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WEDNESDAY, APRIL 14, 2010

EASYLIVING www.gvnews.com GREEN VALLEY NEWS & SUN C1

U.S. monument is at home — in Mexico

By Richard Zidonis next arroyo. But pioneer I


Special to the Green Valley News am not. I understand that the
Wild West is, well, history. The

D
riving south on year is 2010, and I am merely
the interstate, I a snowbird tourist who occa-
pass the Tubac sionally thinks himself to be
exit doing 75 an adventurer.
miles per hour. One would assume, though,
Nogales, on the border, is not that in 1864, almost 150 years
too many minutes away. ago, the phrase “a tourist”

RICHARD ZIDONIS | SPECIAL TO THE GREEN VALLEY NEWS


I try to imagine it’s 1854, could not attach itself to any-
the year the U. S. Senate one giving Southern Arizona a
ratified the Gadsden Treaty. I go. Yet J. Ross Browne uttered
would be on horseback, then, those words.
and Nogales would be a day’s In his book “A Tour Through
ride. Arizona – 1864,” Browne
Put my Blazer 4x4 on a writes that he “should have
forest service road in the risen to the dignity of an origi-
Santa Rita Mountains along nal explorer, instead of ram-
the Santa Cruz Valley, and I bling over the trodden paths of
instantly transform into an the western world as I now do,
Arizona Territory pioneer, a mere every-day tourist, in
expecting a nomadic Apache the footsteps of those giant old OBELISK 122: A piece of American history can be found on the
warrior to rise up from the freebooters.” other southern side of the U.S.-Mexico border.

J. Ross Browne really knows how to territorial acquisition within the conti- on the Southern Arizona border within he “stopped awhile at the boundary line to
hurt a guy. nental United States, was needed to estab- reach of each of us. In 1855, when Emory examine the monument erected by Colonel
But I heal quickly, and despite Browne’s
lish a transcontinental railroad along a departed his Boundary Headquarters at Emory nine years earlier in 1855.” He was
stinging rebuke of my modern sense of ad-
southern route. Ten million dollars later, the Grove of Walnuts — also known as No- referring to boundary monument 26, and
venture, I, we, can still allow our imagina-
the almost 30,000 square miles of present gales, he left behind a pyramid of stones he added that “very little of it remains save
tion to run free, and, as you will read, each
Southern Arizona, along with a sliver of known as boundary monument 26. an unshapely pile of stones.”
of us can still touch the past that touched J.
New Mexico, became the property of the When that “every-day” tourist Browne Unshapely or not, the stones were the
Ross Browne and others like him. USA. passed through the border area, he wrote border, and the border brought men who
Properties come with borders, and bor- first about how pleasant was the boundary were busy being men. The Grove of Wal-
A pile of stones ders need to be surveyed. West Point gradu- area of Southern Arizona with “grass up to
The Gadsden purchase, the last major ate Major William H. Emory left his mark our horses’ shoulders.” He tells us also how SEE MONUMENT, PAGE C4

Is it Alzheimer’s disease or just routine aging process?


By Ellen Sussman Forgetting where you put the car keys, started with a quip: “I’m delighted with the decline in memory, thinking and reasoning
Special to the Green Valley News showing up on the wrong day for an appoint- turnout. You all remembered to come.” skills. The most common form of dementia
ment or not being able to balance the check- “Denial and acceptance are the two biggest is Alzheimer’s disease, which accounts for 70
“The normal adult forgets, remembers book — is it a sign of Alzheimer’s disease, an- hurdles,” she said. “Understanding dementia percent. It’s a progressive degenerative dis-
that she forgot and later may remember other form of dementia or a senior moment makes it easier to cope with.” ease that causes death of nerve cells in the
what she forgot. An Alzheimer’s patient that comes with normal aging? An Alzheimer’s Association pamphlet brain.
forgets, forgets that she has forgotten and Debra Anderson of the Desert Southwest states that memory often changes with aging, “At age 85 and beyond, there’s a 50 percent
couldn’t care less five minutes later.” Chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association spoke but memory loss that disrupts daily life is not
Dr. Dan Blazer, Duke University to an audience of about 75 at Quail Creek and a typical part of aging. Dementia is a slow SEE ALZHEIMER’S, PAGE C4

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