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Name:

Due Date: on or before 8th March, 2019

CAPE PHYSICS – ASSIGNMENT 2

1. (2011)
a. Define the term ‘specific latent heat of fusion’ of a substance. (1)
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b. A solid of mass 2.0 kg receives heat at the rate of 1.0 x 105 J per minute. Its temperature, T, (in
K) during the first 45 minutes of the experiment is shown on the graph on the next page.
i. What are the values of the melting point and boiling point of the substance? (2)

Melting point: ………………………………………………….

Boiling point: ………………………………………………….

ii. Calculate the gradient of the two linear regions of the graph labeled P and Q. (4)
Gradient P

Gradient Q

iii. State, giving your reasoning, whether the specific heat capacity of the liquid is greater or
smaller than that for the solid state. (2)
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iv. Calculate the specific heat capacity of the substance in the liquid state. (3)

v. Calculate the specific latent heat of fusion of the substance. (3)


Name:
Due Date: on or before 8th March, 2019
Name:
Due Date: on or before 8th March, 2019

2. (2012)
a.
i. Describe how a physical property of a substance which varies with temperature may be
used for the measurement of temperature on an empirical centigrade scale. (2)
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ii. Explain how the absolute thermodynamic scale of temperature differs from that
described above. (2)
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iii. Mercury expands only a small amount when heated. There are many liquids which
expand a great deal more. State ONE reason why mercury is still often used in
thermometers. (2)
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b. A resistance thermometer is placed in a bath of liquid at 0 0C and its resistance is found to


be 3750 Ω. At 100 0C, its resistance is 215 Ω. The bath is cooled until the resistance is 950Ω.
i. Determine the new temperature of the bath, as measured using the resistance
thermometer. (2)

ii. The reading taken at the same time on a mercury-in-glass thermometer placed in the
bath is 76 0C. Suggest ONE reason for the difference between this reading and the value
calculated above in b (i). (1)
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Name:
Due Date: on or before 8th March, 2019

c. Figure 3 shows an electric water heater designed to provide a continuous supply of hot
water. Water is flowing at the rate of 0.300kg min-1, the inlet thermometer registers 20.00C,
the voltmeter reads 120 V and the ammeter reads 10.0 A.
i. Calculate the power developed by the heater. (2)

ii. When a steady state is finally reached, what is the reading on the outlet
thermometer? (2)

iii. State ONE reason why it is not necessary to take into account the heat capacity of
the apparatus itself. (1)
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iv. State the type of thermometer used in this apparatus. (1)


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