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ENG 1020-008: Introductory College Writing

State Hall 0315 Tuesday/Thursday 8:30 – 9:45 (woof)


Wayne State University
Fall 2018

Instructor: DeGenaro, Anthony (Tony) Office: 10402 5057 Woodward


E-mail: anthony.degenaro@wayne.edu Office Hours: Tuesday 1-3pm; Thursday 10-11am
Twitter: @tonyisapoet Preferred Pronouns: He/Him

Course Description

Writing is something we often only think of as a noun: “ah, writing, a thing I made and
am now done making.” This course is designed around the re-consideration of writing as
a verb: “ah, yes, writing, the thing I am doing always – and not just with words.” We
want to shift our understanding of writing from pen, paper (there, I’ve aged myself – let’s
say keyboard and characters on a screen) to writing as text-based meaning-making. But
let’s take that one step further and think of texts more broadly. Maybe you can read a
film, like 1996 cinema masterpiece “Twister,” or perhaps we consider that Beyoncé’s
visual album “Lemonade” was written with the same layers of complexity as any kind of
more traditional academic “text.”

From this re-imagining of text and writing, this course aims to provide a foundation upon
with all future writing you do at Wayne State University, specifically, the kinds of
research-based writing and knowledge-creation you will be doing within your specific
majors, once you choose them.

The course begins with a question: are you a writer? and from there we’ll use reflection
and close-reading to think about the ways we embody the role of a writer, and the way
we create writing; we will think about the kinds of writing specific to your role as a
student at Wayne State. This course will ask you to be introspective, creative, and in
charge of your learning. Be prepared to think, to speak, and to create!
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Department of English Description

Building upon students’ diverse skills, English 1020 prepares students for reading, research, and
writing in college classes. The main goals of the course are (1) to teach students to consider the
rhetorical situation of any piece of writing; (2) to have students integrate reading, research, and
writing in the academic genres of analysis and argument; and (3) to teach students to develop
analyses and arguments using research-based content, effective organization, and appropriate
expression and mechanics.

To achieve these goals, the course places considerable emphasis upon the relationship between
reading and writing, the development and evaluation of information and ideas through research,
the genres of analysis and argumentation, and the use of multiple technologies for research and
writing.

Learning Outcomes

Reading
 Use reading strategies in order to identify, analyze, evaluate, and respond to arguments,
rhetorical elements, and genre conventions in college-level texts and other media.
Writing
 Compose persuasive academic genres, including argument and analysis, using rhetorical
and genre awareness.
 Use a flexible writing process that includes brainstorming/inventing ideas, planning,
drafting, giving and receiving feedback, revising, editing, and publishing.
Researching
 Use a flexible research process to find, evaluate, and use information from secondary
sources to support and formulate new ideas and arguments.
Reflecting
 Use written reflection to plan, monitor, and evaluate one’s own learning and writing.

The final project for this course is going to be a reflective essay turned in alongside a
portfolio which will contain your work from throughout the semester. Even though
technically the final a concern for the end of the semester, you may not want to be like Aaron
Burr and “wait for it (wait for it)” because the texts you will be asked to reflect on are the
writings you’ll be doing throughout the term.

Look in your WSU email for a folder shared with you (its name is your WSU ID) in
OneDrive. There, you’ll collect, store, and compile various writing projects from ENG 1020.
Take a look at what Professor Adrienne Jankens has to say about how the Wayne State
English Department values, and expects you to use, this portfolio tool by watching this
insanely helpful video!

Sometimes, I will ask you to submit assignments directly to your portfolio, but this is your
space, and you should use it in a way that paints a full picture of who you are as a writer
while you grow this semester in ENG 1020.
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Required Materials

o From Inquiry to Academic Writing: A Practical Guide - Stuart Greene & April Lindisky,
Macmillian, 2018. Note: this is a special edition of the textbook and you must purchase or
rent the text from the WSU Bookstore.
o Regular & Reliable access to Canvas & WSU email.
o a notebook or journal

Assignments

This course will feature 5 major projects along with less formal writing for in-class activities and
homework

1. Rhetorical Analysis & Synthesis Project (5 pages)


2. Critical Narratives Project (5-8 pages)
3. Researched Argument Project (6-8 pages)
4. Infographic Project (multimodal)
5. Reflective Letter Project (and portfolio) (4-6 pages)

During the semester we will do a variety of assignments that are specifically organized by format,
deadline, and means of submission. It is crucial to your success in the course that you carefully
review submission instructions in class and on Canvas. Submission guidelines are non-
negotiable. Submitting any type of assignment incorrectly will be cause for losing points on
assignments (this includes technical difficulties). If you are having difficulties with the printers,
Canvas, your WSU email, or anything else that would prevent you from submitting assignments
correctly and in a timely manner, contact me and the necessary people to solve your issue to
avoid losing credit for your work. Utilize the technology that is available to you as a student at
WSU, which includes access to Microsoft Word – as a general rule, all assignments should be
submitted as .doc, .docx, or .pdf – unless otherwise indicated. Finally, in-class assignments
cannot be made up no matter what – but some can be done during class time from home.

Please use MLA format for citations when necessary. Typed assignments must be double-spaced
in 12pt Times New Roman, with standard one-inch margins. Printed assignments must have page
numbers inserted in the top right corner of the page and need to be stapled. Individual
assignments will indicate their submission modes but in general rough drafts of major projects are
hard copy and final drafts of major projects are submitted digitally to Canvas.

Readings for Class:

When you have a reading assignment, you are responsible for the content. This means you must
prepare for class by reading (or listening) carefully and annotating the text. Take notes in a
journal, in the margins, in your cell phone; summarize the gist of the reading, raise questions that
talk back to the reading, and be ready to voice your opinions and ideas in class. The only
“wrong” answer is silence during a discussion. Spend time thinking about what you read so that
your contributions can be substantial. “I liked it,” “it was boring, or “omg Prof, this is garbage
why did you make us read/watch/listen to this?” are not substantial responses, valid as they may
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be. If a reading confuses/disgusts/upsets/annoys/[negative verb of your choosing] you, come talk


to me about it during office hours. With that being said, I will be sure to make content warnings
(CW) available for all of the texts we encounter in class.

Contact & (In)formality:

My office is located on the tenth floor of the Maccabee Building on the corner of Warren &
Woodward (5057 Woodward). I’m right around the corner form the elevators. The best way to
reach me when I’m not in the office will always be my WSU email, please feel free to send
questions & comments at any hour and I will respond as fast as I can; I do not respond to Canvas
Messenger. Additionally, if you have a very quick question you may reach out to me via Twitter!

While I hope class feels like an informal and communal space, email is not a casual space. I will
delete emails that are vulgar, vague, and unprofessional. Treat email as a mode of clear and
formal communication. Before emailing be sure check Canvas and the course syllabus – you
may find the answer to the question faster that way.

A good rule to live by in any kind of communication is to offer solutions, not problems!

My Attendance & Participation Policy:

Attendance is mandatory. This should not be a lecture class; workshops and discussions both
depend on your active presence and participation. Trust me, trust the process, and be in the chair.
But also, be awake. I’ll almost always have coffee while I’m teaching: you may have coffee (or
any kind of non-disruptive energy-bearing snack) while you’re learning. Let’s be together and be
active.

Daily absences will impact your running grade and the work you miss during those class days.
Your final grade is subject to change based on participation and attendance; if you are absent
more than four times you should not expect to receive an A in this course. For example, if you
have excellent attendance you will likely benefit from a rounded grade on a project, but if your
participation is poor, may see a lower grade.

Most simply put: college is very expensive and this course is part of that investment. Spend your
money wisely. The parking lot & traffic is never an acceptable excuse and if you arrive more than
10 minutes late, you will be considered absent. With all that being said, I am aware that life
happens: Communicate with me, I’m flexible, but I can’t be flexible if you’re not in touch. To
paraphrase Hamilton, you must be in the room where it happens (the room where it happens).

University Attendance Policy (2017–2018 Undergraduate Bulletin): Whenever attendance


forms a basis for a portion or all of a course grade, students must be provided with explicit
written information concerning that fact during the first week of classes. Such information shall
be specific with regard to the penalty incurred for each absence and the means, if any, to
compensate for the absence. It should be recognized that there may be certain situations where the
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student may not be permitted to make up the absence(s).

Tentative Course Schedule

note on the schedule, assignments, the syllabus, and Canvas: if there is a disagreement between Canvas &
the syllabus when there is a disagreement between Canvas and the syllabus Canvas deadlines are always
correct. When in doubt, shoot me an email before something is due and we can be flexible.

Tuesday’s Thursday’s
For Next Time For Next Time
(FNT): (FNT):
8/30 Read:
Introduction to class, From Inquiry to
syllabus, textbook, Academic Writing
Canvas. pgs xix – 19; also
read from Ch 13 250-
260 (but do not read
the sample essays
included in those
pages)

Do:
You: The Writing
Writer on Canvas.
9/4 Read: 9/6 Read:
Discussing the Backpacks v Discuss argument, FIAW 265-270
rhetorical triangle, Briefcases by Carroll Backpacks v (Logos), FIAW 260-
ethos, “argument” – PDF on Canvas. Briefcases, rhetorical 265 (pathos). 270-
situation. 275 (logical
Do: fallacies).
Freewrite: Backpacks
vs Briefcases Do:
Celebrity Beefs &
Their Rhetorical
Situations
9/11 Do: 9/13 Skim:
Discuss Celebrity Memo: Ethos, bring Peer review Memo: FIAW ch 8.
Beefs two printed copies to Ethos.
class on Thursday. Do:
Project One begins. Discuss pathos & Memos: Pathos &
logos further. Logos (due on
Canvas).
9/18 Work on: 9/20 Due:
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Discuss Project One Project One: No class, come to my Project One:


Final Synthesis Synthesis & office either during Synthesis &
Rhetorical Analysis class time or office Rhetorical Analysis
hours to discuss due 9/25
progress of project
one.
9/25 Read: 9/27 Do:
Begin Project Two. “How to Tame a Discuss Anzaldua, Start working on your
Wild Tongue” by ethos. Critical Narrative.
Read “Shitty First Gloria Anzaldua Prepare for Critical Rough Draft due
Drafts” & Freewrite. Narratives. 10/2, please bring
Do: two printed copies
(note: this essay can Establishing Our Freewrite: What Do I to class.
be found on Canvas, Own Sense of Ethos Care About? (In-class
but I will distribute Discussion board, writing).
printed copies in “Wild Tongue”
class). response.
10/2 Do: 10/4
Peer Review of Peer Review No class meeting,
Critical Narratives Response optional office
Rough Draft, please (due by end of 10/4). conferences, not-
bring two printed optional come pick
copies to class. up your rough
drafts.
10/9 Read: 10/11 Do:
Critical Narrative FIAW ch5 pgs 34-50. Discuss Inquiry Research Awareness
Final Draft due. Questions, Research Project due 10/18
Do: Awareness Project.
Discuss inquiry, Inquiry Questions
research, questions. discussion board on
Canvas, Chapter 5
Support Thread.
10/16 Do: Research 10/18 Do:
Open conferences in Awareness Project. Look at R.A. Research to Persuade
classroom – projects, begin on Canvas.
attendance optional. Project 3.

Good opportunity to
workshop ideas for
Research Awareness
Project.
10/23 Do: 10/25 Do:
Shark Tank Day! Annotated Continue discussing Rough Drafts for
Bibliography. and working on Project Three
Project Three.
10/30 Do: 11/1 Do:
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Bring three printed Continue working on Discuss various types Reflective Writer
copies of your your rough drafts. of claims, arguments Freewrite on Canvas.
Project Three as you begin to form
Rough Drafts. Read: your own. Read:
FIAW Ch 9 (pgs 112- “Revising by Reading
Peer Review. 138). Aloud” by Peter
Elbow on Canvas
11/6 Do: 11/8 Do:
Discussion and free Project Three Second Bring two printed Kinds of Visual
write on Peter Rough Draft. copies of your Rhetorics on Canvas
Elbow’s “Revising by Project Three
Reading Aloud” Second Rough “Read”:
Draft. Kathy Schrock’s
Guide to Everything.
Peer Review.
11/13 Do: 11/15 Work on:
Discuss Project 3B. Infographics. Present Infographics. Project 3A with the
feedback and
experience of 3B
supporting your
understanding of your
argument and your
research.
11/20 Project 3A due by 11/22
No Class for 11:59p.m. Thanksgiving
Thanksgiving! Wednesday, 11/20
11/27 Read: 11/29 Do:
In-class: FIAW Ch 6 (pgs 51- Discuss Reflection. Project 4 Rough
(Hopefully) Less 62) Draft
Shitty Rough Drafts
Freewrite Do:
Ch 6 Support Thread
12/4 Do: 12/6 Work on:
(Jay Z’s birthday) Nothing, try to relax, Freestyle rap battle, Project 4 final
Peer Review. finals will be fine, I group hug, possible project.
promise. awards ceremony,
Bring two printed potluck, etc, etc.
copies of rough
drafts.
12/11 12/13
Study Day Final Project due by
11:59 p.m.
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Grading Distribution & Scale

There are five grading categories, each worth 20% of your final grade.

This will be easier to see on Canvas, but essentially:


 Projects 1, 2, & 3 pretty much contain the final results of those project areas
 Project 4, which focuses on using reflection as a writing tool includes rough drafts for the
other major projects, and assignments which specifically ask you to reflect, revise, or
think of writing-as-a-verb.
 Assignments, participation, and project builders include everything else, including
attendance.

Grade Scale:
A 100 – 94% B 86 – 84% C 76 – 74%
A- 93 – 90% B- 84 – 80% C- 73 – 70%
B+ 89 – 87% C+ 79 – 77% D 69 – 60%

In general, grades on any type of assignment are final. However, if you believe I should consider
adjusting a grade I am happy to discuss grades and assignments in my office only – for these meetings you
should bring your assignment with you and should be prepared to demonstrate specifically why the grade
should be adjusted. I would recommend not bringing up grades in the classroom as to protect your
privacy.

Note: an 89.9% is still a B. I won’t consider rounding any grade unless a student has perfect attendance.
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Academic Integrity

1. Don’t plagiarize. This course has been designed to give you the opportunity to share your voice
& your perspective. This includes copying your own work from pervious courses. Do not throw
away your shot.
2. I invented the change the font on the punctuation marks to be larger trick. Don’t try to play me
like that. That’s cheating. If When I catch it, you’ll take a zero on that assignment.
3. I consider it a display of poor Academic Integrity to disrespect members of our classroom
community by either using hate speech, or other demeaning and/or violent language that might
make our classroom an unsafe space. However, the line for respect shouldn’t be drawn at don’t-
use-hate-speech; be attentive, be untethered from your devices, and be politely engaged.

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Policy on Plagiarism (2018– 2019 Undergraduate Bulletin):
The principle of honesty is recognized as fundamental to a scholarly community. Students are expected
to honor this principle and instructors are expected to take appropriate action when instances of academic
dishonesty are discovered. An instructor, on discovering such an instance, may give a failing grade on the
assignment or for the course. The instructor has the responsibility of notifying the student of the alleged
violation and the action being taken. Both the student and the instructor are entitled to academic due
process in all such cases. Acts of dishonesty may lead to suspension or exclusion.

Board of Governors’ extended definition of Academic Misbehavior to include reuse of work (Office
of the Provost, April 17, 2018).

Academic misbehavior…includes…unauthorized reuse of work product…, which means submission for


academic credit, without the prior permission of the instructor, of substantial work product previously
submitted for credit in another course.

Warrior Writing, Research, and Technology (WRT) Zone

The WRT Zone is a one stop resource center for writing, research, and technology. The WRT
Zone provides individual tutoring consultations, research assistance from librarians, and
technology consultations, all free of charge for graduate and undergraduate students at WSU.
Tutoring sessions are run by undergraduate and graduate tutors and can last up to 50 minutes.
Tutors can work with writing from all disciplines.

The WRT Zone (2nd floor, UGL) provides individual tutoring consultations, research assistance
from librarians, and technology consultants, all free of charge for graduate and undergraduate
students at WSU. The WRT Zone serves as a resource for writers, researchers, and students’
technology projects. Tutoring sessions focus on a range of activities in the writing process –
considering the audience, analyzing the assignment or genre, brainstorming, researching, writing
drafts, revising, editing, and preparing documentation. The WRT Zone is not an editing or
proofreading service; rather, tutors work collaboratively with students to support them in
developing relevant skills and knowledge, from developing an idea to editing for grammar and
mechanics. Research and technology support is offered on a first-come-first served basis and
covers research strategies, assessment of sources, general technology support, and help with
Adobe Dreamweaver, Encore, Flash, Illustrator, Photoshop, and more. To make a face-to-face or
online appointment, consult the Writing Center website: http://www.clas.wayne.edu/writing/
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Extra Credit:

I do not offer extra credit on final grades; however, you may be able to improve a grade on a
major writing assignment by visiting the writing center during the drafting process. In order to
receive this extra credit, you most show documentation of your writing center visit. Ask the
consultant to send me a report from the visit or send me a picture of the assignment you workshop
in the writing center with the WRT Zone stamp.

WSU Undergraduate Bulletin Description

Cr 3. Prereq: placement through ACT score, English Qualifying Examination, or passing grade in
ENG 1010. A course in reading, research, and writing skills that prepares students to write
successfully in college classes.

Course Placement for ENG 1020

Students are placed into ENG 1020 by different means (see the ENG 1010-1020 Placement Rules
handout at <http://testing.wayne.edu//EPR.pdf>). Most students are placed via ACT scores:
students with an ACT English score of 21 or above are placed into ENG 1020. Students can also
be placed into ENG 1020 via the English Qualifying Examination (see the EQE Information
handout at <http://testing.wayne.edu/app/testinfo.cfm?eid=TEEQE>).
Students also may enroll in ENG 1020 if they received an S grade in ENG 1010.

General Education Designation

With a grade of C or better, ENG 1020 fulfills the General Education Basic Composition (BC)
graduation requirement. Successful completion of Basic Composition is a prerequisite to
enrolling in courses that fulfill the General Education IC (Intermediate Composition) requirement
for graduation (e.g., ENG 3010, 3020, 3050, Literature & Writing courses).

Last day for Add/Drop: September 12; last day to withdraw: November 12

“Completing a SMART Check at the Welcome Center is mandatory if you are intending to
withdraw from a class. Withdrawals can seriously impact your financial aid and progress toward
degree completion. Consider carefully before making the decision to withdraw from this course.
The attached document describes resources for helping you with this decision.”

University Policy: The mark of I—Incomplete, is given to an undergraduate student when he/she
has not completed all of the course work as planned for the term and when there is, in the
judgment of the instructor, a reasonable probability that the student can complete the course
successfully without again attending regular class sessions. The student should be passing at
the time the grade of ‘I’ is given. A written contract specifying the work to be completed should
be signed by the student and instructor. Responsibility for completing all course work rests with
the student (2017-2018 WSU Undergraduate Bulletin).

Student Disability Services


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Students who may need an accommodation based on the impact of a disability should contact the
instructor privately to discuss specific needs. Additionally, the Student Disabilities Services
Office coordinates reasonable accommodations for students with documented disabilities. The
office is located in 1600 David Adamany Undergraduate Library and can be reached by phone at
313-577-1851. Please consult the SDS website for further
information: http://studentdisability.wayne.edu.

Counseling & Psychological Services 

CAPS provides many free and confidential services to Wayne State students, including but not
limited to: individual therapy, couples therapy, support groups, crisis intervention, and
workshops. If you are feeling overwhelmed, or simply need someone to talk to, CAPS is a great
resource. The CAPS office is located on the 5th floor of the Student Center building. CAPS
also offers support 24 hours a day through their crisis hotline, which can be reached at
313.577.9982. For more information, please visit: http://caps.wayne.edu/.

WSU Resources for Students


 Student Disability Services (SDS) http://studentdisability.wayne.edu/
 Academic Success Center (ASC) http://www.success.wayne.edu/
 Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) http://www.caps.wayne.edu
 Dean of Students’ Office (DOSO) http://www.doso.wayne.edu
 Office of Military and Veterans Academic Excellence (OMVAE) http://omvae.wayne.edu
 Department of English website http://clas.wayne.edu/English/
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ENG 3010-12: Intermediate Writing


State Hall 0029 10:00 a.m. – 11:15 p.m.
Wayne State University
Winter 2019

Instructor: DeGenaro, Anthony (Tony) Office: 10402 (5057 Woodward)


E-mail: anthony.degenaro@wayne.edu Office Hours: Tuesday 12:00 – 1:00
Twitter: @InstructorDee Preferred Pronouns: He/Him

Department of English Description

Building on students’ diverse skills, ENG 3010 prepares students for reading, research,
and writing in the disciplines and professions, particularly for Writing Intensive courses
in the majors. To do so, it asks students to consider how research and writing are
fundamentally shaped by the disciplinary and professional communities using them.
Students analyze the kinds of texts, evidence, and writing conventions used in their own
disciplinary or professional communities and consider how these items differ across
communities. Thus students achieve key composition objectives: 1.) learn how the goals
and expectations of specific communities shape texts and their functions; 2.) learn how
writing constructs knowledge in the disciplines and professions; and 3.) develop a
sustained research project that analyzes or undertakes writing in a discipline or
profession.

To achieve these goals, the course places considerable emphasis on analytical and critical
reading and writing as well as the development of research skills. It typically requires
genres like the research proposal, literature review, research presentation, and researched
argument and the use of varied technologies for research and writing. ENG 3010 follows
a Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) approach teaching Composition at the
intermediate level. WAC approaches guide students to investigate writing in their fields
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and to develop a holistic awareness of communicative practices in their disciplinary


discourse communities. In order to develop this awareness, ENG 3010 leads students to
identify and analyze commonly used genres, writing conventions, and audience
expectations in their disciplines. Then, based on this work, students develop a research
proposal designed for readers in their own disciplines. Through group work, class
discussions, and peer review, students consider how texts, research, and writing practices
in their disciplines compare to those of other disciplines.

Learning Outcomes
Reading
Analyze genres from the student’s discipline or profession, including their associated
discourse community, audience(s), rhetorical situations, purposes, and strategies.

Writing
Use a flexible writing process and varied technologies to produce texts that address the
expectations of the student’s disciplinary or professional discourse community in terms of
claims, evidence, organization, format, style, rhetorical situation, strategies, and effects by
drawing on an explicit understanding of the genre(s) being composed.

Researching
Write research genres, use research methods, and conduct primary and secondary research to
produce an extended research project relevant to the student's discipline or profession.

Reflecting
Use reflective writing to describe developing knowledge about writing (especially writing in
one’s discipline or profession) and about oneself as a writer (including one’s ability to plan,
monitor, and evaluate one’s writing process and texts).

Required Materials

o Miller-Cochran, Susan K., and Rochelle L. Rodrigo. The Wadsworth Guide to


Research: Wayne State Edition. Boston, MA: Wadsworth Cengage Learning,
2015. ISBN: 9781305757899 Note: this is a special edition of the textbook and
you must purchase or rent the text from the WSU Bookstore.
o Regular & Reliable access to Canvas & WSU email.
o a notebook or journal

Assignments

Students are required to write 32 pages or more (approx. 8,000-9,000 words) in ENG
3010 (NOT) including drafts and informal writing). However, reading responses, student-
generated primary research artifacts, and other formalized “minor” assignments may
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count toward this goal. This course will feature a minimum of 4 major projects along
with 1 multimodal presentation and less formal writing for in-class activities and
homework. Students are required to submit at least 1 formal project that is between 10-15
pages in length, not including any associated requirements for works cited and/or
reflective writing.

The major projects for the course are intended to scaffold together, building upon
students’ emerging writing capacities, discourse community awareness, familiarity with a
central research focus, and a body of written content. Taken together, these emerging
competencies and artifacts should lead students to develop a longer, higher-stakes project
which not only models an effective process for research and writing in their
professional/disciplinary discourse communities, but also resembles an important genre
of that community (the formal research proposal).

1. Personal Research Guide


2. Genre Analysis
3. Research Proposal with Literature Review
4. Field-Based Research
5. Reflective Letter

Form & Formatting:


In general assignments ask you to type in 12pt Times New Roman (or a similar serif
font) with standard one inch margins and double-spacing. Be sure your name, date, and
course/section number appear at the top of the front page.

When an assignment asks to be submitted via paper, that means you must print the
appropriate number of copies prior to meeting for class, and if documents are more than
one page, staple your work. I would recommend not relying on accessing a printer within
the few precious minutes prior to class. Come to campus early if you are not able to print
at home or print the night prior.

When an assignment asks to be submitted via Canvas, be careful to observe the


submission guidelines. Sometimes assignments are meant to be uploaded and submitted,
in this instance, you may upload word documents in only .doc or .docx format. I’m
happy to show you how to convert Mac Pages documents into Word format, or download
Google Doc(uments) into Word format. What I will not do is accept .Pages or Doc
shares. That’s a zero, and a replacement will be considered late.

Sometimes, assignments on Canvas will occur on Discussion boards. In these instances


be sure to carefully follow the specific directions of the discussion board itself, but in
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general, you’ll input your response directly into the message thread. My advice is to type
this in a separate document and then cut-and-paste into Canvas, as Canvas has been
known to eat work.

As always, be sure to carefully read the assignment texts – that will always be your best
guide.

Google Docs & Google Drive


You may not submit assignments via Google Docs or Google Drive unless an assignment
specifically asks for this mode. There are two reasons for this: first, if you do not
adequately allow permissions for me to access your work, I’ll have to pester you to see
your work – and trust me – I email enough. The second reason is because of the open
editing feature of Google Doc. You can send me the link, and continue editing, which is
a great writing practice but untenable for submitting assignments that have hard
deadlines. To be perfectly honest, when I get a notification or an email sharing a Google
Doc with me, I usually just delete it. Be sure to deliver your good work in a format that
makes it possible for me to read and enjoy your good work!

Readings for Class:

An enormous part of the work this semester is in reading and often entire class sessions
will be devoted to interacting with texts you’ll read for homework. I feel very strongly
about not doing things like reading quizzes or needless homework assignments (in
addition to the countless labors you encounter as students and human beings) which
means there is an extra demand to do “good” reading. What can happen is: you can take
notes in the margins of the book, or print out & highlight (or do digitally – who knows
about those fancy computers!?) PDFs, write up discussion questions or keep a reading
journal, text your friends about it, call somebody and summarize the reading, make notes
on your cell phone, or really anything it takes to be prepared to discuss the main ideas of
the texts you read.

What you can’t do is come to class the next day and not have anything to say about the
reading

My Attendance & Participation Policy:

Good news/bad news: this is a class that relies heavily on participation, discussion, and
presentation. This is bad news because I recognize how difficult it can be to put yourself
out there, to share ideas in a new and unsteady space, and really, I imagine I’m the only
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person in the room actively excited about being a doofus in front of the room (which is
fine).

The good news is: we’re together a community of learners. It is our job to collaborate,
discuss, and problem solve towards the goals of this course. When class asks you to
contribute, it isn’t to make you look stupid, rather, this course is designed to invite and
encourage your contribution and your authorship in the class. Let me run that back to
you differently: like Alexander Hamilton in Hamilton, this is your shot. Don’t throw
away your shot.

Attendance is mandatory. This should not be a lecture class; workshops and discussions
both depend on your active presence and participation. Trust me, trust the process, and
be in the chair. But also, be awake. I’ll almost always have coffee while I’m teaching:
you may have coffee (or any kind of non-disruptive energy-bearing snack) while you’re
learning. Let’s be together and be active.

Daily absences will impact your running grade and the work you miss during those class
days. Your final grade is subject to change based on participation and attendance; if you
are absent more than four times you should not expect to receive an A in this course. For
example, if you have excellent attendance you will likely benefit from a rounded grade
on a project, but if your participation is poor, may see a lower grade.

Let me make something clear: I am fully aware you are in other classes. You might also
have a job, you might have a family, a significant other, personal interests, social lives, a
novel you are working on, a devoted Twitch following, sports, clubs, academic and non-
academic commitments. I know that, I respect that. I’ll do everything I’m capable of
doing to be transparently aware of that; hopefully, you’ll extend me a similar courtesy.
To me, this means two things that can (must?) exist simultaneously:
1. You, your interests, and your commitments deeply and completely matter.
2. This class, its workload, and intellectual tasks deeply and completely matter.
I’ll remember as I’m giving assignments to never needlessly burden you extra work, and
in return I simply ask that you treat this required course with the same level of serious
attentiveness as the other courses you are enrolled in. It may not be obvious now, but this
course will be one of the most useful learning experiences for your academic, personal,
and professional live.
I would never tell you not to use a cell phone, tablet, or laptop during class; if those
devices are useful to you, by all means, learn and participate in ways best for you. I do
expect, regardless of your choice to use these devices, that you are fully engaged in this
course during this course. Don’t be working on your lab report during a discussion, or
studying for a psych exam during a free write. I won’t act like this class is more
important than those, please don’t act like this class is worth less. If you are caught doing
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other work in class, you’ll be marked absent. Being here means a lot more than being
here.

Most simply put: college is very expensive and this course is part of that investment.
Spend your money wisely. The parking lot & traffic is never an acceptable excuse and if
you arrive more than 10 minutes late, you will be considered absent. With all that being
said, I am aware that life happens: Communicate with me, I’m flexible, but I can’t be
flexible if you’re not in touch. To paraphrase Hamilton, you must be in the room where
it happens (the room where it happens).

University Attendance Policy (2017–2018 Undergraduate Bulletin): Whenever


attendance forms a basis for a portion or all of a course grade, students must be provided
with explicit written information concerning that fact during the first week of classes.
Such information shall be specific with regard to the penalty incurred for each absence
and the means, if any, to compensate for the absence. It should be recognized that there
may be certain situations where the student may not be permitted to make up the
absence(s).

Last day for Add/Drop: for Winter 2019, January 18. Last day to withdraw (no tuition
refund): for Winter 2019, January 18.

Contact & (In)formality:

My office is located on the tenth floor of the Maccabee Building on the corner of Warren
& Woodward (5057 Woodward). I’m right around the corner form the elevators. The
best way to reach me when I’m not in the office will always be my WSU email, please
feel free to send questions & comments at any hour and I will respond as fast as I can; I
do not respond to Canvas Messenger. Additionally, if you have a very quick question
you may reach out to me via Twitter!
While I hope class feels like an informal and communal space, email is not a casual
space. I will delete emails that are vulgar, vague, and unprofessional. Treat email as
a mode of clear and formal communication. Before emailing be sure check Canvas and
the course syllabus – you may find the answer to the question faster that way.

A good rule to live by in any kind of communication is to offer solutions, not problems!

Tentative Course Schedule


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note on the schedule, assignments, the syllabus, and Canvas: if there is a disagreement between
Canvas & the syllabus when there is a disagreement between Canvas and the syllabus Canvas
deadlines are always correct. When in doubt, shoot me an email before something is due and
we can be flexible.

Tuesday For Next Time: Thursday For Next Time:


1/8 Read: 1/10 Read:
Freewrite: Reflective Thonney, “Teaching Discuss Readings, WG chapter 4
“Field” Work. the Conventions of attempt to build a
Academic Writing” working class Porter, “Intertextuality
Introductions to class, definition of and the Discourse
Project One; go over Wardle, “Identity, “Discourse Community”
syllabus. Authority, and learning Community”
to Write in New Do:
Workplaces” Have Wadsworth Reading Response #2
Guide (WSU Edition)
Do: with you in class
Reflective “Field” today.
Work if you didn’t
finish in class. RSQ: Wadsworth
Guide (WG) chapter 1,
Reading Response #1 chapter 4 (p69-70).
1/15 Read: 1/17 Do:
Freewrite: Prescriptive WG 5 Primary and Secondary Finish Primary &
“Field” Work Research Process – Secondary Research
Do: Brainstorming and (by Saturday)
Discuss Porter, WG 4. Prescriptive “Field” work session.
Work Interview Reflection

1/22 Do: 1/24 Read:


In-class reading: Rough Draft of Web Web Content Peer Harris, “The Idea of
Principles of Good Content Review – please bring Community”
Web Design two printed copies of
your rough drafts. Do:
Work on building Reading Response #3
websites. Work session.
1/29 Read: 1/31 Project One Due
Begin Project Two. WG 6 Studio Workshop with Sunday, Feb 3.
your discourse
RSQ: Miller, “Genre as Survey 2-3 peer community articles.
Social Action” reviewed journal
articles in your
discourse community

Do:
Reading Response #4

Print 1 of your peer


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reviewed journal
articles for class.
2/5 Do: 2/7
Writing session: Project Do:
Two Rough Draft Project Two Rough Annotated
Draft Bibliography A
2/12 Read: 2/14 Read:
Project Two Rough Emig: “Writing as a Discuss Emig essay, WG 7
Draft Peer Review, Mode of Learning” annotated
please bring two bibliographies. Do:
printed copies to class. Do: Reading Response #5;
Annotated Annotated
Discuss and workshop Bibliography A Bibliography B
Cornell Annotations.

In—class research
session.

2/19 Read: 2/21 Read:


Look at Creswell in Bazerman: Discuss Bazerman, WG 3;
class, discuss Literary “Relationship between group-led discussion WG pgs155-161
Reviews. Reading and Writing” questions.
Feb 22:
Do: In-class writing time. Project Two Final
Collaborate on Draft Due.
discussion questions.
2/26 Do: 2/28 Do:
Discuss WG readings; Literature Review & Lit Review Peer Commit to Oral
Work on Reading Proposal Rough Draft Review, please bring Presentations for P3
Response #6 in class / two printed copies to Final via email before
collaboratively. class. 3/5.
Discuss writing process

Freewrite: Reading
Response #6

In-class work session.


3/5 3/7 Project Three Finals
In-class writing day & Project Three Final: due no later than 3/12
optional draft Oral Presentations. (you may turn in
conferences. sooner).
3/12 3/14 3/15
week 9 ½ Spring Break Prof D’s wedding
Spring Break No classes
No classes

Project Three Final:


Lit Review &
Proposal due no later
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than Tuesday, 3/12 by


midnight.
3/19 (RE)Read: 3/21 Read:
Introduction to Project WG 5 (specially about Discuss WG 5 Wardle: Enculturation
Four: Field-Based interpretation of data (data/coding); in-class
Research. and analysis of data; coding exercise. Do:
101-111). Wardle Response
Work on tracking down
a field professional.
3/26 Read: 3/28
Discuss Wardle; begin Finish Beaufort: “The Discuss the Five
looking at Beaufort. Question of Writing”; Knowledge Domains;
Bawarshi: “Rethinking Guidelines for
Writing Instruction” Analyzing Genres.

Do: In-class writing &


Reading Response #8 development time.
4/2 Do: 4/4
No class meeting: Written Draft of Project In-class writing time.
optional conferences. Four due
Project Four Written
Draft Due.
4/9 4/11
Project Four Project Four
Presentations Presentations wrap-up;
Discuss: Course Final
Reflection
4/16 Final Reflection due 4/18 Exams: April 24-30
In-class writing: by the end of class on [stretch day]
Final Reflection 4/18; if you have I’m available to hang
submitted it prior to out, play cards, offer
class, you do not have last bits of feedback on
to come to class! your Final Reflection,
discuss the finer merits
of the film Twister, and
mostly, congratulate
you on an excellent
semester.

Attendance not
mandatory!

Grading Distribution & Scale

Grade Scale:
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A 100 – 94% B 86 – 84% C 76 – 74%


A- 93 – 90% B- 84 – 80% C- 73 – 70%
B+ 89 – 87% C+ 79 – 77% D 69 – 60%

In general, grades on any type of assignment are final. However, if you believe I should consider
adjusting a grade I am happy to discuss grades and assignments in my office only – for these
meetings you should bring your assignment with you and should be prepared to demonstrate
specifically why the grade should be adjusted. I would recommend not bringing up grades in the
classroom as to protect your privacy.

Note: an 89.9% is still a B. I won’t consider rounding any grade unless a student has perfect
attendance.

Academic Integrity

4. Don’t plagiarize. This course has been designed to give you the opportunity to share
your voice & your perspective. This includes copying your own work from pervious
courses. Do not throw away your shot.
5. I invented the change the font on the punctuation marks to be larger trick. Don’t try to
play me like that. That’s cheating. If When I catch it, you’ll take a zero on that
assignment.
6. I consider it a display of poor Academic Integrity to disrespect members of our classroom
community by either using hate speech, or other demeaning and/or violent language that
might make our classroom an unsafe space. However, the line for respect shouldn’t be
drawn at don’t-use-hate-speech; be attentive, be untethered from your devices, and be
politely engaged.

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Policy on Plagiarism (2018– 2019 Undergraduate
Bulletin):
Instructors MUST describe their penalties and policies for cases of plagiarism—e.g., failing
grade for the assignment; failing grade for the course; report to the English Department, the
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the University Student Conduct Officer; etc. The
English Department adheres to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences policy on
plagiarism:

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Policy on Plagiarism (2018– 2019 Undergraduate
Bulletin): The principle of honesty is recognized as fundamental to a scholarly community.
Students are expected to honor this principle and instructors are expected to take appropriate
action when instances of academic dishonesty are discovered. An instructor, on discovering
such an instance, may give a failing grade on the assignment or for the course. The
instructor has the responsibility of notifying the student of the alleged violation and the
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action being taken. Both the student and the instructor are entitled to academic due process
in all such cases. Acts of dishonesty may lead to suspension or exclusion.

Board of Governors’ extended definition of Academic Misbehavior to include reuse of work


(Office of the Provost, April 17, 2018)
Academic misbehavior…includes…unauthorized reuse of work product…, which means
submission for academic credit, without the prior permission of the instructor, of substantial
work product previously submitted for credit in another course.

Board of Governors’ extended definition of Academic Misbehavior to include reuse of


work (Office of the Provost, April 17, 2018).

Academic misbehavior…includes…unauthorized reuse of work product…, which means


submission for academic credit, without the prior permission of the instructor, of
substantial work product previously submitted for credit in another course.

Warrior Writing, Research, and Technology (WRT) Zone

The WRT Zone is a one stop resource center for writing, research, and technology. The
WRT Zone provides individual tutoring consultations, research assistance from
librarians, and technology consultations, all free of charge for graduate and
undergraduate students at WSU. Tutoring sessions are run by undergraduate and
graduate tutors and can last up to 50 minutes. Tutors can work with writing from all
disciplines.

The WRT Zone (2nd floor, UGL) provides individual tutoring consultations, research
assistance from librarians, and technology consultants, all free of charge for graduate and
undergraduate students at WSU. The WRT Zone serves as a resource for writers,
researchers, and students’ technology projects. Tutoring sessions focus on a range of
activities in the writing process – considering the audience, analyzing the assignment or
genre, brainstorming, researching, writing drafts, revising, editing, and preparing
documentation. The WRT Zone is not an editing or proofreading service; rather, tutors
work collaboratively with students to support them in developing relevant skills and
knowledge, from developing an idea to editing for grammar and mechanics. Research and
technology support is offered on a first-come-first served basis and covers research
strategies, assessment of sources, general technology support, and help with Adobe
Dreamweaver, Encore, Flash, Illustrator, Photoshop, and more. To make a face-to-face or
online appointment, consult the Writing Center website:
http://www.clas.wayne.edu/writing/

Extra Credit:

I do not offer extra credit on final grades; however, you may be able to improve a grade
on a major writing assignment by visiting the writing center during the drafting process.
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In order to receive this extra credit, you most show documentation of your writing center
visit. Ask the consultant to send me a report from the visit or send me a picture of the
assignment you workshop in the writing center with the WRT Zone stamp.

WSU Undergraduate Bulletin Description

Cr 3. Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 (or equivalent course) in reading, research
and writing for upper-level students. Emphasis on conducting research by drawing from
the sciences, social sciences, humanities, and professions in preparation for Writing
Intensive courses in the majors.

Course Placement for ENG 3010

To enroll in ENG 3010, students must have completed their WSU Basic Composition
(BC) requirement (ENG 1020 or equiv.) with a grade of C or better. Students who have
not completed this requirement will be asked to drop the course.

General Education Designation

With a grade of C or better, ENG 3010 fulfills the General Education IC (Intermediate
Composition) graduation requirement. Successful completion of an IC course with a
grade of C or better is a prerequisite to enrolling in courses that fulfill the General
Education WI graduation requirement (Writing Intensive Course in the Major).

More information on the General Education requirements is available from the


Undergraduate Programs office: http://advising.wayne.edu/curr/gnd1.php

University Policy: The mark of I—Incomplete, is given to an undergraduate student


when he/she has not completed all of the course work as planned for the term and when
there is, in the judgment of the instructor, a reasonable probability that the student can
complete the course successfully without again attending regular class sessions. The
student should be passing at the time the grade of ‘I’ is given. A written contract
specifying the work to be completed should be signed by the student and instructor.
Responsibility for completing all course work rests with the student (2017-2018 WSU
Undergraduate Bulletin).

Student Disability Services

Students who may need an accommodation based on the impact of a disability should
contact the instructor privately to discuss specific needs. Additionally, the Student
Disabilities Services Office coordinates reasonable accommodations for students with
documented disabilities. The office is located in 1600 David Adamany Undergraduate
24

Library and can be reached by phone at 313-577-1851. Please consult the SDS website
for further information: http://studentdisability.wayne.edu.

Counseling & Psychological Services 

CAPS provides many free and confidential services to Wayne State students, including
but not limited to: individual therapy, couples therapy, support groups, crisis intervention,
and workshops. If you are feeling overwhelmed, or simply need someone to talk to,
CAPS is a great resource. The CAPS office is located on the 5th floor
of the Student Center building. CAPS also offers support 24 hours a day through their
crisis hotline, which can be reached at 313.577.9982. For more information, please
visit: http://caps.wayne.edu/.

WSU Resources for Students


 Student Disability Services (SDS) http://studentdisability.wayne.edu/
 Academic Success Center (ASC) http://www.success.wayne.edu/
 Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) http://www.caps.wayne.edu
 Dean of Students’ Office (DOSO) http://www.doso.wayne.edu
 Office of Military and Veterans Academic Excellence (OMVAE)
http://omvae.wayne.edu
 Department of English website http://clas.wayne.edu/English/