Sie sind auf Seite 1von 20

 

Group Members

              Faizan Ashraf 
            Jacob Dorabialski 
         Peter Hwang 
       Terry Kim 
     David Kong 
  Jason Shin 
Transportation in the 
1920s and 1930s 
Bulletin Board Assignment 
 
The 1920's and 1930s were a period of great progress in 
transportation. For many Canadians, transportation reflected 
all that was new and modern about these decades. This 
project focuses on five main modes of transportation in the 
1920s and 1930s: automobiles, trains, ocean liners, public 
transit and airplanes. 
 
Faizan Ashraf, Jacob Dorabialski, Peter Hwang, Terry Kim, 
David Kong, Jason Shin 
11/1/2006 
Transportation in the 1920s and 1930s 

Table of Contents 
INTRODUCTION  4 

AUTOMOBILES  5 

HENRY FORD  5 
INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES  6 
ASSEMBLY LINE  6 
THE MODEL T  6 

TRAINS  8 

CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY  8 
CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAY  9 
PASSENGER TRAINS  10 
FREIGHT TRAINS  11 
TECHNOLOGY IN TRAINS  11 

OCEAN LINERS  13 

WHAT IMPELLED OCEAN LINERS TO GAIN DEMAND AND TO PROSPER?  13 
FAMOUS SHIPPING AND PASSENGER LINERS  13 
THE CUNARD LINE  13 
THE CUNARD‐WHITE STAR LINE  14 
THE BLUENOSE  14 

PUBLIC TRANSIT  15 

TRAFFIC CONGESTION  15 
TRAM  16 
TORONTO CITY'S TRANSIT  16 

Faizan Ashraf, Jacob Dorabialski, Peter Hwang, Terry Kim, David Kong, Jason Shin     
Transportation in the 1920s and 1930s 

AIRPLANES  17 

COMMERCIAL AIRLINES  17 
AIRMAIL  18 
THE VIEW OF AIR TRAVEL IN CANADA  18 
IMPROVEMENTS IN COMMERCIAL AIR TRAVEL  18 
ESTABLISHED CANADIAN AIRLINES  19 
ESTABLISHMENT OF CANADIAN AIRLINES  ERROR! BOOKMARK NOT DEFINED. 
BOEING 314  19 

ZEPPELINS  20 

THE GOLDEN AGE  20 
THE HINDENBURG DISASTER  20 
 

Faizan Ashraf, Jacob Dorabialski, Peter Hwang, Terry Kim, David Kong, Jason Shin     
Transportation in the 1920s and 1930s 

Introduction 
Jake Dorabialski 

The 1920’s and 30’s were the years of economic growth and decline; they represented the times of 
development and recession in society. The most profound advancements in transportation occurred 
during the post WWI era. Land transportation was the most dominant form of transportation. The 
expansion of the use of the automobiles revolutionized the way the world functioned. People depended 
on cars for traveling between work and home, to run errands, and to visit one another. With the 
automobile, people could run society faster; thus, the world developed and prospered at a faster rate. 
Water transportation was also significant to the subject of transportation during the 1920’s and 30’s.  
During that time period, transatlantic liners were the most significant mode of sea transportation. World 
powers competed for ocean supremacy, battling to build better ocean liners. The 1920’s and 30’s were 
the golden age of sea transport. Conversely, another form of transportation was emerging – air 
transportation. With their first introduction in WWI, the airplane developed to challenge the main 
modes of long distance transportation—ocean liners and trains. In addition, Zeppelins also completed 
with planes for air supremacy. However, their prosperous reputation was devastated with the 
Hindenburg disaster. Urban transportation experienced gradual increase as it was available only in the 
largest cities in Canada. Public transportation was a solution to provide a method of travel for the 
increasing populations in cities and traffic congestion. Expansion in transportation technology (especially 
the automobile, ocean liners, and commercial airplanes) was at its highest in 1920’s and 30’s. These 
developments helped shape and prosper society.  

Faizan Ashraf, Jacob Dorabialski, Peter Hwang, Terry Kim, David Kong, Jason Shin     
Transportation in the 1920s and 1930s 

Automobiles  
By: Faizan Ashraf 

The most important age in automotive history was arguably the 1920’s. This was when the automobile 
industry experienced great development and prosperity. At this time, the world was booming and 
experiencing extreme and rapid economic growth. Vehicle demand became extremely high. Before 
automobiles were introduced and mass‐produced, land transportation was very slow and difficult. 
Automobiles dominated what was once the world of bicycles and horse carriages. Cars were used to go 
between work and home, to run errands, and to go on vacations. The appeal of saving time significantly 
increased car sales. As the world became more advanced, automobiles became more popular. 

Henry Ford 

Henry Ford was the most successful automobile maker of all time. He served as an inventor, 
entrepreneur and an advocate for automobiles of his time. He contributed to the growth of the North 
American economy at a time when it was still suffering from post‐war effects. Henry Ford shaped parts 
of our society to what it is today.  

In 1903, Ford established the Ford motor company and took his place as the vice president and 
chief engineer. The company had poor success as it was very slow at producing cars, making only 3 to 4 
vehicles a day.  

However, this soon changed. Ford invented the Assembly Line and implemented it to the faster 
production of cars. He also utilized the Internal Combustion Engine in his automobile models. These 
technologies made his cars affordable, reliable, and efficient. This led to the conception of the Model T 
in 1908. 

Faizan Ashraf, Jacob Dorabialski, Peter Hwang, Terry Kim, David Kong, Jason Shin     
Transportation in the 1920s and 1930s 

 
Internal Combustion Engines 

The most crucial part for an automobile is its engine. Before the invention of fuel and steam 
engines, the only sources of power for vehicles were man power and horses. The gasoline internal 
combustion was the most widely used engines for automobiles back in the 1920s. This engine was 
popular because it could reach a wide range of speed and its design allowed it to be mass powered. As 
the years passed engines have been modified to increase speed power and efficiency. 

Assembly Line 

The auto assembly line was one of the biggest improvements in automobile production. It cut 
down the duration of assembling a vehicle by almost half. This technology was perfected by auto‐maker 
Henry Ford. The assembly line consisted of a large conveyor belt which moved the chassis of a car to 
different stations in the factory. As the belt moves, sections of the automobile were placed in place. The 
distinct advantage was that the work was divided amongst numerous of people. The average auto 
factory went from making only 4 or 5 vehicles a day to over 100. This assembly line also decreased the 
price because of the not as many workers were necessary. For example, the $1000 price tag of the Ford 
T Model (90,000 in current CND) became $500 after the introduction of the assembly line. In conclusion, 
the assembly line allowed the average Canadian to buy an automobile because of the substantial 
decrease of price. 

The Model T 

The Model T was produced mainly in Detroit, Michigan, which is the center of automobile 
production today. By the fourth year of production, almost 12,000 Model T’s were sold. The 
introduction of the assembly line ensured that the Model T maintained its competitive price. One car 
only required 93 minutes to manufacture. Later on, the variations were developed such as the Model T 
Roadster, Coupe, Fordor and Tudor. Ford had sold over fifteen million Model T’s worldwide by the end 
of 1927. The Model T had brought the automobile to the average person, as a result of its low cost. 

Faizan Ashraf, Jacob Dorabialski, Peter Hwang, Terry Kim, David Kong, Jason Shin     
Transportation in the 1920s and 1930s 

How the Automobiles Influenced Society 

The world was significantly changed in the 1920’s and the 30’s due to the widespread use of 
automobiles. By the end of the 1920s, automobiles became so inexpensive that almost every family 
owned an automobile. As a result, the way of life was considerably changed. Workers did not have to 
seek employment near their household, and could live farther away and still get to their jobs with ease. 
People would be able to run their errands with greater convenience. Finally, families could go on 
vacation on their own schedule and visit their relatives in distant places. Overall, automobiles increased 
the society in both productivity and efficiency, which spared more time for entertainment and 
recreation.  

The automobile also brought substantial economic prosperity. More and more money was 
invested into the automobile industry. New roads and highways were being built to accommodate the 
growing number of cars. 

Unfortunately automobiles also negatively influenced society. Firstly, roads were not being 
paved at the rate of the multiplying amount of cars. This resulted in a huge problem of traffic 
congestion. Secondly, the amount of pollution created by automobiles were appalling. Thirdly, there 
was a problem in attempting to cross the country since there were no transcontinental highway at that 
time, only dirt and unreliable roads. The automobile served the people of this world in a very influential 
manner.

Faizan Ashraf, Jacob Dorabialski, Peter Hwang, Terry Kim, David Kong, Jason Shin     
Transportation in the 1920s and 1930s 

Trains 
David Kong 

It was November 7th of 1885, when the last spike of the Canadian Pacific Railway was driven into the 
ground in Craigellachie, British Colombia. This symbolized the official completion of the transcontinental 
railway, promised by Sir John A. McDonald over a decade ago. Spanning 1600km of rugged and barren 
terrain of the Canadian Shield and the Rocky mountains, this system brought a nation together. 

However this apparent triumph was overshadowed by multiple factors, including debt, war and 
bankruptcy. In the 1920’s and 30’s, the railway scene was filled with two huge locomotive companies: 
Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) and the Canadian National Railway (CNR). 

Canadian Pacific Railway 

Sir John A. McDonald proposed confederation along with a national dream – a 
transcontinental railway that will link the nation coast to coast and virtually shrink down the size 
of Canada. The Canadian Pacific Railway was the solution – linking the Dominion of Canada from 
sea to sea. This would promote the settlement to the west and allow the transportation of 
products from city to city along its extensive route. 

For the first forty years of the service, the CPR had a monopoly on railway services, and 
therefore, was the most profitable railroad. No other railway could compete as effectively on a 
national level. For decades, the CPR bought out smaller, insignificant networks to expand their 
own. 

In the early years, the CPR stayed as a freight line, providing an economic lifeline for 
western Canada. As a result, all products from Western Canada could be shipped to Eastern 
Canada, where it could be sold. Rail represented the most economic method for farmers to ship 
their products. 

 However, as the amount of passenger travelers increased, the CPR built its tourism line. 
They opened luxury cars to allow the rich to go on vacation in the Alberta Rockies. In addition, 
the CPR built large hotels, including the famous Banff Spring Hotel and Chateau Lake Louise. 
Both are still standing today. 

When the depression occurred in the 1930’s, the CPR stayed out of debt – being the only 
rail company to do so. They continued to pay shareholders dividends until 1932. By the end of 

Faizan Ashraf, Jacob Dorabialski, Peter Hwang, Terry Kim, David Kong, Jason Shin     
Transportation in the 1920s and 1930s 

the 1930s, the Canadian Pacific Railway expanded further in airlines and cruise lines. For the 
decades to come, the CPR remained as the greatest travel and transport object in Canada. 

Canadian National Railway 

In 1917, amidst the great war, the Canadian Government took over the Canadian 
National Railway. 17 new lines were integrated into this system. In addition, small local rail lines 
consolidated under the new Canadian National Railway. This included the Grand Trunk Pacific, 
which extended the track into British Colombia. In 1923, the CNR completed the Grand Trunk 
railway, making it an actual coast to coast system. The CNR went from Vancouver to Halifax – 
spanning over 35000 kilometers, making it one of the longest railways in the world. In 
comparison to the Canadian Pacific, the CPR only went only from Vancouver to Montreal. 

In addition to railways, the CNR also owned a telegraph company, a steamship line as 
well as a chain of hotels. During the 1920’s, the CNR fine‐tuned their services – such as their 
uniform timetables, work rules and salaries. 

The Canadian National Railway did many things to attract customers by promoting an 
enjoyable trip.  The CNR worked creating more first‐class cars as in the 1920’s, people were 
becoming more prosperous. One of the highlights of travelling on the CNR was established by 
their first radio network in Canada to entertain train travelers. Specially equipped cars would 
allow travelers to listen to programs broad casted by one of the CNR’s many radio stations 
located across the country. This radio service is now known as the Canadian Broadcasting 
Company. 

However these successes were short‐lived, as the stock market crashed in 1929 – giving 
way to the Great Depression. In the 1930’s, individuals and businesses failed, and the same fate 
occurred to the Canadian National railway. Also, the drought badly hurt Prairies farmers, 
stopping the trafficking of grain. The cars that would have carried wheat now housed homeless 
men desperately searching for work. 

Thankfully, the depression ended by the end of the decade. New developments 
occurred, such as an addition of a national air service, which became a subsidiary of CNR. The 
start of air travel helped the Canadian National Railway get out of debt, but as Canada entered 
the Second World War, the CNR was used for the transportation of soldiers and products to help 
win the War. 

When looking into the topic of transportation, there are two different categories. The first category is 
the transportation of people; the second category is the transportation of goods. Both railway 
companies focused on these two categories to make a profit. In this case, there are two different kinds 
of trains – Passenger Trains and Freight Trains. 

Faizan Ashraf, Jacob Dorabialski, Peter Hwang, Terry Kim, David Kong, Jason Shin     
Transportation in the 1920s and 1930s 

Passenger Trains 

There are four main passenger trains in the 1920’s and 1930’s. These trains have 
different characteristics that are set to the class of passengers and the length of their trip. The 
four types are the Colonist Car, the Coach Car, the Sleeping Car and the Dining Car. 

Colonist Car 

The Colonist Car is geared to settlers on their road to the prairies. This was the 
most inexpensive way to travel long distances. The advantage was the low cost, but the 
disadvantages included the lack of amenities and luxuries. Passengers had to sit on 
wooden seats and sleep on platforms that came down from the ceiling. People brought 
their own blankets to ease the pain of sleeping. In addition, they had to cook their own 
meals on stoves at the back of the car. These stoves were also the only source of heat. 

Coach Car 

The Coach Car was used by travelers who seek some comfort, and are taking 
short trips. This car was of average comfort, with pillowed seats and food such as candy, 
fruits, sandwiches, cold drinks and coffee. This car is far more comfortable than the 
colonist car. 

Sleeping Car 

The Sleeping Car was used by passenger who had to make long journeys. Seats 
in these cars were easily turned into beds. Staff on board would assist the passenger in 
getting comfortable. In addition, curtains between beds were added for privacy. 

Faizan Ashraf, Jacob Dorabialski, Peter Hwang, Terry Kim, David Kong, Jason Shin     
Transportation in the 1920s and 1930s 

Freight Trains 

Freight Trains represented the economic development of Western Canada. Their 
relatively small market was compensated because of the transportation of goods to Eastern 
Canada was simple thanks to the transcontinental system.  In the 1920’s and 1930’s, Canadian 
Prairies had a very rural based economy – lead by farming. The market for agriculture was 
located in large cities of Canada, which included Montreal and other Eastern Canada 
destinations. Freight trains were the easiest and most economical way for farmers to carry these 
loads over long distances. 

The Canadian Pacific owned a monopoly on transcontinental transportation before the 
arrival of the Canadian National. The CPR could therefore charge as much as they would like, 
and the farmers would have to pay it. The arrival of the CNR meant that the two companies 
would have to fight for customers, which would keep the prices competitive. This brought the 
freight pricing standards down, helping the farmers a great deal.  

Technology in Trains 

 Two major developments occurred in Trains. The first one is the change of fuel. The 
second one is the implementation of a reliable breaking system.  

Development of the Steam Engine 

Early trains were powered by steam. The process included coal, wood and 
heated water in a boiler. This boiling water resulted in steam. The steam was then 
collected in a steam dome, piped to the cylinders, where it expanded. This forced 
pistons to move back and forth, similar to that of a car. These pistons were connected to 
the long arms called driving rods, which turned the huge wheels of the train. 

The huge disadvantage was that the train needed to refill itself all the time. 
Large steam engines burned 15 tons of coal for a distance of 200km. The coal, wood and 
water was picked up at servicing spots every 200 km. The boiler needed water often, 
which was filled every 16 km.  

Diesel locomotives replaced the steam engine. In the late 1920’s, they were 
used in smaller trains. In the 1930’s, passenger trains began usage of diesel engines, 
which were much more powerful. In the 1940’s, diesel engines completely took over the 
steam engine in regular service.  

Diesel locomotives were preferred because they were more efficient, and did 
not require the constant servicing that used to plague the steam engine. This new 

Faizan Ashraf, Jacob Dorabialski, Peter Hwang, Terry Kim, David Kong, Jason Shin     
Transportation in the 1920s and 1930s 

technology featured diesel powering an electric generator. This electric generator would 
turn the rail wheels. Also, hydraulic were also tried, the efficiency and control of the 
electric generator came out on top. 

Development of the “Brakemen” 

When trains needed to stop, the conductor would give the signal, and the 
brakeman‐ the person who is in charge implementing the brakes would manually use 
hand‐wheel techniques to apply brakes. This is very dangerous because it was 
ineffective, and impractical as trains became longer and faster. This is when a new idea 
was formed 

This new idea involved a pneumatic system – where compressed air would halt 
the train. Compressed air obtained from a pump was much stronger than a manual 
brake applied by a person. This way, the conductor could quickly brake the train without 
having to call the brakeman. 

Air was pumped into the storage tanks on the train. Air was replenished before 
the departure as well as whenever necessary. Pressure indicators on tanks would show 
the conductor how much was in the tank, and when a refuel was necessary. To use 
these brakes, air in tanks was pumped down onto the brakes. This force was enough to 
stop the wholes from turning. In an emergency situation, high pressured air brakes 
would stop the train in a shorter distance, usually half a mile. 

Although the idea was excellent, the first pneumatic brakes failed. 

Early 20th century transportation was mainly based on railway locomotives. For people, air travel was 
not yet perfected and only the rich could own cars. For products, trains represented the cheapest way to 
get the goods from Western Canada to Eastern Canada. This broad market of transportation was a 
battlefield for two huge railway companies. The Canadian Pacific Railway as well as the Canadian 
National Railway. The CPR definitely won, as it was the only company to stay afloat during the Great 
Depression. The CNR also served a great purpose. Its entry into business kept prices competitive for 
Prairie farmers, who benefited from such competition. Early 20th century was also an extremely 
innovative phase for trains and many other forms of transportation. Two main innovations included the 
development of the steam engine and the brake system. Finally, trains in the early 20th century created a 
class difference. While privileged travelers could eat steak and view the scenery, the poor had to crouch 
around the furnace to warm themselves up. Railway locomotives are still important to Canada today, 
but not as prominent as they were a century ago. In times of war, trains helped Germany transport their 
soldiers to the war front. In times of crisis, the railway helped homeless men find jobs in foreign cities. In 
Canada, trains helped minimize a huge scattered nation, and bring forward a peaceful tomorrow. 

Faizan Ashraf, Jacob Dorabialski, Peter Hwang, Terry Kim, David Kong, Jason Shin     
Transportation in the 1920s and 1930s 

Ocean Liners 
Jason Shin 

The period between the 1920’s and 1930’s is widely held as the golden age of ocean liners. Ocean liners 
were the only way to get between North America and Europe. At that period of time, there were great 
advancements in speed, size and elegance of liners as competition grew between European and North 
American companies. Demand for faster and larger ships rose. The need to build more superior ships 
had shaped the 1920’s and 1930’s as the age of transatlantic transportation. 
 

What impelled ocean liners to gain demand and to prosper? 

In the 1920’s, ocean liners experienced strong demand and growth on the account of the 
following reasons. Primarily, ocean liners were the only way to get between North America and 
Europe. Furthermore, great economic booms and prosperity in the 1920’s led to an increasing 
number of people who traveled for business or vacation purposes. Most importantly, in the 
1920’s a large number of immigrants came to the United States and Canada from Europe on 
transatlantic liners.  
 

Famous  shipping and passenger liners  

In the beginning of twentieth century, competition flared between the great powers for ocean 
supremacy. This mostly included the building of warship fleets for WWI, but after the war, 
especially in the 1920’s, it also included building grand ocean liners. These ocean liners became 
national identities that represented the wealth and power of a country. The most prominent 
and leading shipping lines at that time were Britain’s Cunard Line, and White Star Line; 
Germany’s Hamburg America Line , and North German Lloyd; and France’s French Line. 

The Cunard Line 
Founded by a Canadian businessman, the Cunard Line began running as a transatlantic 
steam ship mail service. In the World War One, Cunard Lines lost eleven out of eighteen 
passenger liners. In the 1920’s, the Cunard Line decided to rebuild its lost fleet. In 1923, 
it began to construct Franconia II.  It was a single stacker but was far superior in size 
compared to other ships. Franconia II was one of Cunard's most luxurious ships in the 
1920's with garden lounges, and with fifteenth‐century styled rooms. In the early 
1920’s, shipping companies started to rely a lot on cruising instead of transatlantic 
crossings. Franconia II was of the earliest cruising ships; and it was popular with 
celebrities of the time.  

Faizan Ashraf, Jacob Dorabialski, Peter Hwang, Terry Kim, David Kong, Jason Shin     
Transportation in the 1920s and 1930s 

The Cunard­White Star Line 
By the early 1930's, the famous Cunard Line and other ocean liners encountered 
financial difficulties. There was a decrease of the number of passengers due to the 
depression. The British government agreed to provide financial assistance on the terms 
that Cunard merges with White Star Line (a former competitor). On May, 1934, the 
merge took place and the Cunard‐White Star Line was born.   

By the end of 1934, the new line completed the new super‐liner, RMS Queen Mary. It 
was the second largest passenger ship and it was the fastest ocean liner for the first year 
of its service. The RMS Queen Mary ranked the highest in size, speed and luxury. The 
Cunard‐White Star line was secretly building another passenger ship Queen Elizabeth. 
Queen Elizabeth was the biggest passenger ship the world has ever seen but 
unfortunately, the construction was finished when World War II began. As the result, 
Queen Elizabeth could not earn much glory and had no choice except to become a troop 
ship just like many other ocean liners. As the war came to an end, air travel stepped 
over the ocean liners in the 1950’s and 60’s.  

  The Bluenose 
In 1920, many Nova Scotians wanted a grand fishing vessel for use in the Grand Banks 
fisheries. In addition, it was planned to be one that would have a high top speed, 
enough to compete with the typically fast New England schooners. Construction began 
on the ship in December 1920 and was finished in March, the next year. The Bluenose 
was a wooden‐mast sail ship. Amid hundreds of spectators, the Bluenose was launched 
into Lunenburg harbor on March 26, 1921. The Bluenose held its title as the world’s 
fastest fishing schooner for seventeen years. Unfortunately, in 1942, it was sold to the 
West Indian Trading Company. Atlantic Canadians were devastated as they fought hard 
to keep the iconic schooner in Nova Scotia. In 1946, the Blue nose hit a coral reef of 
Haiti and sunk to the bottom of the sea.  

Faizan Ashraf, Jacob Dorabialski, Peter Hwang, Terry Kim, David Kong, Jason Shin     
Transportation in the 1920s and 1930s 

 
Public Transit 
Peter Hwang 

The face of public transit did not appeal to many Canadians in the 1920’s and 1930’s. Above all, public 
transportation was available only in the largest cities in Canada. However, even in these cities, 
transportation came across a few problems. Trams and buses took longer to travel than automobile. In 
addition, their schedules were often delayed. Commuters often preferred the automobile over trams 
and buses.  

However, public transportation did also have its advantages. Trams and buses helped reduce traffic 
congestion. In addition, it was more affordable to use trams and buses as opposed to automobiles. 

Traffic Congestion 

  With the growing numbers of automobile and the amount of legal drivers in the 1920’s, , traffic 
congestion became a huge issue. As a result, in 1923, many changes were introduced to reduce 
congestion in Toronto. For example there were more parking lots, parking tolls, time limits as well as 
regulations concerning traffic on streets. Toronto also began constructing more roads for cars and 
streetcars to travel on. Placing a traffic director at major intersections was used as an early method to 
control traffic.  

Faizan Ashraf, Jacob Dorabialski, Peter Hwang, Terry Kim, David Kong, Jason Shin     
Transportation in the 1920s and 1930s 

 
Tram 

In the 1920’s and 30’s, the largest cities of North America used trams as the main mode of public 
transportation. In the 1920s, trams were not widespread throughout the country. There were only tram 
systems in Toronto and Montreal at that time.  

  In the 1920s and 30s, traffic congestion was a major issue. Legal drivers increased drastically, 
causing traffic. Public transportation helped reduce this problem.  

Trams were considered to be much better than buses because they were less crowded than 
buses and it had higher capacities for passenger numbers. Trams were also able to squeeze through 
narrow roads and were also more comfortable because the brakes and accelerations were smoother. 

  There were a few disadvantages. Primarily, trams often ran late. Secondly, they were also more 
expensive than buses. Thirdly, it created lots of noise due to its wheels. 

Toronto City's Transit  

  A provincial act created the Toronto Transportation Commission (TTC) in 1920. This commission 
took over and combined the nine existing transit systems within the city in 1921. The TTC expanded the 
Toronto streetcar system to connect Toronto's residential areas with the business district. In 1921, TTC 
introduced a bus service in Toronto. Buses did not play a significant role in transportation in the 1920’s, 
and was seldom used by citizens. 

  In the 1920’s and 30’s, public transit was a growing method of transportation; however, it was 
only available in major cities such as Toronto and Montreal. Public transit was not widespread because 
only the largest cities could afford and maintain it. In addition, the Great Depression had a serious 
financial affect on public transit. Government municipalities had to provide large support to near‐
bankrupt transportation services. Furthermore, the Great Depression caused an increase of migration 
from rural to urban areas. Therefore, cities were faced to provide a higher population with more public 
transportation. Municipalities were often unable to cope with the burden and the people were faced 
with few alternative choices such as using the automobile, cycling, and walking.  

Faizan Ashraf, Jacob Dorabialski, Peter Hwang, Terry Kim, David Kong, Jason Shin     
Transportation in the 1920s and 1930s 

Airplanes 
Terry Kim 

As early as WWI, the introduction of aviation had a major impact on the world. Progressing from the 
1920’s, more Canadians became heavily dependent on airline passenger travel.  As people began to 
realize the significance of the air transportation, airline services rapidly increased in demand and size. 
Airmail was booming, with the continuous support of businessmen who enjoyed fast mail delivery 
services. However, the early airline industry did not touch a large number of people.  The reason being 
was that most of the Canadian population during those years could not afford the expensive costs 
introduced by the airlines.  

Commercial Air lines  

The development of commercial airliners began in the late 1910’s to the early 1920’s. During 
that period of time, the government considered the role of aviation as a part in developing northern 
Canada. Through the government’s help, Canada was able to lead the world in the transportation of air 
cargo. But soon enough, depression hit Canada like a maelstrom. To recover from the damage, P.M. 
King, in 1935, promised a trans‐Canadian airline system. This created a base for the international airlines 
and airports we see today. Transatlantic flights were also introduced later that decade, but were too 
expensive for the majority of Canadians. 

Year  Leaving from  Going to  Price 


1931  Winnipeg  Regina  $18.50 
  Montreal  New York  $33.40 
  Moncton  Toronto  $88.25 
1939  North America  Marseilles, France  $375.00 
      $675.00* 
*Round Trip from North America to Marseilles. Equivalent to about 7000 CND today. 

Faizan Ashraf, Jacob Dorabialski, Peter Hwang, Terry Kim, David Kong, Jason Shin     
Transportation in the 1920s and 1930s 

 
Airmail  

Airmail was a successful and developing industry that was prospering from aviation. Airplanes were 
much more efficient as they were faster than trains and ships. However, airplanes were not trusted with 
important material since accidents were known to occur. As aircrafts advanced, people started changing 
their fixed thoughts about aviation. The airmail trend steadily increased. As the plane’s reputation 
steadily amplified, people were more exposed to air transportation. 

Th e view of air travel in Canada  

Due to the outrageous prices and worsening economy, air travel was not very popular amongst 
Canadians. The costs were much higher than what the average Canadian family could afford. Many 
Canadians also did not trust the safety of planes, especially after a widely publicized devastating plane 
crash in 1931. Many airline companies and airplane manufacturers needed to create a safer and a more 
efficient air service. Air travel needed more improvements before they could challenge the main mode 
of transportation during that time period ‐ trains and ocean liners.  

Improve ments in Commercial Air Travel  

During the start of the 1930’s, there was a competition to create more efficient and improved 
airplanes. Aircraft manufacturers and airline companies took a big step to create a secure and a cost‐
efficient way to fly. This period of time was believed to be the most groundbreaking period in 
development of aviation in history. Many new functions were added to these planes. 

Some of the innovative improvements were: 

• Air‐cooled engines which was much more efficient than water‐cooled engines 
• Reduction of weight 
• Increased stability 
• Faster speed due to more efficient engines 
• Use of Altimeters‐an instrument which measures altitude of an object over fixed level 
• Airspeed indicators‐an instrument used in aircraft to display the airspeed of an aircraft 
•  “Artificial horizon” system or also known as “attitude indicator”: a system which informed 
the orientation of the airplane relative to the ground.  
 

Faizan Ashraf, Jacob Dorabialski, Peter Hwang, Terry Kim, David Kong, Jason Shin     
Transportation in the 1920s and 1930s 

Established Canadian Airlines  

In the late 1930’s, there were many small airline companies in Canada offering scheduled 
passenger and mail flights from city to city. This gave the government an idea to start an airline business 
themselves. In 1937, the Canadian government created Canada Airlines (later renamed to Air Canada). 
In the late 1930’s, the Canadian Pacific Airlines was created. This resulted in a rivalry between the 
government’s Canada Air and the new Canadian Pacific Airlines. Canadian Pacific Airlines began to fly 
the Atlantic routes while Air Canada specialized in trans‐Canada flights. These two airlines competed 
with one another over the Canadian airline market until in late 1990’s when Air Canada bought out 
Canadian Pacific Airlines. 

Boeing 314  

In 1927, William Boeing founded the Boeing Airline Company. It was one of the most powerful 
and prospering manufacturers, growing rapidly in the late 1930’s. They created efficient and reliable 
new models. The Boeing 314, was first developed in 1935. The model was a great success as many 
airline companies purchased the plane, including Pam America Airlines. 

Faizan Ashraf, Jacob Dorabialski, Peter Hwang, Terry Kim, David Kong, Jason Shin     
Transportation in the 1920s and 1930s 

 
Zeppelins 
Jake Dorabialski 

A Zeppelin is a type of dirigible that was first developed by German aviation pioneer Ferdinand Graf von 
Zeppelin. He developed his first airship called the LZ1 in 1900. With further advancement, Zeppelin’s 
airship flights became increasingly successful and caught the public’s attention in Germany. During 
WWI, Zeppelins were used especially for military purposes by the German army; however, after the war 
they were developed for commercial travel.  

The Golden Age  

  The Golden Age of Zeppelin dirigibles was marked in 1928, with the construction of the Graf 
Zeppelin. The Zeppelin Company had expanded to commercial flights and manufactured the dirigibles 
not for military purposes but for a way to “peacefully connect people.” The Graf Zeppelin undertook 
flights around Europe and South Africa. Despite the Great Depression, the company faced growth, 
profiting from transporting mail throughout Europe and North America. Oddly, the Zeppelin Company 
also experienced an increasing number of passengers, especially from the United States. 

The Hindenburg Disaster 

Built in 1935 by the Zeppelin Company, the Hindenburg was considered the most superior air 
vessel ever created. It was the largest dirigible at that time, measuring 250m (almost three times as long 
as a Boeing 757). The Hindenburg used hydrogen, a very explosive gas, to ascend. The Hindenburg also 
ranked high in elegance and was very luxurious. It attracted the most wealthy people as well as 
celebrities. 

The Hindenburg had its first commercial flight in 1936, one year before its last. Despite the 
world's decreasing economy, the Hindenburg was very successful, making many passenger and cargo 
mail service flights. This success led the Zeppelin Company to expand on trans‐Atlantic service flights.  

However, the project was immediately devastated as the Hindenburg exploded in May 1937, 
while making a flight in New Jersey, U.S.A. When the hydrogen gas caught fire, the top part of the ship 
exploded and it all came crashing to the ground. This disaster marks the end of the Zeppelin era and its 
Golden Age. People lost all hope and confidence in dirigibles; therefore, their demand sharply dropped. 
All projects to expand blimp transportation were abandoned and many companies who manufactured 
dirigibles went bankrupt. 

Faizan Ashraf, Jacob Dorabialski, Peter Hwang, Terry Kim, David Kong, Jason Shin