highest mountain in way to get around. They aren't cheap, though.
Japan at 3, 776 metres. It is an active volcano Prices start at about £600. But with petrol prices
going up, who knows? Maybe they'll soon be as
but it hasn't erupted since 1708!
fashionable here as they are in China.

4 • Check that students understand the task.


• Give them a couple of minutes to make
notes.
• They compare ideas in pairs.
• Listen to their ideas as a class.

5
• Students read the notes carefully first.
• Play the CD. Students work individually and
copy and complete the notes.
• Check progress. If necessary, play the CD
again.
• Check answers as a class.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Vocabulary and Listening
Verbs of movement (1)
• • Listen and repeat the verbs of movement in the box. Which can you do
without any equipment?
answers
climb
sail fly climb drive cross fall crash carry pull
push follow arrive take off land
cross
fall
carry
pull
push
follow
arrive

It's easy to (1) ... things with The great thing about an Cycling isn't much fun when
an electric bicycle! electric bicycle is that you everyone else prefers to
never need to (2) .. . it up hills! (3) ....

It's so relaxing to (4) ... Guim managed to (5) ... It took Guim weeks to (6) ...
across the ocean. to the top of Mount Fuji in Australia in the heat!
Japan - without his bicycle!

2 Read the text and complete the sentences with words 6 listen again and answer the questions.
from exercise 1.
1 Where do people still prefer cars? 1 In Europe.
2 How does the man usually travel to 2 By car.
3 Listen and check your answers to exercise 2.
work? 3 The traffic.
4 How do you think electric bicycles are different from 3 What is the problem with cycling in the 4 Going up a
normal bicycles? centre of London? hill.
4 Which part of the man's journey is 5 They make
5 • : Listen to a TV programme about electric easier for him than for other cyclists? cycling
5 Give one advantage of e-bicyles. possible for
bicycles and copy and complete the notes.
everyone.
6 Give one disadvantage of e-bicycles.
I 6 They're
Electric bike~ expensive.
• al~o e2lled (I) ...
kilometres
• power come~ from a (2) ...
an hour • fa~te~t ~peed: (3) ...
4 China • popular in (4) ...
5 600 • co~t in the UK: from (5) £ ...

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Cultural awareness
In 1945, the very first MeDonald's
fa$1: food restaurant opened
-~~~~~~ on Route 66 in San Bernadino,
FREQUENTLY ASKED C~lifornia. The Disney film Cars
QUESTIONS HOME ,.., I
!H$o takes place on Route 66.

WHAT IS ROUTE 66? HAS ANYONE EVER TRAVELLED ALONG


It is a road that goes from Chicago in the Midwest to Los ROUTE 66 ON FOOT?
Angeles on the West Coast. It crosses eight states and is Yes, they have! In 1928 there was a race which
3,940 km long. People sometimes call it 'The Main Street went from one end of Route 66 to the other and then
of America'. continued to New York! The route was 5,507 km
HOW LONG HAS IT EXISTED? long, making it the longest race in history!
Since 1926. Now, however, there are newer, longer WHAT IS THERE TO SEE ON ROUTE 66?
highways and Route 66 no longer appears on most maps. The road passes through beautiful scenery, including
HAVE PEOPLE STOPPED USING IT NOW? the Arizona Desert and the Black Mountains. There
No! Many people, especially tourists, still travel on it are also lots of interesting towns and sights on the
because it is an important part of American history. way, such as the Grand Canyon.
WHAT'S SO IMPORTANT ABOUT IT?
Route 66 was one of the very first highways in the USA.
Cars were a new invention then, and wide roads like Route
66 made it much easier to get from one place to another.
WHY HAS IT BECOME SO FAMOUS?
I~ 1946 Bobby Troup wrote a song about Route 66 which
became a big hit. Since then, many performers have
recorded versions of the song.
HAS THE ROAD CHANGED A LOT OVER THE
1---.....------.... YEARS?
Yes, it has, but you can still see what it was like in the
past. Herman's Gas Station in Thoreau, New Mexico,
· ~~co~ ·
6-
~ CHICAGO
~
first started selling petrol in 1935. The Wigwam Motel in
There are
Holbrook, where you can stay in a Native American tent,

~' ·
newer, longer has also been there since the 1930s.
highways 66
today. LOS ANGELES
2 True 1139 MILES I • 1139 MILES
3 False
Route 66
was one of
1 Look at the map and the picture. Which two 4 Find American words in the text that mean ...
.' . ~- .... ...
::!....::...... ;.. - •• '·
the very first
highways American cities does Route 66 connect? 1 highway
1 a big road.
in the USA 2 gas
2 petrol.
when cars 2
were a new 3 a hotel. 3 motel
connection between the songwriter Bobby
invention.
Troup and Route 66?
4 False CULTURAL COMPARISON
You can still
3 Read the text again. Are the sentences true or 5 Think of a long car journey that you have made in
stay at the
Wigwam false? Correct the false sentences. your country and answer the questions.
Motel.
1 Route 66 is the longest road in America. 1 Where did you go?
5 False 2 You can still drive along Route 66 today.
The 1928 2 What did you see?
race
3 Route 66 existed before anyone had a car. 3 What did you enjoy about the journey?
continued to 4 The Wigwam Motel has now closed. 4 What didn't you enjoy about it?
New York. 5 The 1928 race stopped at the end of
Route 66.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Cultural awareness
Journeys in the USA 4 • Point out that some words are different
in British English and American English.
Common examples include shop and store
and trainers and sneakers.
In this lesSon students wilt:
• read •ut Aoute 66
• describe a long car joumey in their
• Students work individually and find the
American words for the three items.
• They compare answers in pairs.
COI.\Intry
• Check answers as a class. Point out that
motel is short for motor hotel and is always
found next to a road .
Warmer
Write USA on the board. Put students into
Word check
pairs. Ask them to make a list of US cities.
Make sure students understand the words.
Set a time limit of two minutes. The pair with
Ask them to translate them into their language.
the most cities wins.
Highlight that a hit is a very successful song,
film, play, show, television programme, etc.
1 • Check students understand the task.
• They look at the map and the picture and find CULTURAL COMPARISON

the answer. 5 • Students read the questions and make a


• Check the answer as a class. note of their answers.
• Put them into pairs to ask and answer the
questions.
• Listen to some pairs as a class.
Route 66 passes through eight states on its
way from Chicago to Los Angeles: Illinois,
Culture video: Transport
Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, New . --~-

Mexico, Arizona and California.

2 I
• Explain the task.
• Play the CD. Students listen and follow the
text in their books.
• They compare their answer in pairs.
• Check the answer as a class.

Bobby Troup's rhythm and blues song Route


66 was first recorded by Nat King Cole in
1946. Many artists have recorded the song,
including Chuck Berry, the Rolling Stones
and Depeche Mode.

3 • Students read the sentences carefully first.


• They read the text again and decide if the
sentences are true or false.
L • They compare answers in pairs and correct
the false sentences.
• Check answers as a class and highlight the
information in the Fact box.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Grammar
Present perfect: questions 4 • Put students into pairs.
and short answers • They ask and answer the questions from
exercise 3.
! -. . -~ ( '.. ! : • . • Listen to some pairs as a class.
- - - - -

In this lesson stt.lden~ WiH:


• ask and anew~r questrQflS U$ing the Grammar in context:
pre$em perfect Transport
• read a $hort tct>tt abOut tFan&~ort
5 • Check students understand the task.
Students work individually to complete
Warmer the project with the present perfect form
Write the sentence She has been to San of the verbs in brackets.
Francisco on the board. Ask students to turn • They compare answers in pairs.
the statement into a question. Elicit that the
question is Has she been to San Francisco?
and point out that we begin questions in the
Concorde was a supersonic passenger
present perfect with Has or Have.
aircraft jointly developed by the UK and
France. In all, 20 aircraft were built and they
1 • Students copy the table into their notebooks.
operated for 27 years on routes such as
• They complete the table using driven, has
London to New York. While regular flights
and haven't.
take about 7 hours to reach New York from
• They compare answers in pairs.
London, Concorde could fly this route in 3
• Check answers as a class. Point out that we
hours 30 minutes.
contract the negative short answers (hasn't,
haven't) but we never contract the affirmative
short answers. 6
• Play the CD. Students listen and check
2 • Check students understand the task. Show
their answers to exercise 5.
how the words are reordered to make the
question.
• Students work individually to write the
question forms and the short answers to the
questions.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class. Highlight the
irregular past participle of sing (sung).
Study guide: page 83

Highlight the information in the Lo0k! b.ax. Point


out that No, I haven't can also b~ used as the
short answer to the question. We US$ the full
answer with never to emphasize the a~swer.

3 • Explain the task. Make sure students


remember to use the past participle of the
verbs in brackets.
• Check answers as a class. Highlight the
irregular verb ride, rode, ridden.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Grammar Gil» Grammar in context:
Present perfect: questions Transport
and short answers 5 Complete the project with the present perfect
form of the verbs in brackets.
questions you ever
th_pught
Have 1/ we I you I they (1) ... along Route 66?
(2) ... he I she I it been in a song? Ajourney through the 2 Hav~
people
short answers hi~tory oftran~port uS:ed
Yes, I have. I No, I (3) .... by Jame~ Pre~ton, age.a !3 3 have flown
Yes, it has. I No, it hasn't. (t) .• (you ever f thinK) about the traMport you u,;e 4 Has he
every day? (2) _ (People (use) car~. biKes and Invented
1 Copy and complete the table with driven, has trains for hundreds of years or are has
and haven't. they a modern invention? 'Read my becC!lme
1 driven project to find out' haven't
I Has 2 Order the words to make questions about lJ'~ !7~3: the Montgolfia brother,; started
J 3 l:iaven't Route 66. Then write true short answers. l3J ... (fly) for the fir~t time - in a 7 has never
hot-air balloon! been
Route 66 I famous I become I Has ? have
It's lc514: George ~tevenson's Lnvention Is
l-ias: 'Route 66 become famous:? Ves:, it has:. &oin~ to ct).ange the world. (4J ... designed

1 hotels I all I closed I the I Have I old ? (he (inveht) the car. the bus or the train? ·has
It's lc563: Lor1don (5) .. (become) epened
2 inI Has I been I film I it I a?
the first city in the world with an
Have all the 3 about I sung I it I people I Have?
f.~ old hotels 4 longer roads I Have I they I built?
underground railway. At the moment
~ closed? No, there ts only one line! The other lines
they haven't.
5 walked I anyone I Has I Route 66 I along? (6) _ (not f ~art) running yet.
~ « Has it been It's lc570: lots of peop le ar~ riding
ina film? bil(yc.les ll~e this! Cycling L7) _ (never (
·~~ Yes, it has. We ofteA wse ivet in present perfect be) so difficult!
~H Have people EJUestlons (o mean 'at some time in your I)'s lqQ3: the Wright brothers (c5) _ r~~~~g
sung about
life', (design) the first Plane with an
'{I it? Yes, they engine.
"lave. The negative of ever Is never..
It's 1Ci0c5: l-lenry Ford (q) .. (open)
.:,l Have they Have you ever: driver:~ a e~ar? the first car facto ry. Now people
built longer Yes. I have. I Na, I've never driven a car. can own a car!
'i roads? Yes, It's !Cj76: for the first t ime
I ;hay h~ve. passengers (lo) .• Ltravel) by
'-.., asanyone
' 3 Write questions using the present perfect
Concorde. a tleW Kind of plane.
walked and ever. It's fCJ~ter than the ~peed of
a10119 Route sound.
1L~67Y es, (travel) across America?

~
'hey have. '<: ICiqs , the UK an d France
1-iave you ever travelled acros-s: America"
11) •. (fin l ~h) building lhe Cha nnel
1 (see) the film Cars? unnel. There i~ now a railway
2 (ride) a motorbike? line between the two countries
3 (stay) in a hotel?
which goe,; under th e ,;ea!
1 Haveyou
ever seen 4 (eat) fast food? Finally, in cas e you're wondering, George ~tevenson
:11 thefllm 5 (climb) a mountain? invented the tra in!
Cars?
~ 2 Have you 4 Work in pairs. Ask and answer the questions
• Listen and check your answers.
ever ridden a from exercise 3·
11otorbike?
3 Have you e 1-iave you ever travelled acros:s: America"
1 ever stayed ~ No, I haven't. What was the most popular l'$tM of
1 'n a hotel?
. ,. -.-lave you transport too years ago? What Ts the most
ever eaten popular form of transport 11
fast food?

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-
Integrated skills
All about transport 4 • Explain the task. Encourage students to find
the key words in sentences a-e before they
listen.
• Play the CD again.
• Students compare answers in pairs.
• work on all feur skills
• Check answers as a class.
• read information abGM: nm jf.illtll$y8
• listen to diatouues abCilut v.vel - .
• 3.04 Audioscript, exercise 3
• write a personalized dialOgue
• act out their dialogue 1
Girl 1: Quick, Zak! Hurry up!
Boy 1: Don't worry. It's not going yet.
Girl 1: Yes, it is! Look! The doors are closing!
Warmer Boy 1: Oh well, we'll just have to wait for the
Write the word Manchester on the board. Ask next one.
students to work in pairs and say what they Girl 1: But there isn't another one. That was the
know about this city. Listen to their ideas as last train tonight.
Boy 1: Oh no!
a class, eg It has two famous football teams,
Girl 1: We'll have to get a taxi now ...
Manchester City and Manchester United. It's Boy 1: Yes ... or walk home.
in the north of England. It rains a lot. It's an
2
industrial city. Boy 2: Excuse me ... can I help you with that?
Girl 2: Oh, yes please! That's very kind of you.
Boy 2: Phew! It's very heavy. What have you got
Step1: Read in it?
1 • Explain the task. Girl 2: Too many things for a week in
Manchester!
• Students look at the information about trams
Boy 2: Yeah, right. Well, here we are.
in Manchester. They answer the question. Girl 2: Thank you. I'm glad it's got wheels ... it
• They compare answers in pairs. was just the stairs that were a problem. Thanks
• Check the answer as a class. again for you help.
• Highlight Nina's speech bubble. Elicit Boy 2: No problem. Enjoy the rest of your stay!
answers to the question from the class. 3
Boy 3: Oh no ... Look at all the people waiting to
2 • Students read the questions carefully first. buy tickets at the ticket office.
• They look at the information again and find Girl 3: Don't worry. We can use the ticket
the answers. machine.
• They compare answers in pairs. Boy 3: But I haven't got any change.
Girl 3: That's OK. The machine gives change.
• Check answers as a class.
Look, you choose the station you're going to,
, like this, and then the kind of ticket you want,
Step 2: Listen like this, and then you put the money in here.
Boy 3: What's the matter?
Girl 3: It isn't working.
Boy 3: What isn't working?
Listening for key words Girl 3: The ticket machine. That's why all those
Highlight the information in the Skills builder people are waiting at the ticket office!
box and emphazise the importance of
focusing on key words.

3
• Read the question aloud to the class.
• Play the CD.
• Students listen and note down the answer.
• Check the answer as a class.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Integrated skills - continued
Asking for travel information
5 9 • Students practise their dialogues in pairs.
• Students read the dialogue first. • For extra practice, they swap roles in both
• Play the CD. Students listen and follow the dialogues.
text in their books. They write answers 1-4 in
10 • Choose some pairs to act out their dialogue
their notebooks.
for the class.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Students raise their hand if another pair has
• Check answers as a class.
the same destination as they do. This will
6 • Play the CD again, pausing after each encourage them to listen carefully to their
question or statement and each response for classmates.
students to repeat as a class.
• Ask students to repeat the dialogue several
times both chorally and individually with the
correct stress and intonation.
• Students practise the dialogue in pairs. Then
swap roles and practise the dialogue again.

Step 3: Write ·
7 • Students work individually. They copy the
questions in bold into their notebooks.
• They look at the information on page 80
again and choose a different place from Nina
to get to in Manchester.
• Students write answers to the questions.

8 • Ask students to look at the Communication


kit: Asking for travel information. Encourage
them to use these questions when writing
their dialogue.
• Students work individually and write their
dialogue, using the dialogue in the book as a
model.
• Monitor while they are writing and give help if
necessary.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Hello. Could you tell me how to get to the Yes, of course. The nearest station is (2) .... Shall
(1) ... , please? I show you on the map?
Yes, please. OK, we're here at Corn brook. Take the (3) ... line
to Piccadilly Gardens, then take the blue line to
Shudehill.
Where do I change trains? At Piccadilly Gardens.
Great! Thanks. How much is it? Are you under 16?
Yes. That's just (4) ... , please.
OK. Here you are. Thanks. Bye!

5 1 Listen to Nina asking about traveltln Step tp Communfc.o.~~:


in Manchester. Complete 1-4 in your notebook.
9 Work in pairs. Take turns to practise your
6 Listen again and repeat. Practise your intonation.
dialogues.
2 Shudehill
3 pink • 1-/ello. Could you tell me how to get to ... ?
4 a pound Step J: Wr!ti.~ . Ve>, of cour>e. Th e ne<Jre>t >t<Jtion i> _

7 Copy the questions in bold into your notebook. 10 Act your dialogue for the class.
Then look at the information on page So again.
Choose a different place in Manchester and CO MUNJCATIIQN KJT
write your answers to the questions.
Asking for travel information
8 Imagine you want to travel to the place you have Could you tell me how to get to ... ?
chosen. Write a new dialogue. Write both parts. How do I get to?
Use the dialogue in exercise 5 to help you. Where do I change (trains)?
How much is it?
1-/ello. Could you tell me how to get to ... ? What time does it leave?
Ve>, of cour>e. The ne<;rer;t >t<Jtion ir; ...

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Writing
A blog post

SEEING THE SIGHTS IN LONDON


This is the second day of my holiday in Lt>ndon! I've
never been here before, so I'm really excited!
Yesterday we went to Buckingham Palace, but we
didn't see the Queen! We also went to the London
1 The writer
Eye . It was fun, but Mum thought it was o bit scary.
has been to
Buckingham Today we' re shopping in Harrods, the biggest shop
Palace and in the world! We come here by Tu be, bot we got o
the London bit lost. The london Underground is really busy -
Eye, been and !here ore ·a lot of stations!
shopping, We've still got lots of things to do! We haven't
travelled by been Ia Madame Tussouds or the Natural History
Tube and got Mu$eum yet. I hape we'll hove time to go there
a bit lost.
tomorrow becmuse it's our last day!
2 The writer
hasn't been ' - •. =::::. -
to Madame 1 Read and listen to the blog post. 5 Rewrite the sentences using really. f' ...
Tussauds or Answer the questions. 1 We had a
the Natural It was hot on the train.
What has the writer ... really great
History It WCJ' reCJIIy hot on the tmin. time.
Museum. 1 already done?
1 We had a great time. 2 I was really
2 not done yet?
2 I was tired after the journey. tired after
the journey.
2 Look at the sentences from the blog post. What 3 I think Berlin is an amazing city.
3 I think Berlin
is the meaning of the words in blue? 4 There was a long queue for the museum. is a really
5 It's a big shop. amazing city.
1 Mum thought it was a bit scary.
2 The London Underground is really busy. 4 There was
a really long
Writing task queue for
3 Read the Writing focus. Then find more the museum.
examples of really and a bit in the blog. Write a blog post.
5 It's a really
Plan Imagine you are on holiday. Make big shop.
notes about:
really excited WRITING FOCUS • where you are and how you feel.
a bit lost really and a bit • what you've already done. -
We can use really and a bit before adjectives in • what you're doing now.
informal writing, such as in a blog or an email. • what you haven't done yet.
really= very
a bit = a little Write Write two short paragraphs based
I'm really hungry! on your notes.
Sam is a bit sad. Chec.~k Check your writing.

1 The museum 4 Rewrite the sentences using a bit and the ~ present perfect
was a bit words in brackets. ~ other verb tenses
boring.
2 It's a bit cold The buses weren't very fast. (slow) 0 really and a bit+ adjective
today. The bu,ec; were CJ bit c;low.
3 The people
were a bit
1 The museum wasn't very interesting. (boring)
unfriendly. 2 It isn't very warm today. (cold)
4 The meal 3 The people weren't very friendly. (unfriendly)
was a bit 4 The meal wasn't very cheap! (expensive)
expensive!

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Writing
A blog post
Write 1 The hotel wasn't very comfortable.
(uncomfortable) 2 The journey wasn't very
In this lesson st1.1d.,t$ wUI: easy. (difficult) on the board. Students rewrite
• ruo a short travel bre>g SJoet the sentences using a bit as in exercise 4:
• I:J68 th~ adVerb$ really and a bit 1 The hotel was a bit uncomfortable. 2 The
• write a lbr.g post journey was a bit difficult.

5 • Make sure students understand the task.


Warmer
Remind them that really comes before the
Write London on the board. Elicit from the
adjective.
class what they know about the city, eg
• Students work individually and rewrite the
famous sights (Buckingham Palace, Tower
sentences using really.
Bridge) , museums (the Science Museum, the
• They compare answers in pairs.
Victoria and Albert Museum of Childhood),
• Check answers as a class.
things to do (shopping in Oxford Street,
walking in the parks).
Writing task
1 The aim of this activity is for students to
• Make sure students understand the task. write a blog post that includes the correct
• Play the CD. Students listen and follow the use of the present perfect and other tenses,
text in their books. really and a bit+ adjective. Ask the students
• They answer the questions. to follow the stages in the Student's Book.
• They compare answers in pairs. At the Check stage, ask them to swap
• Check answers as a class. notebooks and check each other's writing.

2 • Students read the sentences.


• They translate them into their language.
Writing reference and practice: Workbook page 132
• Check answers as a class. Highlight that a bit
is a less formal way of saying a little and that
really is a less formal way of saying very.

3 • Students read the information in the


Writing focus box. Point out that both
these adverbial expressions come before
adjectives.
• They work individually and find more
examples of really and a bit in the text.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

4 • Explain the task. Focus on the example and


show how the first sentence is transformed
using the adjective in brackets and the
adverbial phrase a bit.
• Students work individually and rewrite the
sentences using a bit and the words in
brackets.
• They compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers as a class.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Study guide
Grammar, Vocabulary and Speaking
Tell the students the Study guide is an Speaking
important page which provides a useful • Check that students understand the phrases
reference for the main language of the unit: the to use for asking for travel information.
grammar, the vocabulary and the functional • Tell students to act out a conversation
language from the Integrated skills pages. between someone asking for travel
Explain that they should refer to this page when information and the other person giving the
studying for a test or exam. information.

Grammar
Additional material
• Tell the students to look at the example Workbook
sentences of the present perfect: affirmative • Progress check page 62
and negative. Make sure students • Self-evaluation page 63
understand how to use the tense. • Grammar reference and practice pages
• Then tell students to look at the example 96-97
sentences of the present perfect: questions • Vocabulary extension page 108
and short answers. Ensure they understand • Integrated skills page 117
how to form the tense correctly. Get students • Writing reference and task pages 132-133
to translate into their own language if
necessary.
• Refer students to the Grammar reference
on pages 96-97 of the Workbook for further
revision.

Vocabulary
• Tell students to look at the list of vocabulary
and check understanding.
• Refer students to the Wordlist on page 151
of the Workbook where they can look up any
words they can't remember.

Teacher' Resource File and Exa


• Basics section pages 41-46 • Unit 7 End-of-unit test: Basic, Standard and
• Vocabulary and grammar consolidation Extra
pages 27-30 • CEFR Skills Exam Generator
• Translation and dictation pages 8, 18
• Evaluation rubrics pages 1- 7
• Key competences worksheets pages 13-14
• Culture and CLIL worksheets pages 25-28
• Culture video worksheets pages 13-14
• Digital competence worksheets pages 13-14
• Macmillan Readers worksheets pages 5-6

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Study guide
Grammar
Present perfect: affirmative and Vocabulary
negative Transport
bicycle lorry
use of the present perfect caravan motorbike
We use the present perfect to talk about things coach plane
in the past, when we don't say exactly when th ey ferry ship
ha~ f!en ed . helicopter the Underground
affirmative horse and carriage tram
hot-air balloon yacht
I've seen lots of mon uments.
He I She I It's visited interesting places.
You I We I They've lived in many di fferent Verbs of movement (1)
countries. arrive drive pull
carry fall push
negative
climb fly sail
I haven't read th e new novel. crash follow take off
He/ She / It hasn't been on a yacht. cross land
We / You I They haven't flown by heli copter.

Present perfect: questions and


short answers Speaking
Asking for travel information
questions Co uld you tell me how to get to ... ?
Have 1/ you I we I they been to the USA? How do I getto?
Has he I she I it seen th e TV programme? Where do I cha nge (trai ns)?
short answers How mu ch is it?
Yes, I have. I No, I haven't. What time does it leave?
Yes, he has. I No, he hasn't.

LEARNI G TO LEARN
Present perfect spelling rules When you are reading in English and find a
• For most verbs, add-ed to the infinitive to word you don't know, try using a monolingual
form the past participle dictionary instead of a bilingual one.
walk ""7 walked jump ""7 jumped Monolingual dictionaries contain a lot of
useful information about new words.
• Some past participles are irregular, but the
same as the past simple
have ""7 had say ""7 said
• Some past participles are irregular and
different from the past simple
do ""7 did-+ done
give ""7 gave ""7 given
Check the Irregular verbs list on page 126.

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


In this unit the student will learn ..• In this unit the student will learn how to ...
• understand, memorize and correctly use • identify specific information in an online
vocabulary related to sport and competitions magazine article about superstition and sport
CLCCMSTSCC CLC DC CAE SCC
• understand, memorize and correctly use • look online for information about a famous
vocabulary related to verbs of movement (2) CLC athlete CLC DC CAE SIE
L2L • identify specific information in a radio
• understand and correctly use the present perfect programme about superstitions CLC CAE sec
+ for and since and the difference between the • read a leisure centre timetable, listen to four
present perfect and the past simple CLC L2L announcements and learn how to make
• about superstitions in Ireland and compare with arrangements CLC sec L2L
superstitions in their country CLC CMST sec CAE • write an email CLC DC SIE L2L
• about Ireland by watching a short video CLC DC • prepare for and do a listening exam about
CMSTCAE answering open questions CLC SIE Lll

• Sports and competitions: winner, • An online magazine article about superstition in sport
loser, champion, etc • Read a text about superstitions in Ireland
• Verbs that go with different • Read a leisure centre timetable •
sports: play, do, go • Read an email
• Verbs of movement (2): carry,
Writing· Interaction and production
cross, spill, etc
• Write a personalized dialogue about making arrangements
Grammar • Write an email in three steps: plan, write, check
• Present perfect + for and since • Learn how and where to use adjectives
• How long with the present perfect
Listening
• Present perfect and past simple
• Listen to part of a radio programme about superstitions
Functional language • Listen to announcements at a leisure centre
• Phrases for making arrangements
Pronunciation • Ask and answer questions about the sport you do
• Linking words: final consonant +
vowel sound
• Prepare and act out a dialogue about making
arrangements for an activity

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Evaluation
• Unit 8 End-of-unit test: Basic, Standard and Extra
Se lf-study and
self-evaluation
• Study guide:
Student's Book page 93
• Progress check and self-
evaluation :
Workbook pages 70-71
• Grammar reference and practice:
Workbook pages 98-99
Digital material
• Wordlist:
Workbook pages 151-157 Pulse Live! Digital Course including:
• Interactive grammar tables
Learning strategies
• Audio visual speaking model: Making arrangements
and thinking skills
• Audio visual cultural material: Ireland
• Understanding timetables

Cultural awareness
• Superstitions in Ireland
• Comparing superstitions in Ireland
with superstitions in students'
own countries and regions

Cross-curriculal'i
contents
• The history of superstitions, Irish
beliefs and superstitions
• Language and literature: writing
an email
• ICT: searching the internet for • Basic worksheets, Teacher's Resource File pages 47-52
information • Vocabulary and Grammar: Consolidation worksheets,
Teacher's Resource File pages 31-32

Extension material
CLC Competence in linguistic
• Fast-finisher activity: Student's Book page 85
communication
• Vocabulary and Grammar: Extension worksheets,
CMST Competence in mathematics,
Teacher's Resource File pages 33-34
science and technology
oc Digital competence
sec Social and civic
competences Teacher's Resource Fife
CAE Cultural awareness and
• Translation and dictation worksheets pages 9, 19
expression
• Evaluation rubrics pages 1-7
L2L Learning to learn
• Key competences worksheets pages 15-16
SIE Sense of initiative and
• Culture and CLIL worksheets pages 29-32
entrepreneurship
• Culture video worksheets pages 15-16
• Digital competence worksheets pages 15-16
• Macmillan Readers worksheets pages 5-6

-FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY-


Vocabulary and Speaking
Sport and competitions
1 I Check the meaning of the words in the box. Then listen
winner, loser, and repeat. Which ones can be a person?
champion,
supporter, winner loser champion tournament
opponent, opponent captain race match goal
captain, coach

It's been a fantastic year for


sport at Swallow School.

SEPTEMBER Eight students from Swallow


Jake Matthews scored a School took part in a (7)
brilliant ( 1) ... in the football Between them they raised
"£:650 for charity. A wonderful
(2) ... against Healey School.
achievement!
Well done. Jake!

Iris Carter in Year 9 beat


William Lee to become the Swallow School's Angus
local under-16s chess (3) ... .