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Training Manual B 737-300/400/500 ATA 51-57 Structure Part 66 B1

Training Manual B 737-300/400/500

ATA 51-57 Structure

Part 66 B1

STRUCTURE EQUIPMENT FURNISHING

B737-300/400/500

52-57

For Training Purposes Only

ATA

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26.08.2005

Page: 1

Page: 1

DIMENSIONS AND AREAS GENERAL

B737-300/400/500

06-00

For Training Purposes Only

6 DIMENSION AND AREAS

INTRODUCTION

Purpose The Boeing 737−300 / −400 / −500 twin engine airplane is designed for short to medium range operation.

System Description The airplane is a metal low−wing monoplane with a full cantilever wing and tail surfaces, semi−monocoque fuselage, and fully retractable tricycle−type landing gear. The two powerplants (CFM56−3) are located on short struts below and forward of the wing.

Structural Weight Limitation

B377−300

B737−500

MTW (max. Taxi Weight

57 830

54 200

MATOW (max. Takeoff Weight)

57 600

54 000

MALW (max. Landing Weight)

52 600

49 900

MZFW (max. Zero Fuel Weight)

49 450

46 500

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DIMENSIONS AND AREAS GENERAL

B737-300/400/500

06-00

For Training Purposes Only
For Training Purposes Only

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Figure 1

General

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DIMENSIONS AND AREAS GENERAL

B737-300/400/500

06-00

For Training Purposes Only

MAINTENANCE PRACTICES

General The airplane is divided into stations, waterlines, and buttock lines. They are measured in inches. They will help you quickly identify the location of compo- nents, the center of gravity and the weight distribution. Standard Abbreviations and Definitions

Fuselage BS, B STA, or STA Body (Fuselage) Station. A plane that is perpendicular to the fuselage cent- erline. It is measured from a point 130.00 inches forward of the nose. BBL or BL Body (Fuselage) Buttock Line. A vertical plane that is parallel to the vertical centerline plane, BBL 0.00. It is found by its perpendicular distance from the fuselage centerline plane. (It is a measurement of width.) BRP Body (Fuselage) Reference Plane. A plane that is perpendicular to the BBL plane and goes through BWL 208.10, the top of the main deck floor beams. BWL or WL Body (Fuselage) Waterline. A plane that is perpendicular to the BBL plane, parallel to the fuselage centerline. It is measured from a parallel imaginary plane, BWL 0.00, 148.5 inches below the lowest fuselage surface. LBL Left Buttock Line RBL Right Buttock Line

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DIMENSIONS AND AREAS GENERAL

B737-300/400/500

06-00

For Training Purposes Only

B STA B STA 130.00 625.60 BODY BUTTOCK LINE (BBL) BBL 0
B STA
B STA
130.00
625.60
BODY BUTTOCK
LINE (BBL)
BBL 0
BWL 542.50 BWL 306.50 BWL 208.10 (BRP) BODY WATER LINE (BWL) BWL 106.00 BWL 0.00
BWL 542.50
BWL 306.50
BWL 208.10 (BRP)
BODY WATER
LINE (BWL)
BWL 106.00
BWL 0.00
BODY STATIONS FIN STA 0.00 BWL (208.10)
BODY STATIONS
FIN STA 0.00
BWL
(208.10)
 

BS

130.00

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Figure 2

FIN WL

242.00

FIN WL 0.00 BWL 300.58)
FIN WL 0.00
BWL 300.58)

Reference Planes and Lines

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DIMENSIONS AND AREAS GENERAL

B737-300/400/500

06-00

For Training Purposes Only

PRINCIPAL DIMENSIONS AND AREAS

General Dimensions are included for the wing, ailerons, flaps, horizontal stabilizer sur- faces, vertical stabilizer surfaces and body. Areas are included for the wing and stabilizer surfaces.

Dimensions Overall Airplane

− 109 feet−7 inches (737−300)

Length

− 119 feet−7 inches (737−400)

Length

− 101 feet−9 inches (737−500)

Length

− 94 feet−10 inches

Width

− 36 feet−6 inches (vertical stabilizer tip, top of the fairing to

Height

the ground)

Fuselage Height of the body reference plane (top of the floor beam WL 208.10).

Above the ground at the main gear

102.10 inches.

Height (constant cross section)

Above the body reference plane

98.4 inches

Below the body reference plane

59.60 inches

Height to the centerline of the windows above the body reference plane 38 inches

Length

1267 inches (737−300)

Length

1387 inches (737−400)

Length

1173 inches (737−500)

Areas

Wing (basic)

Horizontal Stabilizer Surfaces fuselage) Vertical Stabilizer Surfaces (total)

980.0 square feet

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545 square feet (total, with the area in the

370 square feet

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DIMENSIONS AND AREAS GENERAL

B737-300/400/500

06-00

For Training Purposes Only

12 FT 4 IN 12 FT 4 IN.
12 FT 4 IN
12 FT 4 IN.
06-00 For Training Purposes Only 12 FT 4 IN 12 FT 4 IN. 109 FT 7
06-00 For Training Purposes Only 12 FT 4 IN 12 FT 4 IN. 109 FT 7
06-00 For Training Purposes Only 12 FT 4 IN 12 FT 4 IN. 109 FT 7
109 FT 7 IN.
109 FT 7 IN.
13 FT 2 IN. 36 FT 6 IN. 13 FT 2 IN. 40 FT 10
13 FT 2 IN.
36 FT 6 IN.
13 FT
2 IN.
40 FT 10 IN.
105 FT 7 IN.
94 FT 10 IN. 41 FT 8 IN. 17 FT 2 IN.
94 FT 10 IN.
41
FT 8 IN.
17
FT
2 IN.

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Figure 3

Principal Dimensions B737-300

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Page: 7

TOWING & TAXING TOWING

B737−300/400/500

09−10

For Training Purposes Only

POWER PLANT AND INLET DANGER AREAS

Purpose The wing−mounted engines require that the ground personnel be aware of the danger areas. The engine inlet efficiently directs air into the engine.

System Description The characteristics of jet engine operation require extreme care to prevent in- jury to personnel and/or damage to equipment. An operating engine consumes large quantities of air and is capable of sucking large objects into the inlet in- cluding humans. The exhaust of an operating engine has a velocity capable of overturning work stands, carts and at high engine power can easily pick up hu- mans. Also the noise of the operating engine can be harmful to the human hearing system. Numerous incidents have been reported including injury to personnel by jet en- gines. One incident has resulted in a fatality.

General Component Locations The powerplant danger areas are the air inlet and exhaust from the fan and core sections of the engine. All these sections provide hazards due to high air velocity and generated noise.

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Operation A typical engine inlet hazard area extends fan shaped forward from the inlet and aft from the inlet lip to the forward end of the cowl panels. When the en- gine is operating above idle thrust the hazard area extends further forward from the inlet and further aft of the nose cowl inlet lip. Personnel working on the en- gine aft of the inlet should take special care to strictly avoid this hazard area.

WARNING:

DURING GROUND RUNNING OPERATION THE ENGINE IS CAPABLE OF DEVELOPING ENOUGH SUCTION AT THE INLET TO PULL A PERSON UP TO OR INTO THE DUCT WITH POSSIBLE FATAL RESULTS. THEREFORE, WHEN APPROACHING ANY JET ENGINE, PRECAUTIONS MUST BE TAKEN TO KEEP CLEAR OF ALL INLET AIR STREAM. THE SUCTION NEAR THE INLET CAN ALSO PULL HATS, GLASSES, LOOSE CLOTHING AND WIPERAGS FROM POCKETS INTO THE ENGINE. ANY LOOSE ARTICLES MUST BE MADE SECURE OR REMOVED BEFORE WORK- ING AROUND THE ENGINE.

Page:8 Page: 16

TOWING & TAXING TOWING

B737−300/400/500

09−10

100 FEET (30.5 METERS) 1 RIGHT ENGINE 175 FEET (53,3 METERS) LEFT ENGINE R =
100 FEET
(30.5 METERS)
1
RIGHT ENGINE
175 FEET
(53,3 METERS)
LEFT ENGINE
R = 9 FEET
(2.7 METERS)
2
4 FEET
(1.2 METERS)
INLET
COWL
LIP
R = 13 FEET
(4 METERS)
5 FEET
1
(1.5 METERS)
IDLE POWER (FORWARD THRUST)
INLET
2
FORWARD BREAKAWAY POWER (BOTH ENGINES OPERATING)
COWL
LIP
For Training Purposes Only

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Figure 4

Inlet and Exhaust Dangers Areas

Page: 17

Page:9

STRUCTURES DESCRIPTION AND OPERATION

B737−300/400/500

51−00

For Training Purposes Only

51

STRUCTURES

STRUCTURES - DESCRIPTION AND OPERATION

General The structure of the airplane is designed to provide maximum strength with minimum weight. This object has been achieved by designing alternate load paths into the structure, so that a failure of one segment cannot endanger the airplane, and also by the use of appropriately selected materials. The materials most commonly used thoughout the structure are aluminum, steel, and magne- sium alloys. Of these, the most extensively used are certain aluminum alloys selected according to the particular type of load they are best suited to with- stand. Aluminum and fiberglass honeycomb core material is used extensively on sec- ondary areas of structures and many of the flight surfaces. Maintanance practices concerning blowout doors and panels are covered in applicable chapters on structures.

Fuselage The fuselage is a semimonocoque structure with the skin reinforced by circum- ferential frames and longitudinal stringers. It is composed of four sections: body sections 41, 43, 46, and 48, of which the forward three together extend from body station 178 to body station 1016 and contain all the passenger, crew, and cargo accommodations. The fourth section of the fuselage is at the aft end and provides support for the empennage. The entire shell of the fuselage between body stations 178 and 1016 is pres- surized with the exception of the cavity enclosing the nose gear wheel well, and the large cutout which accommodates the center wing box and main leanding gear well. When installed, the forward airstairs are contained below the floor of body section 41. The fuselage frames at body sations 540 and 664 incorporate points at which the fuselage is attached to the wing front and rear spars. The connection between the inboard end of the landing gear support beam and the fuselage is a swinging link fitting attached to the frames at body stations 695 and 706.

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Body section 48 of the fuselage is not pressurized and extends aft from the rear pressure bulkhead at body station 1016. The vertical fin structure and the horizontal stabilizer structure are supported by the 48 section. The APU is in- stalled in a fireproof compartment below the horizontal stabilizer.

Wings The structure of the wing, between left and right tips, consists of the left wing box, the center wing box, and the right wing box. The left and right wing boxes are cantilevered from the center wing box which carries, and is enclosed within, the fuselage. The thickness and chord of each wing tapers down towards the tip and, in plane view, both wings sweep back from the center wing box. On each wing, the leading edge structure is cantilevered forward from the wing front spar. The trailing edge structure is cantilevered aft from the wing rear spar and supported additionally, at the inboard end of the wing, by the landing gear support beam. A bearing approximately midway along the landing gear support beam, together with one forward of it attached to the wing rear spar, from the axis of main landing gear rotation and are the points at which landing loads are transmitted to the wing structure. Five control surfaces are supported by the leading edge structure of each wing:

two flaps are hinged from the inboard one−third of the wing span, and along the outboard two−thirds three extendable slats are installed. The control surfaces along the trailing edge of each wing consist of inboard and outboard flaps, an aileron and a total of five spoilers.

Page:10

STRUCTURES DESCRIPTION AND OPERATION

B737−300/400/500

51−00

For Training Purposes Only

SCL

BONDED

WAFFLE

DOUBLER

OUTER SKIN ROLLED STRINGER (TYP) WINDOW FRAME EXTRUDED (TYP) STRINGERS FRAME to FRAME 20−INCH (STD)
OUTER
SKIN
ROLLED
STRINGER
(TYP)
WINDOW
FRAME
EXTRUDED
(TYP)
STRINGERS
FRAME to FRAME
20−INCH (STD)
10−INCH (STD)

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Figure 5

Typical Basic Structure

Page:11

For Training Purposes Only

FUSELAGE

B737-300/400/500

GENERAL

53-00

ATA 53

53−00

FUSELAGE

GENERAL

FUSELAGE GENERAL DESCRIPTION

Purpose The fuselage is a structurally sound and aerodynamically contoured body which supports the wings, stabilizers and landing gear. Most of it is pressurized for the coverage of payload.

System Description

A typical section through the fuselage consists of an upper and a lower oval

which intersect approximately at the floor level. At the intersection, the fuselage

is reinforced by transverse floor beams.

Above this floor structure, which extends from the front pressure bulkhead at Body Station 178 to the rear pressure bulkhead at Body Station 1016, the up- per lobe of the fuselage encloses the cabin and is basically a continuous shell, with cutouts in the skin for doors and windows. Below the floor the continuity of the lower lobe, which encloses the cargo compartments, is interrupted by sev- eral major structural features: the nose landing gear wheel well, the cavity for the center wing box, and the main landing gear wheel well. Aft of the rear pres- sure bulkhead, the floor is discontinued and this section of the fuselage, which tapers towards its aft end, supports the vertical fin, the horizontal stabilizer, and contains a compartment for the APU.

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For Training Purposes Only

FUSELAGE

B737-300/400/500

GENERAL

53-00

Purposes Only FUSELAGE B737-300/400/500 GENERAL 53-00 SCL VRC/RRH 26.08.2005 Figure 6 Body Station Diagram

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Figure 6

Body Station Diagram B737-300

Page:Page:13

For Training Purposes Only

DOORS

B737-300/400/500

GENERAL

52-00

ATA 52

52−00

DOORS

GENERAL

INTRODUCTION

Purpose The purpose of the doors is to permit entry to or exit from the various airplane compartment and areas.

General Component Locations Entry Doors:

− Provide for entry and exit for passengers and crew members. Located on the left side, forward and aft. Galley Service Doors:

− Located forward and aft on the right side, they are normally used for servicing the galleys. They also serve as emergency exits. Emergency Exits:

− The overwing emergency hatches are available as emergency exits on both sides. Cargo Compartment Doors:

− Provide access to the cargo compartments; located forward and aft of the wing on the right side. External Service Doors:

− These doors are used by ground personnel for maintenance and servic- ing. The two doors in the pressurized portion are located in the lower fuselage forward and aft of the nose gear. The flight compartment door is a secure door controlled by the flight crew. It provides positive separation between the flight compartment and passenger compartment.

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For Training Purposes Only

DOORS

B737-300/400/500

GENERAL

52-00

AFT GALLEY SERVICE DOOR (RIGHT SIDE) SECTION 48 ACCESS AND BLOWOUT DOOR EMERGENCY AFT ENTRY
AFT GALLEY
SERVICE DOOR
(RIGHT SIDE)
SECTION 48 ACCESS
AND BLOWOUT DOOR
EMERGENCY
AFT ENTRY DOOR
EXIT HATCH
(RIGHT SIDE)
EMERGENCY
EXIT HATCH
FORWARD GALLEY
SERVICE DOOR
(RIGHT SIDE)
EMERGENCY
EXIT HATCHES
CSD OIL RESERVOIR
SIGHT GAGE ACCESS
DOOR
1
FORWARD
ENTRY
DOOR
ENGINE OIL TANK
ACCESS DOOR
1
ON 737−400 ONLY

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Figure 7

Door Locations

Page: 47

Page:15

DOORS PASSENGER / CREW

B737-300/400/500

52-10

For Training Purposes Only

52−10

ENTRY DOOR

Purpose The purpose of the entry doors is to provide the primary entrance and exit for the passengers and flight crew.

Location The entry doors are located on the left side of the airplane at the fore and aft ends of the passenger compartment.

Physical Description/Features The forward entry door is 34 inches wide and 72 inches high, the aft entry door is 30 inches wide and 72 inches high. Both are inward − outward opening plug− type doors. An upper and lower hinge assembly support the door on its forward edge; the doors may be closed or opened from inside or outside the airplane. The door is opened by manually operating the centrally located handle. This action causes the internal mechanism to release the latches, folds the gates inward, and moves the door to its most inward position. The door is manually swung through the door opening and stowed in the open position forward of the opening.

PASSENGER / CREW

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DOORS PASSENGER / CREW

B737-300/400/500

52-10

For Training Purposes Only

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1. PULL HANDLE

3

26.08.2005

2. ROTATE HANDLE CLOCKWISE

LATCH

LEVER

SEE

A

Figure 8

A

OPEN

Entry Door operating from outside Airplane

4

Page: 51

Page:17

DOORS PASSENGER / CREW

B737-300/400/500

52-10

For Training Purposes Only

THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK

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DOORS PASSENGER / CREW

B737-300/400/500

52-10

For Training Purposes Only

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1

5

26.08.2005

2

Figure 9

3

6

Entry Door operating from inside Airplane

4

2 Figure 9 3 6 Entry Door operating from inside Airplane 4 ENTRY AND GALLEY DOORS

ENTRY AND GALLEY DOORS (EXAMPLE)

NOTE: DOOR GATE LINING REMOVED

Page: 53

Page:19

DOORS PASSENGER / CREW

B737−300/400/500

52−10

For Training Purposes Only

ENTRY DOOR MECHANISM

Physical Description/Features

The entry door mechanism consists of several assemblies that accomplish the following functions:

Handle Mechanism:

This mechanism, through a duplex arm, converts the rotary motion of the handles to a push−pull motion of two cranks. One crank actuates the latches, and upper and lower gates during initial handle rotation. The other crank moves the forward edge of the door inward to its open posi- tion during further rotation. Door stops and latching assembly:

− These devices transmit pressure loads from the door to body structure, and latch the door in the closed position. Centering Guide:

A pin on the aft edge of the door slides into a guide track on the frame to

align the stops and latches.

Lower Hinge:

A rigid hinge arm is attached to the lower end of both the body and door

torque tube assemblies. A hydraulic snubber impedes door movement at its travel extremities.

Upper Hinge:

A rigid hinge arm is attached to the body and door torque tube assembly.

A guide arm parallel to the hinge arm rides in an “S” shaped track to con-

trol the door rotation about its torque tube. Spring Assist Torque Tube (counterbalance assembly):

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The upper and lower hinge arms are attached to a vertical, body mounted torque tube to support the door when it is open. Torsion springs around this torque tube provide opening and closing assistance.

to support the door when it is open. T orsion springs around this torque tube provide

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Page:20 Page: 54

DOORS PASSENGER / CREW

B737−300/400/500

52−10

For Training Purposes Only

TOP GATE LATCH ROD LATCH AND STOP ASSEMBLY CONTROL ROD GUIDE TRACK TOP HINGE HINGE
TOP GATE
LATCH ROD
LATCH AND
STOP ASSEMBLY
CONTROL ROD
GUIDE TRACK
TOP HINGE
HINGE
SUPPORT
HANDLE MECHANISM
ASSIST
HANDLE
TORQUE TUBE
ASSEMBLY
CONTROL ROD
LATCH ROD
BOTTOM HINGE
CONTROL ROD
HINGE
SUPPORT
BOTTOM GATE

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Figure 10

Entry Door Mechanism

Page: 55

Page:21

DOORS EMERGENCY EXIT

B737-300/400/500

52-20

For Training Purposes Only

52−20

EMERGENCY EXIT

EMERGENCY EXIT HATCH

Purpose The purpose of the emergency exit hatch is to provide a means of exiting the passenger compartment in the event of an emergency.

Location These identical hatches are located on each side of the fuselage at the over- wing area.

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DOORS EMERGENCY EXIT

B737-300/400/500

52-20

HATCH (2 LOCATIONS) SEE A 1
HATCH
(2 LOCATIONS)
SEE
A
1
HATCH (4 LOCATIONS) SEE A 2 1 ALL EXCEPT 737−400 2 737−400 SCL VRC/RRH 26.08.2005
HATCH
(4 LOCATIONS)
SEE
A
2
1
ALL EXCEPT 737−400
2
737−400
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For Training Purposes Only

Figure 11

RELEASE HANDLE LIFT HANDLE HATCH A Emergency Hatch Operation Page:23 Page :
RELEASE HANDLE
LIFT HANDLE
HATCH
A
Emergency Hatch Operation
Page:23
Page
:

DOORS EMERGENCY EXIT

B737-300/400/500

52-20

For Training Purposes Only

EMERGENCY EXIT HATCH OPERATION

Inside Removal The hatch is opened from the inside by pulling down and in on the handhold pocket which is attached to the operating handle. The action of the handle ro- tates the torque tube and turns the latch rollers. The latch rollers disengage from the latch fittings and the top edge of the hatch moves inward. Continuing to hold the upper handle, the lower handhold is grasped with the other hand and the hatch is pulled inward at the top edge. The hatch is then lifted upwards and inwards away from the opening, disengaging the lower pivot fitting from the lower pivot hook.

Outside Removal The hatch is opened from the outside by pushing in on the panel at the top of the hatch and then pushing the hatch into the airplane.

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DOORS EMERGENCY EXIT

B737-300/400/500

52-20

For Training Purposes Only

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B737-300/400/500 52-20 For Training Purposes Only SCL HATCH REMOVAL (EXTERNAL) 1 2 STEP 1 STEP 3

HATCH REMOVAL (EXTERNAL)

1
1
2
2

STEP 1

Purposes Only SCL HATCH REMOVAL (EXTERNAL) 1 2 STEP 1 STEP 3 STEP 2 STEP 4

STEP 3

STEP 2 STEP 4
STEP 2
STEP 4
1 2
1
2

RELEASE HANDLE COVER ATTACHED WITH SCREWS

RELEASE HANDLE COVER ATTACHED WITH BRACKETS

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Figure 12

HATCH REMOVAL (INTERNAL)

Emergency Hatch Operation

Page: 83

Page:25

For Training Purposes Only

DOORS

B737-300/400/500

CARGO

52-30

52−30

CARGO

CARGO COMPARTMENT DOORS

Purpose The purpose of the cargo compartment doors is to provide access to the for- ward and aft cargo compartments. The forward cargo compartment door also permits access to the flight crew oxygen cylinder.

Location The cargo compartment doors are located on the right side of the airplane; the forward cargo compartment door is forward of the wing and the aft cargo compartment is aft of the wing.

Physical Description/Features Both cargo compartment doors are plug−type, inward opening, manually oper- ated, and hinged at the upper edge. Both doors are the same in design and operation; however, they are not interchangeable. The forward door is 48 in- ches wide by 35 inches high and the aft door is 48 inches wide by 33 inches high. Each door is hinged from the fuselage structure by two hinge arms on the up- per edge. Pressurization loads are transmitted to the fuselage by twelve stop fittings. Each door is equipped with a balance mechanism to counterbalance the weight of the door. A snubber is installed between the hinge arms to re- strain the free—fall of the door if the balance mechanism cable fails.

Latch Mechanism The door latching mechanism consists of two latching rollers, one at each end of a horizontal torque tube. The latching rollers engage latch fittings attached to the fuselage. The torque tube is connected to the operating handle assembly. The operating handle assembly has a handle on the inside of the door and a handle on the outside. The inside handle is stationary but the outside handle is spring−loaded so that it retracts flush with the door when released after use.

Balance Mechanism Balance Mechanism on airplanes with an uplatch,

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door balance is maintained by springs attached to the upper aft inner edge of the door between the inner web and outer skin.

balance is maintained by springs attached to the upper aft inner edge of the door between

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26.08.2005

− The springs connect to a cable assembly wound on a cable drum mounted on the forward inner structure of the door. From the cable drum, the cable runs over two pulleys mounted on the inner structure of the door and connects to an overhead floor beam.

− The cable grooves in the cable drum have a decreasing radius in order to provide a constant tension in the cable system as the door is opened and closed.

The balance mechanism is arranged so that the springs are stretched when the door is closed. When the door is opened, the springs contract to raise the door to or near the open latched position. On airplanes with a counterbalance assembly,

door balance is maintained by a spring−driven idler crank that drives a cam fixed to a cable drum.

− The springs, idler crank, cam and drum are all located in the counterbal- ance assembly mounted on the inner structure of the door.

− From the drum the cable runs over a pulley mounted on the inner struc- ture of the door and connects to an overhead floor beam.

− The counterbalance mechanism is arranged so that the springs are com- pressed when the door is closed.

− When the door is opened the springs extend to drive the idler crank, cam and drum to raise the door.

Page:26 Page: 84

For Training Purposes Only

DOORS

B737-300/400/500

CARGO

52-30

CABLE

CLIP

(2 PLACES)

TAB

FLOOR BEAM

LANYARD

ASSEMBLY

SNUBBER

BEARING PLATE

(4 PLACES)

DOOR FRAME

HINGE ARMS

(2 PLACES

 

LOCKING

CABLE

WIRE

ASSEMBLY

INNER SKIN

REMOVED

FOR CLARITY

LATCH

CARGO COMPARTMENT DOOR INSIDE LATCH HANDLE

CARGO COMPARTMENT (DOOR IN CLOSED POSITION)

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Figure 13

26.08.2005

CARGO DOOR

LATCH MECHANISM

SEE

B

SPRINGS

FWD

SPLICE PLATE

DOOR STOP

SEE

A

ROLLER ARM

(2 PLACES)

DOOR

FRAME

LAMINATED

SHIM

ROLLER STOP

SERRATED

TORQUE TUBE

PLATE

BEARING HOUSING

(2 PLACES)

TORQUE

TUBE

CARGO DOOR LATCH MECHANISM

B

DOOR STOP

A

DOOR

FRAME

Cargo Comp. Doors Component Location (Airplane with Uplatch)

ROLLER STOP SERRATED PLATE LAMINATED SHIM

Page: 85

Page:27

DOORS DOOR WARNING

B737-300/400/500

52-70

For Training Purposes Only

52−70

DOOR WARNING

DOOR UNLOCK INDICATORS

Operation/Control Sequence The individual warning lights for the doors are located on the overhead panel, P5. The electronic equipment compartment access door and the lower nose compartment door activate the same light, EQUIP, through individual micro- switches. The circuit is such that both doors must be latched in order to extin- guish the warning light. The other warning lights are activated by sensors oper- ated by each individual door.

Normal Sequence When a door is unlatched, the sensor or microswitch completes a circuit and illuminates the appropriate warning light on the P5 panel. Closing and latching the door will extinguish the warning light. When all of the doors are closed and latched, the DOORS annunciator light will extinguish.

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Page:28 Page: 102

DOORS DOOR WARNING

B737-300/400/500

52-70

For Training Purposes Only

AFT SERVICE DOOR SENSOR AFT ENTRY DOOR SENSOR AFT CARGO COMPARTMENT DOOR SENSOR FORWARD ENTRY
AFT SERVICE
DOOR SENSOR
AFT ENTRY
DOOR SENSOR
AFT CARGO
COMPARTMENT
DOOR SENSOR
FORWARD ENTRY
DOOR SENSOR
MAIN EQUIPMENT CENTER SEE D
MAIN EQUIPMENT
CENTER
SEE
D

FORWARD CARGO

COMPARTMENT

DOOR SENSOR

FORWARD SERVICE DOOR SENSOR FORWARD OVERHEAD PANEL

SEE

A
A

FORWARD ACCESS DOOR SWITCH ELECTRONIC ACCESS DOOR SWITCH

A FORWARD ACCESS DOOR SWITCH ELECTRONIC ACCESS DOOR SWITCH FWD D MISCELLANEOUS SWITCHING MODULE P5−20 DOOR

FWD

D
D

MISCELLANEOUS SWITCHING MODULE

P5−20 DOOR WARNING MODULE SEE B SEE C A FORWARD OVERHEAD PANEL
P5−20 DOOR WARNING
MODULE
SEE
B
SEE
C
A FORWARD OVERHEAD PANEL

FWD

 

FWD

FWD

ENTRY

CARGO

SERVICE

AFT

 

AFT

AFT

ENTRY

EQUIP

CARGO

SERVICE

P5−20 DOOR WARNING MODULE MASTER FIRE CAUTION WARN PUSH TO RESET BELL CUTOUT ANTI−ICE ENG
P5−20 DOOR WARNING MODULE
MASTER
FIRE
CAUTION
WARN
PUSH TO RESET
BELL CUTOUT
ANTI−ICE
ENG
HYD
OVERHEAD
DOORS
AIR COND
C SYSTEM ANNUNCIATOR LIGHTS

(219881)

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26.08.2005

Figure 14

Door Unlock Indication

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For Training Purposes Only

WINDOWS

B737-300/400/500

GENERAL

56-00

ATA

56-00

56 WINDOWS

GENERAL

INTRODUCTION

Purpose The purpose of the airplane windows is to provide:

− Visual means to fly the airplane and for collision avoidance,

− emergency exit from the flight compartment,

and an opening in the opaque fuselage through which the environment may be viewed.

General Component Locations The windows on the airplane are grouped as follows:

− Flight Compartment windows

− Passenger Compartment windows

Inspection windows

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VRC/RRH

26.08.2005

Page:30 Page:

WINDOWS

B737-300/400/500

GENERAL

56-00

INSPECTION WINDOW PASSENGER FLIGHT COMPARTMENT COMPARTMENT WINDOWS WINDOWS INSPECTION WINDOW For Training
INSPECTION
WINDOW
PASSENGER
FLIGHT
COMPARTMENT
COMPARTMENT
WINDOWS
WINDOWS
INSPECTION
WINDOW
For Training Purposes Only

SCL

VRC/RRH

26.08.2005

Figure 15

WINDOWS INTRODUCTION

Page:31 Page: 107

WINDOWS INSPECTION AND OBSERVATION

B737-300/400/500

56-40

For Training Purposes Only

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For Training Purposes Only

WINDOWS INSPECTION AND OBSERVATION

B737-300/400/500

56-40

VIEWER COVER

FLOOR PANEL

WING CENTER SECTION PRESSURE WEB STRUCTURE

VIEWER WINDOW

VIEWER TUBE

REMOVABLE FLOOR PANEL

UPPER TUBE

LOWER TUBE

CONTROL CABIN

FLOOR STRUCTURE

BOTTOM PLATE

VIEWER COVER

 

MIRROR

(2 PLACES)

WINDOW

FWD

MAIN GEAR DOWNLOCK VIEWER

A

SCL

VRC/RRH

NOSE GEAR DOWNLOCK VIEWER

26.08.2005

B

Figure 16

NOSE WHEEL WELL UPPER STRUCTURE

WINDOW

Viewer and Observation Windows

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WINDOWS INSPECTION AND OBSERVATION

B737-300/400/500

56-40

For Training Purposes Only

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