Sie sind auf Seite 1von 7

CIS 171: CISCO II: Network Router Technologies (5 credits – Fall 2010)

Instructor: Ron Evans


Office: Santa Rita A114
Phone: 206-6793
Email: revans@pima.edu
Office hours: T 3:40-5:40pm, WTh 1:45-other times by appt.

The site: http://westcompsci.pima.edu/~revans/CIS171 (CIS is capital letters) contains labs, etc…

Prerequisite: CIS170: CCNA Semester I

Course Overview
Cisco Networking Academies II is the second in a sequence of four courses. This course focuses on
learning static routing and dynamic routing protocols (RIPv1, EIGRP, OSPF), and troubleshooting
routing problems..

Texts
With the advent of CCNA Exploration Version 4.0, the texts & lab books have changed. It is not required
that you purchase either, as your text is available online and your labs are also available from the online
materials. However, many students may still want to purchase the printed copies of these. They can be
purchased from the official text website or one can search for them at half.com.

Link to all CCNA Exploration V4.0 Texts and Lab books at Publisher’s Website

CCNA II Text Link: Routing Protocols and Concepts, CCNA


Exploration Companion Guide, 2nd Edition
(ISBN-10: 1-58713-206-0; ISBN-13: 978-
1-58713-206-3; Published: Dec 6, 2007;
Copyright 2008; Dimensions 8x9-1/4;
Pages: 640; Edition: 2nd.)

CCNA II LAB Link: Routing Protocols and Concepts, CCNA


Exploration Labs and Study Guide, 2nd
Edition (SBN-10: 1-58713-204-4; ISBN-
13: 978-1-58713-204-9; Published: Nov 29,
2007; Copyright 2008; Dimensions 8-
1/2x10-7/8; Pages: 576; Edition: 2nd.)
ADA Statement
Pima Community College strives to comply with the provisions of Title 111 of the Americans with
Disabilities Act of 1990 and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Students requiring special
accommodations need to notify Disable Resources Office and the instructor so that appropriate
verification and identification of reasonable accommodations may be made in a timely manner
(Accomodations cannot be made without verification of need.)

Course Grading (each quiz may be taken 3 times; online final may be taken twice)
online final (note: your overall grade for the class cannot be more than one letter grade higher than you
online final exam) 30%
online quizzes (ch 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11) 55%
Labs, Activities, & Packet Tracer Exercises (choose any 15 @ 1% each) 15%

note: your final grade cannot be more than one letter grade higher than your online final

Letter Grade Percentage


A 90-100%
B 80-89%
C 70-79%
D 60-69%
F <60%

Course Outline:

Performance Objectives:
Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to do the following:

1. Basic Router Configuration: passwords, interfaces(ip addresses, masks), bring interfaces up


2. Configure Static & Default Routes
3. Configure RIP Routing in a system of routers
4. Configure EIGRP Routing in a system of routers
5. Configure OSPF Routing in a system of routers
6. Analyze the contents of a routing table
7. Employ tools/commands to troubleshoot routing problems in a system of routers
8. List the advantages/disadvantages of distance vector routing protocols relative to Link-
State routing protocols
9. Compare & Contrast individual routing protocols (RIPv1 & v2, EIGRP, and OSPF)

Important Dates
Last day to drop with refund or change to audit Oct 27th, 2010
Last day of class/finals Dec 19th, 2010
Withdrawal Deadline Nov 29, 2010
Holidays Nov 11th, Nov 25-28

Attendance, Quizzes & Tests


Class attendance is not required. You need to complete all the work, but most importantly all the online
quizzes and tests (final must be taken in the classroom unless pre-arranged with the instructor).

Online Chapters & Topics


1. Introduction to Routing and Packet Forwarding
2. Static Routing
3. Introduction to Dynamic Routing Protocols
4. Distance Vector Routing Protocols
5. RIP Version I
6. VLSM and CIDR
7. RIPv2
8. The Routing Table: A Closer Look
9. EIGRP
10. Link-State Routing Protocols
11. OSPF

Optimal Class Schedule


WK DATES Topics LABS, etc…
1 Oct 26 Ch 1,2 Ch 1 & 2 Assessments
2 Nov 2nd Ch 3, 4 Ch 3 & 4 Assessments
3 Nov 9th Ch 5, 6 Ch 5,6 Assessment
4 Nov 16th Ch 7 Ch 7 Assessment
5 Nov 23rd Ch 8 Ch 8 Assessment
6 Nov 30th Ch 9 Ch 9 Assessment
7 Dec 7th Ch 10 Ch 10 Assessment
Ch 11 Assessment, online final, and
8 Dec 14th Ch 11; take final by Dec 19th
online feedback

Sites: cisco.netacad.net

Required Labs & Due Dates (your 3 lowest labs will be dropped – 15 labs counted; labs can be
emailed to revans@pima.edu or handed in on Tuesday night class)
Packet Tracer Exercise or Lab Due Date (must be emailed by midnight)
PT1.5.1: Cabling a Network with Routers, Sunday, Oct 31
Switches, and Hosts
PT1.5.2 Basic Router Configuration Sunday, Oct 31 – only need to turn in the
final activity window picture with the %
completed
PT 2.8.1 Basic Static Route Configuration Wed, Nov 3rd
PT 2.8.3 Troubleshooting Static Routes Wed, Nov 3rd– only need to turn in the
(how to load scripts into the running final activity window picture with the %
configuration) completed
PT3.5.2 Subnetting Scenario 1 Sunday, Nov 7th
Only need to answer the quesrions
and/show the final picture with the
percentage completed on this lab
PT3.5.4 Subnetting Scenario 3 Sunday, Nov 7th Only need to answer the
questions and turn in final picture with the
percentage completed on this lab
PT Ch 4 PT Skills Integration Sunday, Nov 7th
Challenge in 4.7.1 Only need to turn in/the final picture with
the percentage completed on this lab
PT5.6.1C Running RIPv1 on a Stub Sunday, Nov 14th
Network
PT5.6.3 RIP Troubleshooting Sunday, Nov 14th Only need to turn in/the
final picture with the percentage completed
on this lab
PT6.4.1 Basic VLSM Calculation and Sunday, Nov 14th Only need to turn in the
Addressing Design final picture with the percentage completed
PT 7.5.1 RIPv2 Configuration Sunday, Nov 21st
PT7.5.3 RIPv2 Troubleshooting Sunday, Nov 21st Only need to turn in the
final picture with the percentage completed
PT8.4.1 Investigating the Routing Table Sunday, Nov 28th
Lookup Process
PT8.4.2 The show ip route Challenge Lab Sunday, Nov 28th
Only need to turn in/show the final picture
with the percentage completed on this lab
PT9.6.1 Basic EIGRP Configuration Lab Sunday, Dec 5th
PT9.6.3 Troubleshooting EIGRP Sunday, Dec 5th
Configuration Lab Only need to turn in/show the final picture
with the percentage completed on this lab
PT11.6.1 Basic OSPF Configuration Lab Sunday, Dec 12th
Only need to turn in/show the final picture
with the percentage completed on this lab
PT11.6.3 Troubleshooting OSPF Wednesday, Dec 15th
Configuration Lab Only need to turn in/show the final picture
with the percentage completed on this lab

Below is a sample lab:

PT 3.1.4: Investigating a VLAN Implementation


Introduction/Overview (a few sentences on the concepts to be learned in this lab)

In this lab, we investigate how the introduction of VLANs into layer 2 switches affect or confine broadcast IP
traffic. ARP requests represent a large part of broadcast traffic within networks. The creation of virtual lans
(VLANs) using layer 2 switches represent an economical way to reduce the size of broadcast domains, which, in
turn, improves security and reduces network congestion.

Method/Procedure (include one or more print-screens or pictures and the steps to accomplish the lab)

Task 1: Observe Broadcast Traffic in a VLAN Implementation


Step 1: Ping from PC1 to PC6.
Wait for all the link lights to turn to green. To accelerate this process, switch back and forth between Simulation and
Reatime mode.
Use the Add Simple PDU tool. Click PC1 and then PC6. Click the Capture/Forward button to step through the
process. Observe the ARP requests as they traverse the network.
In normal operation, when a switch receives a broadcast frame on one of its ports, it forwards the frame out all other
ports. Notice that S2 only sends the ARP request out Fa0/1 to S1. Also notice that S3 only sends the ARP request
out Fa0/11 to PC4. PC1 and PC4 both belong to VLAN 10. PC6 belongs to VLAN 30. Because broadcast traffic is
contained within the VLAN, PC6 never receives the ARP request from PC1. And because PC4 is not the destination,
it discards the ARP request. The ping from PC1 fails, because PC1 never receives an ARP reply.
Step 2. Ping from PC1 to PC4.
Use the Add Simple PDU tool. Click PC1 and then PC4. Observe the ARP requests as they traverse the network.
PC1 and PC4 both belong to VLAN 10, so the path of the ARP request is the same as before. Because PC4 is the
destination, it replies to the ARP request. PC1 is then able to send the ping with the destination MAC address for
PC4.

Task 2: Observe Broadcast Traffic without VLANs


Step 1. Clear the configurations on all three switches and delete the VLAN database.
On all three switches, enter user EXEC mode with the password cisco. Then enter privileged EXEC mode with the
password class.
To observe broadcast traffic without VLANs, erase the configuration and delete the VLAN database on each switch.
The commands for S1 are shown here.
S1#erase startup-config
Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all configuration files! Continue? [confirm]
[OK]
Erase of nvram: complete
%SYS-7-NV_BLOCK_INIT: Initialized the geometry of nvram
S1#delete vlan.dat
Delete filename [vlan.dat]? Enter
Delete flash:/vlan.dat? [confirm] Enter
Step 2. Reload the switches.
S1#reload
Proceed with reload? [confirm]Enter
Wait for all the link lights to return to green. To accelerate this process, switch back and forth between Simulation
and Reatime mode.
Step 3. Click Capture/Forward to send ARP request and pings.
After the switches reload and the link lights return to green, the network is ready to forward your ARP and ping
traffic. Click the Capture/Forward button to step through the process. Notice that the switches now forward the ARP
requests out all ports, except the port on which the ARP request was received. This default action of switches is why
VLANs can improve network performance. Broadcast traffic is contained within each VLAN.
Notice that the ping from PC1 to PC6 still fails. Why? What is required for this ping to succeed?

Conclusions (a paragraph or two on what was learned)

In this lab, we obtained some perspective into VLANs or virtual local area networks created on layer 2 switches.
We saw how the creation of VLANs affected broadcast traffic ( destination IP = 255.255.255.255), i.e., broadcast
traffic (e.g., ARPs) is confined to individual VLANS, just as broadcast traffic is confined to local area networks
(LANs). This confinement of broadcast traffic reduces overall traffic, as well as providing some security to the
individual VLANs

For our purposes, each interface off of a router represents a network or subnet LAN. In the IP world, devices in a
LAN can be ascertained through their IP address (where all devices in the same LAN must be in the same IP
network or subnet). The IP address of the router interface represents the gateway IP address for all devices on that
network or subnet.
Using Layer 2 switches, we can create virtual LANs (VLANs), so that we don’t necessarily need routers to divide
devices into separate IP networks. Notice, however, that, as in this lab where we had three VLANs, there must be
an IP gateway address for each VLAN to get out of the VLAN, and that each gateway IP address must be a separate
router interface. Thus, in this lab, we would have needed three separate gateway IP addresses in order for devices in
each VLAN to send traffic outside of their own VLAN.

Final picture of lab showing the percentage completed in the Activity Window

Packet Tracer Labs


Each Packet Tracer Lab will have the following sections (PT Labs don’t need to be over 2-4 pages):

PT 9.6.1 Basic EIGRP Configuration


A. Introduction/Overview (A short introduction to what the lab is about)
B. Method/Procedure (Should list the steps and show a few screenshots of what you’re doing)
C. Conclusions/Lessons Learned (Highlights of what you learned in the lab)
D. Screen shots, including screen shot of final activity window with percentage completed