Sie sind auf Seite 1von 175

Food and Feeding Habits

• Fishes exhibit feeding habits from simple filter feeding to
highly predatory life
• The feeding habits of fishes are assessed by:
1. Field observations
2. Analysis of gut contents
3. Laboratory experiments
 
Categories of food
 
• Phytoplankton­e.g. diatoms, dinoflagellates
• Zooplankton­e.g. copepods, crustacean larvae, other
microscopic invertebrates.
• Nekton­e.g. fishes, shrimps, cuttlefishes and squids.
• Benthos­e.g. annelid worms, bivalves, gastropods.
• Detritus­particulate or suspended dead organic material
associated with rich microbial flora
Classification of food based on its importance
 

• Main or basic food
• Occasional or secondary food
• Incidental food
• Emergency or obligatory food
Dependence on food type

• Euryphagic – Mixed diet
• Stenophagic – Narrow range of food
• Monophagic – Single food item
Fish Food Preferences
1. Herbivorous : i.e. Labeo fimbriatus, L. rohita,
Ctenopharyngodon  idella
2. Detritivorous : i.e. Labeo calbasu, Mugil cephalus
3. Omnivorous : i.e. Etroplus suratensis, Cyprinus carpio,
Tor putitora
4. Planktivorous : i.e. catla ­ zooplankton feeder, silver
carp ­ phytoplankton feeder
5. Carnivorous : i.e.Wallago attu, Mystus singhala
 
 
The carnivorous fishes further classified as
 
•        Insectivorous  ­  i.e. Trout
•        Carcinovorous  ­   i .e. Black bass
•        Malacovorous ­  i.e. Black carp
•        Piscivorous  ­   i.e. Barracuda
•        Larvivorous  ­   i.e. Gambusia affinis
•        Cannibalistic  ­  i.e. Lates calcarifer
Based on their Position in Water Column

• Surface feeders
• Mid­water or column feeder
• Bottom feeders
Major Fish Feeding Types
1. Predators
• Feed on macroscopic animals.
•  Teeth for grasping and holding to seize their prey
organism firmly.
• Have large mouth, reduced gill rakers, large stomach
and short intestine.
2. Grazers
•  Grazing fishes take their food by bites on a
     large spread of food organisms.
     i.e. Butterfly fishes (Chaetodontidae) and Parrot fishes
(Sparidae)
3. Food strainers
•  Sieve water to get the food material
•  The gill rackers are numerous, elongated and closely
set in
• They filter large volume of water to obtain small sized
planktonic organisms
4. Food suckers
• Fishes swallow their food by sucking the desired food or
food containing material
            e.g. sturgeon.
 
5. Parasitic feeding
•  Specialized mode of feeding and fishes are no
exception to this highly evolved feeding habit
• Feed on the body fluids of the host fish.
            e.g. lampreys
Feeding Adaptations in Fishes
Lips
 
• The fishes which take large piece of food at a time do
not have modified lips (all carnivorous fishes).
• Suctorial feeders (suckers) have an inferior mouth and
fleshy lips.
• Suctorial feeders also have barbels around the mouth.
The sensory organs present in these barbels help in
locating the food
 Mouth
 
• The grazers and suctorial feeders have adaptations on
other mouth parts.
• The trumpet fishes (Aulostomidae), the cornet fishes
(Fistulariidae) and the pipe fishes (Syngnathidae) as
well as many butterfly fishes (Chaetodontidae) of coral
reefs have mouth that resembles elongated beak.
 
 Teeth
• In bony fishes, there are three sets of teeth in jaws,
mouth and pharynx.
 
• Predatory fishes have teeth like modifications on the
inner surface of the pharyngeal arch e.g. northern pike
(Esox lucius).
 
• Teeth in jaw are canine (fang like), incisor (frontline
cutting), molariform (grinding with flattened surface),
cardiform (short, fine and pointed arising from a pad),
and villiform (elongated teeth that resembles the
intestinal villi)
 
• Predators such as barracuda, ribbon fishes, silver bar
have pointed teeth which help in grasping, puncturing
and holding the prey.
 
•  Skates (Rajidae) have grinding (Molariform) teeth in oral
or pharyngeal cavities.
 
• Razor like cutting teeth (Incisors) are seen in predacious
fishes like piranha of the Amazon and barracuda of
warm seas.
 
• Teeth are absent in plankton feeders .
 Gill Rackers
• The gill rackers are specialized in relation to food and
feeding habits.
 
• In plankton feeders, gill rackers are numerous,
elongated and closely set in for straining the water
efficiently.
 
• Predatory fishes­gill rackers are reduced or absent.
 Digestive track
   It exhibit various modifications in relation to feeding
habits.
 Oesophagus
   Highly distensible muscular tube.
Stomach
• It shows various modifications especially with respect to
shape.
• In piscivorous fishes, the stomach is typically quite
elongate e.g. gars and barracuda
 
• In omnivorous species, the stomach is sac like.
• Stomach is modified into grinding organ like a gizzard e.
g. mullets, sturgeons, gizzard shads.
• The stomach is highly distensible, as in Bombay duck.
•  A remarkable modification of stomach exists in the
puffers (Tetraodontidae) and porcupine fishes
(Diodontidae) which inflate it with water or air to assume
an almost globular shape.
•  True stomach is not seen in all the fishes
 
Intestine
     It   is shorter in carnivores and much elongated and
arranged in many fold in herbivores (very long and
highly coiled in rohu and mrigal) while the omnivores
show an intermediate condition
 
Stimuli for Feeding
 
• Internal motivation or drive ­ season, time of day, light
intensity, time and nature of last feeding, temperature
and any other internal rhythms that may exist.
 
• Food stimuli perceived by the senses like smell, taste,
sight and the lateral line system that release and control
the momentary feeding act.
 
• The interaction of these two groups of factors
determines when, what and how a fish will feed
 
Detection of Food in Fishes
 
Night feeders
• Detecting the food by smell and taste e.g. catfishes
 
Sight feeder
• Feed intensely will be more during day.
• In surface feeders like minnows, eyes are oriented
upwards above the mid lateral line.
Selection of food
 
• The final selection takes place in the mouth and
pharynx especially in bottom dwelling fishes.
 
• Selection is made by various sensory structures situated
in mouth, tongue, gill rackers, epibranchial organs, and
tissue surrounding the pharynx.
 
•  The gill rackers, pharyngeal teeth, bristles and
epibranchial organ serve as mechanical structures in
retaining or rejecting the food
How Much Food, Fishes Feed On?
 
• Herbivores fish feed on large quantity e.g. grass carp.
 
• The carnivores fish feed on animal matter which is rich
in nutrients; hence take a small meal.
 
Fish Feeding Periodicity in
Fishes
 
Season
• Feeding periodicity is related to water temperature and
metabolic rate.
• Annual cycle of temperature variation is more
pronounced in temperate waters, where feeding
frequency is more in summer.
 
Migratory cycle and reproductive activity
• Fishes which undertake migration for breeding eat
intensively and accumulate reserve food material.
Amount of food consumed daily
• It depends mainly on the quantity of food and size of
fish.
 
Quantity of food
 
• In tropical waters, temperature and metabolic rate being
higher the food requirement is also higher.
• The fishes living in temperate waters feed on small
quantity of food as the temperature and metabolic
activity are also lower e.g. salmon.
 
Size of fish
 
• Small fishes consume more food .
    For example, small fishes which weigh about 2­5 grams
consume 6­10% of their body weight per day, whereas
bigger fishes which weigh about 30 gm or more feed on
2­3% of their body weight per day.
• During spawning season, most of the fishes stop
feeding due to the enlargement of gonads.
Food and Feeding Habits of
Fin Fishes in Indian Water
Indian Oil Sardine (Sardinella longiceps)
• It is predominantly a phytoplankton feeder­Fragillaria
oceanica, Coscinodiscus, Thallassiothrix and
Pleurosigma.
• They may also feed on copepods, dinoflagellates,
ostracods, larval prawn, larval bivalves, fish eggs.
 
Lesser sardines
•  It feed on a variety of phytoplankton and zooplankton.
 
Anchovies
•   It feed on phytoplankton, and zooplankton.
Mackerel
• Mackerels are plankton feeders, feeding to a greater
extent on zooplankton and to a lesser extent on the
phytoplankton.
•  Adults feed on larval shrimps and fish.
Tuna
• Tunas are carnivores and the major food items include
crustaceans cephalopods (juveniles and adults), eggs,
larvae and juveniles of small fishes.
 
Carangid fishes
• It feed mostly on fishes like anchovies, sardines, silver
bellies,’squids, cuttlefishes shrimps and crabs. The
young ones feed mostly on prawns, squids and
anchovies.
 
 Ribbon fishes (Trichiurus lepturus)
• All the ribbon fish species are highly carnivorous,
predatory and voracious feeders.
• They prefer small and medium sized fishes and shrimps.
 
Bombay­Duck (Harpadon nehereus)
• It is a carnivorous fish
 
Silver belly
• mainly zooplankton feeders.
 
Sciaenids
• They are carnivores and active predators.
 
Lizard fishes
• The young ones feed chiefly crustaceans like lucifer,
acetes, mysis and fishes such as anchovies and silver
bellies.
 
Adult
• Adult feed on crustaceans such as copepods.
 
Pomfrets
• Young ones feed on copepods, ostracods, amphipods,
larval stages of squilla, lucifer .
• Adult feed on crustaceans such as copepods (Oithona
spp., Euterpina spp., and Eucalanus spp.), copepod
nauplii, ostracods, amphipods, lucifer and zoea larvae.
They also feed on larger crustaceans, polychaetes,
larval decapods, foraminiferans,
Goatfishes
• Goatfishes are carnivores.
• They feed almost exclusively on crustaceans, especially
penaeid shrimps, crabs and small fishes.
 
Perches
     predatory fishes, mainly feeding on other fishes and
invertebrates such as crabs, prawns, stomatopods etc.
 
Flatfishes
• In general, the food items of flatfishes include benthic
invertebrates, fishes and cephalopods.
 
Elasmobranches
 
• Elasmobranches are carnivores and predaceous in
nature, with the exception of Rhincodon typus (Whale
Shark) which is mainly a zooplankton (filter) feeder.
• Sharks mainly feed on pelagic teleosts such as sardine,
mackerel, bombay duck etc. and cephalopods (squid,
octopus, and cuttlefish).
•  Skates and rays mostly feed on benthic organisms.
 
Food and Feeding Habits of
Shell Fishes in Indian Water
 
Penaeid Shrimps
 
• Penaeid shrimps are mostly omnivorous, feeding at the
muddy bottom.
• Their post­larvae and juveniles feed on detritus but sub­
adult prawns prefer polychaetes, bivalves, gastropods,
benthic copepods, ostracods, amphipods and
foraminifers.
• The adults of larger penaeids become predaceous and
feed on cephalopods and smaller species of prawns
and fishes.
 
Non­penaeid shrimps
       Feeds on detritus
 
Marine crabs
 
• Crabs feed mainly on smaller crustaceans, fishes,
molluscs, polychaetes, detritus, bits of plant and other
organic materials.
 
Lobsters
 
• Lobsters generally prefer mussel and clam.
Occasionally, they eat smaller crustaceans, polychaetes,
fishes while scavenging.
 
 
 
 
Cephalopods
 
• The cephalopods are generally carnivorous and their
food consists of teleost fishes, crustaceans and other
cephalopods.
• Cannibalism is common among cephalopods. Feeding
intensity decreases during the spawning season
 
Age and Growth in Fishes
 
• Increase in body size as a function of age.
 
• In natural water bodies, age and growth studies are
essential to understand the age structure of a
population from which mortality rate is estimated.
 
• Growth in fishes can be determined by counting
annual or daily rings that are formed on hard parts
such as scales, otolith, vertebrae etc.
 
• The annular rings are formed due to seasonal
variations in temperature and availability of food in
the environment.
 
• Another direct method of recording growth is by
tagging and recapture, but it is expensive and
recovery of tagged fishes is meager
 
Growth model
 
• The von Bertalanffy growth function (VBGF) is
expressed as:
             Lt= L (1­ e­k (t­ t0))
• Where, ‘L’ is the maximum size that could be
attained by a fish; it is also termed as asymptotic
length.
• ‘K’ is a growth coefficient at which fish attains the
maximum length and
•  ‘to‘ is a hypothetical age at which length of a fish is 
zero and ‘t’ is time to reach the length Lt.
Methods of Age Determination
using Hard Parts
 
Scales
• For age and growth study, 3­4 scales from the region
between dorsal fin and lateral line are removed.
• Lateral scale radius and the distance between the focus
and annuli are measured for a relationship between
scale radius and fish length.
 
Opercular bones
     The opercular length O­A, the annuli O­A1, O­A2, O­A3,
….O­An are measured and regression analysis of
opercular length and fish length is carried out
 
Vertebrae
• Vertebrae lying below the dorsal fin has to be studied.
• Study large number of vertebrae for the clarity of
rings   before actually using the vertebra for age
determination.
 
Frontal bones
• Growth rings are observed under reflected polarized
light against dark back ground.
 
Cleithra
• These can be viewed under stereoscopic binocular
microscope.
 
 
Otoliths
• Sagitta, lapillus and asteriscus are the three otolith
present in the membranous labyrinth of fish on each
side.
• Of these, sagitta is the largest and often used in age
determination.
Methods of Age Determination
using Length Frequency
Method
 
Basic Principle
 
• Length frequency distribution tend to group themselves
around a central value called mode and the progression
of modes through successive intervals of time indicates
the pattern of growth.
 
 
Collection and processing of Length Frequency Data
   
• Samples for length frequency should be collected at
random from the commercial catches as soon as they
are landed.
• Sampling should be done before sorting into various
market size groups.
• Length data should be collected separately for
different gears and for different mesh types of the
same gear.
• Sexes should be treated separately.
• Total length or fork length or standard length should
be taken depending on the convenience.
• The data should be recorded in mm or cm in a
primary register.
 
• It is better to take the length frequency data for a period
of two years (24 months).
• Individual lengths are grouped into appropriate size
classes which should not normally exceed twenty five.
• The weekly data may be pooled on a monthly basis.
• The data thus pooled must be drawn in the form of
frequency polygons or histograms for each month.
• Progression of modes is traced through successive
months.
 
Integrated method (Pauly, 1983)
 
• A growth curve is drawn with a curved ruler directly
upon the length frequency samples sequentially
arranged in time.
This method is based on the following tenets
• Growth in fishes is at first rapid, then decreases
smoothly and for the population as a whole is best
approximated by a long continuous curve rather than
by several short straight segments.
• A single, smooth growth curve to represent the
average growth of the fishes of a given stock.
 
• The growth patterns repeat themselves from year to
year
• The intervals on the time axis proportional to the time
elapsed between the sampling dates.
• The original data must be plotted at least twice or
more along the time axis, which allows for longer,
stabilized growth curves to be drawn and all relevant
age groups should be included in one single line.
• The various growth curves should have the same
shape, and vary only as to their origin.
 
 
 
 
• The scale of the ordinate (length) should start at zero,
thus allowing to identify the approximate spawning
periods.
• The more peaks a curve connects the more likely to
depict the actual growth of a population.
• The modal lengths corresponding to various ages
(starting from an arbitrary age) can be read off the
curve at regular time intervals, and may be then used
to determine the growth parameters.
 
 
Reproduction in Fishes
• Reproduction is a fundamental biological process which
enables continuation of species.
• In fisheries biology, reproduction assumes greater
significance to understand sexual dimorphism, process
of maturation, size or age of maturity, breeding season,
spawning area, sexual segregation, migration, fecundity,
embryonic, larval development and recruitment.
 
Types of reproduction
• In fishes, generally the sexes are separate exhibiting
bisexual reproduction, but sometimes they are
hermaphrodites and rarely parthenogenesis is seen.
• In bisexual reproduction, sperms and eggs are
produced in male and female sex organs called testis
and ovaries respectively.
• In hermaphrodites, both the sex organs are in a single
individual and may develop simultaneously; such fishes
are called synchronous hermaphrodites.
• e.g. Polynemus heptadactylus.
• Development of male gonads before female gonads
(protandrous hermaphrodites e.g. Sparus spp.)
• Development of female gonads before male gonads
(protogynous hermaphrodites e.g. Grouper).
• Development of young ones without fertilization. e.g.
Parthenogenesis.
• sperm serves only one of its two functions, that of
inciting or triggering the egg to develop.
• It does not take any part in heredity.
• The resultant young ones are always females
(gynogenesis) e.g. Poeilia formosa
Male reproductive organ (Testis)
   
• It consists of a pair of testes which lies ventral to the
kidneys.
• The testes are free anteriorly but posteriorly they
continue as sperm ducts which open into urinogenital
papillae.
• The spermatogonia undergo a number of maturation
stages to develop motile sperms. This process is called
spermatogenesis.
• In the space between the seminiferous tubules there are
interstitial cells called Leydig cells, which are endocrine
in function and produce male sex hormones called
testosterone.
 
Female reproductive organ (Ovary)
 

• A pair of elongated sac like structures found in the
abdominal cavity just ventral to the kidney which are
called ovaries.
• The ovaries are free anteriorly but each ovary
continues posteriorly as oviduct.
• Two oviducts fuse and open exteriorly by a genital
aperture.
 
 
• The wall of the ovary consists of three layers.
• Peritoneum (outermost thin covering layer).
• Tunica albuginea (made up of connective
tissue, muscle fibres and blood capillaries).
• Germinal epithelium.
 
• The germ cells in the germinal epithelium are called
oogonia which undergo a number of maturation
stages to become a ripe ovum
Breeding
• It refers to successive stages of courtship, mating
and spawning.
Courtship
• It is the heterosexual reproductive communication
system which ultimately leads to mating.
Mating
• It refers to the sexual act itself in which at least one
male and one female come close together and
release their gametes more or less simultaneously
into the surrounding media (external fertilization) or
by the transfer of sperm from male into female
(internal fertilization).
 
 
Spawning
It is the process of release of gametes
• Oviparous
• Viviparous.
Fertilization
 
External fertilization
• Eggs and from female and milt (liquid containing sperm)
from male are released simultaneously to the exterior
environment where they meet each other for fertilization.
Internal fertilization
• Sperms are deposited into the reproductive organ of the
female where fertilization takes place. In case of internal
fertilization following three things are usually found
 
Spawning Stages
Pre­spawning
• Different stages of development of gonad (Testis and
Ovary) takes place.
Spawning
• Release of sperms and eggs occurs.
Post spawning
• Recovery stage where maturation of gonads begins
again from the initial stage
 
 
Sexual Characters in Fishes
Monomorphism
• No external characters to distinguish the sexes
• e.g. sardine, seer fish, carangids, etc.
Sexual dimorphism
• It is possible to determine the sex from their external
body features.
Permanent dimorphism
• Distinguished after the onset of sexual maturity.
• e.g.: fighter fish (Betta splendeus).
Temporary dimorphism
• Distinguished only during the spawning season.
• e.g. common carp (Cyprinus carpio)
 
 
Sexual Polymorphism
 
• Sexes distinguished by more than one character.
• e.g: Salmon.
Primary characters
• Males – testis and ducts
• Female – ovaries and ducts ­ found out by dissecting
the fish.
Secondary characters
• It have no relation with reproductive process but
serve as additional structures for spawning.
• e.g: Claspers, Gonopodium, Papillae etc.
 
 
 
Body shape
• Females heavier and larger ­ because of the ovaries.
Genital papillae
• Small tube in cloacal aperture ­ distinguishes male
from females.
• e.g. darters, lampreys etc.
• Pearl organ (Nuptial tubercles)
• Horny short structures seen on the snout, cheek
(head region) only in males.
• e.g. common carp, minnows.
• Fins
• Fins are larger in males than the female and
• In males, fins are rough and grainy in nature
• e.g. Indian major carps.
 
Coloration
• Most male fishes are brightly coloured.
• e.g. Parrot fishes
Accessory sexual characters
• Modification of anal fin to an organ called
gonopodium in males.
• e.g. Guppies
Pelvic fins
• The pelvic fins are modified into claspers in males.
• e.g. Sharks
• Female accessory sexual characteristic is seen in the
form of egg laying tube or ovipositor.
• e.g. Asiatic lump sucker
 
Head characters
• Males develop knob like hook and is called leype,
seen at the tip of both the jaws.
• e.g. Salmons
 
Size
• Deep sea male angler fish parasitic on the body of
female.
 
Sexual dimorphism is least pronounced in case of fishes
which don’t exhibit parental care
 
Matura on and Spawning
• ‘Maturation’ ­ cyclic, morphological changes which the
male and female gonads undergo to attain full growth
and ripeness.
• “Spawning” ­ release of male and female gametes from
the body of fish.
• “Breeding” ­ all these events along with their
prespawning and spawning phases.
• The breeding season ­ time of peak maturity ­ spawning
occurs in a population.
Maturity stages
• ‘Maturity stages’ is unique ­ accepted meaning in
Fisheries Biology. 
•  As a measure to observe the degree of ripeness of the
ovaries and testes of a fish.
• The term first maturity ­ spawning for the first time. 
• Cycle of maturity of gonads ­ and observe them with
large number of samples at weekly intervals. 
Five scale Maturity stage description 
Females
• Immature
• Ovary small, firm, no eggs visible.
• Maturing virgin or resting 
• Ovary  more  extended,  firm,  small 
oocytes  visible.
Developing
•  Ovary large, starting to swell the body cavity.
•  Colour varies according to species.
Gravid:
Large, filling or swelling the body cavity,  large ova flows when
gently pressed or cut
Spent:
Ovary shrunken,  few residual eggs and many small ova.
 
 
Males:
• Immature: Testis small, translucent, whitish
• Developing or resting:
     Testis white, flat, convoluted, easily visible to the 
      naked eye, about ¼ length of the body cavity.
• Developed:
Testis large, white, no milt produced when pressed or cut 
Ripe:
Testis large, opalescent white, drops of milt produced when 
pressed or cut 
Spent:
Testis shrunk, flabby, dirty white in colour.
 
Fecundity
Fecundity

• Fecundity depends on
• Absolute numbers of eggs produced
• Immature eggs present
• Fixatives and preservatives used
• Formalin
• Modified Gilson’s Fluid
 
Gravimetric method

• Based on weighing and counting of eggs
• Random samples of about 500 eggs are counted and
weighed
• Total number of eggs in an ovary calculated from the
equation F = nG/g
where F = Fecundity;
n= number of eggs in the subsample;
G=total weight of the ovary;
g = weight of the subsample.
Volumetric method

• Cleaned eggs are put in a measuring cylinder made up
to a known volume with water
• Subsample of known volume is again drawn with a
pipette
• Number of eggs in the subsample is counted
• Fecundity is calculated from the equation F = nV/v
• Where, n = number of eggs in the subsample
• V = volume which contain all the total eggs
• v = volume of the subsample
 
Automatic egg counter

Advantage
• Error in any sub­sampling technique is avoided
Disadvantage
• Slowness of this machine
 
Sex Ratio
 

• Expected sex ratio is 1:1 in the nature
• Sex ratio is calculated in the following equation
x2 = ∑ (O – E)2 / E
Where, O – Observed value
E – Expected value
 
Parental Caring Fishes
Parental Caring Fishes

• Guard their eggs and young ones.
• Produce only very few numbers of eggs.
• Exhibit territorial behaviour.
• Elaborate courtship behaviour.
• Guarders are divided into 2 types
Substratum Spawners
• 4 categories depending on the substratum
Lithophils (Rock spawners)
• Spawn on flat rocks
• Males clean the substratum
• Courtship and fertilization, on the clean
substratum
• e.g. gobies and puffer fish
Phytophils (Plant spawners)
• Deposit their eggs on plants. e.g. Cat fishes
 
 
Aerophils (Terrestrial spawners) 
• Deposit their eggs on the underside of the overlying rock or
plant (above the water level)
• Spraying or splashing the water by males over the eggs to
keep the eggs moist.
• e.g. Characin spp.
Pelagophils
• Released in open water
• Eggs are sticky
• Eggs are always found in clusters
• Parental care is exhibited by both male and female fish
• Climbing perch
Nest Spawners
Lithophils
• They use gravel; for building nests and guarded by
males
• e.g. cichlids
Phytophils
• Build their nests by using plant material
• e.g. Bowfin.
Psammophils
• Build their nests on sandy bottom.
• e.g. Cichlosoma spp.
 
Aphrophils
• Build their nest by bubbles and froth
• e.g. Siamese fighter and Gourami
Speleophils
• Build their nests in natural or constructed cavities of
burrows.
• e.g. Cat fishes.
 
Burrow Nest Spawners
Polyphils  
• Build their nests with miscellaneous materials.
• e.g. Arowana.
Ariadnophils
• Build their nests by using plant materials, held together by
secretion of kidney, once the fertilization is over, males drive
away the female
• e.g. Stickle backs.
Actinariophils
• Make use of sea anemones.
• Lay their eggs in and around sea anemones to avoid
predation.
• e.g. Amphiprion (clown fish)
 
Bearers
 
External Carriers
Transfer brooders
• Eggs are carried by various means to deposited
elsewhere in a suitable area.
• e.g. Cyprinodontids
Forehead brooders
• After spawning female transfer the eggs on to the
depression or hook like structure on the forehead of
males.
• e.g. Kurtidae
 
 
Mouth brooders
• Carry their eggs in the mouth till the young ones hatch out.
• Young ones move around their parents. If find any danger,
jumps into the mouth of the mother
Skin brooders
• Fertilized eggs are attached on to the skin.
• Once the fertilization is over, Eggs get attached to the
spongy skin of the female.
• e.g. south american cat fish
Pouch brooders
• Deposit the eggs in a cutaneous pouch
• In the case of male sea horse (Hippocampus), females
deposit the fertilized eggs into the pouches of the males.
 
Internal Bearers
Ovi­ovoviviparous  
• Fertilization is internal
• incubation is external
• No nourishment from the parents.
• e.g. sharks and skates
Ovoviviparous
• Fertilization internal
• incubation is also internal without any nutrient supply
from the females
• they get protection
• e.g. many sharks and skates and living fossil fish,
Latimeria chalumnae
 
 
Viviparous
• Fertilization internal
• incubation is internal
• get nutrient supply from females.
• e.g. Carcharinidae and poeciliidae
Developmental Stages of
Finfishes
 
Developmental Stages of Finfishes
 

• Development is a process by which an organism
reaches its adulthood.
• Development in fish is continuous
Embryonic development
 
• Fully ripe egg, a small opening
• Micropyle appears in the shell
• Perivitelline space
• Embryo is bathed during its development.
• After fertilization
• Micropyle is closed
• Temperature
• ph of water
• Greater influence
• Developing embryo
• Embryonic development begins from the moment the
Egg is penetrated by a sperm
• Fertilized egg
• Undergoes segmentation
• It passes from one­celled to many celled stage
• Cleavage
• Fertilized egg
• Divided into smaller cells
• Blastomeres
• A small disc like part (germinal disc) of the egg
• Meroblastic
• Disc of cells thus formed
• Upper or animal pole
• Blastoderm
• Blastomeres
• Having segmentation cavity
• Blastocoels
• Cell of the blastoderm
• Continued to grow over the yolk
• Epiboly
• Gastrula on in fishes
• Forma on of primary rudimentary organs
• Anterior part of the embryo
 
• Various organs
• Formed from the ectoderm, mesoderm and endoderm
• Ectoderm gives rise
• Epidermis
• Brain
• Spinal cord
• Lens of the eye
• Internal ear
• Muscles
• Appendages
• Axial skeleton
 
• Skin, scales
• Mesoderm cells
• Endoderm
• Inner lining of the digestive tract
• Sex cells
• Endocrine glands
• Thyroid
• Ultimobranchial glands
• Derived from endoderm cells
• embryonic phase
• It ends in hatching
Larval development
 
• Larval phase begins once the embryo is free
• Becomes increasingly fish like
• Rely on its yolk or mother for nutrition
• Yolk sac is absorbed
• The larva should develop the ability to capture food
organisms.
• Carnivorous taking mainly zooplankton
• Larval fish
• Using its stored yolk
• Called prelarva
• Yolk sac fry
• After absorption of the yolk
• It is called post larva (advanced fry). Larval development
continues until
• Reaches the fingerling stage
• Resembles the adult
 
Fish Eggs
General characteristics of eggs
 
S.No. Pelagic eggs Demersal eggs  
1.     Eggs are small in size Eggs are bigger in size
2.     Eggs laid singly Eggs are laid in mass
3.     Small yolk content More yolk content
4.     Prolonged developmental Developmental period is
period short
5.     Egg membrane thin and Egg membrane thick
smooth
6.     Fecundity is more Fecundity is less
7.     No parental care Mostly with parental care
General characteristics of eggs
 
S.No. Pelagic eggs Demersal eggs  
6.     Fecundity is more Fecundity is less
7.     No parental care Mostly with parental care
8.     The eggs are transparent The eggs are opaque
  e.g. Sardina pilchardus e.g. Anguilla sp.
Solea solea Synodus indicus
Gadus morhua Clupea harengus
Identification keys of isolated pelagic fish eggs
 

• Single oil globule
• Non­smooth egg membrane (Ilisha elongata)
• Wide perivitelline space (Japanese sardine)
• Narrow perivitelline space (Carangidae)
• Non­oil globule
• Non­smooth egg membrane (Synodontidae)
• Wide perivitelline space (Anguilliformes)
• Narrow perivitelline space (Engraulidae)
• Multi­oil globules
• Non­smooth egg membrane (Soleidae)
• Wide perivitelline space (Anguilliformes)
• Narrow perivitelline space (Cynoglossidae)
 
Fish Larvae
Characters used for the identification
• Yolk shape  
• Position of oil globule
• Anterior
• Posterior
• Scattered
• concentrated in yolk
• Number of myomeres
• Color
• Thickness
• Sculpture
• Appendage
 
 
• Position of anus
• Anterior
• Half Body
• Posterior
• Fin Fold
• Origin of Position
• Wide
• Narrow
• Sculpture
• Melanophores
• Location
• Form
Diagnostic features applicable to different groups of
fish larvae
1.   Short oval body   Balistidae
2.     Short depressed body Pegasidae
3.   Crest on nape Leiognathidae
4.   Barbel on lower jaw Exocoetidae
5.   Elongated tentacle on operculum Champsodontidae
6.   Bony ridge over eyes Carangidae
7.   Protruded snout Exocoetidae
8.  Pelvic fins abdominal Soft rayed fishes
9.    Single short dorsal fin Engraulidae
10. Single long dorsal fin Carangidae
11. Two dorsal fins Mugilidae
12. Pectorals enlarged Exocoetidae
13. Ventral fins absent Tetradontidae
14. Elongated fin rays on dorsal Soleidae
15. No spines on operculum Labridae
16. Spines on operculum Scombridae
17. Elongated spines on the Acanthuridae
dorsal and ventrals
  Alimentary canal  
18.   Bulged or sac like Clupeidae
19. Long and straight Cynoglossidae
20. Short and coiled Majority of Perciform fishes
  Anal opening  
21. At middle of body Bothidae
22. Behind middle of body Mugilidae
23. Far backwards Synodontidae.
24. Far forwards Blennidae
  Pigmentation  
25. Dense Holcentridae
26. Partial Mullidae
27. Blotches, spots Apogonidae
  Myotomes  
28.   Vertebrae Less than 24 Balistidae
29.   30­40 Labridae
Larval Forms in Mollusca
Trochophore
• Pear shaped
• Measures about 0.5 mm in length
• Circle of preoral cilia
• Prototroch or velum divides the body into two unequal
parts
• Upper one consist of prostomium
• Lower part bearing mouth and anus
• Preoral part is large and convex
• Near the apical cilia
• Two ciliated elevations each consisting of a single cell
• Bearing a bunch of cilia called telotroch
 
• Comprises mouth
• Stomodaeum
• Oesophagus
• Stomach
• Intestine (mesenteron)
• Statiolith sacs appear
• Sides of the mouth
Veliger

• preoral ciliate area
• velum begin to protrude on both sides as a bilobed flap
• very delicate
• anterior end of the larva
• provided with eyes
• Tentacles
• larva has a shell
• Alimentary canal is complete
• anus is shifted to anterior side
• foot usually bearing an operculum
• larval heart and kidney present
• situated at the anterior end of the body immediately
behind the velum
• Statocyst and gill­rudiments present
• long cilia of the velum function
• Locomotion
• suspension feeding
 
Glochidium

• Glochidium larva enclosed by two valves
• Each edge of which bears a hook
• Shell valves cover a larval mantle
• Bears four groups of sensory bristles
• Rudimentary foot is present
• Attached a long adhesive thread
• Byssal thread
• Neither mouth nor anus
• Measures from 0.1 mm to 0.5mm
Developmental Stages in
Cephalopoda
Developmental Stages in Cephalopoda

• Egg is usually very large
• Contains a great quan ty of nutri ve yolk
• Like sharks
• Rep les
• Birds
• Belongs to the telolecithal meroblas c type
• Enclosed in a capsule
• Number of such capsules
• Cemented together to form strings
Ontogeny of Sepia
 

• One blastoderm grows very slowly
• After long time
• Embryo are quite recognisable
• Two germinal layers lies
• Centre of the germinal disc or animal pole is placed
dorsally
• Mass of nutritive yolk lies ventrally.
 
1st Stage
 
• Centre of the germinal disc
• An oval­rhombic bulging
• Rudiment
• Visceral dome
• Mantle
• Rudiment of the eye appears
• Rudiment of the funnel cartilage, forms close to its outer side.
• Part of the ridge lying in front of this prominence becomes
• Muscle
• Runs from the funnel to the nuchal cartilage
 
• posterior part
• paired rudiment of the funnel itself
• Between the two rudiments
• rudiments of the gills
• pit in the centre of the rudiment
• a shell gland
 
2nd Stage
 

• Rudiments just described
• Becomes more prominently
• First indications of the head is seen
• Embryo becomes covered with cilia
• Extreme anterior end the mouth appears in the middle
line
• Forming the opening of the oesophagus, which begins
to sink inwards.
 
3rd Stage
 

• Whole embryo has become
• Arched dorsally
• Posterior edge of the rudiment of the visceral dome
• Mantle fold has grown
• Partly covers the rudiments of the gills
• Proctodaeum has formed by invagination, and its
aperture, the anus could be seen
• Rudiment of the fifth pair of arms appears.
 
4th Stage
 

• Free mantle edge all round its base
• Whole embryo projects more distinctly from the yolk
• Rudiments of the arms shift near to one another
 
5th Stage
 

• Arms shift still nearer to one another (i.e. towards the
axis of the embryo)
• Embryo is seen from the dorsal side
• Recognizable as young Sepia
• Free edges of the rudiments of the funnel fuse and
move to a position within the mantle cavity.
 
 
6th Stage
 

• Rudiments of the head and arms have now assumed
• Typical position to form the "head”
• Embryo is now altogether distinct from the yolk
• The sac becomes smaller
• When the embryo is hatched out
• Size of the yolk­sac is only one­third of the young
animal.
 
Early Development in Shrimps
EGGS
• Eggs opaque  
• Narrow perivitelline space
• Chorion has a purplish sheen
• Diameter ­ 0.25 to 0.27 mm
• Yolk mass ­ 0.22 to 0.24 mm
• First cleavage began at 00.15 hours
• Second cleavage at 00.30 hours blastula stage was
observed at 01.30 hours
 
• Gastrulation at 02.15 hours
• all the 3 naupliar appendages could be seen at 07.45
hours
• 3 appendages were fully formed with long setae at
13.00 hours .
• Furcal setae first pierced the egg membrane and
nauplius wriggled out of the egg 16 to 17 hours after the
eggs were spawned.
 
NAUPLIUS I
 

• Ocellus present at anterior median region of body
• Dorsal surface of body bears posteriorly a small median
denticle
• A pair of dorsally curved caudal setae present at
posterior end of body
• 3 pairs of appendages present
• Duration of this substage was 4 to 4 hours.
 
NAUPLIUS 11
 

• No change in number of setae on A1
• Outer terminal and outer lateral setae distinctly smaller
than in Nauplius I
• Exopod of A2 with an additional rudimentary seta on
outer distal margin
• This bifurcate condition is retained in later naupliar
substages
• Duration of this substage is 3 to 4 hours.
 
NAUPLIUS III
 
• No appreciable increase in body measurements
• Duration of this substage is 6 to 8 hours.
 
NAUPLIUS IV
 
• Duration of this substage is 3 to 4 hours.
 
NAUPLIUS V
 
• Duration of this substage was 10 to 12 hours.
 
NAUPLIUS VI
 
 
• Body more elongated
• Frontal organ
• Carapace clearly demarcated
• Appendages not clearly segmented
• Duration of this substage was 15 to 24 hours.
 
PROTOZOEA I
 

• Carapace anteriorly rounded, with median notch
• Frontal organs present as rounded protuberances
• Ocellus of nauplius persists
• Developing compound eyes covered with carapace
• Body divisible into 3 parts
• Carapace covered anterior region
• 6 segmented thorax in middle
• Posterior unsegmented abdomen
• Newly hatched protozoea with a swelling in anterior part
of the abdomen
• Duration of this substage was 24 to 48 hours.
 
 
PROTOZOEA II
 

• Presence of a well developed curved rostrum
• Bifurcated supraorbital spines
• Stalked compound eyes
• Absence of frontal organs distinguish this substage from
the previous one.
• Duration of this substage was 48 to 72 hours.
 
PROTOZOEA III
 

• Supraorbital spines not bifurcate
• Telson demarcated from 6th abdominal segment by an
articulating joint
• Abdominal segment 1 to 5 with dorsomedian spine on
posterior border
• Duration of this substage was 24 to 36 hours.
 
MYSIS I
 

• Larvae assume more or less a shrimp like appearance in
this stage
• Rostrum long and curved extending beyond eye, devoid
of rostral spines
• Supraorbital prominent
• A small spine present at anteroventral angle of carapace
• Hepatic spine well developed
• Duration of this substage was 48 to 72 hours.
MYSIS II
 

• Presence of a spine on scaphocerite and appearance of
unsegmented pieopod buds
• Distinguish this substage from mysis I.
• Duration of this substage was 24 to 48 hours.
 
MYSIS III
 

• Development of 2 segmented pleopod bud.
• Distinguishes this substage from mysis II.
• Duration of this substage was 24 to 48 hours.
 
POSTLARVA I
 

• Rostrum with 1 or 2 dorsal spines
• Supraorbital
• Hepatic and
• Pterygostomiaspines present
• Duration of this substage was 24 to 30 hours.
 
Group Marking Techniques in
Fishes
Group Marking Techniques in Fishes

• Any procedure or technique that makes fish identifiable
either as an individual or as a member of the batch is
termed as marking.
• Fish marking and tagging programs are vital as fishery
manager’s tools for assessing fish populations.
Purpose of marking and tagging
 

• To study the population parameters such as density,
mortality rate, survival rate, rate of exploitation, rate of
recruitment.
• To study the migratory pattern – direction, speed,
distance, purpose of migration
• To study the return of anadromous and catadromous
fishes to their natal environment and to understand the
parent – stream theory.
• To study the age and growth of fishes.
• To study the survival and growth of transplants.
 
Fin clipping
 
• A part of the fin is cut by using scissors ­ most popular ­
easy to perform and ­ regeneration is uncommon.
• Pelvic fins ­ usually selected for fin clipping.
Disadvantages
• Suitable only for short term marking
• Fin may regenerate
• Chances of getting infected.

Opercular and fin punch
 
• A hole is made in opercular bone or fins using a
punching machine.
 
Branding
 

• Hot or very cold rods are used to brand the fish. It is
done below the dorsal fin or caudal peduncle region.
Hot Branding
• It is done using a heated pencil or electrically heated
wire.
Cold Branding
• It is done using a mixture of ethanol and dry ice or 
acetone and dry ice or liquid nitrogen or solid CO2
 
Tattooing
 
• The pigments are implanted just below the skin by
using a needle or vibrator.

Silver Nitrate marking

• Different shapes of marks can be made on opercular
region using silver nitrate pencils.
 
 
Subcutaneous Injection
 
• Materials are injected just below the skin (subcutaneous
injection) by using a syringe.
Injection with Liquid latex
 
• Coloured latex is injected just below the dorsal fin. This
is useful for transparent bodied fishes.
 
Injection with vital stain
• This is used to study the organogenesis.
 
Injection with fluorescent materials
• Fluorescent material like tetracycline is injected into the
fish body where cephalothorax and the abdominal
region join. This technique is used for invertebrates
(Crustaceans).
 
Elastomer dye marking
 

• The visible fluorescent elastomer implant provides
externally visible, subcutaneous marks. The needles are
inserted below skin on ventral surface of the fish and
elastomer is injected subcutaneously.
 
Individual Internal Marking
Technique in Fishes
Individual Internal Marking Technique in Fishes
 

• Individual organisms are given a separate number or
code to identify them by tagging.
• Tagging is a process of attaching foreign objects bearing
a number or code to the body of the fish to make them
identifiable.
 
Internal Marking Technique
 

• A metal or plastic coded material will be inserted inside
the body and the inserted material can be identified by
X­ray method or by radioactive method or by magnetic
principle.
• Passive integrated transponder tags
• Glass encased electronic transponder tags are inserted
into the peritoneal cavity of fish. Each tag has an
individual code which can be read by a battery­powered
reader held close to fish.
 
Individual External Marking
Technique – I
T – Bar Tags
 
 
• These are numbered plastic tags with a 'T' shaped head.
• These tags are cost effective and popular on fish,
crustacean species.
• T­bar tags are convenient even in some shellfish species
where large numbers of fishes may need to be tagged
in a short space of time and/or holding time is critical for
fish survival.
 
Plastic tipped dart tags
 

• These tags are very popular with recreational fish
tagging programs for a wide variety of species due to
ease of use & lower unit cost of applicators compared to
T­bar tags.
• The large dart tags are used on finfish and sharks with a
size of about 60 cm including tuna, barramundi, tarpon
and king mackerel.
 
Stainless steel head dart tags (SSD)

• These are used for marking large fishes like billfish and
sharks which cannot be easily brought aboard.
• The tag head is specially ground and sharpened to
anchor smoothly in firm tissue or muscle.
 
Body cavity tags
 

• Body cavity internal anchor tags have extremely long
term tag retention. Hence, they can be used for the
estimate of population size or exploitation rate.
•  The tag is designed in such way that the anchor lies
parallel with the inside abdomen wall and the external
marker lies backwards.
Self locking "cinch­up" loop tags
 

• These tags are suitable for certain species in
recreational or aquaculture fish tagging programs,
particularly if user skill in tagging fish is not high.
• These tags are popular for use on macrophytic algae
and are also being tried as a "wrap­around" carapace
and claw tag on crabs and as a band tag on marine
turtles.
 
Individual External Marking
Technique II
Individual External Marking Technique II
 
 
 
Plastic head intra­muscular tags – Game fish tag
 
•These are suitable for tagging large game fish that cannot easily
be brought on board.
•They are not suitable for tagging sharks due to the toughness of
their skin.
 
Polyethylene Streamer Tags
 

• Extremely popular with researchers for a wide variety of
finfish and crustaceans especially shrimp, lobster and
juvenile fish.
 
 
Fingerling tags
 
• Small numbered plastic tags of different colours are
attached to a thread and which is passed through the
body above lateral line on upper portion of caudal
peduncle or through muscle at base of dorsal fin rays
and tied over the top of fish.
 
Disc and Button tags
• These are disc and button shaped tags.
 
Petersen disc tag with wire pin
• These are widely used for finfishes, crustaceans and
molluscs.
 
 
 
Carlin Disc
•  These are larger numbered plastic tags of different
colours with two threads and which is through the
muscle at base of adjacent dorsal fin rays of the fish
using a needle and make a knot on the other side of fish
body to secure tags.
 
Food­safe ruggedized RFID PIT tags
• Completely embedded and encapsulated in surgical
plastic, food grade resin, and acrylic and withstand
extreme temperature, pressure and shock.
• These tags are compatible with most RFID scanners.
• They bond quickly with tissue and do not need
additional coatings to prevent the migration of tag in
fishes.
• They are red in color for easier visibility and retrieval
upon recapture.
Information to be printed on tags
 
• Organization Name
• Organization Address
• Phone Number
• Reward Announcement
• Other Information
• Tag Number
 
 
 
Release information
 
• Species
• Location of tag release
• Date of tag release
• Length
• Weight
• Biological Sample (scales, otoliths)
• Other Information
Recapture information
 
• Species
• Location of tag recapture
• Date of tag return
• Length
• Weight
• Biological Sample (scales, otoliths)
• Recapture gear
• Disposition (harvested, re­released)
• Other Information
 
 
Tagging programme contact information
 
• Program Name
• Contact Person
• Organisation
• Telephone Number
• E­mail
• Street Address
• City/State/Zip/Postal Code
• Fax Number
• Web Site
 
 
Necessary qualities of a tag
 
• Durable; high retention rate; small; visible; cheap; easily
available; should not affect the movement and
behaviour of the fish; harmless to fish.