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Chapter 1

INTRODUCTION

Rationale of the Study

Educational tour is your guide to cool hidden and unique things in the world

around you. It is also recognized as important moments in learning, a shared social

experience that provides the opportunity for students to encounter and explore novel

things in an authentic setting. Educational Tour is usually for observation, for learning

and development or to provide students with experiences aside from their daily activities,

such as going in adventure places with the school staff and their classmates. It is

important to prepare the students by developing their visual literacy, and by integrating

the trip actively into their curriculum. Educational tour creates psychological benefits

through giving the students the correct concept and ideas that they can use in their

studies. It also helps the students to discover the other realms of our environment and can

satisfy their need for aesthetic pleasure. Educational tour let the students explore the

beauty of our society. It is vital for students for they will have a chance to view and

explore places like Aliguay Island, Sungkilaw Falls, Silinog Island Beach, Magsaysay

Park, Cogon Eco Tourism Park, Tulwanan Village, Oisca Park.

Educational tour provides an opportunity for the students visiting a new place and

meeting new people. The educational tour in tourism and hospitality education is a useful

education tool for transforming learning experience. It is a great way to bring excitement

and adventure to learning. It is also helpful for the teachers to clarify, establish and to
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relate and coordinate accurate concepts, interpretations and appreciations and enable

them to make learning more concrete, effective, interesting, inspirational, meaningful

experiences. Students will experience a more holistic, integrated picture of the

information that students have learned more things. Students are energized by excitement

going to a destination in terms of educational tour. They have the opportunity to

determine what they learn and how they learn it.

The Commission on Higher Education (CHED) has banned colleges and

universities from carrying out educational tour, following a bus crash that killed 15

people who were on their way to a camping activity. In this moratorium shall continue

and remain in effect until all measures have been undertaken to effectively address the

issues concerning educational tour and stringent procedures supposed to be adopted by

HEIs to ensure the safety and welfare of concerned HEI stakeholders,she added.

Directives on the conduct of school educational tour are outlined in CHED

Memorandum Order No.17,which states that school events must be essential to enhance

the curriculum of the course.

DepEd order (DO) No. 52, series of 2003, addressed to the head of principals of

private and public school’s punitive measures or activities related to the trip, which will

put the students who could not join the trip at a disadvantage, shall imposed. Teachers

must refrain from conducting tests based on these educational tours, but students shall be

given activities in school as substitute for not joining the trip.


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The memorandum also requires schools to hold prior consultation with the

students when there are additional costs involved in educational tours and discuss risk

assessment procedures with parents. Places to visit must be educational, such as cultural

and historical sites, or science exhibits in museums. Trips to malls and attendance at

noon-time TV shows are discouraged. In the view of the financial difficulties of Filipino

families and the monetary costs of the trip, the department issued DepEd Memorandum

No. 529, series of 2009, to reinforce and direct strict compliance to existing policies

against putting additional financial burden on the student’s parents.

Colleges and universities are also required to inform the Commission Higher

Education (CHED) regional office of any outside trip a month before it is held.

Furthermore, the same department order mandated that “no educational tour should be

undertaken without the written consent of the parents of the student’s guardians.” These

educational tours must well-planned ahead of time with the students and safety measures

should be discussed a month before the trip.

This study entitled “Perception of HRM Students’ on the effects of educational

tour to Learning and Development” aims to determine the skills and learning of the

student that has been developed during their educational tour. This research is also

emphasizing the impacts and advantages and upgrading and enhancing the learning of the

students in educational tour.


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Conceptual Framework

This study examines the benefits and the development of the student. The hands-

on activities during educational tour enabled students to recall information about their

learning and behavior. Educational tour also became one of the compulsory activities in

the field of study.

Learning theories are conceptual frameworks describing how knowledge is

absorbed, processed, and retained during learning. Cognitive, emotional, and

environmental influences, as well as prior experience, all play a part in how

understanding, or a world view, is acquired or changed and knowledge and skills

retained.

Behaviorists look at learning as an aspect of conditioning and will advocate a

system of rewards and targets in education. Educators who embrace cognitive theory

believe that the definition of learning as a change in behavior is too narrow and prefer to

study the learner rather than their environment and in particular the complexities of

human memory. Those who advocate constructivism believe that the learner’s ability to

learn relies to the extent on what he already knows and understand and the acquisition of

knowledge should be an individually tailored process of construction. Transformative

learning theory focuses upon the often-necessary change that is required in the learner’s

preconceptions and world view. Geographical learning theory focuses on the ways in

which contexts and environments shape the learning process.


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Learning style theories there is an impressive body of evidence on how teaching

methods and curriculum design affect deep, autonomous, and reflective learning. Yet

most faculties are largely ignorant of this scholarship, and instructional practices and

curriculum planning are dominated by tradition rather than research evidence. As a result,

teaching remains largely didactic, assessment of student work is often trivial, and

curricula are more likely to emphasize content coverage than acquisition of lifelong

and life-wide learning skills.” (Knap per 2010).

As seen in figure 1, as stated between the relationships that related to the impact

of students to educational tour to their experience.

Independent Variable Dependent Variable

BSHRM Students’
Perception on Perception of HRM
educational Tour Students on the effects of
educational to Learning
 Technical Skill and Development
 Social Skill
 Knowledge

Figure 1. Schematic Diagram of the Study

As seen in figure 1, as stated between the relationship that relate to the perception of the

BSHRM students on the effects of educational tour to HRM graduating students through

their learning and development based on their technical skill, social skill, and

knowledge.
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Statement of the Problem

The statement of the problem is a definition of the question that has risen for

inquiry and solution of the “Perception of HRM Students’ on the Effects of educational

tour to learning and development”. The researcher emphasizing the impact of the

educational tour for the students to upgrade and enhance their learning, which has to

developed their leaning in terms of their participation.

More specifically, the researcher intends to answer the following question:

1. What is the respondent profile in terms of;

1.1 Age

1.2 Sex

2. What is the importance of educational tour in the development of respondents’

learning?

2.1 Technical Skills

2.2 Social Skills

2.3 Knowledge

3. What are the impacts of educational tour to respondents’ learning and

development?

3.1 Positive

3.2 Negative
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Significance of the study

The significance of the study is to know the capability of the student on how to

widen the knowledge they learned in educational tour.

To the students. In educational tour is an avenue towards grasping new sets of

experiences that can be extracted to get more ideas and concepts. Students who are

engaged in have the chance to explore and encounter many things. Educational tour is a

perfect way to inject to the student’s new learnings. Scientifically speaking, it is easy for

the students to learn and perceive the things that they see actually and personally.

Educational tour is also a perfect instrument of the students for team building and

enhancing connections with the people involved in the trip.

To the staff and faculty. The role in pre-planning, implementation and reflection

often dictates the impact of the educational tour on the students which may lead to

improve learning and to develop it. To give an information and learning of the students

during their discussion, teachers will share a topic about the educational tour in terms of

discussing the experiences that the students can have and places they are going to

experience to make them excited going on a educational tour. Discipline, awareness and

safety measures must be observed to protect the students in any risks. Preparing the

students to be alert by all means can help the trip be successfully safe and enables the

students to react correctly on whatever scenario they will be in. Preparation involves

camaraderie, proper attitude, obedience, and students must be taught how to follow

instructions properly.
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To the Parents/Guardians. Play a great role on giving their children the permission

to be engaged on educational tour. However, parents must consider the advantage and

disadvantage of the trip. Educational tour is used as an instrument for educational

purposes. In terms of educational purpose, parents will not hesitate to give their children

the permission unless there is no note sent from the staff or the school. Considering the

fact that educational tour is a risky process, there should always be some kind of

measures wherein the parents, the school, the teachers and the students should agree with.

To the Colleges. The schools who conduct educational tour must really prioritize

the safety of the persons involved in a trip and not just the outcome of it. The purpose of

the trip is to gain more knowledge and indulge the students in a more effective way of

learning, but safety should be placed on the top of the agenda.

Scope and Delimitation of the Study

This study shall be conducted for the purpose of tracing the learning and

development process of the students, specifically for those students who are taking up the

program BSHRM (Bachelor of Science in Hotel and Restaurant Management) and for the

graduating students of this program. This study was conducted to know the capability,

skills and learning of the main respondents, the fourth year graduating HRM students in

JRMSU Dipolog campus, JRMSU Dapitan and Katipunan Campus in terms of

educational tour. This is specifically for the fourth year graduating HRM students in

schools in Dipolog, Dapitan city and Katipunan which offers BSHRM for the academic

year 2017-2018 and uses the descriptive-correlation method of the research with the aid

of interview, questionnaire, observation and documentary analysis.


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This study focused on educational tour, “Perception of HRM Student’s on the

Effects of Educational tour to Learning and Development” therefore, the researcher

conducted the study in knowing the enhancement of the student’s in experiencing

educational tour in the places they were going to experience.

Operational definition of terms

Authentic -Worthy of acceptance or belief as conforming to or based on fact.

Adventure -An undertaking usually involving danger and unknown risks and an

exciting or remarkable experience.

Development - The process of developing or being developed.

Conduct - The way a person behaves in a particular place or situation.

Excursion – A short journey or trip, especially one engaged in as a leisure activity.

Educational tour - An educational tour or excursion is a journey by a group of people to

a place away from their normal environment.

Historical - Of or concerning history or past events.

Impact - The action of one object coming forcibly into contact with another.

Learning -The act or experience of one that learns and or knowledge or skill

acquired by instruction or study.

Observation - The action or process of observing something or someone carefully or in

order to gain information.


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Technical skills – Are the abilities and knowledge needed to perform specific task.

Social Skills – Are the skills we use to communicate and interact with each other, both

verbally and non-verbally, through gestures, body language and are personal appearance.

Knowledge – Facts, information and skills acquired by a person through experience or

education or practical understanding of a subject through discovering or learning.

CHED – The Commission on Higher Education is a government agency that covers both

public and private higher education institution.

DepEd – The Department of Education is responsible for ensuring access to, promoting

equity in and improving the quality of basic education.


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CHAPTER 2

Review Related Literature

This chapter presents foreign literature and selected studies which are related to

the study. These literatures and studies are reviewed by the researcher to give a

background in the preparation and conduct of the study.

Literature

According to Dewitt & Storks dieck 2008,research has demonstrated that fieldtrips

can be designed to more effectively support student learning. Fieldtrips works best when

they provide support for students to explore in a personally meaningful way, learning in

fieldtrips is impacted by many factors the structure of the fieldtrip impacts learning.

According to Bamberger & Tal, 2008 in this issue evidence of even longer term

outcomes was found in study of a class trip to a science center in Israel (Bamberger &

Tal 2008, in this issue). Although pre-trip measures of knowledge or understanding were

not used, interviews with 8th grade students 16 months after the visit revealed that the

students recalled facts and details and the experience, such as exhibit names, activities in

which they had participated, and guide explanations. Students also indicated that they felt

they had learned from the visit and that social interaction were a valued part of their

experience.
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According to (Coughlin 2010, p.200) just as the library may be used as a resource

for planning future fieldtrips, points out that collaborating with outside sources can be

beneficial for planning these “lived learning” experiences. Other points made by

Coughlin further state that “learning is optimized only when teachers actively integrate

the content of fieldtrip with the curriculum”. Such planning is especially important when

“when school administrator demands that fieldtrips have a curricular connection in order

to address state standards and meet curricular needs to study dealt with the planning and

implementation of a history lesson in the Lutz-Franklin Schoolhouse

According to Coughlin (2012) also advocates for the pairing of teachers with

outside resources in order to develop appropriate materials to be used before and after the

visit. Doing this can ensure that the information given on the fieldtrip will be better

received and also, that the curricular standards are fully achieved.

According to Wong and Wong (2009), The educator/teacher plays a very

important role in enhancing the learning experiences of students on a field trip. He or She

has to be actively involved in the different phases of organizing the fieldtrip and also has

to perform different roles and functions.

According to Martin-Ordas et al. 2012 ,p.208 in titled the benefits of the study,

and on activities during fieldtrips enabled students to recall information” According to

their study, “thinking about and imagining the future are highly adaptive capacities” so it

can be assumed that field trips can also foster a level of higher thinking making them a “

valuable teaching tool”(p.209) from this episodic memory. Furthermore, “students were

able to distinguish between the past, present, and future events”(p.208). Being able to

distinguish between past and present events is a pretty typical effect of episodic memory.
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However, being able to distinguish future events is a phenomenon referring to as

“episodic foresight”?

According to Krakow Ka(2012,p.236), She states that “informal discussions with

[her] students several years after they have taken [her] class suggest that what they

remember most are the fieldtrips” and then goes on to describe that “fieldtrips include

any learning experience that occurs outside a classroom. Kolb’s experiential learning

theory was emphasized, supporting Krakow Ka’s (2012) belief that “learning is the

process where by knowledge is created through the transformation of experience”(p.237).

She was suggest that fieldtrips are a form of active learning and students get valuable

added experience when seeing things for themselves.

According to Farrell’s (2012,p.223) Even more importantly, teachers may use

episodic memory to focus on the positive and negative aspects of fieldtrips that they have

been on or perhaps even those that they have facilitated in the past. Definition of episodic

memory gives an even better connection to how teachers may use their memories in the

fieldtrip planning process. He states that “episodic memory refers to our ability to

mentally re visit the past and re- experience past episodes and events.

According to (Conway,2009 p.2305), Allowing for such re-visitation can allow

teachers to place themselves in a past situation in order to reflect on what he or she liked

about the experience as well as what he or she would change. Thus, teachers’ episodic

memory can aid in planning of future fieldtrips for their students.

According to Fries- gaither & lightle (2011) yet science is often limited in

elementary school curricular 0f science concepts and skills.


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According to Tal and Morag (2009) describe fieldtrips as student’s experiences

outside of the classroom at interactive locations designed for education purposes: Field

trips maybe planned for purposes:

1.) To provide first hand experience

2.) To stimulate interest and motivation in science

3.) To add relevance to learning and interrelations ships.

4.) To strengthen observation and perception skills.

Related Studies

According to Clare Herrick(2010) in titled lost in field and ensuring the student

learning in the “threatened” geography fieldtrip in the department of geography, kings in

college London. As a result of its importance to the discipline’s identity and

epistemology, the nature of fieldwork and the fieldtrip itself have recently come under

close scrutiny in the education and geographical literature, therefore critically

interrogates the role and use of fieldwork within geographical teaching and learning in

the light of its changing and increasingly contested status within the discipline in three

parts. First, it outlines and reflects upon the current debate surrounding the threat to the

primacy of fieldtrips in geography at a time of on going up in higher education. Second,

through the empirical example of personal experiences teaching on second-year under

graduate urban geography fieldtrips to San Francisco in December 2007 and 2008,the

paper engages with the current discussions of the pedagogical importance of fieldtrips.

Third, the paper asks, to what extent teaching in the fieldtrip might foster the experiential

or active learning needed to inspire the kind of ‘deep learning’ approaches that hold the

kind,of‘transformative’potential envisaged as a key goal of education more broadly.


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The paper concludes that despite the threats it faces, the pedagogical significance

of fieldwork means that it must remain a,fundamental tenet of the geographical

educational experience.

According to Omola A. Adedokun(2012) in titled using virtual fieldtrips to

connect students with university scientists the journal of science education and

technology. Physical fieldtrips to scientist work places have been shown to enhance

student perceptions of science, scientist and science careers. Although virtual fieldtrips

(VFTs) have emerged as viable alternatives or supplements to traditional physical

fieldtrips, little is known about the potential of virtual fieldtrips to provide the same or

similar science career exploration advantage as physical field trips. The over arching goal

of this paper is to describe a VFT, zip trip, designed to provide middle school students,

especially those in resource limited rural areas, with access to university scientists. Using

zip trips as a case example, the paper identifies and describes some of the core

characteristics and elements of high quality authentic VFTs that foster student scientist

interactions. In addition, the paper uses program evaluation data to examine the impact of

zip trips on student perceptions of scientists.

According to Torstein Weismann (2013) in titled tuning the fieldtrip in journal of

geography in higher education. Educators are experiencing difficulties with 1 day

fieldtrips in human geography. Instead of teaching students how to apply theory in the

field and learn to sense geography in everyday life, many excursions have degraded in to

tourist like events, where lecturers try to motivate rather passive students against a noisy

urban backdrop. Although various (partly) students lead approaches have successfully
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addressed the issue, there are still high number of tourist that use a traditional, tutor-led

model.

According to J.A.Gonzales –Delgado and A.M.Martinez –Grana and J. Civics at the

University of Salamanca in titled Virtual 3D tour of the Neogene paleontological heritage

Huelva. Virtual fieldtrip in paleontology and geology offer an expanded environment to

make field sites more accessible for a broader audience. Base on extensive experience

working in upper Neogene deposits in the province of Huelva, on the western edge of the

Guadalquivir Basin, we have selected 10 sites for the regional paleontological-geological

interest (geosites). By applying geo informatics tools, we have produce a virtual 3D tour

of the geo reference geo sites, integrating multiple thematic digital layers ( including

geological maps, a digital terrain model and other photos). Each stop in the tour contains

descriptive and graphic elements that can be viewed in free virtual globes

(e.g...,GoogleEarth), combined with diagrams, photographs and information sets that

quantitatively assess the cultural tourism, scientific and educational value of the geo

system.
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Chapter 3

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

This research was deals with the method used by the researcher in the study, the

research design and research locale, respondents of the study, research instrument, data

gathering, procedure and statistical treatment.

Research Design

This research basically aimed to gather insights, identify, define, present, interpret

and analyze the perception of HRM students on the effects of educational tour in learning

and development of the students.

The research on the perception of HRM students on the effects of educational tour

involves students, specifically those who were taking the HRM (Hotel and Restaurant

Management) program in the schools such as, namely JRMSU Dipolog Campus, JRMSU

Dapitan Campus and JRMSU Katipunan Campus. The method of collecting data was

through a survey by questionnaire, while the research design was Descriptive. The

descriptive design by discovering new meaning, determining the frequency describing

what exists and provides information that deals everything that can be studied.
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Research Locale

The study was conducted in the three (3) Campuses of Jose Rizal

Memorial State University including Main Campus, Dapitan city, Dipolog

Campus, and Katipunan Campus.

Jose Rizal Memorial State University Main Campus, Dapitan City, is

Located at Gov. Sta. Cruz, Guan ding Adasa st, Dapitan City, Zamboanga Del

Norte and Jose Rizal Memorial State University Dipolog Campus Located at

Lower Turno, Dipolog City, Zamboanga Del Norte and Lastly Jose Rizal

Memorial State University Katipunan Campus Located at Municipality of

Katipunan Zamboanga Del Norte.

The Jose Rizal Memorial State University (JRMSU) is a state university in

the Philippines. It is mandated to provide higher professional, technical, special

instructions for special purposes and promote research and extension services,

advance studies and progressive leadership in education, agriculture, arts and

sciences, engineering and other fields.

JRMSU’S history was established by virtue of RA 9852 with

Congressman Cecilia G. Jalosjos-Carreon as a principal author and Congressman

Cesar Jalosjos as co-author. It was approved by President Gloria Macapagal

Arroyo on December 15, 2009. Figure 2 shows the Location Map of the above

mention University Campuses, the Main Campus, Dipolog Campus and

Katipunan Campus.
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Figure 2. JRMSU Main Campus Location Map


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Figure 3. JRMSU Dipolog Campus Location Map


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Figure 4. Katipunan Campus


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Respondents of the study

The respondents of the study are the Fourth year Bachelor of Science in Hotel and

Restaurant Management in the designated area, there were 100% of the respondents that

was given with the questionnaire, namely; Jose Rizal Memorial State University Dapitan

Campus, and Jose Rizal Memorial State University Dipolog Campus, Jose Rizal

Memorial State University Katipunan Campus.

Table 1. Respondents of the study

Name of School Number of Total Number

Students Of Respondents

Jose Rizal Memorial

State University Dapitan 50 50

Campus

Jose Rizal Memorial State

University Dipolog 50 50

Campus

Jose Rizal Memorial State

University Katipunan 13 13

Campus

Total 113 113


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Research Instrument

The instrument for this data collection is to though survey by the aid of a

questionnaire. Most of the question are answerable a rating, some are for provision of

supplementary information. The items in the questionnaire include personal data. The

data were going to collect was through simple quantitative analyses that is percentage and

means.

The research instrument was actually divided into three parts. The first was on the

respondent’s profile which includes data on age, gender, name of school. The second part

of the research instrument includes the skill and knowledge of the respondents. The third

part of the research instrument is the questionnaire proper which requires the respondents

to answer the question with the rating scale, namely; 5 for the Very Effective, 4 for the

effective, 3 for moderate, 2 for less Effective, 1 for not Effective

In answering the questionnaire proper, the respondents are asked to rate each

statement using a five-rating scale; namely 5 for Very Important, 4 for Important, 3 for

Moderate, 2 for Less Important, 1 for Not Important.

The questionnaire proper includes question about technical skill, social skill and

knowledge through the effects and development of the respondents learning. This also

includes the Disadvantage and advantages in the in the questionnaire proper.

Furthermore, the statement concerning “Perception of HRM Students on the effects of

educational Tour to Learning and Development” in terms of the benefits of the students

in participating educational tour and hands on learning and experience.


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To gather the desire data, the researcher distribute the questionnaire to HRM

graduating Students SY-(2017-2018) to the respondents of the Jose Rizal Memorial State

University- Katipunan Campus, Dipolog Campus and Dapitan Campus Offering Bachelor

of Science in Hotel and Restaurant Management.

Validation of Research Instrument

The instrument used by the researcher which is the questionnaire was thoroughly

reviewed by the research adviser. On the other hand, researchers consulted experts to

validate the constructed research instrument. The instrument used by the researchers

which is the questionnaire, will be given to non-respondents who will answer the possible

question. The researchers surveyed 10 possible non respondents where findings, result

shows that strong relationship can be established between the instrument made and the

respondents answers, conforming that the research instrument used by the researchers

which is the questionnaire is valid.

Data Gathering Procedure

The researchers obtain a permission letter to be sent to the Dean’s office asking

permission to conduct a survey for the graduating students of the degree Bachelor of

Science in Hotel and Restaurant Management.


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Statistical Treatment

As the researchers present, interpret, and analyze the data gathered, a certain

statistical tool and technique was used. This study used the following quantitative

research to achieve research purposes

Formulas:

𝑓
P (%) = 𝑁 x 100 Where: f = observed frequency

N = total frequency

∑𝑋
Arithmetic mean: 𝑥̅ = Where: ∑ 𝑥= sum of all ratings
𝑵

N = total no. of students

This study will be using the following rating scale for technical skill, social skills and

knowledge

5=Very Important 4=Important 3=Moderate 2=Less Important 1=Not important

The following question with the rating scale for positive and negative effects

5=Very Negative Effect 4= Negative Effect 3=Moderately Negative Effect 2=Less

Negative Effect 1=No Negative Effect


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Chapter 4

PRESENTATION, ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION OF DATA

This chapter presents the data in graphs and tables followed by their analysis and

interpretation.

Problem no. 1 What is the Profile of the Respondents in terms of Age and Sex?

Age
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5 7
1

18-19 20-21 22-23 24-25 26-27

Figure 5. Age of Respondents

The age of the respondents is presented in the figure above. As shown in the

figure, 59.29% of the respondents were between eighteen to nineteen(18-19) years old,

out of one hundred thirteen respondents (113), 29.20% of which were 20-21 years old,

4.42% were 22-23 years old, 6.20% were 24-25 years old and only 0.89 % were 26-27

years of age. These students taking the course Bachelor of Science in Hotel and

Restaurant Management were on their fourth year level.


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Figure 6. Sex of Respondents

Figure 6 shows the sex of respondents. As shown in the figure, 55% of the

respondents were female while 45% of it were male. Students who took the course

Bachelor of Science in Hotel and Restaurant Management in three (3) Campuses namely:

JRMSU-Katipunan Campus, Dipolog Campus and Dapitan Campus were mostly female

compared with male as observed.

Problem No. 2 What is the importance of educational tour in the development of

respondents learning?

Technical Skills are the abilities and knowledge needed to perform specific tasks.

These are qualities acquired by using and gaining expertise in performing physical or

digital task. However, more and more industries rely on employees with technical

knowledge. Customer service representatives may need technical skills relating to

customer management and telephone system. Technical skills are important because
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nearly every job relies on different tools, programs and processes. If you have sought

after technical knowledge and skill common in your industry, you will be more

competitive candidate.

Table 2 shows the respondents’ technical skills. It can be observed that most of

the respondents favored that education tour really “provide self-experience” having a

mean of 4.50 which was verbally interpreted as “very important” as compared to

“provide opportunity to show individual” having a mean of 4.31 which was verbally

interpreted as “very important”. The average weighted mean for the technical skills is

4.42 which was described as “very important”.

Bachelor of Science in Hotel and Restaurant Management (BSHRM) students

found it necessary for the school to conduct educational tour as it really provide self-

experience as perceived by the students. Having a first-hand experience in visiting hotels,

restaurants, different tourist spots and other hospitality related destinations are far

different from learning these in class through discussion with only seeing those

destinations in video presentation. Hospitality world can be better understood if students

were able to observe how hotel operates, how restaurateurs and hoteliers behave and act

in front of the guest, how food attendants serve the meal, how room attendants attend to

guests’ requests and how guests with complaints interact with them. Seeing them in

person is far better than seeing them in pictures especially those supplies, amenities,

facilities and equipment found in the standard and luxurious hotels. The finding was

supported by Dewitt and Storks Dieck’s (2008) research which has demonstrated that

educational tour really can provide self- experience and effectiveness in students

learning.
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Table 2. Technical Skills

Average

A. Technical skills Weighted Mean Interpretation

Provide self – experience 4.50 Very Important

Widens perspectives through actual 4.44 Very Important

Experience.

Allows to learn outside the classroom 4.40 Very Important

Enhance the classroom learning and 4.46

discussion through real experience study. Very Important

Develop more interest in learning. 4.49 Very Important

Guide to face future challenges and 4.38 Very Important

hindrances.

Help to be aware of professional skills. 4.45 Very Important

Overcome the learning difficulties 4.40 Very Important

Provide opportunity to show individual 4.31 Very Important

COMPOSITE MEAN 4.42 Very Important


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SOCIAL SKILLS

The term social skill refers to the skill needed to handle and effectively influence

other people’s emotions. This may sound manipulative, but it can actually be as simple as

understanding that smiling at people makes them smile back, and can therefore make

them feel more positive. According to Bamberger and Tal (2008), educational tour helps

promote sense of discipline from the visit and that social interaction was valued part of

their experience.

Table 3 shows the importance of educational tour in terms of students’ social

skills. It can be observed that most of the respondents favored that educational tour is

“Very Important” in developing student’s social skills with a composite mean of 4.42.

Students taking BSHRM program should learn how to interact with various types of

individuals since service industry is of dynamic in nature. Guests and/or customers may

come and go in the hotel premises of different values, cultures, preferences and attitudes.

Some were very demanding that requires special attentions making sure that they will not

leave the hotel dissatisfied and unhappy. Therefore, future service personnel in the

hospitality needs to learn sense of discipline (4.50) on dealing individuals and these can

be best developed through educational tour as perceived by the respondents. Moreover,

educational tour also promote cooperation and unity among the students (4.49), helps

develops one’s personality (4.46) and leadership qualities (4.46), improves social

relations (4.42), boost self-confidence and self-trust (4.37), able to satisfies students’

psychological needs (4.34) at the same time promote student-teacher interactions (4.32)

which gives students and teacher an avenue to understand and appreciate one another

during the tour.


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Table 3. Social Skill

Average

B. Social Skills Weighted Mean Interpretation

Helps for the development of balanced 4.46 Very Important

personality.

Promote cooperation and unity among 4.49 Very Important

students.

Develop leadership qualities. 4.46 Very Important

Help to promote sense of discipline. 4.50

Very Important

Boost self – confidence and self-trust. 4.37 Very Important

Improve social training and/or social 4.42 Very Important

relation.

Promote interaction between students 4.32 Very Important

and teacher.

Helps in satisfying psychological needs of 4.34 Very Important

students.

COMPOSITE MEAN 4.42 Very Important


32

KNOWLEDGE

The very goal of education is to provide learners lifelong learning’s and

experiences that they could use in their individual lives. This concrete and authentic

application of the theories learned during lectures will be applied through educational

tours.

Table 4 shows the importance of educational tour in terms of how students’

knowledge enhanced through it. The study revealed that educational tour is “very

important” to enhance the knowledge of the students with a weighted mean of 4.43.

Based on the study conducted, undergoing educational tour for BSHRM students

really provides them an avenue to show better performance in their studies, having the

highest weighted mean of (4.53). It will give students the confidence to participate in

different school activities and enables them to enhance their talents in fruit carving, flair

tending, flower arrangement and other activities related to the course they are taking as

they were given opportunity to observe and sometimes participate on how employees in

the hotel personnel performs those tasks which gives them additional learning’s that will

surely be inculcated unto their minds. The finding was supported by Coughlin (2012) that

educational tour is helpful for individuals to show better performance in studies.


33

Table 4. Knowledge

Average

C. Knowledge Weighted Mean Interpretation

Offer the opportunity to teach students 4.46 Very Important

something new

Promote the importance of historical 4.40 Very Important

places and cultural heritage.

Helpful for individual to show better 4.53 Very Important

performance in studies.

Help to achieve better result at higher 4.47 Very Important

level.

Aware students about facilities available 4.36 Very Important

within our society.

Assist in selecting specific field of studies 4.37 Very Important

for students

Helpful to meet the need of higher 4.44 Very Important

education.

COMPOSITE MEAN 4.43 Very

Important
34

Scale Range Interpretation

5 4.21-5.00 Very Important

4 3.41-4.20 Important

3 2.61-3.40 Moderate

2 1.81-2.60 Less Important

1 1.00-1.80 Not Important

Problem No. 3What is the effects of educational tour to respondents’ learning and

development?

Today’s students are deemed to be multimodal learners, meaning that they can

learn best when they are presented with multimedia materials. Authentic activities are of

prime importance. Educational tour is one of those because it lets the students touch, feel

visualize, precept and listen to the real people at work.

Table 5 shows that the positive effects of educational tour to the

respondents learning and development were “Very Effective” because the respondents

have rated it “5” with a total weighted mean of 4.89.

Educational Tour in general, is part of the curriculum enhancement, hence,

broadens the students learning opportunities and a feel of the real world, particularly for

Bachelor of Science in Hotel and Restaurant Management (BSHRM) students. Through

educational tour, students can be able to meet new people and make friends with them

(4.48) like hotel managers and supervisors, front office attendants, food attendants, room

attendants and many more. Students can also discover new things (4.47) about the latest
35

trend, technologies and development adopted by the hospitality and tourism industry. The

quality of education may also increase (4.44), and gives students new perspective in life

(4.42), expanse students’ world view (4.40). Furthermore, it can develop the interpersonal

skills of the students through bonding with their instructors, classmates and those people

who work in the hospitality industry, nurtures new ideas and trends, give motivation to

pursue to their chosen course and prepare the students by developing their visual literacy

through integrating the tour activity.

The finding was supported by Farewell (2012, p.223), that educational tour gives

a positive effects in students learning.


36

Table 5. Positive Effects

Average

D. Positive Effects Weighted Mean Interpretation

It gives student a new perspective in life. 4.42 Very Negative Effect

Discover new thing. 4.47 Very Negative Effect

Meet new people and making friends. 4.48 Very Negative Effect

Exposed to new experiences that hopefully 4.35 Very Negative Effect

broaden their horizons.

Increase students’ motivation. 4.33 Very Negative Effect

Expanding students’ world view. 4.40 Very Negative Effect

Better bond between teachers and 4.39 Very Negative Effect

students.

Learning about local culture. 4.40 Very Negative Effect

Language learning opportunities. 4.35 Very Negative Effect

Increases quality of education. 4.44 Very Negative Effect

COMPOSITE MEAN 4.89 Very Negative Effect

Table 6 shows the negative effects of educational tour in students. It can be

observed that “Budget Restraints” having a mean of 3.96 which was verbally interpreted

as “Very Negative Effect” was the identified negative effect of educational tour which

incurred the highest mean. The total average weighted mean on this aspect is 3.85 which

was interpreted as “Very Negative Effect”.


37

Educational tour is a very expensive activity indeed. Some students cannot afford

because it is costly especially to those on the marginalized sector. Budget constraint is

one of themost common problems in educational tour. It becomes the common negative

effect of educational tour. This weakens the opportunity of the student to experience the

real world of work before the actual practice of the profession.


38

Table 6. Negative Effect

Average

E. Negative Effects Weighted Interpretation

Mean

A time consuming. 3.74 Very Negative Effect

Costly. 3.82 Very Negative Effect

Exposes students to security risks and hazards 3.93 Very Negative Effect

like accidents etc.

Large amount of preparation. 3.81 Very Negative Effect

Students’ exposure to health risks like colds, 3.75 Very Negative Effect

coughs, headache, etc.

They will miss other classes. 3.81 Very Negative Effect

Parents’ anxiety level will increase due to 3.91 Very Negative Effect

tours’ safety precautions.

Shortage of resources and venue 3.91 Very Negative Effect

Budget restraints. 3.96 Very Negative Effect

Lack of support from school administration. 3.87 Very Negative Effect

Difficulty in controlling students’ behaviour 3.83 Very Negative Effect

TOTAL 3.85 Very Negative Effect


39

Scale Range Interpretation

5 4.21-5.00 Very Negative Effect

4 3.41-4.20 Negative Effect

3 2.61-3.40 Moderately Negative Effect

2 1.81-2.60 Less Negative Effect

1 1.00-1.80 Negative Effect


40

Chapter 5

SUMMARY, FINDINGS, CONCLUSIONS, AND RECOMMENDATIONS

This chapter presents the summary, findings, conclusions, and recommendations

of the present investigation.

Summary

This study focused on the perception of educational tour to BSHRM students

learning and development, the researcher used the descriptive method using the survey

questionnaires through BSHRM students as our respondents, this method was very

appropriate in observing and analyzing the data needed in the study. This study was

conducted in the different JRMSU campuses; Dapitan, Dipolog and Katipunan. A total of

one hundred thirteen (113) respondents were given questionnaires and they answered it

with utmost honesty and integrity.

Findings

The following were the findings of the present investigation:

1. In terms of the respondents profile.

1.1 Most of the respondents were female with 55% of 113

respondents, while 45% of the respondents were male.

1.2 Most of the respondents were18-19 years old comprising a total of

67,while ages 20-21 years old a total of 33 respondents, ages 22-23

years old have only a total of 5 respondents, ages 24-25 years of age
41

have a total of 7 respondents and lastly ages 26-27 have only 1

respondent.

2. In terms of students’ perception on educational tour.

2.1 On the students’ perception on educational tour in terms of

technical skills, most of the respondents favored “provide self-

experience to student” having a mean of 4.50 which was described as

“Very Important”.

2.2 On the students’ perception on educational tour in terms of social

skills, most of the respondents favored “help to promote sense of

discipline” during the conduct of educational tour having a total mean

of 4.50which was described as “Very Important”.

2.3 On the students’ perception on the importance of educational tour

in terms of knowledge, most of the respondents favored that it is

“helpful for individual to show better performance in studies “having a

mean of 4.53 which was described as “Very Important”.

3. In terms on the positive and negative effects of educational tour.

3.1 In terms of the positive effects of educational tour to the

respondents’ learning and development, it was verbally interpreted as

“No Negative Effect” having a total weighted mean of 4.89, it was

where most of the respondents perceived that educational tour gives

student a new perspective in life where they can also meet new people

and make friends.


42

3.2 In terms of the negative effects of educational tour to the

respondents’ learning and development, it was verbally interpreted as

“Less Negative Effect” having a total weighted mean of 3.85.

Conclusions

1. Most of the fourth year students enrolled in Bachelor of Science in Hotel

and Restaurant Management were female, and were 18-19 years old.

2. Educational tour develops students’ learning technically compared to mere

classroom lectures. Students can be able to see the real pictures of hotel

and restaurant facades and building, the actual views of different tourist

spots and destinations as well as the hoteliers and restaurateurs profession

in the hospitality and tourism industry. Having on-hand experience in the

service industry world provide better views to students thus develop and

enhance their technical skills.

3. Although students have constant social interactions in the school

environment with their peers, faculty and staff, but having an educational

tour develops and promotes more the students’ sense of discipline as they

will be able to interact also to other people outside their usual environment

especially the individuals in the hospitality industry, like hotel managers,

food and beverage supervisors, food attendants, front desk clerk, room

attendants and many more.

4. Students’ level of knowledge will be enhanced through educational tour as

they will be able to relate the theoretical concepts they had learned from

lectures to the actual scenario and happenings in the hospitality and


43

tourism industry, thus students can be able to show better performance in

their studies in school.

5. Conducting educational tour to students taking BSHRM program gives

positive effects to students in general. As they could meet new people,

make new friends and be able to see new perspective in life.

6. Despite the positive effects of educational tour, some students see

educational tour as costly or expensive since it requires money for them to

visit hotels, restaurants and tourist spots, considering the transportation,

food and room accommodation expenses.

Recommendations

Based on the conclusion, the following recommendations were derived:

1. It is recommended that Bachelor of Science in Hotel and Restaurant

Management Program should conduct educational tour before they will receive

their degree in accordance to the CHED requirements in such a way that they

can experience or take a view of the real world.

2. For students who cannot join the educational tour, they shall be given parallel

school activity which provides similar acquisition of knowledge of the required

practical competencies and achieve other learning objectives.

3. Since educational tours require additional cost on the part of students, prior

consultation from the students shall be undertaken as much as possible. All

these information shall be part of the student’s handbook so that the same shall
44

be explained during the General Orientation of Freshmen before the class starts,

including the details of the educational tour.

4. The school should provide visual aids, pictures, videos for interesting lecture

and get some further ideas on experiencing educational tour even if they are

inside their classroom.


45

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Dewitt and Storks Dieck (2008),”Educational Tour Issue”. Unpublished


Master’s Thesis. Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Maynila, Philippines.

Bamberger and Tal (2008), “Cognitive learning on Educational tour”.


Unpublished Master’s Thesis. Pamantasan ng lungsod ng Maynila,
Manila, Philippines.

Coughlin(2010, p.200) “Environmental learning” Unpublished Undergraduate


Thesis, University of Wisconsin-Stout, U.S.A

Wong and Wong (2009), “Educational tour activity supplementing


classroom learning”. Unpublished Undergraduate Thesis. University
of Wisconsin-Stout, U.S.A

Martin-Ordas et al. (2012, p.208), “Benifits of Educational tour”.


Unpublished Master’s Thesis. Pamantasan ng lungsod ng Maynila,
Manila, Philippines.

Krakow Ka (2012, p.236) “Learning is the process whereby knowledge is


created through the transformation of experience” Unpublished
Undergraduate Thesis. University of Wisconsin-Stout, U.S.A.

Farrell (2012, p.223), “Episodic memory refers to ability to mentally re- visit
and re-experience past episodes and events”, Unpublished Master’s
Thesis. Pamantasan ng lungsod ng Maynila , Manila, Philippines.

Conway (2009 p.2305), “Environmental Interaction”. Unpublished


undergraduate Thesis. University of Wisconsin-Stout, U.S.A.
46

Appendix C

Date:

Sir/Madam:

Good Day!

The undersigned are 3rd Year BSHRM students of Jose Rizal Memorial State
University, Katipunan Campus and as part of our Curriculum; we are required to conduct
a research study. It is in partial Fulfilment of the requirement for the course taken RES 32
(Research Methods with Thesis). Your cooperation is in great help in the fulfilment of
our study entitled, Perception of HRM Students on the effects of Educational Tour to
Learning and Development.”

In connection to this, we will be conducting a survey with the graduating


students for us to partially complete the data needed in our research study.

Hence, may we request your approval for us to conduct our survey in this school.
Rest assured that all responses of the students will be treated with strict confidentially.

Thank you!

Sincerely,

CRISTY M. DIONALDO
Student
KRISTINE B. HAMPAC
Student
ADRIAN D. MOCORRO
Student
HARRY JOHN R. BULAT-AG
Student
47

Appendix A

QUESTIONNAIRE ON THE PERCEPTION OF HRM STUDENTS’ ON THE


EFFECTS OF EDUCATIONAL TOUR IN LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT”

Direction: Please fill out the necessary information below:

Part 1. Respondent’s Profile

1.) What is the respondents profile in terms of the following?


A. Age
B. Sex Female Male

Part 2. Importance of Educational Tour

Directions: Put a check mark () in the column that corresponds to your


answer. Please be guided by the table below in answering the following
items.

Rating Scale Description


5 Very Important
4 Important
3 Moderate
2 Less Important
1 Not Important

A. TECHNICAL SKILL 5 4 3 2 1
Provide self – experience.
Widens perspectives through actual experience.
Allows to learn outside the classroom.
Enhance the classroom learning and discussion through
real experience study.
Develop more interest in learning.
Guide to face future challenges and hindrances.
Help to be aware of professional skills.
48

Overcome the learning difficulties.


Provide opportunity to show individual.

A. SOCIAL SKILL 5 4 3 2 1
Helps for the development of balanced personality.
Promote cooperation and unity among students.
Develop leadership qualities.
Help to promote sense of discipline.
Boost self – confidence and self trust.
Improve social training and/or social relation.
Promote interaction between students and teacher.
Helps in satisfying psychological needs of students.

B. KNOWLEDGE
Offer the opportunity to teach students something.
Promote the importance of historical places and cultural heritage.
Helpful for individual to show better performance in studies.
Help to achieve better result at higher level.
Aware students about facilities available within our society.
Helpful to meet the need of higher education.
49

Part 3. Effects of Educational Tour to Respondents’ Learning and


Development

Direction : Put a check mark ( ) in the column that corresponds to your


answer. Please be guided by the table below in answering the following
items.

Rating Scale Description


5 No Negative
Effect
4 Less Negative
Effect
3 Moderately
Negative Effect
2 Negative Effect
1 Very Negative
Effect

Positive Effects 5 4 3 2 1
It gives student a new perspective in life.
Discover new thing.
Meet new people and making friends.
Exposed to new experiences that hopefully broaden their
horizons.
Increase students’ motivation.
Expanding students’ world view.
Better bond between teachers and students.
Learning about local culture.
Language learning opportunities.
Increases quality of education.

Negative Effects 5 4 3 2 1
A time consuming.
Costly.
50

Exposes students to security risks and hazards like


accidents etc.
Large amount of preparation.
Students’ exposure to health risks like colds, coughs,
headache, etc.
They will missed other classes.
Parents’ anxiety level will increase due to tours’ safety
precautions.
Budget restraints.
Lack of support from school administration.
Difficulty in controlling students’ behaviour.