Sie sind auf Seite 1von 12

1.

San Agustin Church in Manila


San Agustin Church (Spanish: Iglesia de la Inmaculada Concepción de María de San
Agustín) is a Roman Catholic church under the auspices of The Order of St. Augustine,
located inside the historic walled city of Intramuros in Manila. The San Agustin Church is
patterned after some of the magnificent temples built by the Augustinians in Mexico, its
present edifice was built in 1587, and completed, together with the monastery, in 1604.The
atmosphere is medieval since "both church and monastery symbolize the majesty and
equilibrium of a Spanish golden era."
The massive structure of the church, the symmetry and splendor of the interiors (painted by
two Italians who succeeded in producing trompe l'oeil), the profile of the mouldings,
rosettes and sunken panels which appear as three-dimensional carvings, a baroque pulpit
with the native pineapple as a motif, the grand pipe organ, the antechoir with a 16th-
century crucifix, the choir seats carved in molave with ivory inlays of the 17th century and
the set of 16 huge and beautiful chandeliers from Paris.[

2. Santa Maria Church in Santa Maria, Ilocos Sur


The Church of Our Lady of the Assumption (Nuestra Señora de la Asuncion),
commonly known as the Santa Maria Church is the parish church of Santa
Maria in Ilocos Sur province, Philippines. The church was designated as
a UNESCO World Heritage Siteon December 11, 1993 as part of the Baroque Churches of
the Philippines, a collection of four Baroque Spanish-era churches.[2]
The Santa Maria Church is an attraction to both tourists and Catholics in Ilocos Sur. It is
not only a reminiscent of the four centuries of Spanish domination of that area but also a
unique structure with a diversified architectural design of bricks and mortar. It was built on
top of a hill not only as a lookout and a citadel but as a religious center during the early
administration of the region by both the friars and soldiers of Spain.

3. Paoay Church in Paoay, Ilocos Norte

The Saint Augustine Church (Spanish: Iglesia de San Agustín de Paoay), commonly known as
the Paoay Church, is the Roman Catholic church of the municipality of Paoay, Ilocos
Norte in the Philippines. Completed in 1710, the church is famous for its distinct
architecture highlighted by the enormous buttresses on the sides and back of the building.
It is declared as a National Cultural Treasure by the Philippine government in 1973 and
a UNESCO World Heritage Site under the collective group of Baroque Churches of the
Philippines in 1993. Paoay church is the Philippines' primary example of an Spanish
colonial earthquake baroque architecture dubbed by Alicia Coseteng,[3] an interpretation of
the European Baroque adapted to the seismic condition of the country through the use of
enormousbuttresses on the sides and back of the building.[2] The adaptive reuse of baroque
style against earthquake is developed since many destructive earthquakes destroyed earlier
churches in the country.

4. Miagao Church in Miag-ao, Iloilo

The Miagao Church also known as the Sto. Tomas de Villanueva Parish Church is a Roman
catholic church located in Miagao,Iloilo, Philippines. It was also called the Miagao Fortress
Church since it served as defensive tower of the town against Muslim raids. The church was
declared as a UNESCO World Heritage Site on December 11, 1993 together with San Agustin
Church in Manila;Nuestra Señora de la Asuncion Church in Santa Maria, Ilocos Sur; and San
Agustin Church in Paoay, Ilocos Norte under the collective title Baroque Churches of the
Philippines, a collection of four Baroque Spanish-era churches. The church's over-all architectural
style falls under the Baroque Romanesque architectural style.[3] Its ochre color is due to the
materials used in constructing the church, adobe, egg, coral and limestone.[5],[4] The church's
foundation is 6 meters deep[6] and the massive stone walls at 1.5 meters thick are intensified
through the use of 4 meter thick flying buttresses as protection to the Moro invaders as stipulated
under Royal Decree 111 of 1573 (Law of the Indies)

5. Loboc Church of Loboc, Bohol

The San Pedro Apostol Parish Church commonly known as Loboc Church, is a Roman
Catholic church in the municipality of Loboc, Bohol, Philippines, within the jurisdiction of
the Roman Catholic Diocese of Tagbilaran. The church is built along the banks of the Loboc
River. The coral stone church follows a cruciform plan, with a sunken pyramidal roof on
its crossing. As a church built by the Jesuits, exterior walls of the church have the Jesuit insignia
and icons of an angel's wing and head. Major renovations were undertaken by Augustinian priest
Father Aquilino Bon, including the addition of a portico to the façade (1863–1866) and re-roofing
with tiles (1873). Father José Sánchez, OAR, added stone buttresses to the walls (1891–1893) and
side porticoes (1895–1896). Because of frequent flooding, its wooden flooring was changed to
cement tiles in 1895 and was elevated in 1969.

6. Boljoon Church of Baljoon, Cebu

The Nuestra Señora del Patrocinio de Maria Parish Church (Our Lady of Patronage of Mary
Parish Church), commonly known as Boljoon Church, is a Roman Catholic Church dedicated to
the Our Lady of Patrocinio in the municipality of Boljoon, Cebu, Philippines, under the Roman
Catholic Archdiocese of Cebu. The church is a fortress church, built of coral stones and located on
a hill near the sea. It originally served as a watchtower for possible Moro raids. The church is
known for its original terra cotta roof tiles and its distinct folk art or Filipino Baroque style,
predominantly on its choir screen and pulpit. Twenty-eight pillars support the 2-metre (6.6 ft)
thick walls made of mortar and lime. Its ceiling paintings are the work of Miguel Villareal, a
native of Boljoon. The three gates and the walls of the church are made of coral stones and were
constructed from 1802 to 1808 under the auspices of Father Bermejo.

7. Guiuan Church of Guiuan, Eastern Samar

The Immaculate Conception Parish Church commonly known as Guiuan Church, is a Roman
Catholic church in the municipality of Guiuan, Eastern Samar, Philippines, within the jurisdiction
of the Diocese of Borongan.

Guiuan Church is nestled inside a fort. It is well known for its extensive shell ornamentation in its
interiors.[5] Studies revealed that at least eight types of seashells were used. Before its destruction,
it still has two elaborately carved doors out of the original three doors. The main door on the
entrance has exquisite carvings of the Twelve Apostles while a side door has carved
representations of angels. A bell tower on top fort was built in 1854. Another convent was built by
Father Arsenio Figueroa in 1872. The church was refurbished in 1935 and the sanctuary was
renovated in 1987. On November 8, 2013, the church along with other buildings and structures in
Guiuan was severely damaged due to Typhoon Haiyan. While the roof was destroyed and the
facade was damaged, the church's stone walls remain unscathed, as do the floors and the crypts.

8. Tumauini Church of Tumauini, Isabela

The San Matias Parish Church (Spanish: Iglesia Parroquial de San Matías), commonly
known as Tumauini Church, is a Roman Catholic church in the municipality
of Tumauini, Isabela, Philippines within the jurisdiction of the Roman Catholic Diocese of
Ilagan. It became a separate parish independent from Cabagan under the advocacy of Saint
Matthias in 1751. Tumauini is an ultra-baroque church known for its extensive use of red
bricks on its exterior and interior ornamentations. Brick was used due to lack of good
quality stones in the area. The church building is made entirely of ornately-designed red
bricks in its façade and its interior walls.A closer look at the brick façade shows numbers
and dates for the correct sequence of the bricks in Forto's design. The façade is flanked by
two pseudo-Corinthian columns and niches, one located above the entrance and the two
remaining larger niches on each side of the columns. The church's circular pediment is
unique relative to all other churches built during the Spanish Era.

9. Lazi Church of Lazi, Siquijor

The San Isidro Labrador Parish Church (Spanish: Iglesia Parroquial de San Isidro Labrador),
commonly known as Lazi Church, is a Roman Catholic church in the municipality of Lazi,
Siquijor, Philippines within the jurisdiction of the Diocese of Dumaguete. Lazi
(formerly Tigbawan) became an independent parish from Siquijor on August 8, 1857. The
present stone church was built in 1884 by Filipino artisans followed by the bell tower in the
following year.[1] The construction of the convent was made with coralstones and hardwood,
commenced in 1887 and completed in 1891. Both the church and the convent were done under the
direction of Recollect priest Father Toribio SánchezIt became an independent parish in 1857 under
the advocacy of Saint Isidore the Laborer. The church is built of sea stones and wood.[1] It belongs
to the neoclassical style. It has two pulpits and has retained its original retablo and wood florings.

10.Baclayon Church of Baclayon, Bohol

La Purisima Concepcion de la Virgen Maria Parish Church (also The Immaculate Conception
of the Virgin Mary Parish Church), commonly known as Baclayon Church, is a Roman
Catholic Church in the municipality of Baclayon, Bohol, Philippines within the jurisdiction of
the Roman Catholic Diocese of Tagbilaran. Baclayon was founded by the Jesuit priest Juan de
Torres and Gabriel Sánchez in 1596, and became the oldest Christian settlement in Bohol. It was
elevated as a parish in 1717 and the present coral stone church was completed in 1727.
The Augustinian Recollects succeeded the Jesuits in 1768 and heavily renovated the church since
then. The church, built out of coral stones, is a cross shaped (cruciform) church with its juncture
or crossing surmounted by a pyramidal wall. The original tiled roof was replaced by galvanized
iron in 1893.[5] The church complex is strategically located facing the sea. It originally has
defensive stone walls around but was removed in the 1870s.[1] It also has a school building built
our of corastones in the middle of the 19th century and a wood and stone market built in 1881.

11.Maragondon Church of Maragondon, Cavite

The Our Lady of the Assumption Parish Church (Spanish: Iglesia Parroquial de Nuestra
Señora de la Asunción), commonly known as Maragondon Church, is the only heritage structure
in the municipality of Maragondon, Cavite, Philippines declared by theNational Museum as
a National Cultural Treasure. Maragondon is unique among Jesuit churches for its proportion.
The façade is narrow but tall, not squatty as in other churches. To the left of the façade is the taller
bell tower with no clear divisions between the stories. It is a single quadrilateral shaft tapering
upwards ending with finials at the four corners and surmounted by a rounded roof. The façade is
chastely ornamented with the tapering buttresses supporting it. Repairs were made on the convent
between 1666 and 1672. In 1687 another church was begun although the construction was
interrupted; only in 1714 was it completed. The church was repaired a number of times but data
on the renovation are sketchy. After 1860 the Recollect added windows with colored glass panes,
and set these in a wooded frame decorated with a quail on a plate, the attribute of San Nicolas de
Tolentino.

12.San Sebastian Church in Quiapo, Manila


The Basílica Menor de San Sebastián, better known as San Sebastian Church, is a Roman
Catholic minor basilica in Manila,Philippines and the seat of the Parish of San Sebastian.
Completed in 1891, San Sebastian Church is noted for its architectural features. an
example of the revival of Gothic architecture in the Philippines, it is the only all-
steel temple in the Philippines,[1][2] and is the only prefabricated steel church in the
world.[3] In 2006, San Sebastian Church was included in the Tentative List for possible
designation as a World Heritage Site. It was designated as a National Historical Landmark
by the Philippine government in 1973.[4]
San Sebastian Church is under the care of The Order of the Augustinian Recollects, who
also operate a college adjacent to the basilica. It is located at Plaza del Carmen, at the
eastern end of Recto Avenue, in Quiapo, Manila

13.Parish Church of San Agustin in Bacong, Negros Oriental

St. Augustine of Hippo Church was built near the sea. It was constructed by the
Augustinian Recollects in 1865. The church's main attraction is the altar and the pipe
organ, created in Spain. It also features religious items which are being displayed. Its bell
tower, the tallest in the province served as look out for the enemies. The Parish of Saint
Augustine of Hippo, situated in the town of Bacong in Negros Oriental, is a glimpse of
how the Filipinos build a sturdy structure in the past. The strong bell tower at the side of
the church is made from blocks of coral stones while the facade is made from concrete and
modern-design stones.

14.Parish Church of the Immaculate Conception in Balayan, Batangas

The Parish Church of Immaculate Conception, (Spanish: Iglesia Parroquial de la Inmaculada


Concepción) also known asBalayan Church, is Parish Church in
the town of Balayan, Batangas in the Philippines, within the Archdiocese of Lipa. The church is
listed as a National Cultural Treasure as its construction was supervised by Filipino Seculars
during the Spanish Colonial Period. Balayan church complex originally had stone fortifications as
a measure against pirates who have sacked the town at least three times. After a raid in 1754, a
stone cota or fort was erected with the church and convent inside.[2] To guard the bay, a small
fortification was also constructed on top of a hill on the other end of the town.[2] This fortified
church survived well in the nineteenth century; the walls of the cota were taken down probably
about the same time as those of Bauan and Batangas, in the 1840s.

15. Parish Church of Saints Peter and Paul in Calasiao, Pangasinan

The Saints Peter and Paul Parish Church (Iglesia Parroquial de los Santos Pedro y Pablo),
commonly known as Calasiao Church is a baroque church located in Poblacion
West, Calasiao, Pangasinan, Philippines. It belongs to the Vicariate of Sts. Peter and Paul under
the Ecclesiastical Province of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Lingayen-Dagupan. The 57,
840 Catholics is under the pastoral care of Rev. Fidelis B. Layog, assisted by Rev. Isidro Palinar,
Jr. and andRev. Raymund Manaois. The imposing Latin American-style facade of bricks and
cement of Calasiao Church, today, is 88.3 meter long, 25 meters wide and 27.3 meters high.The
sprawling convent is 75 meters long, 25 meters wide and has 2 yards. Its 5-storey octagonal brick
bell tower (replica of the earthquake destroyed original on July 16, 1990) with architectural
designs that slightly resemble those of the Southeast Asian Hindu-Buddhist Pagodas is 30 meters
high. As one of the Baroque Churches of the Philippines, the Parish Church of Saints Peter and
Paul has been at the forefront of Philippine history-Spanish colonial rule. Its unique architectural
design reflects the Spanish and Latin American architecture integration of indigenous Philippines
works of art with Chinese style fusion. Its massive bricks or ladrillo had been designed to
withstand revolts and rebellions, due to its fortresses facade.

16. Parish Church of San Vicente de Ferrer in Dupax del Sur, Nueva Vizcaya

The San Vicente Ferrer Parish Church (Tagalog: Simbahan ng Parokya ni San Vicente
Ferrer; Spanish: Iglesia Parroquial de San Vicente Ferrer), commonly referred to as Dupax
Church or Dupax del Sur Church, is an 18th-century Baroque church located at Brgy.
Dopaj, Dupax del Sur, Nueva Vizcaya, Philippines. The parish church, under the advocation
of Saint Vincent Ferrer, is under the jurisdiction of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Bayombong.
The church complex has been declared a National Cultural Treasureby the National Museum of
the Philippines in July 2001. The façade is described as a reflection of that of Tuguegarao
Cathedral, only less in ornamentation and lower in height. Unlike the church of Tuguegarao, the
church of Dupax has no spiral columns and pilasters that offer support to the structure. The façade
is divided by cornices into horizontal segments of plastered brick. To the left of the façade is the
four-level, unplastered, rectangular bell tower. The base features saint’s niches similar to that
found on the second level of the façade while the second level features long, narrow windows
framed with bracket columns. The tower is capped with a decorative parapet and a small cupola
surmounted by a cross. The church plaza is enclosed by a low perimeter wall and a replica of an
earlier atrial cross.

17.Church of the Immaculate Conception in Guiuan, Eastern Samar


The Immaculate Conception Parish Church (Spanish: Iglesia Parroquial de la
Inmaculada Concepción), commonly known as Guiuan Church, is a Roman Catholic
church in the municipality of Guiuan, Eastern Samar, Philippines, within the jurisdiction of
theDiocese of Borongan.
The church is classified as a National Cultural Treasure by the National Museum of the
Philippines. It was formerly nominated to theUNESCO World Heritage Sites of the
Philippines under two categories, the Baroque Churches of the Philippines (Extension) and
the Jesuit Churches of the Philippines.
It was totally destroyed when Typhoon Haiyan made landfall in Guiuan and struck other
parts of Central Visayas on November 8, 2013. The present stone church was dedicated to
the Virgin Mary under the title of the Immaculate Conception and was built by the early
Jesuits and was renovated by adding a transept and baptistery during the term of Father
Manuel Valverde and Pedro Monasterio in 1844. A bell tower on top fort was built in
1854. Another convent was built by Father Arsenio Figueroa in 1872. The church was
refurbished in 1935 and the sanctuary was renovated in 1987.[4] On November 8, 2013, the
church along with other buildings and structures in Guiuan was severely damaged due
to Typhoon Haiyan. While the roof was destroyed and the facade was damaged, the
church's stone walls remain unscathed, as do the floors and the crypts.

18. Parish Church of Saints Peter and Paul in Tuguegarao City, Cagayan
The Saints Peter and Paul Parish Church (Iglesia Parroquial de los Santos Pedro y
Pablo), commonly known as Calasiao Churchis a baroque church located in Poblacion
West, Calasiao, Pangasinan, Philippines. It belongs to the Vicariate of Sts. Peter and Paul
under the Ecclesiastical Province of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Lingayen-
Dagupan. The 57, 840 Catholics is under the pastoral care of Rev. Fidelis B. Layog,
assisted by Rev. Isidro Palinar, Jr. and andRev. Raymund Manaois. The imposing Latin
American-style facade of bricks and cement of Calasiao Church, today, is 88.3 meter long,
25 meters wide and 27.3 meters high.The sprawling convent is 75 meters long, 25 meters
wide and has 2 yards. Its 5-storey octagonal brick bell tower (replica of the earthquake
destroyed original on July 16, 1990) with architectural designs that slightly resemble those
of the Southeast Asian Hindu-Buddhist Pagodas is 30 meters high.The prized
original retablos (and a classic altar) is ornately decorated with statues of saints. The
Baroque-style carved, the painted ceilings and the magnificent overall exterior are
preserved for centuries. The intricate sculpture has tone of the Renaissance age's undying
European Art as demonstrated by the majesty of its ceiling or dome, walls and the altar
from the aisle near the main door

19. Parish Church of the Immaculate Conception in Jasaan, Misamis Oriental


The Immaculate Conception Church (Spanish: Iglesia de Nuestra Señora de la
Inmaculada Concepción de María) is a Baroque church located in Poblacion,
Upper Jasaan in Misamis Oriental, Philippines. It was declared by the National Museum as
a National Cultural Treasure in Northern Mindanao due to its artistic design and cultural
values.The church was a provincial attempt to mimic the famous San Ignacio Church
of Intramuros in Manila. The Jesuit brothers Francisco Rivera and Juan Cuesta are credited
with the construction of the original church. The church of Jasaan falls under Barn
Style Baroque with originally a tri-partite partition. It spans 150 ft long and 60 ft wide. The
brick wall on all sides about 20 ft high and almost 4 ft thick.The portal area leads to two
semi-arched openings to the choir loft area. Vertical articulation is rendered through the
shallow piers which divide the areas into three. It is further squeezed to the narrow central
portion of the facade. The church is flanked by square towers to a level above the apex of
the pediment. Significant church portions includes the original brick paving, neo-
Gothic retablo, and ceiling woodwork (reminiscent of basket weave).

20. Parish Church of San Juan Bautista in Jimenez, Misamis Occidental

The San Juan Bautista Parish Church (Spanish: Iglesia Parroquial de San Juan Bautista),
commonly referred to as Jimenez Church, is a late-19th century, Baroque church located at Brgy.
Poblacion, Jimenez, Misamis Occidental, Philippines. The parish church, under the patronage
of Saint John the Baptist, is under the jurisdiction of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Ozamiz.
The church is predominantly Baroque in architecture with features reminiscent of
the Renaissance style. The church façade, contrary to other Roman Catholic churches of the same
era, is devoid of a pediment. It features a portico with three semicircular arched entrances lined on
top with a parapet. The rectangular mass of the portico is crowned by three pedimented
saints’ niches. Behind the façade is the nave wall with its simple, gabled roof and windows. To the
left of the church stands the rectangular, three-tiered bell tower topped with finials, a domed roof
and a lantern. The clock mechanism are still intact. The interiors of the church is reportedly one of
the best preserved interior of a Roman Catholic church in Mindanao. It features a painting done in
1898 and portions made of tabique pampango, a local version of a dry wall using panels of
interwoven slats or branches and covered with lime.

21. Parish Church of Santa Catalina de Alejandria in Luna, La Union


The Santa Catalina de Alejandria Church is a Roman Catholic church located
in Luna(formerly Namacpacan), La Union, Philippines under the jurisdiction of the Roman
Catholic Diocese of San Fernando de La Union. Formerly called as Luna Church, the
church is placed under the advocacy Saint Catherine of Alexandria in 1690 and known for
its devotion to the Our Lady of Namacpacan. Like other Philippine churches built in
earthquake-prone areas, Namacpacan Church is classified as an Earthquake
Baroque church with thick walls and buttresses connected to a brick exterior stairway of
different designs and shapes.[4] A ceremonial archway orcapilla possa can be found at the
church's entrance. Its 1872 white and yellow facade falls under the Baroque style with the
presence of rounded pediments. Three sets of two pairs of engaged columns and two sets
of single columns along with twin belfries adorning the façade. A wooden altar, Spanish-
era stone pulpit and a wood relief of the Baptism of Christ, probably polychromed, can be
found inside the church.Its convento is now used as a school.

22. Parish Church of San Carlos Borromeo in Mahatao, Batanes


San Carlos Borromeo Church (Spanish: Iglesia Parroquial de San Carlos Borromeo),
also known as Mahatao Church, is a Roman Catholic church located in Mahatao, Batan
Island, Batanes, Philippines. The church is made of stone and lime, common building
materials in Batanes. Anespadaña belfry is located on top of the facade's pediment with
one of its bells dated 1874. The church has uneven wall thickness due to addition of step
buttresses and even buttress walls. Its interiors, decorated in Baroque style, showcase floral
designs sunburst ornaments painted in polychrome and gilt which lends a golden glow
among the statuary. The main retablo houses images of Saint Charles Borromeo, patron, on
the center and surrounded by Saint Joseph, Saint Dominic de Guzman and Saint Rose of
Lima. Two minor altar housing the image of the Our Lady of the Rosary on the right and of
the Holy Child on the left of the central altar can also be found.
On the right side of the facade is the church convent. The second floor of the convent is not
the typical volada or cantilevered gallery for convents in the Philippines but an open
extended deck. At the back of the convent are remains of an old circular well.Located on
the left side of the facade is a beacon used for navigation.

23. Parish Church of San Gregorio Magno in Majayjay, Laguna


The San Gregorio Magno Parish Church (Filipino: Simbahan ng Parokya ni San
Gregorio Magno; Spanish: Iglesia Parroquial de San Gregorio Magno), also known
as Majayjay Church and St. Gregory the Great Parish Church, is one of the oldest Roman
Catholic churches in the Philippines located in the municipality of Majayjay in Laguna. Its
façade has three levels, each level scaled proportionally and topped by a
triangular pediment with a circular window. The centralnave consists of a huge wooden
door of the main portal, choir loft windows and saint's niche. The interior contains
a retablo mayorand four other minor retablos with intricate designs. The floor is tiled
with azulejo and the walls have been preserved with some alterations. The five-storey
square belltower with a conical roof and ballustrated windows on each polygonal level is
connected to the langit-langitan, a cat-walk above the ceiling which leads to the crossing
over the transept.The belfry has arched windows each with a bell trimmed with finials and
a large antique bell on top It also has a large side door on the right side of the
church.Today, the church contains antique images of santos, reliquaries and century-old
liturgical objects.

24. Parish Church of the Assumption of Our Lady in Maragondon, Cavite


Maragondon is unique among Jesuit churches for its proportion. The façade is narrow but
tall, not squatty as in other churches. To the left of the façade is the taller bell tower with
no clear divisions between the stories. It is a single quadrilateral shaft tapering upwards
ending with finials at the four corners and surmounted by a rounded roof. The façade is
chastely ornamented with the tapering buttresses supporting it.
In contrast to the simplicity of its façade is the ornate door, divided into boxes, with floral
designs of different shapes and ships and castles carved on it. Both in and out, the church
fabric made of river stones are covered with a layer of paletada (stucco). The elevation
found in the façade is emphasized in the interior by the use of pilasters that taper the
upwards. This produces a dizzying effect, as the pillars appear to soar up and sway. The
main roof beams are exposed and emblazoned with biblical and commemorative captions.
Over the nave the phrases are in praise of Mary, and those above the choir refer to singing
as praise. The door leading from sanctuary to sacristy is also carved with flowers enclosed
in boxes.

25. Parish Church of Santa Monica in Panay, Capiz


The Santa Monica Parish Church (Spanish: Iglesia Parroquial de Santa Mónica),
commonly known as Panay Church, is the oldest church on the island of Panay located
in Panay Municipality, Capiz, Philippines. It is also the home of the largest church bell in
the Philippines and the fifth biggest in the world.The original structure of the church was
built during the term of Fr. Manuel Lopez between 1692 and 1698, but it was reported that
a typhoon had ruined it. In 1774, Fr. Miguel Murguía rebuilt the church, but it was also
later damaged by a typhoon on 15 January 1875. Fr. José Beloso restored the church in
1884. The original name of the settlement was Bamban and it was changed by the early
Spaniards to Panay, a word which means “mouth of the river". This is also the location of a
fortress built by Juan de la Isla in late 1570. The church, built in the Filipino Colonial
Baroque style with Neo-Classical influence, is a grand structure of coral stone that is 70
meters long, 25 meters wide and 18 meters high. The walls are 3 meters (or about 10 feet)
thick and the floor is covered with marble. Its structure is shaped in the form of a Latin
cross with one large central altar and four lateral ones, each fitted with gorgeously
decorated and gilded retablos of hardwood, decorated with various polychrome statues of
high artistic quality.

26. Parish Church of San Juan Bautista in Tabaco City, Albay


The Saint John the Baptist Parish Church commonly known as Tabaco Church, is
a Roman Catholic Church in the municipality of Tabaco, Albay, Philippines under the
jurisdiction of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Legazpi.The church of Tabaco was founded
by the Franciscans under the advocacy of Saint John the Baptist and became an
independent parish in 1616. The church is built out of dark volcanic soil and stones found
in the area. One unusual characteristic of the church is the presence of mason's marks on
stones used for the construction of the church building, a rare feature in the Philippines.Its
unusual floor plan contains compartments for which there is currently no explanation. It is
known for its beautiful and bell tower embedded with rococo designs.

27. Parish Church of San Ildefonso in Tanay, Rizal


Saint Ildefonsus of Toledo Parish Church commonly known as theTanay Church, is
a Roman Catholic church located in the town of Tanay, Rizal Province in the Philippines.
The construction of the present church was begun in 1773 and was completed after ten
years in 1783. In 2001, it was declared as a National Cultural Treasure Church by
the National Commission for Culture and the Arts. The style of the church, with its
triangular pediment and rounded belfry, leans toward Baroque architecture. The church
also houses a relic of a piece of bone of San Ildefonso housed in amonstrance, given by
Rev. Fr. Felipe Pedraja on October 2006 from Zamora, Spain in which the body of the
patron saint lies.The 14 Stations of the Cross inside the church is considered as one of the
most beautiful Stations of the Cross in Asia.[2] The carvings are depicted to have Malay
features as evidenced by the brown skin of the natives and their squat figures, all of which
are believed to have created by native Tanay artists. Some distinct depictions are borrowed
from the native culture such as the "Tambuli" made of carabao and the bolo instead of the
typical Roman sword. The carvings are encased in large glass windows across each side of
the church.

28. Basilica of St Michael the Archangel in Tayabas, Quezon


The Minor Basilica of Saint Michael the Archangel , (Tagalog: Basilika Menor ni San
Miguel Arkangel; Spanish: Basílica Menor de San Miguel Arcángel) commonly known as
the Tayabas Basilica, is a Roman Catholic basilica located in Tayabas, Quezon,
Philippines under the Roman Catholic Diocese of Lucena. Its titular is Saint Michael the
Archangel, whose feast is celebrated annually on September 29.The church is the largest in
the province of Quezon and is built in the shape of a key. Locals often refer to the church
as Susi ng Tayabas ("The Key of Tayabas"). The church's 103-metre (338-foot) aisle also
has the longest nave among Spanish colonial era churches in the Philippines. Tayabas
Basilica has a unique floor plan that resembles a key. The church's 103 m (338 ft) aisle is
the longest of any church built during the Spanish colonial era. It was built between 1855
and 1860. Its facade is almost eclectic, and was added during renovations to the church.
The unusual three-storey arrangement of the facade includes has an entrance flanked by
two niches in Mudejar style. The windows of the choir loft and the central window on the
second floor have capiz shells. The levels are separated by horizontal bands and images of
angels, and several saints including Saint Francis of Assisi, Saint Dominic and Saint Diego
of Alcala. On the topmost tier are stone-carved statues of archangels Michael, Gabriel and
Raphael.

29. Molo Church in Molo, Iloilo City


Jaro Cathedral, formally Jaro Metropolitan Cathedral and the National Shrine of Our
Lady of the Candles (Spanish:Santuario Nacional de Nuestra Señora de la Candelaria),
is the seat of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Jaro. It is located in the district
of Jaro in Iloilo City, Iloilo, on the island of Panay in the Philippines. It was initially place
under the patronage of Saint Elizabeth of Hungary. The Catholic Bishops' Conference of
the Philippines formally declared the cathedral the National Shrine of Our Lady of the
Candles (Nuestra Señora de la Candelaria) on February 2012. A distinctive feature is that
the bell tower is located across a busy street from the church, on Jaro
Plaza,] resembling Ilocos churches. Typically, belfries are built next to their churches. In
this case, the tower was adjacent to an earlier church, but an earthquake destroyed the
church and left the tower. Another distinctive feature is the stairs attached to the front
facade of the cathedral, over the main entrance, leading up to a shrine featuring a statue of
Our Lady of the Candles, as can be seeN in the picture at the top of this article. The church
also possesses relics of St. Josemaría Escrivá.
Another feature of the church is its all-male ensemble of saints placed on the main pillars,
with the exception of the Virgin's icon. The arrangement is in response to Molo Church's
all-female theme.

30. Church of Nuestra Señora de la Concepcion Historical Landmark in Argao, Cebu


The Cathedral of Our Lady of the Assumption of Maasin (Spanish: Catedral de
Nuestra Señora de la Asunción de Maasin), commonly known as the Maasin Cathedral is
a baroque Roman Catholic church in Maasin, Southern Leyte, Philippines. The church is
home to one of the oldest parishes of the country, the Maasin parish established by the
series of waves of missionaries namely the Jesuits, Augustinians and finally, Franciscans.
Originally built in 1700 by Jesuit priests, the church suffered several destruction and
damage over the years, but has been rebuilt many times by the orders succeeding the
Jesuits. Its present-day structure is constructed at 1968 and subsequently became the seat
of theRoman Catholic Diocese of Maasin which covers the municipalities of Southern
Leyte, including the towns of Matalom, Bato, Hilongos, Hindang, Inopacan and Baybay of
province of Leyte. The present design heavily borrows from the characteristics of baroque
churches in the Philippines, with its traditional triangular pediment and simple facade
punctuated by rectangular niches for the images and windows. However, a seemingly
modern style was applied as shown by its rounded, three-layered bell tower which is a
common feature among late 18th century churches.

Verwandte Interessen