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Accredited with Grade A by NAAC, GoI

Accredited with Grade A by KCG, GoG

ACADEMIC
REGULATIONS
&
SYLLABUS

Faculty of Management Studies


Master of Business Administration

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 1 of 533


CHAROTAR UNIVERSITY OF
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY -
Accredited with Grade A by NAAC, GoI CHARUSAT
Accredited with Grade A by KCG, GoG

Education Campus – Changa, (ECC), hitherto a conglomerate of institutes of


professional education in Engineering, Pharmacy, Computer Applications, Management,
Applied Sciences, Physiotherapy and Nursing, is one of the choicest destinations by
students. It has been transformed into Charotar University of Science and Technology
(CHARUSAT) through an Act by Government of Gujarat. CHARUSAT is permitted to
grant degrees under Section-22 of UGC- Govt. of India.

The journey of CHARUSAT started in the year 2000, with only 240 Students, 4
Programmes, one Institute and an investment of about Rs. 3 Crores (INR 30 million). At
present there are seven different institutes falling under ambit of six different faculties.
The programmes offered by these faculties range from undergraduate (UG) to Ph.D
degrees including M.Phil. These faculties, in all offer 51 different programmes. A quick
glimpse in as under:

Faculty Institute Programmes


Offered
Faculty of Technology & Chandubhai S. Patel Institute of  B.Tech
Engineering Technology  M.Tech
 Ph.D
Faculty of Pharmacy Ramanbhai Patel College of  B.Pharm
Pharmacy  M.Pharm
 Ph.D
 PGDCT /
PGDPT
Faculty of Management Studies Indukaka Ipcowala Institute of  M.B.A
Management  PGDM
 Ph.D
 BBA
Faculty of Computer Applications Smt. Chandaben Mohanbhai Patel  M.C.A / MCA
Institute of Computer Applications. (Lateral)
 M.Sc IT
 Ph.D
 BCA

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Faculty of Applied Sciences P.D. Patel Institute of Applied  M.Sc
Sciences  M.Phil
 Ph.D
 B.Sc
Faculty of Medical Sciences  Ashok and Rita Institute of  B.PT
Physiotherapy  M.PT
  Ph.D
 Manikaka Topawala Institute of  B.Sc (Nursing)
Nursing  M.Sc
 PGDHA
Charotar Institute of Paramedical  PGDMLT
Sciences  GNM
 Ph.D
The development and growth of the institutes have already led to an investment of over Rs.125
Crores (INR 1250 Million). The future outlay is planned with an estimate of Rs.250 Crores (INR
2500 Million).

The University is characterized by state-of-the-art infrastructural facilities, innovative teaching


methods and highly learned faculty members. The University Campus sprawls over 105 acres of
land and is Wi-Fi enabled. It is also recognized as the Greenest Campus of Gujarat.

CHARUSAT is privileged to have 360 core faculty members, educated and trained in IITs, IIMs
and leading Indian Universities, and with long exposure to industry. It is also proud of its past
students who are employed in prestigious national and multinational corporations.

From one college to the level of a forward-looking University, CHARUSAT has the vision of
entering the club of premier Universities initially in the country and then globally. High Moral
Values like Honesty, Integrity and Transparency which has been the foundation of ECC
continues to anchor the functioning of CHARUSAT. Banking on the world class infrastructure
and highly qualified and competent faculty, the University is expected to be catapulted into top
20 Universities in the coming five years. In order to align with the global requirements, the
University has collaborated with internationally reputed organizations like Pennsylvania State
University – USA, University at Alabama at Birmingham – USA, Northwick Park Institute –UK,
ISRO, BARC, etc.

CHARUSAT has designed curricula for all its programmes in line with the current international
practices and emerging requirements. Industrial Visits, Study Tours, Expert Lectures and
Interactive IT enabled Teaching Practice form an integral part of the unique CHARUSAT
pedagogy.

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The programmes are credit-based and have continuous evaluation as an important feature. The
pedagogy is student-centred, augurs well for self-learning and motivation for enquiry and
research, and contains innumerable unique features like:

 Participatory and interactive discussion-based classes.


 Sessions by visiting faculty members drawn from leading academic institutions and
industry.
 Regular weekly seminars.
 Distinguished lecture series.
 Practical, field-based projects and assignments.
 Summer training in leading organizations under faculty supervision in relevant
programmes.
 Industrial tours and visits.
 Extensive use of technology for learning.
 Final Placement through campus interviews.
Exploration in the field of knowledge through research and development and comprehensive
industrial linkages will be a hallmark of the University, which will mould the students for global
assignments through technology-based knowledge and critical skills.

The evaluation of the student is based on grading system. A student has to pursue his/her
programme with diligence for scoring a good Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) and for
succeeding in the chosen profession and life.

CHARUSAT welcomes you for a Bright Future

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CHAROTAR UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND
TECHNOLOGY

Faculty of Management Studies

Accredited with Grade A by NAAC, GoI


Accredited with Grade A by KCG, GoG

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS
Masters of Business Administration (MBA) Programme

Charotar University of Science and Technology (CHARUSAT)


CHARUSAT Campus, At Post: Changa – 388421, Taluka: Petlad, District: Anand
Phone: 02697-247500, Fax: 02697-247100, Email: info@charusat.ac.in
www.charusat.ac.in

Year – 2016

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CHARUSAT
FACULTY OF MANAGEMENT STUDIES
ACADEMIC REGULATIONS

Master of Business Administration (MBA)


To ensure uniform system of education, duration of undergraduate and post graduate
programmes, eligibility criteria for and mode of admission, credit load requirement and its
distribution between course and system of examination and other related aspects, following
academic rules and regulations are recommended.

1. System of Education

The Semester system of education should be followed across The Charotar University of
Science and Technology (CHARUSAT) both at Undergraduate and Master‟s levels. Each
semester will be at least 90 working day duration. Every enrolled student will be
required to take a specified load of course work in the chosen subject of specialization
and also complete a project/dissertation if any.

2. Duration of Programme

2.1 The Master of Business Administration (MBA) programme of Charotar University of


Science and Technology (CHARUSAT) is a two-year full-time post-graduate
programme, leading to the award of the degree of Master of Business Administration
(MBA).

2.2 The span period of the programme is three years from the date of registration in the
programme.

3. Eligibility and mode of admissions

Any graduate who is eligible for admission to the MBA programme will be admitted to
the programme according to the regulations for admission decided by Government of
Gujarat from time to time.

4. Programme Structure and Credits

A student admitted to a program should study the course and earn credits specified
in the course structure. The details of programme structure, credit requirements, areas
of specialisation proposed to be offered, etc. are presented at Appendix – I.

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5. Attendance

5.1 All activities prescribed under these regulations and listed by the course faculty
members in their respective course outlines are compulsory for all students pursuing
the courses. No exemption will be given to any student from attendance except on
account of serious personal illness or accident or family calamity that may genuinely
prevent a student from attending a particular session or a few sessions. However,
such unexpected absence from classes and other activities will require to be
condoned by the Dean/Principal.

5.2 Student attendance in every course should be 80%.

6 Course Evaluation

6.1 The performance of every student in each course will be evaluated as follows:

6.1.1 Internal evaluation by the course faculty member(s) based on continuous


assessment, for 30% of the marks for the course; and

6.1.2 Final examination by the University through written paper or practical test or
oral test or presentation by the student or a combination of these, for 70% of the
marks for the course.

6.2 University Examination

6.2.1 The final examination by the University for 70% of the evaluation for the course
will be through written paper or practical test or oral test or presentation or a
combination of these.

6.2.2 In order to earn the credit in a course, a student has to obtain a grade other than
FF.

6.3 Performance at Internal Evaluation Components & University Examination

6.3.1 A student who secures at least 40% marks in the University examinations in any
course and at least a total of 50% marks in the internal evaluation components
and University examination put together will be declared to have passed that
course, as shown in the following table:

Minimum percentage marks in Minimum total percentage marks


University Exam for pass in any (i.e. Internal + University) for pass in
course any course
40% 50%

6.3.2 If a student secures minimum passing marks of 40% in the University


examinations in any course but fails to obtain the minimum passing total

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percentage of 50%, he/she has to repeat the university examination in the course
till he/she secures the minimum passing total percentage of 50%.

7 Grading

7.1 The total of the internal evaluation marks and final University examination marks in
each course will be converted to a letter grade on a ten-point scale as per the following
scheme:

Grading Scheme:

Range of Marks (%) ≥80 ≥75 ≥70 ≥65 ≥60 ≥55 ≥50 <50

<80 <75 <70 <65 <60 <55

Letter Grade AA AB BB BC CC CD DD FF

Grade Point 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 0

7.2 The student‟s performance in any semester will be assessed by the Semester Grade Point
Average (SGPA). Similarly, his performance at the end of two or more consecutive
semesters will be denoted by the Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA). The SGPA
and CGPA are calculated as follows:

(i) SGPA = ∑ CiGi/ ∑ Ci where Ci is the number of credits of course i

Gi is the Grade Point for the course i

and i = 1 to n, n = number of courses in the semester

(ii) CGPA = ∑ CiGi/ ∑ Ci where Ci is the number of credits of course i

Gi is the Grade Point for the course i

and i = 1 to n, n = number of courses of all semesters up to which CGPA is computed.

(iii) No student will be allowed to move to the second academic year if his/her CGPA is
less than 3 at the end of the first academic year.

(iv) In addition to above, a student has to comply with the requirements of the
regulatory bodies, wherever such requirements exist.

(v) A student will have a maximum of four chances* after first appearing in that
examination to clear that course, subject to the restriction on the span period
stipulated in clause 2.2 above.

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(*Whenever the university conducts the examinations of that course, it will be
considered as a chance, irrespective of whether the student appears for the
examination or not.)

8. Awards of Degree

8.1 Every student of the programme who fulfils the following criteria will be eligible for
the award of the degree:

8.1.1 He should have earned at least minimum required credits as prescribed in


course structure.

8.2 Any student who fails to satisfy minimum requirement of CGPA will be allowed to
improve the grades so as to secure a minimum CGPA for the award of degree. Only the
latest grades obtained by him/her will be considered.

9. Award of Class

The class awarded to a student in the programme is decided by the final CGPA as per the
following scheme:

Distinction: CGPA ≥ 7.5

First class: CGPA≥ 6.0

Second Class: CGPA≥ 5.0

10. Transcript

The transcript issued to the student at the time of leaving the University will contain a
consolidated record of all the courses taken, credits earned, grades obtained,
SGPA,CGPA and class obtained.

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Appendix – I

Details of MBA Programme Structure, Credit Requirements and


Specialisation

A1. Programme Structure

A1.1 The programme is structured into four semesters, consisting of classroom contact-based
work and a summer training / internship programme.

A1.2 Each semester will be for a minimum of 90 working days for classroom work, covering
classroom contact sessions, laboratory / tutorial / library / group work, case discussions
and presentation, field-based as well as library / internet search-based assignments and
projects, classroom exercises, management and simulation games, short quizzes, and
class tests. The duration for any organisational attachment / training during the semester
and final University examinations will be in addition to the 90 working days.

A1.3 The summer training / internship programme will be for a minimum duration of 45 days /
6-8 weeks and will commence at the end of the second semester classroom work.

A1.4 The structure of the MBA programme is as shown in the following figure:

Figure A1: MBA Programme Structure

ORIENTATION
SEMESTER 3

CLASSROOM
WORK

SEMESTER 1

SEMESTER 3
SEMESTER 4
SEMESTER 2 SUMMER
TRAINING/
Second Year
INTERNSHIP
First Year

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A2. Credits

A2.1 Any student of the MBA programme who earns 100 credits by pursuing the prescribed
course work and passing all tests, examinations, assignments, laboratory work, projects
and all other evaluation components as per the passing standards of the University will
be eligible for the award of the Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree.

A2.2 A credit for the MBA programme will mean fifteen (15) classroom contact sessions of
sixty (60) minutes each or fifteen (15) laboratory / tutorial / library / group work sessions
of two hours (120 minutes) each, pursued over a semester. With a minimum of 90
working days spread over about 15 weeks at an average of 6 working days per week, a
credit will mean, on an average, one classroom contact session of sixty (60) minutes or
one laboratory / tutorial / library / group work session of two hours (120 minutes) per
week.

A2.3 The current distribution of credits over the two-year period for classroom contact
sessions and laboratory / tutorial / library / group work sessions will be as follows:

TableA2: Semester-wise Distribution of Credits

Number of
Sl. No. Semester
Credits

1 Semester - 1 23

2 Semester - 2 26

3 Semester 3 - Summer Training/ Internship 04

4 Semester - 3 - Classroom Work 24

5 Semester – 4 23

100

A2.4 A course will be of two or more credits as shown in the detailed list of courses for the
programme.

A2.5 All courses shown in the list of courses are compulsory for all MBA students. However,
students will have the option of pursuing a total of six elective courses of four credits
each, out of eight courses offered during third and fourth semesters and one
comprehensive project of six credits during the fourth semester.

A2.6 Some courses will have only classroom contact sessions and some others will have
tutorial / laboratory / library / group work sessions, as shown in the list of courses.

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A2.7 The University has implemented Choice Based Credit System (CBCS), with effect from
2016-17,which provides a „cafeteria‟ approach; wherein the students can take courses of
their choice, and adopt an interdisciplinary approach to learning from the pull of courses
offered by all the Faculties/ Institutes/ Departments across university.

Below mentioned pull of courses will be offered to the students by different


departments/institutes. Each student has to choose one course (of his /her choice) from
the offered courses.

Semester 1

Course
No Course Name Department/Faculty
Code
1 MA771 Reliability and Risk Analysis Mathematics
2 EE 781 Optimization Techniques Engineering
3 ME781 Occupational Health and Safety Engineering
4 CE 770 Research Methodology Engineering
Computer
5 CA730 Internet & Web Designing
Application
6 PT795 Health & Physical Activity Physiotherapy
7 NR 751 Women‟s Health Nursing
8 RD701 Introduction to Analytical Techniques Applied Science
Introduction to Nanoscience &
9 RD702 Applied Science
Technology
Faculty of
10 MB650 Creative Leadership
Management Studies
11 PH825 Community Pharmacy Ownership Pharmacy

Semester 2

Course
No Course Name Department/Faculty
Code
1 EE782 Energy Audit and Management Engineering
2 CE771 Project Management Engineering
3 IT771 Cyber Security and Laws Engineering
Computer
4 CA 842 Mobile Application Development
Application
5 PT796 Fitness & Nutrition Physiotherapy
6 NR 752 Epidemiology and Community Health Nursing
7 OC733 Introduction to Polymer Science Applied Science
Faculty of
8 MB651 Software based Statistical Analysis
Management Studies
9 PH826 Intellectual Property Rights Pharmacy
10 MA772 Design of Experiments Mathematics

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A3. Specialisation / Concentration

A3.1 The Institute will offer courses of specialisation in the following functional / sectoral
areas /streams of management:

Table A3: Areas / Streams of Specialisation/ Concentration

Functional Areas of Management

 Marketing Management
 Financial Management
 Human Resource Management
 Information Technology Management
 Health Care Management
 Project and Infrastructure Management
 Family Business and Entrepreneurship Management
 Tourism and Hospitality Management
 Journalism and Mass Communication Management

The Institute will endeavour to offer specialisation in as many areas / streams as possible
from the above list. However, any specific area / stream of specialisation / course will be
offered by the Institute during any year only if about twenty-five percent of the students
opt for it and if the faculty resources are available.

A3.2 Any student can claim to have specialised in a particular area / stream if he has
successfully completed

(i) At least six courses (amounting to a minimum of twenty four credits) in


the area / stream by taking electives offered in the area / stream during
the third and fourth semesters of the programme, and
(ii) A comprehensive project of six credits in the area / stream.

A3.3 Every student has to opt for specialisation in only one functional area of management for
the award of MBA degree.

A3.4 A student may specialise in only one functional / sectoral areas / streams of management
by taking six courses in each of the areas and carrying out a comprehensive project in
each of the areas.

A3.5 However, no student will be allowed to specialise in more than one functional stream of
management.

A4. Courses, Curricula and Revision

A4.1 The Faculty Board of the Faculty of Management Studies and the Dean of the Faculty of
Management Studies will keep the curricula current and in tune with the changes

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happening in the world of management and make it relevant to the needs of different
organs of society.

A4.2 The review of the programme, its structure, the course curricula, pedagogy and
evaluation will be undertaken by the individual Boards of Studies at least once in every
two years.

A4.3 Every course of the programme will be designated by a five-digit alphanumerical code as
per the following scheme:

M B Number 1 Number 2 Number 3

Management Business Level / Year Course Serial No.

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TEACHING & EXAMINATION SCHEME FOR MBA

Course Total Number


Course Title Remarks
Code of Credits
Semester – I
MB700.3 Managerial Economics 3
MB701.3 Quantitative Analysis for Management-1 3
MB702.3 Critical Thinking and Case Analysis 3
MB703.3 Managerial Communication 3
MB704.3 Financial Accounting 3
Management Process and Organizational
MB705.3 3
Behaviour
Introduction to Computers and Information
MB706.3 3
Technology
MB650 Creative Leadership 2 University Elective
Compulsory Non-Credit Course:
MB780.3 Communication Skills - 1 ---
02 Hrs.
Total 23
Semester – II
Macro-Economics and Business
MB740.3 3
Environment
MB741.3 Research Methods for Management 3
MB742.3 Quantitative Analysis for Management - 2 3
MB743.3 Human Resource Management 3
MB744.3 Costing and Control Systems 3
MB745.3 Financial Management 3
MB746.3 Marketing Management 3
MB747.3 Operations Management 3
MB651 Software Based Statistical Analysis 2 University Elective
Compulsory Non-Credit Course:
MB781.3 Communication Skills - 2 ---
02 Hrs.
Total 26

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Course Total Number
Course Title Remarks
Code of Credits
Summer Internship Programme (Practical)
MB800.3 4 To be included in Semester – III credits
Duration: 06 to 08 Weeks
Semester – III
MB801.3 Strategic Management 3
MB802.3 Legal Environment and Public Systems 3
Core Courses
MB803.3 Management Information Systems 3
MB804.3 Entrepreneurship and MSMEs 3
Specialisation Course -1 4 Elective / Specialization will be offered
in only one stream / area which will
Specialisation Course – 2 4 remain same for Semester –IV also.
A student can choose any three courses
Specialisation Course – 3 4 from his/her chosen stream.
Total 28
Semester – IV
MB805.3 Comprehensive Project (Practical) 6

MB806.3 Logistics and Supply Chain Management 3


Core Courses
MB807.3 Managerial Effectiveness 2
Specialisation Course – 4 4 Elective / Specialization will be offered
in only one stream / area which will
Specialisation Course – 5 4 remain same for Semester –IV also.
A student can choose any three courses
Specialisation Course – 6 4 from his/her chosen stream.
Total 23
Total Number of Credits 100

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MBA Specialisation Streams and Courses for Semester-III
Stream/Area/
MM FM HRM IT HC PIM FBEM THM JMC
Group Code
Family Business Tourism Journalism and
Elective / Human Information Project and
Marketing Finance Health Care and and Mass
Specialisation Resource Technology Infrastructure
Entrepreneurship Hospitality Communication
Course 1 – Code MB810.3 MB820.3 MB830.3 MB840.3 MB850.3 MB860.3 MB870.3 MB880.3 MB890.3
Principles and
Consumer Strategic Information Health
Financial Project Concepts of
Course 1 Behaviour Human Technology in Economics Leadership Development
Decision Formulation Tourism and
Name and Resource Business and Social Skills Communication
Analysis and Execution Hospitality
Technology Management Management Policy
Management
Course 2 – Code MB811.3 MB821.3 MB831.3 MB841.3 MB851.3 MB861.3 MB871.3 MB881.3 MB891.3
Tourism
Management Business Introduction to
Integrated Organizational Management Hospital Social Projects Policy,
Course 2 of Regulations and Mass
Marketing and Change of Software Planning and and Destination
Name Financial Start-up Communication
Communication Development Projects in IT Management Infrastructure Planning and
Services Financing and Journalism
Development
Course 3 – Code MB812.3 MB822.3 MB832.3 MB842.3 MB852.3 MB862.3 MB872.3 MB882.3 MB892.3
Environmental
Sales Security Indian
System Health Creativity, Media Law
Course 3 and Analysis and Industrial Infrastructural Tourism and
Analysis and Management Incubation and and
Name Distribution Investment Relations Projects Hospitality
Design and Safety Innovation Ethics
Management Management Management
Planning
Course 4 – Code MB813.3 MB823.3 MB33.3 MB843.3 MB853.3 MB 863.3 MB873.3 MB883.3 MB893.3
Financial Introduction Legal
ERP Systems:
Reporting Human to Management of Aspects of Media
Course 4 Strategic Technology Health Care
Analysis and Resource Infrastructure Technology and Tourism and Economics and
Name Marketing Planning and Marketing
Corporate Auditing Policy for Innovation Hospitality Analysis
Implementation
Governance Development Management
Course 5 – Code MB814.3 MB824.3 MB834.3 MB844.3 MB854.3 MB 864.3 MB874.3 MB884.3 MB894.3
Taxation Learning
Relational Financial
Management Project Social Front
Course 5 Rural Occupational Database Management Media
(Both – Management Entrepreneurship Office
Name Marketing Testing Management of Health Analytics
Direct or Through and Management Management
Systems Institutions
Indirect) Software

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MBA Specialisation Streams and Courses for Semester-IV
Stream/Area /
MM FM HRM IT HC PIM FBEM THM JMC
Group Code
Family Business Journalism and
Elective / Human Information Project and Tourism and
Marketing Finance Health Care and Mass
Specialisation Resource Technology Infrastructure Hospitality
Entrepreneurship Communication
Course 1 - Code MB815.3 MB825.3 MB835.3 MB845.3 MB855.3 MB865.3 MB875.3 MB885.3 MB895.3
Data Project and International
Product and Human Hospital Succession
Course 1 Behavioural Warehousing Infrastructure Tourism and Print Media
Brand Resource Operations Planning and
Name Finance and Data Marketing and Hospitality Communication
Management Development Management Management
Mining Pricing Management
Course 2 – Code MB816.3 MB826.3 MB836.3 MB846.3 MB856.3 MB 866.3 MB876.3 MB886.3 MB896.3
Quality
Human Hospital Entrepreneurship Management
Services and Business Project and Electronic
Course 2 Corporate Resource Management Marketing in Tourism
Relationship Process Infrastructure Media
Name Restructuring Information Information and and
Management Reengineering Financing Communication
System System Analytics Hospitality
Business
Course 3 – Code MB817.3 MB827.3 MB837.3 MB847.3 MB857.3 MB 867.3 MB877.3 MB887.3 MB897.3
Application of
Information Medical Audit Cost Benefit Facility and Public Relation
Course 3 International International Compensation Strategic
Security and and Quality Analysis of Event and Corporate
Name Marketing Finance Management Frameworks for
Cyber Law Management Projects Management Film Creation
SMEs
Course 4 – Code MB818.3 MB828.3 MB838.3 MB848.3 MB858.3 MB868.3 MB878.3 MB888.3 MB898.3
Development Health Cost and
International Environmental Cyber
Banking Communication: Professionalization Operations in
Course 4 Retail Human Information and Social Journalism:
Rural and Development of Tourism and
Name Management Resource Systems Audit Impact Convergence
Micro and Family Business Hospitality
Management Assessment and New Media
Finance Dissemination Business
Course 5 – Code MB819.3 MB829.3 MB839.3 MB849.3 MB859.3 MB869.3 MB879.3 MB889.3 MB899.3
Competitive Crises Media
Digital and Derivatives Modeling and Legal Aspects Theory of Strategy and Management in Management
Course 5 Industrial
Social Media and Risk Analysis with of Constraints Management of Tourism and and
Name Jurisprudence
Marketing Management Spreadsheets Health Care Family Business Hospitality Ad Campaign
Portfolio Business Strategies

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Note:
1. Procedure for Selection of Streams / Area / Group and Courses

Step: 1 – Selection of Stream (Only One for the Programme)


A student must choose any one stream of specialization out of the offering. The stream so chosen by the student will remain same for Semester – III
and IV. This will be the area of specialization. Under no circumstances the stream / area of specialization can be changed.
Step: 2 – Choice of Courses in Semester - III
From the stream so chosen (as mentioned in Step: 1), the student has to choose any 03 (three) courses out of 05 (five) options available. The total credit
that can be obtained in Semester-III for specialization courses will 3 courses x 4 credits = 12 Credits. In addition students will undergo a Summer
Internship Programme with Four (04) credits.
Step: 3 – Choice of Courses in Semester – IV
A Student has to repeat Step: 2 in Semester – IV and will have to choose 03 (three) more courses out of 05 (five) in the same stream / area of
specialization that he / she has selected during the start of Semester – III. The total credit that can be obtained in Semester-IV for specialization
courses except Comprehensive Project will be 3 courses x 4 credits = 12 Credits.
Step: 4 – Comprehensive Project
During Semester – IV, a student must undertake his / her Comprehensive Project in the same stream / area that he / she had chosen during the start of
the Semester – III. However, research / project of interdisciplinary nature can be undertaken with the permission of the concerned guide and head of
the institute / principal. The total credit that can be obtained in Semester-IV for specialization through Comprehensive Project is Six (06) credits.
Step: 5 – Total Number of Credits for Specialisation
The total credits for specialization will be 24 i.e. (6*4) for courses and 06 credits for Comprehensive Project. Hence, the specialisation will be of 30
credits.

2. Rules for offering Elective Stream / Courses


 Minimum 25% of students must have opted for a particular course.
 Based on availability of faculty.

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Annexure – A – MBA Teaching / Evaluation Scheme
MBA - Semester – I
Teaching Scheme/Contact Hours Evaluation Scheme
Theory Practical
Course Code Course Name Credits
Contact Total
Theory Practical Internal External Total Internal External Total
Hours Hours
Managerial
MB700.3 3 3.00 --- --- 3.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Economics
Quantitative
MB701.3 Analysis for 3 3.00 --- --- 3.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Management-1
Critical
MB702.3 Thinking and 3 3.00 --- --- 3.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Case Analysis
Managerial
MB703.3 3 3.00 --- --- 3.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Communication
Financial
MB704.3 3 3.00 --- --- 3.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Accounting
Management
Process and
MB705.3 3 3.00 --- --- 3.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Organizational
Behaviour
Introduction to
Computers and
MB706.3 3 --- --- 3.00 3.00 --- --- --- 30 70 100
Information
Technology
Creative
MB650 2 --- --- 2.00 2.00 --- --- --- 30 70 100
Leadership
Communication
MB780.3 --- --- --- 2.00 2.00 --- --- --- --- --- ---
Skills-1
Non- Library --- 5.00 --- 5.00 --- --- --- --- --- ---
---
Credit
Areas --- MANAS --- --- 2.00 --- 2.00 --- --- --- --- --- ---
Computer
--- --- 4.00 --- 4.00 --- --- --- --- --- ---
Tutorial
Total 23 18.00 11.00 7.00 36.00 180 420 600 60 140 200

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MBA - Semester - II

Evaluation Scheme
Teaching Scheme/Contact Hours
Theory Practical
Course Code Course Name Credits
Contact Total
Theory Practical Internal External Total Internal External Total
Hours Hours
Macro-Economics
MB740.3 and Business 3 3.00 --- --- 3.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Environment
Research Methods
MB741.3 3 3.00 --- --- 3.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
for Management
Quantitative
MB742.3 Analysis for 3 3.00 --- --- 3.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Management - 2
Human Resource
MB743.3 3 3.00 --- --- 3.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Management
Costing and
MB744.3 3 3.00 --- --- 3.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Control Systems
Financial
MB745.3 3 3.00 --- --- 3.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Management
Marketing
MB746.3 3 3.00 --- --- 3.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Management
Operations
MB747.3 3 3.00 --- --- 3.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Management
Software Based
MB651 Statistical 2 --- --- 2.00 2.00 --- --- --- 30 70 100
Analysis
Communication
MB781.3 --- --- --- 2.00 2.00 --- --- --- --- --- ---
Skills-2
Non- Library --- 4.00 4.00 --- --- --- --- --- ---
---
Credit
Areas MANAS --- --- 2.00 2.00 --- --- --- --- --- ---
---
Computer
--- --- 2.00 2.00 --- --- --- --- --- ---
Tutorial
Total 26 24.00 08.00 04.00 36.00 240 560 800 30 70 100

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 21 of 533


MBA - Semester – III
Evaluation Scheme
Teaching Scheme/Contact Hours
Course Theory Practical
Course Name Credits
Code Contact Total
Theory Practical Internal External Total Internal External Total
Hours Hours
Summer
MB800.3 Internship 4 --- 8.00 --- 8.00 --- --- --- 30 70 100
Programme
Strategic
MB801.3 3 3.00 --- --- 3.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Management
Legal
MB802.3 Environment and 3 3.00 --- --- 3.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Public Systems
Management
MB803.3 Information 3 3.00 --- --- 3.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Systems
Entrepreneurship
MB804.3 3 3.00 --- --- 3.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
and MSMEs
Specialisation
4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Course - 1
Specialisation
4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Course - 2
Specialisation
4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Course - 3
Non- MANAS --- --- 2.00 --- 2.00 --- --- --- --- --- ---
Credit Placement
Areas --- --- 2.00 --- 2.00 --- --- --- --- --- ---
Assistance
24 + 4
Total 24.00 12.00 0.00 36.00 210 490 700 30 70 100
= 28
Note: For the specialization courses – Teaching and Evaluation Scheme may differ based on the selection of the course by the
students.

For example: MB864.3 – Learning Project Management through Software has practical evaluation components.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 22 of 533


Details of Area of Specializations and Courses Offered under Each area during Semester – III for MBA Programme
Teaching Scheme/Contact Hours Evaluation Scheme
Course
Course Name Credits Contact Total Theory Practical
Code Theory Practical
Hours Hours Internal External Total Internal External Total
Marketing Management (Any Three)
Consumer Behaviour and
MB810.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Technology
Integrated Marketing
MB811.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Communication
MB812.3 Sales and Distribution Management 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
MB813.3 Strategic Marketing 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
MB814.3 Rural Marketing 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
OR
Finance Management (Any Three)
MB 820.3 Financial Decision Analysis 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
MB821.3 Management of Financial Services 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Security Analysis and Investment
MB822.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Management
Financial Reporting Analysis and
MB823.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Corporate Governance
Taxation Management
MB824.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
(Both - Direct and Indirect)
OR
Human Resources Management (Any Three)
Strategic Human Resource
MB830.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Management
Organizational and Change
MB831.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Development
MB832.3 Industrial Relations 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
MB833.3 Human Resource Auditing 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
MB834.3 Occupational Testing 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
OR

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 23 of 533


Teaching Scheme/Contact Hours Evaluation Scheme
Course
Course Name Credits Contact Total Theory Practical
Code Theory Practical
Hours Hours Internal External Total Internal External Total
Information Technology Management (Any Three)
Information Technology in Business
MB840.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Management
Management of Software Projects in
MB841.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
IT
MB842.3 System Analysis and Design 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
ERP Systems: Technology Planning
MB843.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
and Implementation
Relational Database Management
MB844.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Systems
OR
Health Care Management (Any Three)
MB850.3 Health Economics and Social Policy 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
MB851.3 Hospital Planning and Management 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Environmental Health Management
MB852.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
and Safety Planning
MB853.3 Health Care Marketing 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Financial Management of Health
MB854.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Institutions
OR
Project and Infrastructure Management (Any Three)
MB860.3 Project Formulation and Execution 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
MB861.3 Social Projects and Infrastructure 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
MB862.3 Infrastructural Projects 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Introduction to Infrastructure
MB863.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Policy for Development
Learning Project Management
MB864.3 4 --- --- 4.00 4.00 --- --- --- 30 70 100
through Software
OR

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 24 of 533


Teaching Scheme/Contact Hours Evaluation Scheme
Course
Course Name Credits Contact Total Theory Practical
Code Theory Practical
Hours Hours Internal External Total Internal External Total
Family Business and Entrepreneurship Management (Any Three)
MB870.3 Leadership Skills 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Business Regulations and Start-up
MB871.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Financing
Creativity, Incubation and
MB872.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Innovation
Management of Technology and
MB873.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Innovation
Social Entrepreneurship and
MB874.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Management
OR
Tourism and Hospitality Management (Any Three)
Principles and Concepts of Tourism
MB880.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
and Hospitality Management
Tourism Policy, Destination
MB881.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Planning and Development
Indian Tourism and Hospitality
MB882.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Management
Legal Aspects of Tourism and
MB883.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Hospitality Management
MB884.3 Front Office Management 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
OR
Journalism and Mass Communication (Any Three)
MB890.3 Development Communication 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Introduction to Mass
MB891.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Communication and Journalism
MB892.3 Media Law and Ethics 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
MB893.3 Media Economics and Analysis 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
MB894.3 Media Analytics 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 25 of 533


MBA - Semester – IV
Evaluation Scheme
Teaching Scheme/Contact Hours
Course Theory Practical
Course Name Credits
Code Contact Total
Theory Practical Internal External Total Internal External Total
Hours Hours
Comprehensive
MB805.3 6 --- 12.00 --- 12.00 --- --- --- 60 140 200
Project (Practical)
Logistics and
MB806.3 Supply Chain 3 3.00 --- --- 3.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Management
Managerial
MB807.3 2 --- --- 2.00 2.00 --- --- --- 30 70 100
Effectiveness
Specialization
4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Course - 4
Specialization
4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Course - 5
Specialization
4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Course - 6
MANAS --- --- 2.00 2.00 --- --- --- --- --- ---
Non-
Credit Library --- --- 1.00 1.00 --- --- --- --- --- ---
Areas Placement
--- --- 4.00 4.00 --- --- --- --- --- ---
Assistance
Total 23 15.00 19.00 02.00 36.00 120 280 400 90 210 300

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 26 of 533


Details of Area of Specializations and Courses Offered under Each area during Semester – IV for MBA Programme
Teaching Scheme/Contact
Evaluation Scheme
Course Hours
Course Name Credits
Code Contact Total Theory Practical
Theory Practical
Hours Hours Internal External Total Internal External Total
Marketing Management (Any Three)
MB815.3 Product and Brand Management 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Services and Relationship
MB816.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Management
MB817.3 International Marketing 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
MB818.3 Retail Management 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
MB819.3 Digital and Social Media Marketing 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
OR
Finance Management (Any Tree)
MB825.3 Behavioural Finance 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
MB826.3 Corporate Restructuring 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
MB827.3 International Finance 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Development Banking Rural and
MB828.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Micro Finance
MB829.3 Derivatives and Risk Management 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
OR
Human Resources Management (Any Three)
MB835.3 Human Resource Development 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Human Resource Information
MB836.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
System
MB837.3 Compensation Management 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
International Human Resource
MB838.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Management
MB839.3 Industrial Jurisprudence 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
OR

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 27 of 533


Teaching Scheme/Contact Hours Evaluation Scheme
Course Contact Theory Practical
Course Name Credits Total
Code Theory Practical Hours
Hours Internal External Total Internal External Total
Information Technology Management (Any Three)
MB845.3 Data Warehousing and Data Mining 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
MB846.3 Business Process Reengineering 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
MB847.3 Information Security and Cyber Law 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
MB848.3 Information Systems Audit 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Modeling and Analysis with
MB849.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Spreadsheets
OR
Health Care Management (Any Three)
MB855.3 Hospital Operations Management 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Hospital Management Information
MB856.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
System
Medical Audit and Quality
MB857.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Management
Health Communication:
MB858.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Development & Dissemination
MB859.3 Legal Aspects of Healthcare 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
OR
Project and Infrastructure Management (Any Three)
Project and Infrastructure
MB865.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Marketing and Pricing
MB866.3 Project and Infrastructure Financing 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
MB867.3 Cost Benefit Analysis of Projects 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Environmental and Social Impact
MB868.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Assessment
MB869.3 Theory of Constraints 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
OR

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 28 of 533


Teaching Scheme/Contact Hours Evaluation Scheme
Course
Course Name Credits Contact Total Theory Practical
Code Theory Practical
Hours Hours Internal External Total Internal External Total
Family Business and Entrepreneurship Management (Any Three)
Succession Planning and
MB875.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Management
Entrepreneurship Marketing and
MB876.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Analytics
Application of Strategic
MB877.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Frameworks for SMEs
Professionalization of Family
MB878.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Business
Competitive Strategy and
MB879.3 Management of Family Business 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Portfolio
OR
Tourism and Hospitality Management (Any Three)
International Tourism and
MB885.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Hospitality Management
Quality Management in Tourism and
MB886.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Hospitality Business
MB887.3 Facility and Event Management 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Cost and Operations in Tourism and
MB888.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Hospitality Business
Crises Management in Tourism and
MB889.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Hospitality Business
OR
Journalism and Mass Communication (Any Three)
MB895.3 Print Media Communications 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
MB896.3 Electronic Media Communication 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Public Relations and Corporate Film
MB897.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Creation
Cyber Journalism: Convergence and
MB898.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
New Media
Media Management and Ad
MB899.3 4 4.00 --- --- 4.00 30 70 100 --- --- ---
Campaigning Strategies

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 29 of 533


© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 30 of 533
Master of Business Administration (MBA)
Programme

SYLLABI
(Semester – 1)

CHAROTAR UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 31 of 533


MB 700.3: MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS (ME)
YEAR 1, SEMESTER 1
I. Number of Credits : 3

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To enable the students to understand the principles underlying the structure and
functioning of markets.
 To help them to apply economic theory for optimal decision-making at the firm
level in the context of market constraints, through real-life examples from across
the globe and real cases of firms.
 To provide them sufficient exposure to the world of industry, trade and commerce,
so as to make them feel comfortable reading and understanding daily economic and
financial news about firms, and engaging in critical discussion on economic issues
affecting firms.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Introduction
 Ten Principles of Economics
 Thinking like an Economist
1 07
 Interdependence and the Gains from Trade
 Firms and its Objective
 Frontiers of Micro-Economics
Understanding Markets Forces
 The Market Forces of Supply and Demand
 Elasticity, Types and Applications
2 07
 Supply, Demand and Government Policies
 The Theory of Consumer Choice
 Demand Forecasting and Analysis
Markets and Welfare
 Consumers, Producer, and Market Efficiency
3 06
 The Costs of Taxation
 International Trade
The Economics of the Public Sector
 Externalities
4  Public Goods and Common Resources 06
 The Design of the Tax System (with Specific Reference to
India)
Firm Behaviour and the Organisation of Industry
 The Cost of Production
5  Market Structures 08
o Firms in Competitive Markets
o Monopoly

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 32 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No. Sessions
o Oligopoly
 Monopolistic Competition
The Economics of Labour Markets
 Factor Markets
6 08
 Earnings and Discrimination
 Income Inequality and Poverty
7 Contemporary Issues 03
Total 45

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 30 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 06 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 02 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 05 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through
the following components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 33 of 533


The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation
marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 An appreciation of the principles of micro-economics and their potential for firm


level decision-making.
 A desire for reading news of economic and financial changes/developments on a
regular basis, and engaging in discussion and critical evaluation of such
developments.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Book

1. Mankiw, (Latest Edition), Principles of Microeconomics, Cengage Learning.

Reference-Books

1. Salvatore Dominick, (Latest Edition), Managerial Economics - Principles and Worldwide


Applications (Adapted Version), Oxford University Press.
2. Ravindra H. Dholakia and Ajay N. Oza, (Latest Edition), Microeconomics for
Management Students, Oxford University Press.
3. Douglas Bernheim, Michael W., (Latest Edition), Microeconomics, Tata McGraw-Hill.
4. Joseph N., David P., (Latest Edition), Principles of Business Economics, Pearson
Education.
5. D. Salvatore and Ravikesh Srivastava, (Latest Edition), Managerial Economics in a Global
Economy, Oxford University Press.
6. H. L. Ahuja, (Latest Edition), Managerial Economics, S. Chand
7. Geetika, Piyali Ghosh, Purba Roy Choudhary, (Latest Edition), Managerial Economics,
McGraw Hill.
Journals / Magazines / Newspapers

1. Margin - The Journal of Applied Economic Research


2. South Asia Economic Journal
3. Global Business Review
4. Asian Journal of Management Cases
5. Global Journal of Emerging Market Economics
6. Economist
7. Economical and Political Weekly
8. Economic Times
9. Business Standard

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 34 of 533


MB701.3: QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS FOR MANAGEMENT - 1
(QAM-1)
YEAR 1, SEMESTER 1
I. Number of Credits : 3

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To impart the students the required skills in collecting and understanding the data
using basic statistical tools and techniques.
 To help the students discover the potential for application of the statistical tools to
management functional areas like accounting, finance, operations, marketing, HR,
etc. by using MS-Excel / SYSTAT software package for practical applications.
 To expose the students to basic statistical tools and techniques relevant to
managerial decision-making through examples and cases drawn from different
functional areas;
 To help the students develop proficiency in the use of MS-Excel for data analysis and
interpretation of outputs for managerial decision-making; and
 To provide the necessary foundation for data collection, analysis, interpretation and
presentation in other courses.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Collection, Presentation of Data, and Descriptive
Statistics
 Collection of Data
o Understanding Data
o Data Measurements – Categorical, Numerical
 Presentation of Data in Tables and Charts
1 o Categorical Data –Bar Chart, Pie Chart 06
o Numerical Data – Histogram, Line Graph,
Contingency Tables
 Numerical Descriptive Measures
o Central Tendency
o Dispersion / Variation
o Shape – Skewness
Probability and Standard Probability Distributions, with
Illustrations from Managerial Contexts
 Basic Probability Concepts
o Marginal Probability
2 o Joint Probability 08
o Conditional Probability
o Probability Trees and Bayes‟ Theorem
 Probability Distributions
o Discrete Probability Distributions - Binomial,

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 35 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Poisson
o Continuous Probability Distributions – Normal and
Exponential
Sampling Distribution and Confidence Interval
Estimation
 Sampling Distribution
o Sampling – Concept and Types of Sampling
o Sampling Distribution of Mean
3 o Sampling Distribution of Proportion 06
 Confidence Interval Estimation
o Confidence Interval Estimation for Mean (σ Known
and σ Un-known Cases)
o Confidence Interval Estimation for Proportion
o Sample Size Determination
Hypothesis Testing
 One Sample Tests
o Hypothesis Testing - Methodology
o Z-test of Hypothesis for Mean (σ known)
o t-test of Hypothesis for Mean (σ unknown)
o Z-test of Hypothesis for Proportion
4  Two Sample Tests 08
o Comparing the Means of Two Independent
Populations
o Comparing the Means of Two Related Populations
o Comparing Two Population Proportions
o F-test for the Difference between Two Variances
o ANOVA
Chi-Square Tests
 Chi-Square Test for the Difference between Two Proportions
(Independent Samples)
5 06
 Chi-Square Test for the Difference among more than Two
Proportions
 Chi-Square Test of Independence
Correlation, Regression and Forecasting
 Correlation
 Simple Linear Regression
o Determining the Simple Linear Regression Equation
o Measures of Variation
o Residual Analysis
6 09
o Inference about Slope and Correlation Coefficients
 Multiple Regression
o Developing Multiple Linear Regression Model
o Residua Analysis
 Forecasting Basics
o Time Series Analysis

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 36 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No. Sessions
o Using Multiple Regression Model
7 Contemporary Issues 02
Total 45

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 31 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 06 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through
the following components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation


marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 37 of 533


V. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VI. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 The potential of using the statistical tools and techniques.


 Knowledge base of using software packages for managerial decision-making under
conditions of risk and uncertainty.

VII. Reference Material

Text-Book

1. David .M. Levine, Krehbiel, Berenson, P.K. Viswanathan, (Latest Edition), Business
Statistics – A First Course, (Latest Edition), Pearson Education.

Reference-Books

1. Anderson, Sewney, (Latest Edition), Statistics for Business and Economics, Thomson.
2. Aczel, Soundarapandian, (Latest Edition), Complete Business Statistics, Tata McGraw-
Hill.
3. T N Srivastava, Shailaja Rego, (Latest Edition), Statistics for Management, Tata
McGraw-Hill.
4. Christian Albright, Wayne Winston, et. al., (Latest Edition), Data Analysis and
Decision-making with MS-Excel, Thomson.
5. D. P. Apte, (Latest Edition), Statistical Tools for Managers – Using MS-Excel, Excel Books
6. Naval Bajpai, (Latest Edition), Business Statistics, Pearson.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 38 of 533


MB702.3: CRITICAL THINKING AND CASE ANALYSIS (CTCA)
YEAR 1, SEMESTER 1
I. Number of Credits : 3

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To expose the students to the need for critical thinking practice as a necessary
ingredient in decision-making capabilities;
 To inculcate in them the habit of analysis as a routine and enable them to seek and
know the reasoning behind any situation, decision, data, information, news, etc.; and
to demonstrate how to apply an analysis framework to an in-depth case example
indicating necessary connections formed during analysis.
 To develop the students as managers who know how to think, i.e. how to become
independent, self-directed thinkers and learners, to introduce the key steps of case
analysis, output of recommendations and writing skills.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No. Sessions
The Fundamentals of Critical Thinking
 Introduction to Critical Thinking
 Barriers to Critical Thinking
1  Basic Logical Concepts 06
 Identifying Statements, Premises, Conclusions
 Recognising Arguments
 Language and Critical Thinking
Logical Fallacies
 Fallacies of Relevance
 Fallacies of Insufficient Evidence Arguments
 Analyzing Arguments
2  Evaluating Arguments 08
 Informal Logic
 Categorical Logic
 Propositional Logic
 Inductive Reasoning
Researching and Writing Arguments
 Finding, Evaluating and Using Sources
 Writing Argumentative Essays
3 06
 Practical Applications
 Thinking Critically about the Media
 Science and Pseudoscience

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 39 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Introduction to Case Analysis
 Types of Cases
4 06
 Working with Cases
 Learning from Case Analysis
Case Analysis Overview
 Case Reading
 Taking Case Notes
 Identifying the Business / Management Problem
 Identifying and Prioritising the Issues
 Bringing in Outside Concepts
5 08
 Evaluating Relevant Information and Underlying
Assumptions
 Developing Possible Solutions
 Evaluation of Alternatives and Selection of Appropriate
Solution
 Action Planning
Writing Case Analysis
6  Writing the First Draft 06
 Second, Subsequent and Final Drafts
7 Contemporary Issues 05
Total 45

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 20 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 10 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 05 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 08 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 40 of 533


V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through
the following components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation


marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 An analytical and enquiring mindset that does not accept any information at face
value, but evaluates critically its source and implications.
 An ability to analyze the case (situation) with application of knowledge attained and
write the report.
VIII. Reference Material

Text-Book
1. Bassham Gregory, et. al., (Latest Edition), Critical Thinking – A Student‟s Introduction, Tata
McGraw-Hill.
2. James S. O‟ Rourke IV, Singh Anubha, (Latest Edition), Management Communication – A
Case-Analysis Approach, Pearson Education.

Reference-Book
1. TaherNasreen, Gopalan Swapna (ed.), (Latest Edition), Critical Thinking –
Concepts and Applications, ICFAI University Press.
Journals / Magazines / Newspapers
1. Dialogue Journals and Critical Thinking.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 41 of 533


MB703.3: MANAGERIAL COMMUNICATION (MC)
YEAR 1, SEMESTER 1
I. Number of Credits : 3

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To develop communication skills required in business organisation, namely:


listening, speaking reading and writing.
 Sensitize the students on the nuances of effective communication at work.
 Students should be able to demonstrate improved interpersonal and group
communication skills
 Students should be able to design and communicate effective formal and informal
messages
 Students should be able to make an effective presentation with an appropriate media
support.
 Student should demonstrate improved persuasion and influencing skills for better
negotiations.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom
Title/Topic
No. Contact Sessions
Introduction
 The Role of Communication in Contemporary Business
 Communicating within Organizations
 Types of Communication
1  Process of Communication 09
 The C‟s of Good Business Communication
 Causes of Interference to Effective Business Communication
 External Influences on Business Communication
 Using Technology to Improve Business Communication
Interpersonal Communication-I
 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication
2  Communication Styles or Modes 08
 Managerial Listening and Responding
 Nonverbal Communication
Interpersonal Communication-II
 Managing Conflicts in Organization
3  Communicating in Diverse Environment 08
 Managerial Negotiation
 Interviews
Managerial Writing
 Stages of Writing process
4 09
 Preparing Good-and-Neutral News Messages
 Preparing Bad-News Messages

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 42 of 533


Module Classroom
Title/Topic
No. Contact Sessions
 Preparing Persuasive Messages
 Notice, Agenda and Minutes of Various Official Meetings
 Organizing Business Reports and Proposal
 Communication for Employment
Communicating in Work Teams
5  Productive Meeting Management 07
 Making Formal Presentation
6 Contemporary Issues 04
Total 45

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 21 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 06 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 04 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 12 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through
the following components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 43 of 533


The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation
marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 The ability to communicate effectively in business situations.


 The ability to communicate message accurately, handle intercultural situation that
require thoughtful communication.
 The ability to use appropriate words and tones and so on.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Books

1. Bovee, Courtla and L., Thill, John V., Chaturvedi, Mukesh, (Latest Edition), Business
Communication Today Pearson Education.
2. Lehman, Dufrene, Sinha, (Latest Edition), BCOM. Cengage Learning.
3. Raman, Singh, Praksh, (Latest Edition), Business Communication, Oxford.

Reference-Books

1. Lesikar, R.V. and M.E. Flatley, (Latest Edition), Basic Business Communication, Tata
McGraw-Hill
2. Koneru Arun, (Latest Edition), Professional Communication, McGraw Hill
3. O, Rourke James and Gupta Jaba Mukherjee, (Latest Edition), Management
Communication: A Case-Analysis Approach, Pearson Education.
4. Hynes Geraldine, (Latest Edition), Managerial Communication: Strategies and Applications,
Tata McGraw-Hill.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers


1. Business Communication Quarterly
2. Journal of Business Communication
3. Strategic Communication Management
4. Journal of Business and Technical communication
5. Harvard Business Review

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 44 of 533


MB704.3 FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (FA)
YEAR 1, SEMESTER 1
I. Number of Credits : 3

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To expose the students to the framework of accounting concepts.


 To relook at the mechanics related to preparation of the balance sheet, income
statement, cash flow statements.
 To understand computation of ratios and basic analysis of the annual report.
 To help the students evaluate managerial choices of alternative accounting practices,
issues in accounting policy and accounting standards.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Financial Accounting
 Beginning Assumptions
 The Income Statement
 The Balance Sheet
1 08
 The Statement of Retained Earnings
 The Statement of Cash Flows
 Qualitative Characteristics of Accounting Information
 Recording Accounting Transactions
Accrual Accounting and Adjusting Entries
 Accrual and Cash Bases of Accounting
2  Adjusting Journal Entries 08
 Closing Process
 The Accounting Cycle
Completion of Accounting Cycle: Final Accounts
 Financial Statements of Limited Liability Company
 Measurement of Business Income
3 09
 Revenue and Expense Recognition, Assets and Liabilities,
Divisible Profits, Managerial Remuneration.
 Consolidated Financial Statement
Analysis and Interpretation of Financial Statements
 Types of Analysis
4  Comparative Financial Statements
09
 Common Size Statements
 Trend Analysis
 Ratio Analysis
Creative Accounting
5
 Window Dressing 08
 Forensic Accounting and Forensic Auditing

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 45 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No. Sessions
International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS)
 Important Standards
 Differences and Similarities between Indian AS, IAS / IFRS
and US GAAP
6 Contemporary Issues 03
Total 45

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 25 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 06 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 05 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 07 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through
the following components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation


marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 46 of 533


VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 Develop a thorough understanding of accounting records and how transactions are


recorded in them;
 Be able to understand and interpret financial statements for various forms of
businesses;
 Be able to analyse and interpret the data contained in these statements for improved
decision-making; and

VIII. Reference Material


Text-Books
1. Norman H. Godwin, C. Wayne Alderman, Debashish Sanyal, (Latest Edition),
Financial ACCT- A South Asian Perspective, Cengage Learning.
2. Dhanesh K Khatri, (Latest Edition), Financial Accounting, Tata McGraw Hill.
3. Paresh Shah, (Latest Edition), Financial Accounting for Management, Oxford University
Press.
4. Asish K. Bhattacharyya, (Latest Edition), Financial Accounting for Business Managers-
PHI.
5. Dr. S.N. Maheshwari and Dr. S.K. Maheshwari, (Latest Edition), Financial Accounting,
Vikas Publishing House Pvt. Ltd.

Reference-Books

1. Ambrish Gupta, (Latest Edition), Financial Accounting Management An Analytical


Perspective, Pearson Education.
2. Stice and Stice, (Latest Edition), Financial Accounting Reporting amp; Analysis, Thomson.
3. Robert N. Anthony, David F. Hawkins and Kenneth A. Merchant, (Latest Edition),
Accounting –Text and Cases, TMH.
4. Samuel C. Weaver, J. Fred Weston, (Latest Edition), Finance and Accounting for Non-
financial Managers, Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing Co. Ltd.
5. Horngreen, (Latest Edition), Financial Accounting, Pearson Education.
6. Ashok Banerjee, (Latest Edition), Financial Accounting, Excel Books.
7. Weygandt, Kieso, Kimmel, (Latest Edition), Financial Accounting, Wiley India Edition.
8. M.E. Thukaram Rao, (Latest Edition), Accounting for Managers, New Age International
Publishers.
9. S. K. Bhattacharyya, (Latest Edition), Accounting for Management-Vikas Publication.
10. N. P. Srinivasan, (Latest Edition), Accounting for Management, S Chand Publications.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers


1. Asian Journal of Finance and Accounting
2. Finance India

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 47 of 533


MB705.3: MANAGEMENT PROCESS AND ORGANIZATIONAL
BEHAVIOUR (MP & OB)
YEAR 1, SEMESTER 1
I. Number of Credits : 3

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To expose the students to the different functions performed by managers, the roles
they have to play for those functions , and the knowledge and skills they have to
develop for the roles through real life examples and cases;
 To help the students develop an understanding of concepts and tools like MBO and
SWOT to develop proficiency in the planning of activities of an organization.
 To enable the students to appreciate the importance of entrepreneurship, innovation
and leadership and to help them realize the need for collaboration and networking in
the management of any functional area of management;
 To provide the necessary foundation for all other courses based on management
practices across the world
 To expose the students to the environmental and organisational context, cognitive
processes and dynamics of organisational behavior; and
 To enable them to manage and lead for high performance with the human being at
the centre of the organisation.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Foundations of Management
 Managing
 The External Environment and Organisational Culture
 Managerial Decision Making
1 Planning and Strategizing 06
 Planning and Strategic Management
 Ethics and Corporate Responsibility
 International Management
 Entrepreneurship
Organising
 Organisation Structure
 Organisational Agility
 Human Resources Management, especially with Diverse
Workforce
2 07
 Types of Organizations and Basis for Choice of Different
Types
Leading
 Leadership
 Motivation for Performance

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 48 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No. Sessions
 Teamwork
 Communicating
Controlling
 Managerial Control
3 07
 Managing Technology and Innovation
 Creating and Managing Change
Organizational Culture
 Organizational Theory
4 07
 Creating and Maintaining Organizational Culture
 Rewards and Recognition in Organizational Settings
Cognitive Processes of Organizational Behaviour
 Meaning and Types of Personality
5  Nature and Dimensions of Attitude 07
 Organizational Commitment
 Motives, Motivation and Theories
Dynamics of Organizational Behaviour
 Cause and Effect of Stress
6  Concept and Types of Conflict 07
 Coping Strategies for Stress and Conflict
 Political Implications of Power
7 Contemporary Issues 04
Total 45

IV. Pedagogy
The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 21 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 10 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 06 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.
V. Internal Evaluation
The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated through the following
components:

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 49 of 533


Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100
The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation
marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcomes


At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 A clear understanding and exposure to the functional areas of management and the
roles managers assume for managerial performance.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Book

1. Bateman Thomas, Snell Scott, (Latest Edition), Management – Leading and Collaborating
in the Competitive World, Tata McGraw-Hill.

2. Luthans Fred (2008), Organisational Behaviour, McGraw-Hill (11 e)

Reference-Books

1. Weihrich Heinz and Koontz Harold, (Latest Edition), Management: A Global and
Entrepreneurial Perspective, Tata McGraw-Hill.
2. Stoner, Freeman and Gilbert Jr., (Latest Edition), Management, Prentice Hall of India.
3. Weihrich Heinz and Koontz Harold (2008), Management: A Global and Entrepreneurial
Perspective, Tata McGraw-Hill
4. Kaul, Asha, Effective Business Communication, PHI, New Delhi.
5. Chaturvedi, P.D., and Mukesh Chaturvedi, Business Communication, Pearson
Education
6. McGrath, E.H., Basic Managerial Skills for All, PHI, New Delhi
7. Slocum, Helrigel, Organisational Behaviour, Thomson/Cengage
8. Udai Pareek (2008), Understanding Organisational Behaviour, Oxford University
Press

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 50 of 533


Journals / Magazines / Newspapers

1. Harvard Business Review


2. Academy of Management Review
3. California Management Review
4. Vikalpa
5. IIMB Management Review
6. Decision
7. Indian Management
8. The Smart Manager

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 51 of 533


MB706.3: INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS AND INFORMATION
TECHNOLOGY (ICIT)
YEAR 1, SEMESTER 1
I. Number of Credits : 3

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 This is an introductory course in basic computer use and to expose the students to
IT relevant to the immediate needs of managers;
 Microsoft Office is powerful and popular application software that is used in
businesses around the world. To enable them to develop proficiency in using certain
components of the package includes MS Word, MS Excel, MS Power Point, MS
Access and MS project for managerial applications and for pursuing the other
courses of the MBA programme successfully

III. Course Outline

Module
Title / Topic Classroom Contact / Lab Sessions
No.
Introduction to Computer
 Computer Hardware
01
 Computer Software
 Exercises
Basic of Operating System
 Folder and Files
 Widows Accessory 01
 Widows Utilities
1
 Exercises
Introduction to MS Office Applications
 Microsoft Office Word
 Microsoft Office Power Point
 Microsoft Office Excel 01
 Microsoft Office Access
 Microsoft Outlook
 Microsoft Office Project
Microsoft Office Word
 Creating and Editing document
 Formatting and Printing
2 06
 Table and Graphics
 Mail Merge and Labels
 Exercises

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 52 of 533


Module
Title / Topic Classroom Contact / Lab Sessions
No.
Microsoft Office Excel (Spreadsheet)
 Introduction to Excel
 Formula and Function
3 12
 Formatting and Printing
 Charts
 Exercises
Microsoft Office PowerPoint
 Introduction to PowerPoint
 Working with Slide
 Formatting and Printing
4  Exercises 03
Microsoft Office Outlook
 Introduction to Outlook
 Managing Daily e-mail and Appointments
 Exercise
Microsoft Office Access
 Basic Concepts of a Database -Table, Field,
Records, Key, Data Manipulation, Query, etc.
 Creating a Database
06
 Working with Forms
 Using Queries
 Generating Reports
5
 Exercises
Introduction to IT
 Introduction to World Wide Web
 E-mail Services and Searching
03
 Introduction to Designing Web-Pages
 Insert Text, Image, Hyperlink
 Exercises
Microsoft Office Project
 Introduction to MS Project 2007
 Creating and Defining Projects
 Calendars
 Organizing Tasks
6  Working with Task Duration, Estimates,
10
and Dependencies
 Working with Resources
 Customizing and Formatting
 Resource Management
 Tracking Progress
 Running Reports
7 Contemporary Issues 02
Total 45

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 53 of 533


IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom / Lab Discussion of Concepts and … About 75 Sessions


Applications
 Student‟s Presentations … About 13 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated through the following
components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100
The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation
marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 70 marks and will be based on practical
computer-based tests and a viva-voce.

VII. Learning Outcome

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 An ability to use computers and basic application software packages effectively for
different types of work like formal report preparation, making presentations

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 54 of 533


 The student should have started using excel effectively to have aid in financial and
statistical analysis
 Should be able to plan the activity and appointments using outlook and plan project
for effective implementation.
 Students will develop basic computer skills in above mentioned area which not only
aid them in college studies but also helpful in the industry.

Reference Material

Text-Books

1. R. P. Soni, Harshal Arolkar, Sonal Jain, (Latest Edition), Working with Personal Computer
Software, Books India Publications, Ahmedabad.
2. Stephen L. Nelson, (Latest Edition), The Complete Reference: Office XP, Tata
McGrawHill Publication.
3. Elaine Marmel, (Latest Edition), Microsoft Office Project Bible, Wiley Publication.

Reference-Books

1. Vishal Soni, (Latest Edition), Computer Applications for Management, Himalaya


Publishing House.
2. David Whigham, Business Data Analysis Using Excel, (Latest Edition), Oxford
University Publication.
3. Gary B. Shelly, Misty E. Vermaat, Thomas J. Cashman, (Latest Edition), Microsoft
Office : Introductory Concepts and Techniques, Premium Video Edition.
4. Greg Harvey, (Latest Edition), Excel For Dummies [Paperback]
5. Joe Habraken, (Latest Edition), Microsoft Office in Depth.
6. Rajesh Sheshadri, (Latest Edition), Excel with Excel An Executive‟s Handbook, Prakash
books Publication.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers

1. Harvard Business Review

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 55 of 533


MA771: RELIABILITY AND RISK ANALYSIS-I
YEAR 1, SEMESTER 1 (University Elective – CBCS)

Credits and Hours:


Teaching Scheme Theory Practical/Tutorial Total Credit

Hours/week 2 - 2
2
Marks 100 - 100

A. Objective of the Course:


The course is designed for Engineers, Mathematician, and Industrial Managers. This course
covers basics of Probability and Statistics for prediction of failures in system and quantification
of risk

The objectives of the course are to:

1. Understand basics of Probability and Probability distributions


2. Define the system to be analyzed.
3. Identify the system performance measures (Measuring Reliability and Risk)

B. Outline of the course:


Sr Title of the unit Minimum number
No. of hours
1. Introduction to Probability and Statistics 06
2. Characteristics of Reliability 06
3. Reliability of Simple Systems 06
4. Concept of Safety and Risk Analysis 06
5. Reliability Modeling 06
C. Total Hours (Theory): 30

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 56 of 533


D. Detailed Syllabus:
1 Introduction to Probability and Statistics 06 Hours
1.1 Random Event.
1.2 Basic formula of Probability.
1.3 Random Variable and Probability Distribution Functions.
1.4 descriptive statistics
2 Characteristics of Reliability 06 Hours
2.1 Reliability of a Unit Functioning until First Failure
2.2 System Reliability
2.3 Testing for Reliability
2.4 Exponential Law and Evaluation of parameter
3. Reliability of Simple Systems 06 Hours
3.1 Series System
3.2 Parallel System
3.3 K out of N systems
4. Concept of Safety and Risk Analysis 06 Hours
4.1 Qualitative definition of Risk
4.2 Quantitative definition of Risk
4.3 Failure Model and Effect Analysis(FMEA)
4.4 Hazard and operability analysis(HAZOP)
4.5 Fault Tree Analysis
5. Reliability Modeling 06 Hours
5.1 Software Reliability Analysis
5.2 Human Reliability
5.3 Stress-Strength Analysis
Instructional Method and Pedagogy:

 At the start of course, the course delivery pattern, prerequisite of the subject will be
discussed.
 Lectures will be conducted with the aid of multi-media projector, black board, OHP etc.
 Attendance is compulsory in lectures/laboratory which carries a 5% component of the overall
evaluation.
 Minimum two internal exams will be conducted and average of two will be considered as a
part of 15% overall evaluation.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 57 of 533


 Assignments based on course content will be given to the students at the end of each
unit/topic and will be evaluated at regular interval. It carries a weighting of 5%.
 Two Quizzes (surprise test) will be conducted which carries 5% component of the overall
evaluation.
E. Student Learning Outcomes:

 At the end of the course the students will be able to understand the basic concepts of
Reliability and Risk Analysis.

 Student will be able to apply concepts of these course in their study of specialization
F. Recommended Study Material:

 Text Books:
1. Mathematical Methods of Reliability Theory. B. V. Gnedenko, Yu. K. Belyayev, and A. D.
Solovyev ,Academic Press 1969
2. An Introduction to Basics of Reliability and Risk Analysis. Enric Zio, World Scientific
Publishing Co.Pte. Ltd.2007
3. Reliability and Risk Analysis. Terje Aven, Elsevier Publicaion,1992

 Reference Books/Articles:
1. On The Quantitative Definition of Risk, Stanley Kaplan and B. John Garrick, Risk
Analysis, Vol. I, No. I , 1981
2. Probability concepts in engineering planning and design. Volume II – decision, risk and
reliability. Ang, A.H.-S. and Tang, W.H John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York (1984)
3. M. Modarres, Reliability and Risk Analysis, Marcel Dekker (1993).
4. N.J. McCormick, Reliability and Risk Analysis, Academic Press (1981).

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EE781: OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES
YEAR 1, SEMESTER 1 (University Elective – CBCS)

Credits and Hours:

Teaching scheme Theory Practical Total Credit

Hours/week 2 - 2
2
Marks 100 - 100

A. Objective of the course:


Optimization techniques, having reached a degree of maturity in recent years, are being used in a
wide spectrum of industries, including aerospace, automotive, chemical, electrical, construction,
and manufacturing industries. Optimization methods, coupled with modern tools of computer-
aided design, are also being used to enhance the creative process of conceptual and detailed
design of systems.

The objectives of the course are:

1.To provide an overview of state-of-the-art optimization algorithms and the theoretical


principles that underpin them
2. To prepare the students with the modelling skills necessary to describe and formulate
optimization problems
3. To introduce methods of optimization to students, including linear programming,
network flow algorithms, integer programming, interior point methods, quadratic
programming, nonlinear programming, and heuristic methods.
4. To make the students familiar with the applications of various classical and AI methods
in solving various complex real-world optimization problems.
5. To introduce the students with software tool to solve optimization problem
B. Outline of the Course:
Sr. No. Title of Unit Min. no of hours

1 Fundamentals of Optimization 01

2 Linear Programming 05

3 Unconstrained Optimization 04

4 Nonlinear Programming 05

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5 Fundamentals of Artificial Intelligence methods 01

6 Particle Swarm Optimization and Cuckoo Search Algorithm 08

7 MATLAB programming and Optimization Toolbox 06

Total Hours (Theory): 30

C. Detailed Syllabus
1 Fundamentals of Optimization 01 Hours

Introduction, Feasibility and optimality, Convexity, constraints, Rates of convergence

2 Linear programming 05 Hours

Introduction, Formulation of Linear programming problem, Graphical method, Simplex


method, Basic solution, Basic feasible solution, Simplex algorithm, Two phase method.

3 Unconstrained Optimization 04 Hours

Introduction, Optimality conditions, Newton‟s method for minimization, Line search methods,
Steepest-Descent method, Quasi-Newton method, Modified newton‟s method

4 Nonlinear Programming 05 Hours

Optimality conditions for constrained problems, Kuhn-Tucker conditions, Penalty function


method, Barrier method, The Lagrange multipliers and the Lagrangian function, Sensitivity
analysis, Computing the Lagrange multipliers, Sequential quadratic programming, Interior
point method

5 Fundamentals of Artificial Intelligence methods 01 Hours

To understand importance of AI methods and their comparison with various classical methods
using various criteria.

6 Particle Swarm Optimization and Cuckoo Search Algorithm 08 Hours

Introduction to PSO, Unconstrained and constrained optimization using PSO, Effects of


various coefficients on convergence, Cuckoo Search (CS) Algorithm, Comparison between PSO
and CS

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7 MATLAB programming and Optimization Toolbox 06 Hours

MATLAB programming of various classical and AI methods. Use of MATLAB optimization


toolbox to solve various optimization problems.

D. Instructional Methods and Pedagogy


 At the start of course, the course delivery pattern, prerequisite of the subject will be
discussed.
 Lectures will be conducted with the aid of multi-media projector, black board, OHP
etc.
 Attendance is compulsory in lectures which carries a component of the overall
evaluation.
 Minimum two internal exams will be conducted and will be considered as a part of
overall evaluation.
 Assignments based on course content will be given to the students for each unit/topic
and will be evaluated at regular interval and its weightage may be reflected in the
overall evaluation.
E. Student Learning Outcomes:
A. The students will be able to get awareness about the optimization problems. They can
differentiate the class of classical optimization methods and AI methods
B. The student will learn to handle, solve and analyzing problems using linear
programming and other mathematical programming algorithms
C. The students will also be able to learn different techniques to solve Non- Linear
Programming Problems. They can also use search techniques methods, which are based
on iterative methods, to find optimal solutions of Non-Linear Programming Problems.
D. Ability to develop codes for evolutionary optimization techniques and to solve wide
range of optimization problem.
E. The students will be able to solve optimization methods using software tools such as
MATLAB and be prepared for developing case studies and simulation examples
F. Recommended Study Material:
Books:

1. “Optimization Methods for Engineers”, N.V.S. Raju, PHI, 2014.


2. “Artificial intelligence and intelligent systems”, N.P. Padhy, Oxford University Press,
2005
3. “Engineering Optimization: Theory and Practice”, S. Rao, 4 th Edition, John Wiley &
Sons, Inc., 2009

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ME781: OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH & SAFETY
YEAR 1, SEMESTER 1 (University Elective – CBCS)

Credits and Hours:

Teaching Scheme Theory Practical Total Credit

Hours/week 2 - 2
2
Marks 100 - 100

A. Objective of the Course:


 To raise awareness of key health and safety issues in the workplace.
 To provide knowledge of occupational health and safety, emergency planning and
environmental management.
 To ingrain the consciousness in students related to occupational health,
occupational hygiene, ergonomics, safety and risk management, research
methods, and legal studies.
B. Outline of the Course:
Sr. No. Title of the Unit Minimum Number
of Hours
1 Introduction to occupational health and safety 02
2 Occupational safety and management standards, and 04
regulations for health, safety and environment
3 Identifying safety and health hazards, and risk analysis 04
4 Occupational physiology and psychosocial factors, and 04
work organization
5 Ergonomic workplace design and musculoskeletal 04
diseases
6 Control of workplace hazards 04
7 E-waste management 04
8 Work practices in industries and global strategy on 04
occupational safety and health

Total Hours (Theory): 30

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C. Detailed Syllabus:
1 Introduction to occupational health and safety 02 Hours

Definition and history of occupational health & safety, workplace hazards.

2 Occupational safety & management standards and regulations 04 Hours


for health, safety and environment

2.1 Factories act and rules; Workmen compensation act. Indian explosive act -
Gas cylinder rules - SMPV Act - Indian petroleum act and rules.

2.2 Environmental pollution act. Manufacturing, storage and import of


Hazardous Chemical rules 1989, Indian Electricity act and rules. Overview
of OHSAS 18000 and ISO 14000 National legislation and public
organizations.

3 Identifying safety and health hazards, and risk analysis 04 Hours

3.1 Hazard, risk issues and hazard assessment, Introduction to hazard, hazard
monitoring-risk issue.

3.2 Hazard assessment, procedure, methodology; safety audit, checklist


analysis, what-if analysis, safety review, preliminary hazard analysis (PHA),
hazard operability studies (HAZOP).

3.3 Computer aided risk analysis, Fault tree analysis & Event tree analysis,
Logic symbols, methodology, minimal cut set ranking - fire explosion and
toxicity index (FETI), various indices – Hazard analysis (HAZAN).

3.4 Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA), Basic concepts of software on
risk analysis, CISCON, FETI, ALOHA.

4 Occupational physiology, Psychosocial factors and Work 04 Hours


organization

4.1 Man as system component – allocation of functions – efficiency.

4.2 Occupational work capacity aerobic and anaerobic work – evaluation of


physiological requirements of jobs – parameters of measurements –

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categorization of job heaviness

4.3 Work organization – stress – strain – fatigue – rest pauses – shift work –
personal hygiene.

5 Ergonomic workplace design and Musculoskeletal diseases 04 Hours

5.1 Meaning of Ergonomic

5.2 Meaning of Workplace Design.

5.3 Musculoskeletal Diseases causes and prevention

6 Control of workplace hazards 04 Hours

6.1 Workplace hazards and risk control, Transport hazards and risk control,
Musculoskeletal hazards and risk control, Work equipment hazards and
risk control

6.2 Electrical safety, Fire safety, Chemical and biological health hazards and
risk control, Physical and psychological health hazards and risk control,
Health and safety practical application

7 E-waste management 04 Hours

7.1 Waste characteristics, generation, collection, transport and disposal

8 Work practices in industries and global strategy on 04 Hours


occupational safety and health

8.1 Work practices in industries in manufacturing industries

8.2 Work practices in industries in service industries

D. Instructional Method and Pedagogy:


 At the starting of the course, delivery pattern, prerequisite of the subject will be
discussed.
 Lectures will be conducted with the aid of Multi-Media projector, Black Board, OHP etc.
 Attendance is compulsory in lectures.
 Internal exams/Unit tests/Surprise tests/Quizzes/Seminar/Assignments etc. will be
conducted as a part of continuous internal theory evaluation.

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 Tutorials related to course content will be given to students.
 In the lectures discipline and behavior will be observed strictly.
 Industrial visits will be organized for students to explore industrial facilities. Students
are required to prepare a report on industrial visit and submit as a part of the
assignment.

E. Students Learning Outcomes:


 Students will be able to make models for safety at work.
 Students will be able to select safety methods.
 Students will be able to understand how hazardous the process is at work.
 Students will be able to understand proneness of accidents.
F. Recommended Study Material:
 Text Books:
1. Grimaldi and Simonds , Safety Management, AITBS Publishers , New Delhi (2001)
2. Industrial safety and health, David L. Goetsch, Macmillan Publishing Company, 1993.
3. R.K.Jain and Sunil S.Rao , Industrial Safety, Health and Environment Management
Systems, Khanna publishers , New Delhi (2006)
4. Salvendy, G. (2012). Handbook of human factors and ergonomics. John Wiley & Sons.

 Reference Books:
1. Arezes, P., Baptista, J. S., Barroso, M. P., Carneiro, P., Cordeiro, P., Costa, N., &
Perestrelo, G. (Eds.). (2013). Occupational Safety and Hygiene. CRC Press.
2. Chaturvedi, P. (2005). Managing Safety Challanges Ahead. Concept Publishing
Company.
3. Healey, B. J., & Walker, K. T. (2009). Introduction to occupational health in public
health practice (Vol. 13). John Wiley & Sons.
4. Hester, R. E., & Harrison, R. M. (2009). Electronic waste management (Vol. 27).
Royal Society of Chemistry.
5. Karwowski, W., Soares, M. M., & Stanton, N. A. (Eds.). (2011). Human Factors and
Ergonomics in Consumer Product Design: Uses and Applications. CRC Press.
6. Khan, B. H. (Ed.). (1997). Web-based instruction. Educational Technology.
7. Roughton, J., & Crutchfield, N. (2011). Job hazard analysis: A guide for voluntary
compliance and beyond. Butterworth-Heinemann.
8. Salvendy, G. (Ed.). (2001). Handbook of industrial engineering: technology and
operations management. John Wiley & Sons.
9. Smedley, J., Dick, F., & Sadhra, S. (Eds.). (2013). Oxford handbook of occupational
health. Oxford University Press.

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10. Tillman, C. (2006). Principles of occupational health and hygiene: an introduction.
Allen & Unwin.
 Web Material:
1. International Labour Organization (ILO) http://www.ilo.org/public/english/
2. Occupational Safety & Health Administration United States Department of
Laborhttps://www.osha.gov/about.html

 Other Material:
1. International Journal of Labour Research
http://www.ilo.org/actrav/info/pubs/WCMS_158769/lang--en/index.htm

2. International journal of occupational safety And ergonomics (http://archiwum


.ciop.pl/757).
3. Journal of Safety and Health at Work (http://www.journals.elsevier.com/safety-
and-health-at-work/)

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CE772: RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
YEAR 1, SEMESTER 1 (University Elective – CBCS)

Credits and Hours:

Teaching Scheme Theory Practical Total Credit

Hours/week 2 - 2
2
Marks 100 - 100

A. Objective of the Course:


Quite frequently these days‟ people talk of research, both in academic institutions and outside.
Several research studies are undertaken and accomplished year after year. But in most cases very
little attention is paid to an important dimension that of research methodology. A great deal of
research tends to be futile. It may be noted, in the context of planning and development that the
significance of research lies in its quality and not in quantity.

 To introduce the basic methods of conducting research, explore ideas in formulating research
objectives and hypotheses and sample framework for taking up research studies in a
structured manner.
 To facilitate for the development of an insight into different statistical tools for data analysis,
interpretation and presentation of reports in different areas of research.
 To enable researchers, irrespective of their discipline, in developing the most appropriate
methodology for their research.
 To pay due attention to designing and adhering to the appropriate methodology throughout
for improving the quality of research
 To impact higher education in basic areas as well as interdisciplinary areas and to provide
researchers a platform to carry out quality research and relevant research.
 To prepare the literature in chronological pattern and logically analyze the concerns.
 To help researchers to use tools, techniques, concepts and world‟s best practices to present a
unique research.
 To frame the research problems to enhance the scale of understanding.
 To give guidance and support to initiate and carry out quality research with a focus on
awareness of areas of potential research, guidelines to carry out literature survey in the areas

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of interest, selection of research area, selection of problem for research and formulation of
title, justification of title in current context of research, anticipated research outcome and its
relevance, research methodology to undertake the research, month wise plan for the research
work to be carried out, six monthly review of research work of Doctoral Committee with
eminent well experience Guides constituted by University etc.
B. Outline of the course:
Sr. Title of the unit Minimum number of
hours
No.

1 General introduction to Research 02

2 Research problem Formulation 03

3 Research Design 08

4 Research Publication & Presentation 08


5 Research Ethics and Morals 05

7 Quality indices of research publication 04


Total hours: 30

C. Detailed Syllabus:
1 General introduction to Research 02 Hours

General Introduction:

Importance of Research, Role of Research, Aims & Objectives, Research


Process, Phases of Research. Introduction to Research Methodology:
Meaning of Research, Objectives of Research, Motivations in Research,
Types of Research, Research Approaches, Significance of Research, Research
Methods v/s Methodology, Research and Scientific Methods, Research
Process, Criteria of Good Research.
2. Research problem Formulation: 03 Hours

Review of Research Literature:

Defining the Research Problem: What is Research Problem, Selecting the Problem,
Necessity of and Techniques in defining the problem.
Purpose and use of literature review, locating relevant information, use of library &

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electronic databases, preparation & presentation of literature review, research
article reviews, theoretical models and frame work. Identification of gaps in
research, formulation of research problem, definition of research objectives.

3. Research Design: 08 Hours

Research Design: Meaning, Need, Features of Good Design, Concepts, Types. Basic
Principles of Experimental Design, Developing a Research Plan.

Qualitative Methods: Types of hypothesis and characterization. Quantitative Methods:


Statistical methods for testing and evaluation.

Characterization of experiments: Accuracy, reliability, reproducibility, sensitivity,


Documentation of ongoing research.

Sample Design: Implication, Steps. Criteria for selecting a sample procedure,


Characteristics of Good sampling Procedure, Types of Sample Design, Selecting
Random Samples, Complex random sampling Design.

Measurement and Scaling Techniques: Measurement in Research, Measurement Scales,


Sources of Errors in measurement, Tests of Second measurement, Technique of
developing Measurement Tools, Meaning of Scaling, Scale Classification Bases,
Important Scaling Techniques, Scale Construction Techniques.

Methods of Data Collection: Collection of Primary Data, Observation Method, Interview


method, Collection of Data through questionnaire and Schedules, Other methods.
Collection of Secondary Data, Selection of appropriate method for data collection,
Case Study Method, Guidelines for developing questionnaire, successful
interviewing. Survey v/s Experiment.

Processing and Analysis of Data : Processing Operations (Meaning, Problems), Data


Analysis (Elements), Statistics in Research, Measures of Central Tendency,
Dispersion, Asymmetry, Relationship. Regression Analysis, Multiple correlation and
Regression, Partial Correlation, Association in case of Attributes.
Sampling Fundamentals: Definition, Need, Important sampling Distribution, Central
limit theorem Sampling Theory, Sandler‟s A-test, Concept of Standard Error,
Estimation, Estimating population mean, proportion. Sample size and its

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determination, Determination of sample size.

Analysis of Variance and Covariance: Basic Principles, techniques, applications,


Assumptions, limitations.

Analysis of Non-parametric or distribution-free Tests : Sign Test, Fisher-Irwin Test,


McNemer Test, Wilcoxon Matched pair Test (Signed Rank Test).

Sum Tests : a) Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney Test b)Kruskal-Wallis Test, One sample


Runs Test, Multivariate Analysis Techniques: Characteristics, Application,
Classification, Variables, Techniques, Factor Analysis (Methods, Rotation),
Path Analysis.

4. Research Publication & Presentation: 08 Hours

Thesis, Research paper, Organization of thesis and reports, formatting issues,


citation methods, references, effective oral presentation of research, Documentation
of ongoing research.

5. Research Ethics and Morals: 05 Hours

Issues related to plagiarism and ethics. Intellectual Property Rights: Copy rights,
Patents, Industrial Designs, Trademarks.

6. Quality indices of research publication: 04 Hours

Impact factor, Immediacy factor.

D. Instructional Method and Pedagogy:


 At the starting of the course, delivery pattern, prerequisite of the subject will be discussed.
 Lectures will be conducted with the aid of Multi-Media projector, Black Board, OHP etc.
 Attendance is compulsory in lectures.
 Internal exams/Unit tests/Surprise tests/Quizzes/Seminar/Assignments etc. will be
conducted as a part of continuous internal theory evaluation.
 Tutorials related to course content will be given to students.
 In the lectures discipline and behaviour will be observed strictly.
 Industrial visits will be organized for students to explore industrial facilities. Students are
required to prepare a report on industrial visit and submit as a part of the assignment.

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E. Student Learning Outcomes:
 Research Methodology as a subject should help researchers to prepare the literature in
chronological pattern and should logically analyse the concerns.
 This subject should help in framing the research problems to enhance the scale of
understanding.
 In this world of global village, research papers are available in abundance; one thesis
submitted by a scholar, in no way should be a repetition of a work already done.
 This subject should help researchers to use tools, techniques, concepts and world‟s best
practices to present a unique research.

F. Recommended Study Material:


 Text Books:
1. Research Methodology, Methods & Techniques, C.R. Kothari, Viswa Prakashan,
2nd Edition, 2009.
2. Research Methods- A Process of Inquiry, Graziano, A.M., Raulin, M.L, Pearson
Publications, 7th Edition, 2009.
3. How to Write a Thesis:, Murray, R. Tata McGraw Hill, 2nd Edition, 2010.
4. Writing For Academic Journals, Murray, R., McGraw Hill International, 2009.
5. Writing for Publication, Henson, K.T., Allyn &Bacon, 2005.
 Reference Books:
1. What is this thing called Science, Chalmers, A.F., Queensland University Press, 1999.
2. Methods &Techniques of Social Research, Bhandarkar & Wilkinson, Himalaya
publications, 2009.
3. Doing your Research project, Bell J., Open University Press, Berkshire, 4thEdition,
2005
4. A Handbook of Academic Writing, Murray, R. and Moore, S., Tata McGraw Hill
International, 2006.

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CA730: INTERNET AND WEB DESIGNING
YEAR 1, SEMESTER 1 (University Elective – CBCS)

Credits and Hours:

Teaching Scheme Theory Practical Total Credit

Hours/week 2 - 2
2
Marks 100 - 100

A. Objective of the Course:


 The objective of the course is to provide basic understanding of designing professional
web page templates with Markup language. This syllabus also provides the knowledge
about publishing website.

Methodology & Pedagogy: During the sessions, topics related to web designing technologies
will be covered with suitable examples and students will be required to design and develop
entire web sites using several web designing technologies and editors.

Learning Outcome: Upon successful completion of the course, students will understand basic
concepts of internet and web page architecture and will be able to develop and host web site by
using markup languages and advanced technologies, including HTML and CSS. On completion,
student will be able to design and create an advanced website and will be equipped to undertake
complex internet projects.

B. Outline of the Course:


Sr. No. Content

1. Overview of Internet and WWW, Basic elements of the Internet, Internet services,
Internet Browsers and Servers, Hardware and Software requirements to connect to the
internet, Internet Service Provider (ISP), Introduction to Internet Protocols

2. Introduction to Web Page, Web Site, Web Browser, Overview of HTML, Structure of
HTML Documents

3. HTML Basics Tags and HTML elements

4. List, Marquee & Hyperlink in HTML

5. Images and Tables in HTML

6. Forms in HTML

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7. Media Element in HTML5

8. Introduction to Cascading Style Sheet (CSS), Ways to embed CSS in HTML

9. CSS selectors & Layout

10. CSS Properties

11. Creation of Menu with CSS

12. Introduction to Web Publishing or Hosting : Domain Name, Web Server, Website
Parking, Publishing Website through FTP

E. Total Hours (Theory): 30


 Text Books:
1. Harley Hahn: The Internet Complete Reference, 2nd Edition, Tata McGraw-HILL Edition.
2. Matthew MacDonald: HTML5: The Missing Manual, O'Reilly Media, August 2011.
3. Peter Gasston: The Book of CSS3: A Developer's Guide to the Future of Web Design, No
Starch Press, April 2011.
4. Richard York: Beginning CSS: Cascading Style sheets for Web Design, Wrox Press (Wiley
Publishing), 2005.

 Reference Books:
1. Ivan Bayross: Web Enabled Commercial Application Development using HTML, JavaScript,
DHTML and PHP, 4th revised edition, BPB Publication.
2. Adrian Farrel: The Internet and its Protocol – A comparative approach, Morgan Kaufmann
Publishers.
3. David Mc Farland: CSS: The Missing Manual, O‟Reilly, 2006.

 Reference Links:
1. http://www.w3schools.com [ lecture notes ]
2. http://www.whatwg.org/specs/web-apps/current-work/multipage/#auto-toc-4
[HTML Materials]
3. http://people.cs.pitt.edu/~mehmud/cs134-2084/lectures.html [CSS notes ]

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PT795: HEALTH & PHYSICAL ACTIVITY
YEAR 1, SEMESTER 1 (University Elective – CBCS)

redits and Hours:

Teaching Scheme Theory Practical Total Credit

Hours/week 2 - 2
2
Marks 100 - 100

A. Objectives of the course:

This course will make the student to understand health and physical activity and the impact
inactivity have on his/her health. Health and physical activity constitute major components of a
healthy lifestyle and general health promotion and protection. The knowledge and experience
gained from health and physical activity course will enable students to make informed decisions
about their health as it relates to quality of life and longevity.

Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to:

1. Understand the health-related benefits of physical activity and risks associated with physical
inactivity
2. Comprehend the principles specific to attaining and maintaining good health and fitness
throughout the lifespan
3. Realize the areas of nutrition, cardiovascular health, diseases related to physical activity,
stress management, substance use and abuse, and sexually transmitted diseases.

B. Outline of the course:

S. No. Title of the unit Minimum number


of hours

1. Introduction to health 10

2. Physical Activity 10

3. Introduction to Yoga 10

Total Hours (Theory): 30

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C. Detailed Syllabus:
1 Introduction to Health 10 hours

1.1 What is health?

1.2 Healthcare delivery system: Developing Countries, Developed Countries

1.3 Human anatomy, physiology & physical fitness

1.4 Basics of Nutrition

1.5 Life style disorders – obesity & diabetes

2 Physical Activity 10 hours

2.1 What is Physical activity, exercise, physical fitness, epidemiology?

2.2 Measurement of Physical Activity in individuals

2.3 Physical Activity – Theoretical Perspective: Self-determination, trans theoretical

2.4 Physical Activity and mental health – Body image, depression, problem with exercise

2.5 Barriers & Facilitators of Physical Activity

3 Introduction to Yoga 10 hours

3.1 What is yoga?

3.2 Types of yoga

3.3 Benefits of yoga to various body systems

3.4 Asanas, Pranayam

3.5 Yoga therapy for various back pain, asthma, stress, hypertension, diabetes

D. Instructional Method and Pedagogy:


 Interactive classroom sessions using black-board and audio-visual aids.
 Using the available technology and resources for e-learning.
 Students will be encouraged towards self-learning and under direct interaction with course faculty.
 Students will be enabled for continuous evaluation.
 Case study, didactic mode of group discussions

E. Student Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of the course, the student should be able to:


 Appraise the importance of exercise in maintenance of health and fitness.

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 Objectively define health and physical activity in realistic environment.

F. Recommended Study Material:

 Textbooks:
1. ACSM”s “Health Related Physical Fitness Assessment Manual Lippincott Williams and
Walkins USA, 2005.
2. Nilima Patel (2008) Yoga and Rehabilitation, Jaypee Publication, India
 Reference books:
1. Biddle, S. J. H., & Mutrie, N. (2008). Psychology of physical activity. London: Routledge
2. B.C. Rai. Health Education and Hygiene Published by Prakashan Kendra
3. Puri. K. Chandra. S.S. (2005). Health and Physical Education. New Delhi: Surjeet
Publications

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NR751: WOMEN’S HEALTH
YEAR 1, SEMESTER 1 (University Elective – CBCS)

Credits and Hours:

Teaching Scheme Theory Practical Total Credit

Hours/week 2 - 2
2
Marks 100 - 100

A. Course Objectives:
Upon completing the course, students will be able to

 Understand and describe the sociocultural, behavioral, and policy issues that contribute
to and affect women‟s health at National and International Level.
 Describe the seven domains of health and their impact on women.
 Understand the value and limitations of various tools that are used to measure and
monitor women‟s health.
 Identify major demographic, behavioral and environmental factors that are associated
with women‟s health and how such factors may be incorporated into public health
interventions, programs, and policies.
 Identify trends in major health conditions that affect women.
 Identify the interplay between health services delivery and policy issues as they impact
and are impacted by health issues.

B. Outline of the Course:

Unit Title of Unit Prescribed


No. Hours

I. Overview of Women Health in India: 3

 Women‟s health nationally and locally.


 Women‟s health and the seven domains of health.
 Policy initiatives related to women‟s health issues, as related to
cost, monitoring, measures of success and impact on other policy
initiatives.
II. Female Anatomy & Physiology: 5

 Female anatomy and physiology from the perspective of their


effects on women‟s health, including differences from men‟s
health
 Menstrual and menopause

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III. Women and relationships: Family, social networks and exposure to 5
intrapersonal violence:

 Social meaning for women‟s lives


 Social policies relating to women in the INDIA
 Health policies relating to women
 violence that affect women‟s lives & medical issues
IV. Non Communicable Diseases : 10

 Introduction of Non Communicable diseases in relation to


women health
 Cardiovascular Diseases:
 Women‟s risk factors for cardiovascular disease
 Gender differences in prognosis for and treatment of
cardiovascular disease in women.
 Interactions between knowledge, risk, and outcomes of
cardiovascular disease in women
 Cancer:
 Most common cancers in women (excluding minor skin
cancers) in terms of diagnoses as well as deaths.
 Levels of cancer prevention.
 Public health approach to screening for cancer
V. Mental Health/ Substance use 2

VI. Act & Laws : 5

Indian legislations and law regarding Women protection (Human


Rights)

Total 30 Hours

C. Instruction Method and Pedagogy


The course is based on practical learning. Teaching will be facilitated by reading
material, discussion, microteaching, task-based learning, assignments and various
interpersonal activities like case studies, critical reading, group work, independent and
collaborative research, presentations etc.

D. Evaluation: The students will be evaluated continuously in the form of internal as well as
external examinations. The evaluation (Theory) is schemed as 25 marks for internal
evaluation and 75 marks for external evaluation in the form of University examination.

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Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through the
following components:

Marks
Sl. No. Component Number per Total Marks
incidence

1 Assignments 1 8 8

2 Internal Test/ Model Exam 1 12 12

Attendance and Class Minimum 80%


3 10
Participation attendance

Total 30

External Evaluation

The University Theory examination will be of 75 marks and will test the logic and critical
thinking skills of the students by asking them theoretical as well as application based questions.
The examination will avoid, as far as possible, grammatical errors and will focus on applications.

Marks per
Sl. No. Component Number Total Marks
incidence

1 Theory Paper 01 70 70

Total 70

E. Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course, learners will be able to:
 Understand the sociocultural, behavioral, and policy issues that contribute to and affect
women‟s health at National and International Level.
 Understand the seven domains of health and their impact on women.
 Understand the value and limitations of various tools that are used to measure and
monitor women‟s health.
 Understand trends in major health conditions that affect women.
 Understand the health services delivery and policy issues which impact on women‟s
health.

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RD701: INTRODUCTION TO ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES
YEAR 1, SEMESTER 1 (University Elective – CBCS)
Credits and Hours:

Teaching Scheme Theory Practical Total Credit

Hours/week 2 - 2
2
Marks 100 - 100

A. Objective of the course.


 The objective of the course is to introduce students to different types of experimental
techniques available.
 This course will expose student to state of art equipments and their utility.
 The emphasis is given more on analyzing of the data and operating skills.
 To explore the basics of Chromatography

B. Outline of the Course


Sr. Title of Unit No. of hrs.
No.

1. HPLC 08

2. TGA-DSC 09

3. DLS 05

4. PCR 08

Total Hours (Theory): 30

C. Syllabus Topics:
Sr. No. Title of Unit Topics

1. High Introduction to HPLC, Basic Principle of HPLC, Instrumentation


Performance for HPLC, Types of Detector used in HPLC, Column efficiency in
Liquid liquid chromatography
Chromatography
(HPLC)

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2. TGA-DSC General Discussion, Thermogravemetry Analysis, Instruments
available for Thermogravimetric analysis, Detailed Discussion,
Principle and Applications in various fields of Science and
Engineering. Data Analysis

3. DLS Concept of Dynamic light scattering and basics of Particle size


analyzer, Data Analysis and applications of DLS

4. PCR Introduction and principle of Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR),


Principle of PCR, Primer designing, Detailed methodology of PCR,
Modifications of PCR, Applications of PCR

D. Instructional Methods and Pedagogy:

The topics will be discussed in interactive class room sessions using classical black-board
teaching to power-point presentations. Unit tests will be conducted regularly as a part of
continuous evaluation and suggestions will be given to student in order to improve their
performance.

E. Student Learning Outcomes / objectives:

 The Programme aims at providing students with the methodological concepts and tools
needed to acquire top-level skills in the field of some selected instrumentation
 At the end students would gain experience in using these tools and analyzing the data.

F. Recommended Study Material:

 Text books/Reference books


1. Instrumental methods of analysis by Williard Merritt Dean Settle, 7th Ed. CBS
publishers and distributors Pvt. Ltd.,
2. Instrumental methods of analysis by Williard Merritt Dean Settle, 7 th Ed. CBS
publishers and distributors Pvt. Ltd.,
3. Principles of Gene Manipulation and Genomics by Sandy B. Primrose, Richard Twyman
7 th Ed. Wiley-Blackwell
4. Molecular Cloning: A Laboratory Manual by Joseph Sambrook, David William Russell 3
rd Ed.CSHL Press
5. Principles and Techniques of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology by Wilson and
Walker 7 th Ed. Cambridge University Press
6. Principles of Instrumental Analysis by Douglas A. Skoog, F.James Holler and Timothy
A.Nieman. Publisher: Saunders College Publishing.

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RD702: INTRODUCTION TO NANOSCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
YEAR 1, SEMESTER 1 (University Elective – CBCS)

Credits and Hours:

Teaching Scheme Theory Practical Total Credit

Hours/week 2 - 2
2
Marks 100 - 100

A. Objective of the course:


The objective of the course is to introduce the students:
 To provide a general and broad introduction to the multi-disciplinary field of
nanoscience and nanotechnology
 During the course the students will acquire the basic knowledge of why and how the
physicochemical properties change at the nanoscale.
 The students will become familiar with the typical techniques that allow the
observation, characterization and manipulation of matter at the atomic, molecular
and supramolecular level.
 The recent scientific and technology work in the nano world will be presented to
demonstrate the potential of nanoscience and nanotechnology in diverse areas such as
medicine, biotechnology, chemical industry, information and communication technology,
production and storage of energy, synthesis and manufacture of new materials, etc.
 It is also attempted that the student becomes aware of the ethical, social and economic
implications that can lead this new discipline.
 To cultivate interest in the research and development of nanotechnology for future
advancement of the career.
B. Outline of the Course:

Sr Title of Unit Minimum No. of Hrs


No.

1. Nanotechnology – development history & Implications of 6


nanotechnology
2. Overview on characterization and synthesis of nanostructure 10
materials
3. Overview of nanostructures & Nano devices 10
4. New fields of nanotechnology 4
Total Hours (Theory): 30

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C. Syllabus Topics:

1. Nanotechnology – development history & Implications of nanotechnology

Concept of nanoscience and nanotechnology, Nanotechnology in the history and in


nature. Impact of the nanotechnology in the society: Ethical, social, economic and
environmental implications. the nanoscale. Size dependent physical and chemical
properties. Surface effects. Importance of the surface at nanoscale. The surface/volume
ratio. Size dependent properties

2. Overview on synthesis and characterization of nanostructure materials.

Physical, chemical and biological methods of synthesis of nanostructures, Electron


microscopy, scanning probe microscopy, non-imaging techniques

3. Overview of nanostructures & Nano devices

Zero dimensional, one dimensional and two dimensional nanostructures , Electronic


devices, magnetic devices, photonic devices, mechanical devices, fluidics devices and
biomedical devices

4. New fields of nanotechnology

quantum computing, spintronics, nanomedicines, energy, etc.

D. Instructional Methods and Pedagogy:


The topics will be discussed in interactive class room sessions using classical black-board
teaching to power-point presentations. Students will be exposed to practical operations, and lab
visit and experimental demonstrations of some of the equipment facilities for Nano fabrication &
characterization available in UNI. Students will produce a technical report on the experiences.

E. Student Learning Outcomes / objectives:


Nanotechnology promises to be the technology of the future benefitting the humanity in a
number of ways. This course is aimed at preparing students for further industrial or academic
work in the field of nano-characterization techniques.
F. Recommended Study Material:

 Text Books / Reference Books:


1. Essentials of nanotechnology by Jeremy Ramsden [JR], 2009, Jeremy Ramsden & Ventus
Publishing ApS,
2. Introduction to Nanoscience, S.M.Lindsay, Oxford ISBN 978-019-954421-9 (2010).
3. Guozhong Cao (2004). Nanostructures and Nanomaterials: Synthesis, Properties & Applications,
448 pages, Imperial College Press, ISBN-10: 1860944159.
4. NANO: The Essentials Understanding Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, T. Pradeep,
Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing Co. Ltd., 2007.
5. Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, B K Parthsarathy, ISHA Books, New Delhi, 2007.
6. Nanotechnology: Principles and practices, Sulabha K Kulkarni, Capital publishing
company, 2007.

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MB650: CREATIVE LEADERSHIP
YEAR 1, SEMESTER 1 (University Elective – CBCS)

Credits and Hours:

Teaching Scheme Theory Practical Total Credit

Hours/week 2 - 2
2
Marks 100 - 100

A. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are:

 To create awareness about traits, types, approaches /theories and contemporary issues of
leadership.
 To nurture qualities of creative leadership to meet the 21st century challenges in students.

B. Outline of the Course:

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No. Sessions

Introduction to Leadership

 What are Leadership Skills?


 Ways of Conceptualizing Leadership
 Definition and Components
 A Born Leader
 Traits of Successful Leader
 Why Leadership?
1 05
o Managerial Roles
 Importance of Leadership
Leading Vs Managing

 Roles and Relationships


 Developing Personality for Effective Leading Roles
 Authority Vs. Responsibility
 Leading the Team
 Leadership–Styles, Models and Philosophy
2 Leadership Approach 05
 Trait Approach

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 84 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No. Sessions

 Skills Approach
 Style Approach
 Situational Approach
 Psychodynamic Approach
Leadership Theories

 Contingency Theory
 Path-Goal Theory
 Leader-Member Exchange Theory
Leadership Processes

 Transactional Leadership
3  Transformational Leadership 05
 Authentic Leadership
 Team Leadership
 Integrative Leadership
 Liquid Leadership
Women and Leadership

 Gender and Leadership Styles


4  Gender and Leadership Effectiveness 05
 Glass Ceiling Turned Labyrinth
 Strengths of Women Leadership
 Criticism and Application
Culture and Leadership

 Dimensions of Culture
 Clusters of World Cultures
 Leadership Behavior and Culture Clusters
5 05
 Universally Desirable and Undesirable Leadership
Attributes
 Criticism and Application
 Leadership for High Performing Organisations
 General Principles for Creative Culture
 Nurturing Personal Creativity
Contemporary Issues in Leadership
6  Power and Politics in Leadership 05
 Ethics in Leadership
 Cases in Leadership
Total 30

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C. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise self-learning and active classroom interaction based on students‟
prior preparation. The course instructor is expected to prepare a detailed session-wise
schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the reading material and case material for every
session. Wherever the material for any session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed
text-book, reference books, journals and magazines in the library, or from websites and other
resources not accessible to the students, the course instructor should make the material
available to the students well in advance, so that the students can come prepared for the
classes. The pedagogical mix will be as follows:

 Classroom Contact Sessions … About 20 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 03 Sessions
 Presentation … About 03 Sessions
 Management Exercise/ Stimulations/Game … About 02 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

D. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through the
following components:

Percentage
Sl. Marks per Total of total
Component Number
No. incidence Marks internal
evaluation

1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10

2 Case Analysis and Presentation 2 45 90 30

3 Assignment / Project work 1 60 60 20

4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30

5 Attendance and Class 30 10


Participation

Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation


marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

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E. External Evaluation
The University examination will be based on oral presentation, review of students‟ reports
and a viva-voce and will carry 70% marks for the course evaluation.

F. Learning Outcomes
At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 Appreciation for types, traits, approaches and leadership models/theories.


 Motivation for leadership roles and responsibilities.
 Qualities of creative leadership skills.

G. Reference Material
 Text-book:
1. Leadership – Theory and Practices , Peter G. Northouse, Sage Publications India Pvt.
Ltd., Latest Edition

 Reference Books:
1. Liquid Leadership by Brad Szollose, Prolibris Publishing Media, Latest Edition
2. Effective Leadership by Lussier/ Achua , Cengage Learning Publications, Latest
Edition
3. Integrative Leadership by Hatala & Hatala, Pearson Power Publication, Latest
Edition
4. Cases in Leadership by Rowe and Guerrero, Sage Publications India Pvt. Ltd., Latest
Edition

 Journals / Magazines / Newspapers:


1. HBR Issues on Building Leadership Skills
2. International Journal of Innovation, Creativity and Change
3. Economic Times
4. Business Standard

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PH825: COMMUNITY PHARMACY OWNERSHIP
YEAR 1, SEMESTER 1 (University Elective – CBCS)

Credits and Hours:

Teaching Scheme Theory Practical Total Credit

Hours/week 2 - 2
2
Marks 100 - 100

A. Objective of the Course


Community pharmacy is concerned with promoting the safe and appropriate use of drugs
and common medical devices.

Ownership concept in Community Pharmacy is required to create for the effective delivery of
pharmacy services in an regulated environment in which the nature of pharmacy is clearly
evolving from the supply of goods (pharmaceuticals under prescription, pharmacist and
pharmacy only medicines, and other goods) to the supply of services designed to support the
optimal use of medication as part of a wider health care strategy.

B. Outline of course:
Sr. No. Title of Unit No. of Contact Hours

1 Introduction to Community pharmacy 10

2 Community Pharmacy Management 10

3 Pharmacy Business Plan 10

Total 30

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C. Detailed Syllabus:
Sr no Title of Unit Topics

Roles & Responsibility, relationship with other


Introduction to Community health care providers, Prescribed medication order
1
pharmacy interpretation including OTC medicines, Safe use of
medical devices.

Role, process and scope of Community Pharmacy


Community Pharmacy Management, modern technologies, financial,
2
Management material, staff management and Drug store
management, Code of ethics for Pharmacy.

Creating a Successful Pharmacy Business Plan,


Business Owner Roles, Responsibilities, and
3 Pharmacy Business Plan Management Styles, Legal, Financial and Accounting
Advice for the Beginning Owner, Marketing of
Pharmacy Practice.

D. Instructional Methods and Pedagogy:


The content of the syllabus would be transmitted through different pedagogy tools like
interactive class room sessions using classical chalk - board teaching to Power point
presentations. Class room teaching would also be supplemented with group discussions,
seminars, assignments and case studies.

E. Student Learning Outcomes / Objectives


At the end of the course, the student will be able to understand

 The concept of Community Pharmacy Ownership and its scope


 Students understand the role of the pharmacist in community and development
 Able to learn skill require to set Pharmacy store & its management

F. Recommended Study Material


 Text / Reference Books:
1. Mohd. Aquil, Practice of Hospital, clinical & Community Pharmacy Elsevier

2. Paul Rutter, Community Pharmacy E-Book, Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment, 3rd
Edition

3. A Textbook of Clinical Pharmacy Practice: G. Parthasarathi, Karin Nyfort-Hansen and


Milap Nahata, Universities Press.

4. Research articles as per the assignment

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 89 of 533


MB780.3: COMMUNICATION SKILLS-1 (CS) (NCC)
YEAR 1, SEMESTER 1
I. Number of Credits : Non Credit Course

II. Course Objectives


The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To train the students to become active listeners in every situation in life, and more
so, in their work situations;
 To develop the students‟ confidence to express their ideas comfortably at both inter-
personal and group levels;
 To train them to think in groups of words appropriate to situations and express their
thoughts spontaneously and comfortably in the English language.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Introduction to Oral Communication Skills
1  Listening Skills 01
 Speaking Skills
Listening Skills
 Basics of Listening
 Giving and Getting Feedback
 Understanding Natural Speech
 Strategies of Effective Listening
2  Listening Exercises 10
 Comprehend Main Ideas and Details
 Take Notes: Outline Main Ideas and Supporting Details
 Distinguish between Facts, Opinion and Inferences
 Evaluate What You Hear
 Follow Oral Directions
Speaking Skills
 Developing Self Confidence
 Delivering Your Message
 Preparing Your Speech
3  Speaking to Inform, Persuade and for Special Purposes 10
 Participating in Group Communication
 Preparing Impromptu Speech
 Using Idioms and Proverbs
 Pronunciation
Business Communication Aids
 Elements of Effective English
4  Grammar and Syntax 09
 Effective Paragraph
 Word Usage
Total 30

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IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 13 Sessions


 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 05 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 10 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

V. Evaluation

At the end of the course the students will have to give a seminar. Certificate will be
awarded to the students who have successfully completed the course.

VI. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 The ability to listen patiently and actively to the spoken word and interpret the non-
verbal message from the body language, facial expression and gesture of the speaker.
 Self-confidence and capacity to express spontaneously in the English language.

VII. Reference Material

Text-Books

1. Sweeney Simon, (Latest Edition), English for Business Communication, Cambridge


Publication
2. Jones Leo, Alexan Richard (Latest Edition), New International Business English,
Cambridge.

Reference-Book

1. Hornby A. S., (Latest Edition), Guide to Patterns and Usage in English, Oxford University
Press.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers

1. Harvard Business Review


2. The Smart Manager

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© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 92 of 533
Master of Business Administration (MBA)
Programme

SYLLABI
(Semester – 2)

CHAROTAR UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 93 of 533


MB740.3: MACRO-ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT
(MEBE)
YEAR 1, SEMESTER 2
I. Number of Credits : 3

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To enable the students to gain and make them understand the measurement,
fluctuation / stability and growth of national economic aggregates like national
income, employment / unemployment and price level;
 To help them to relate the changes in the aggregates to national economic policies
and their effect on different types of organised activities;
 To develop a broad understanding about the environment in which the business
operates;
 To make them feel comfortable reading and understanding daily economic and
financial news on India and other countries, and engaging in critical discussion on
economic issues affecting firms.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/ Topic
No. Sessions
The Scope of Macroeconomics
 Introduction to Macroeconomics
 Economic Environment
1  Economic System – Lassiez Fair, Capitalism, Socialism and 05
Mixed Economy
 National Income
 Macroeconomic Indicators
Behavioural and Technology Function
 Consumption Function
 Investment Function
2  Government, Foreign Trade and Foreign Exchange Function 10
 Money Demand and Supply
 Production Function, Factor Market and Aggregate Supply
Function
Economic Models
 Classical and Keynesian Views of Macroeconomics
3  IS – LM Model 06
 Open Economy Macroeconomics
 Unemployment and Inflation

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 94 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/ Topic
No. Sessions
Government and Economic Policies
 Business Cycle and Fluctuations
 Role of Government in Economic Environment
 Fiscal Policy
4  Monetary Policy 12
 Industrial Policy
 EXIM Policy
 Five Year Planning
 Public Finance
Business Environment
 Social and Political Environment
5  Technological Environment 07
 International Business Environment
 Natural and Ecological Environment
 Legal and Labour Market Environment
6 Contemporary Issues 05
Total 45

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 22 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 10 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 05 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 95 of 533


V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through
the following components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation


marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 An appreciation of the principles of macro-economics and the effect of changes in


macro-economic environment for firm level decision-making; and
 A keen desire for reading news of economic and financial changes/developments on
a regular basis, and engaging in discussion and critical evaluation of such
developments.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Books

1. Goodwin, Nelson and Harris, (Latest Edition), Macroeconomics, PHI Learning Pvt.
Ltd.
2. Rangarajan and Dholakia, (Latest Edition), Principles of Macroeconomics, Tata McGraw
Hill Pub.
3. Olivier Blanchard, (Latest Edition), Macroeconomics, Pearson Education.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 96 of 533


Reference-Books

1. George Mankiw, (Latest Edition), Principles of Economics, Thomson Publication.


2. G. S. Gupta, (Latest Edition), Macroeconomics, Tata McGraw Hill Pub.
3. K. K. Dewett, (Latest Edition), Modern Economic Theory, S. Chand and Co.
4. H. L. Ahuja, (Latest Edition), Macroeconomics, S. Chand and Co.
5. Mishra and Puri, (Latest Edition), Indian Economy, Himalaya Publishing House.
6. A. N. Agrawal, (Latest Edition), Indian Economy, New Age International.
7. Vivek Mittal, (Latest Edition), Business Environment, Excel Books.
8. Francis Cherunilam, (Latest Edition), Business Environment, Himalaya Publishing
House.
9. Raj Agrawal and Parag Diwan, (Latest Edition), Business Environment, Excel Books.
10. Justin Paul, (Latest Edition), Business Environment, Tata McGraw Hill Publisher.
11. V K Pailwar, (Latest Edition), Economic Environment of Business, PHI Learning.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers

1. Business Dailies
2. Business and Economic Journal
3. Business and Economics and Magazines

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MB741.3: RESEARCH METHODS FOR MANAGEMENT (RMM)
YEAR 1, SEMESTER 2
I. Number of Credits : 3

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To provide the techniques and skills needed to conduct business research and the
required knowledge and understanding so that students can critically evaluate the
quality of research.
 To provide skills for identification, definition of research problems / hypotheses,
based on literature survey, secondary data and observations.
 To help students in preparation of a management research proposal, designing the
research instruments and collection, coding and tabulating of data for analysis.
 To enable the students to understand the common statistical procedures used to
analyse data from survey and experimental studies, and to use the statistical
software packages like SPSS, SYSTAT, to carry out these procedures and report the
results of such statistical analyses in a manner appropriate for managerial decision-
making.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Planning the Research Project
 Business Research Strategies
 Research Designs
1 06
 Planning a Research Project and Formulating Research Questions
 Literature Review
 Ethics in Business Research
Types of Research and Methods for Collecting Data
 Quantitative Research
o Nature of Quantitative Research
o Sampling
o Structured Interviewing
o Self-completion Questionnaires / Questionnaire Design,
Asking Questions
2 o Structured Observation 12
o Content Analysis
o Secondary Analysis and Official Data
 Qualitative Research
o Nature of Qualitative Research
o Organisational Ethnography and Participant Observation
o Interviewing
o Focus Group Discussion
Research Proposal and Field Wok
3 03
 Writing up a Research Proposal

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 98 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No. Sessions
 Undertaking the Field Work
o Actual Collection of Data
Data Analysis and Presentations
 Univariate and Bivariate Analysis
 Multiple Linear Regression Model
o Standard Multiple Regression Models with Emphasis on
Detection of Collinearity
o Outliers
o Non-Normality and Autocorrelation
4 06
o Validation of Model Assumptions
 Discriminant Analysis
o Statistical Background
o Linear Discriminant Function Analysis
o Estimating Linear Discriminant Functions and their
Properties
o Enterprise Information Portal
Factor Analysis
 Principal Components
 Algorithm for Conducting Principal Component Analysis
 Deciding on How Many Principal Components to Retain
 H-Plot
 Factor Analysis Model
 Extracting Common Factors
 Determining Number of Factors
5  Transformation of Factor Analysis Solutions 09
 Factor Scores
Cluster Analysis
 Introduction
 Types of Clustering
 Correlations and Distances
 Clustering by Partitioning Methods
 Hierarchical Clustering
 Overlapping Clustering
Communicating Research Results
6  Report Preparation 06
 Oral Presentation and Viva-Voce
7 Contemporary Issues 03
Total 45

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 99 of 533


session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 34 Sessions


 Students‟ Research Proposal / Report Presentations … About 09 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated through the following
components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation


marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 A clear understanding of the process of reviewing literature, preparing a sound


research proposal and conducting a business research.
 An understanding of the principles and techniques of multivariate data analysis and
their application; and have hands- on experience on SPSS, SYSTAT.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 100 of 533


VIII. Reference Material

Text-Books

1. Bryman Alan, Bell Emma, (Latest Edition), Business Research Methods, Oxford
University Press.
2. Hair, Joseph, et. al., (Latest Edition), Multivariate Data Analysis, Pearson Education.

Reference-Books

1. Kothari, (Latest Edition), Research Methodology, Methods and Techniques, New Age
International Publishers.
2. Zikmund, Babin, Carr, Adhikari , Griffin, (Latest Edition), Business Research Methods, A
South Asian Perspective, Cengage Learning
3. T.W. Anderson, (Latest Edition), An Introduction to Multivariate Statistical Analysis, John
Wiley.
4. J.D. Jobson, (Latest Edition), Applied Multivariate Data Analysis, Vol. I and II, Springer-
Verlag, N.Y.
5. H. Kris, (Latest Edition), Statistical Tests for Multivariate Analysis, Springer-Verlag,
Heidelberg.
6. A.S. Mulaik, (Latest Edition), The Foundations of Factor Analysis, McGraw Hill, N.Y.
7. D.C. Montgomery and E.A. Peck, (Latest Edition), Introduction to Linear Regression
Analysis, John Wiley, N.Y.
8. M.R. Anderberg, (Latest Edition), Cluster analysis for Applications, Academic Press, N.Y.
9. B. Everitt, Halsted, (Latest Edition), Cluster Analysis, N.Y.
10. D.F. Morrison, (Latest Edition), Multivariate Statistical Analysis, McGraw Hill, N.Y.
11. G.H. Dunteman, (Latest Edition), Introduction to Multivariate Analysis, Sage, London.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers

1. Harvard Business Review

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 101 of 533


MB742.3: QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS FOR MANAGEMENT - 2
(QAM-2)
YEAR 1, SEMESTER 2
I. Number of Credits : 3

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:


 To expose the students to basic concepts of optimisation and OR tools and
techniques relevant to managerial decision-making through examples and cases
drawn from different functional areas;
 To help the students develop proficiency in the use of MS-Excel for optimisation
problems and interpretation of outputs for managerial decision-making; and
 To provide the necessary foundation for data collection, analysis, interpretation and
presentation in other courses.

The course will focus more on the applications and use of software and interpretation of
computer outputs for decision-making, and not on solution procedures (like simplex
method).

III. Course Outline


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No. Sessions
An Introduction to Linear Programming
 A Simple Maximization and Minimization Problem
1  Problem Formulation 08
 Optimal Solution by use of Software (MS-Excel solver )
 Duality and Sensitivity Analysis
Linear Programming Problems variants
 Transportation Problem
2 06
 Assignment Problem
 Transhipment Problem
Network Models and Project Scheduling
 Shortest Route Problems
 Minimal Spanning Tree Problems
3 08
 Maximum Flow Problems
 Project Scheduling with Known Activity Times
 Time-Cost Trade Offs
Waiting Line Models
 Structure of Waiting Line Systems
 Single Channel Waiting Line Model with Poisson Arrivals and
4 Exponential Service times 06
 Multiple Channel Waiting Line Model with Poisson Arrivals and
Exponential Service times
 Economic Analysis of Waiting Lines
Decision Analysis
5 08
 Problem Formulation – Pay off Tables, Decision Trees

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 102 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No. Sessions
 Decision Making without Probabilities – Optimistic Approach,
Conservative Approach, Minimax Regret approach
 Decision Making with Probabilities – Expected Value of Perfect
Information
 Utility and Decision Making
Simulation for Management Applications
 Risk Analysis
6  Inventory Simulations 06
 Waiting Line Simulations
 Use of MS-Excel for Simulation
7 Contemporary Issues 03
Total 45

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:


Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 30 Sessions

Case Discussions … About 06 Sessions

Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 03 Sessions

Student‟s Presentations … About 04 Sessions

Feedback … About 02 Sessions
The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.
Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through the
following components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 103 of 533


The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation
marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

V. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VI. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 With the potential of or tools and software packages for managerial decision-
making.

VII. Reference Material

Text-Book

1. Anderson, Sweeney, Williams, (Latest Edition), An Introduction to Management Science:


Quantitative Approaches to Decision Making, Cengage Learning.

Reference-Books

1. Hillier Frederick, Liberman, (Latest Edition), Introduction to Operations Research, Tata


McGraw-Hill.
2. M.V. Durga Prasad, (Latest Edition), Operations Research, Cengage Learning.
3. Hillier, Hillier, (Latest Edition), Introduction to Management Science, Tata McGraw-Hill.
4. G. Srinivasan, (Latest Edition), Operations Research - Principles and Applications, PHI.
5. A. M. Natarajan, P. Balasubramani, A. Tamilarasi, (Latest Edition), Operations Research,
Pearson.
Journals / Magazines / Newspapers

1. OPSEARCH
2. Journal of Operational Research Society

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 104 of 533


MB743.3: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (HRM)
YEAR 1, SEMESTER 2
I. Number of Credits : 3

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To acquaint students with the various practices and policies of Human Resources
Management in respect of acquisition, reward and development of HR;
 To impart basic knowledge of the Indian Industrial Relation Systems;
 To build awareness of certain important and critical issues in the Indian Industrial
Relation Systems; and
 To provide an exposure to the skills required for managing Industrial Relations.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No Sessions
Introduction to HRM and the Environment
 HRM – History, Strategic Importance, Objectives
1  Strategic Management Approach to HRM 06
 Human Resource Policies
 Global HRM
Acquiring Human Resources
 HR Planning and Alignment
2  Job Analysis and Design 08
 Recruitment
 Selection and Induction
Developing Human Resources
 Training and Development
o Need for Training and Development
o Individual vs. Organizational Needs
o Training Objectives and Strategies
3 08
o Training Methods and Techniques
o Design and Organization of Training
 Career Planning and Development
 Talent Management
 Succession Planning
Rewarding and Separating Human Resources
 Performance Evaluation and Management
 Wage and Salary Administration
4 10
 Fringe Benefits
 Other Forms of Rewarding (Bonus, Incentives etc.)
 Dismissal, Retrenchment, Removal, Suspension, Layoff etc.
5 Legal Aspects in HRM 07

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 105 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No Sessions
 Dispute Settlement Methods
 Minimum Wages Act
 Bonus Act
 Shops and Establishment Act
 Collective Bargaining
 Workmen‟s Compensation Act
6 Contemporary Issues 06
Total 45

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 25 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 06 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 05 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 07 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

V. Internal Evaluation
The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated through the following
components.

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 106 of 533


The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation
marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 The ability to apply the concepts of HR in organisations.


 Make decisions with respect to the various HR processes and procedures.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Books

1. Ivancevich John, (Latest Edition), Human Resource Management, Tata McGraw-Hill.


2. K. Ashwathappa, (Latest Edition), Human Resource Management, Tata McGraw-Hill.

Reference-Books

1. Dessler Gary, (Latest Edition), Human Resource Management, PHI.


2. C B Gupta, (Latest Edition), Human Resource Management, Sultan Chand and Sons.
3. Muller Camen Croucher Leigh, (Latest Edition), Human Resource Management – A Case
Study Approach, Jaico Publishing House.
4. Ajay Garg, (Latest Edition), Labour Laws – One Should Know, A Nabhi Publication.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers

1. Journals and magazines in HRM like Human Capital, HRM Review etc.
2. Management Review – IIM Bangalore
3. Vikalp – IIM Ahmedabad
4. Asian Journal of Management Cases
5. Harvard Business Review

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 107 of 533


MB744.3: COSTING AND CONTROL SYSTEMS (CCS)
YEAR 1, SEMESTER 2
I. Number of Credits : 3

III. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:


 To familiarize students with the basic concepts of management accounting system,
and how the information generated by such a system can be useful for decision
making and performance evaluation.
 To introduce the basic concepts; which form the discipline of costing and control
system.
 To provide the skills necessary to use management accounting information to make
business decisions.
 To illustrate how management accounting information can be used to formulate and
implement strategy in a variety of situation.

IV. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No. Sessions
The Changing Role of Management Accounting and Basic
Cost Terms and Concepts
 The Role of Managerial Accounting and Management Functions
1 06
 Comparing Managerial Accounting and Financial Accounting
 Introduction to Cost Terms, Cost Classification, and Integration
of Costs into Statements (Cost Sheet)
Product Costing
 Production Process
 Lean Production and Manufacturing in a JIT Environment
2 06
 Job Costing
 Process Costing
 Operations Cost
Cost Behavior, Cost Estimation and Techniques of Costing
 Fixed and Variable Costs
 Absorption Costing
3  Variable Costing 09
 Unit, Batch, Product and Facility –Level Costs
 Activity Based Costing
 Cost- Volume- Profit Analysis
Planning and Decision Making
 Budget Development Process
 Master Budget
4 09
 Sales Budget
 Production Budget
 Flexible Budget

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 108 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No. Sessions
 Cash Budget
Variance Analysis
 Standard Costing
 Material Variance
5 06
 Labor Variance
 Overhead Variance
 Interpreting and Using Variance Analysis
Management Control
 Decentralization
6 06
 Performance Evaluation
 Balanced Scorecard
7 Contemporary Issues 03
Total 45

V. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 25 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 06 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 06 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.
VI. Internal Evaluation
The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated through the following
components:
Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 109 of 533


The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation
marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VII. External Evaluation


The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VIII. Learning Outcomes


At the end of the course,
 The students should learn fundamentals and tools of management accounting,
including technical aspects of cost accounting
 The students should develop an understand the relationship between management
accounting and performance management; consider the relationship between
management accounting and strategy;
 Learn management accounting knowledge and techniques and how to assess these
through cost-benefit analysis.

IX. Reference Material


Text-Books
1. Sawyers, Jackson, Jenkins, Arora, (Latest Edition), Managerial ACCT, Cengage
Learning India Pvt. Ltd.
2. P. C., (Latest Edition), Tulsian, Tulsian‟s Practical Costing, S. Chand.
3. Dr. R.P. Rustagi, (Latest Edition), Taxmann‟s Management Accounting, Taxmann.

Reference-Books

1. Ronald W. Hilton, G Ramesh, and M Jayadev, (Latest Edition), Management


Accounting, Tata McGraw Hill Publication
2. Hilton, Maher, (Latest Edition), Management: Strategies for Business Decisions, TMH.
3. Hongren, Sundem, (Latest Edition), Introduction to Management Accounting, THM.
4. Paresh Shah, (Latest Edition), Management Accounting, Oxford University Press.
5. S. K. Bhattacharya and John Dearden, (Latest Edition), Costing for Management, Vikas.
6. Khan and Jain, Management Accounting, TMH.
7. Ravi Kishore, (Latest Edition), Cost and Management Accounting, Taxmann.
8. Hansen and M., (Latest Edition), Cost and Management Accounting and Control, Thomson.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers

1. The Journal of Cost Accounting and Research


2. The Journal of Accounting and Finance
3. The Journal of Management Accounting Research

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 110 of 533


MB745.3: FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (FM)
YEAR 1, SEMESTER 2
I. Number of Credits : 3

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To familiarize the students with concepts and practical applications of finance. The
various financial analytical tools required for setting /running an organization like
raising funds, investments and allocation of profits, etc. considering risk and return
will be addressed
 To help students understand the financial function in totality.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topics
No. Sessions
Meaning, System, Mathematics and Basics of Valuation
 Introduction to Financial Management
 The Financial System
1 08
 The Time Value of money
 Valuation of Bonds and Stock
 Risk and Return
Investment Decisions
 Techniques of Capital Budgeting
2 08
 Cost of Capital
 Estimation of Project Cash Flows
Financing Decisions
 Financing and Operating Leverage
3  Capital Structure Theory and Policy 08
 Sources of Long Term Fund
 Raising Long Term Funds
Working Capital Management
 Cash Management
4  Credit Management 08
 Inventory Management
 Sources of Short Term Funds
Payout Policy
5  Dividend Policy 08
 Dividend Decision
6 Contemporary Issues 05
Total 45

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 111 of 533


IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 24 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 07 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 05 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 07 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

V. Internal evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through
the following components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation


marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

V. External evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 112 of 533


VI. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 An ability to appreciate the difference between accounting and financial functions.


 Proficiency in the theory and applications of basic financial techniques and tools, so
that they can understand and appreciate finance from long-term as well as short-
term perspective for any company/organisation.

VII. Reference Material

Text-Book

1. Pandey I. M., (Latest Edition), Financial Management, Vikas Publication.

Reference-Books

1. Srivastava Rajiv, Misra Anil, (Latest Edition), Financial Management, Oxford


University Press.
2. Van Horne, Wachowicz Jr., (Latest Edition), Fundamentals of Financial Management,
Pearson Education.
3. Briham, Houston, (Latest Edition), Fundamentals of Financial Management, Thomson.
4. Chandra Prasanna, (Latest Edition), Financial Management –Theory and Practice, Tata
McGraw-Hill.
5. M.Y. Khan, P.K. Jain, (Latest Edition), Financial Management-Text, Problems and Cases,
McGraw Hill.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers

1. Finance India
2. Indian Economic Review
3. The Economist
4. Harvard Business Review
5. IIMB Management Review
6. Business Today
7. Economic and Political Weekly
8. The Economic Times
9. Business Standard
10. Financial Express

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 113 of 533


MB746.3: MARKETING MANAGEMENT (MM)
YEAR 1, SEMESTER 2
I. Number of Credits : 3

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To familiarize the students with marketing concepts and practices.


 To acquaint them with the challenges of marketing environment and competition;
 To expose them to the elements of marketing mix; and
 To develop their capacity to formulate appropriate marketing strategies and tactics.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Understanding Marketing Management
 Nature and Scope of Marketing Management
o Company Orientations Toward the Market Place
o Fundamental Marketing Concepts
 Developing Marketing Strategies and Plans
1 05
o Marketing and Customer Value
o Corporate and Division Strategic Planning
o Evaluating Business Portfolios
o Growth Strategies
o Marketing Goals and Plans
Capturing Marketing Insights
 Gathering Information and Scanning the Environment
o Internal and External Sources of Information
2 o The Changing Consumption Pattern of Indian Consumers 05
 Conducting Marketing Research and Forecasting Demand
o The Marketing Research System and Process
o Forecasting and Demand Measurement
Connecting with Customers
 Creating Customer Value, Satisfaction and Loyalty
o Customer Life Time Value
o Customer Databases and Databases Marketing
 Analyzing Consumer Markets
o Factors Influencing Consumer Behaviour
3 o The Buying Decision Process 05
 Analyzing Business Markets
o Organisational Buying and Process
 Identifying Market Segments and Targets
o Levels of Market Segmentation
o Segmenting Consumer and Business Markets
o Market Targeting

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 114 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Building Strong Brands
 Dealing with Competition
o Identifying Competitors
o Competitive Strategies for Market Leaders and Others
 Creating Brand Equity
 Crafting Brand Positioning Strategy
o Choosing POP / POD
o Differentiation Strategies
o Product Life-Cycle and Strategies
Shaping the Market Offerings
4  Setting Product Strategy 10
o Product Characteristic and Classification
o Product and Brand Relationships
 Designing and Managing Services
o Nature of Services
o Marketing Strategies for Service Firms
o Managing Service Quality
 Developing Pricing Strategies and Programs
o Setting the Price
o Adapting the Price
o Initiating and Responding to Price Changes
Delivering and Communicating Value
 Designing and Managing Value Networks and Channels
o Channel Design and Management Decisions
o Conflict Cooperation and Competition
 Managing Retailing, Wholesaling, and Logistics
 Designing and Managing Integrated Marketing Communications
o The Role of Marketing Communication
o Developing Effective Communication
5 10
o Managing Integrated Marketing Communications
 Managing Mass Communications: Advertising, Sales Promotion,
Events, and Public Relation
 Managing Personal Communication: Direct Marketing and
Personal Selling
o Direct Marketing
o Interactive Marketing
o Principles of Personal Selling
Creating Successful Long-Term Growth
 Introducing New Market Offerings
o New Product Development Process
 Tapping into Global Markets
6 05
o Modes of Entry
o Understanding Country of Origin Effects
 Managing a Holistic Marketing Organisation
o Internal Marketing

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 115 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No. Sessions
o Socially Responsible Marketing
o Marketing Implementation, Evaluation and Control
 Emerging Marketing Needs and Opportunities
o Rural Marketing in India
o Social Marketing
o Network Marketing
o E-Marketing / Internet Marketing
7 Contemporary Issues 05
Total 45

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 24 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 09 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 04 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions
The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated through the following
components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 116 of 533


The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation
marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 A clear understanding and exposure to the concept of marketing and its roots in
customer-centric approach, and the elements of marketing mix.

VIII. Reference Material


Text-Book

1. Kotler, Keller, Koshy, Jha, (Latest Edition), Marketing Management: A South Asian
Perspective, Pearson Education.

Reference-Books

1. Stanton, Etzel, Walker, (Latest Edition), Fundamentals of Marketing, McGraw-Hill.


2. Ramaswami, Namakumari, (Latest Edition), Marketing Management: Indian context,
Macmillan India.
3. Kumar Arun, Meenakshi, (Latest Edition), Marketing Management, Vikas Publishing.
4. Saxena Rajan, (Latest Edition), Marketing Strategies, Tata-McGraw Hill.
5. Khurana, Ravichandran, (Latest Edition), Strategic Marketing Management, Global
Business Press.
6. Mazumdar Ramanuj, (Latest Edition), Marketing Strategies, Allied Publishers.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers

1. Journal of Marketing (USA)


2. Indian Journal of Marketing
3. Marketing Master Mind, etc.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 117 of 533


MB747.3: OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT (OM)
YEAR 1, SEMESTER 2
I. Number of Credits : 3

II. Course Objective

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To understand the manufacturing and service operating systems with respect to


design, planning, control and improvement techniques.
 Learn the interdependence of operations management with other functional areas.
 To develop the ability to manage people and resources effectively, to motivate,
organize, control, evaluate.
 To adapt to change which has become critical to competing in today‟s international
markets.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Strategic Importance of Operations
1  Introduction to Operations and Competitiveness 08
 Operations Strategy: Decision Analysis
Designing the Operating System
 Products and Services
2  Processes and Technologies 08
 Facilities: Site Selection and Location Analysis
 Project Management
Managing the Supply Chain
 Supply Chain Management
3  Forecasting 08
 Capacity and Aggregate Planning
 Inventory Management: Simulation
Operations Planning
 Just-in-Time and Lean Production
4 08
 Enterprise Resource Planning
 Scheduling
Ensuring Quality
5  Quality Management
 Statistical Process Control 08
 Waiting Line Models for Service Improvement
6 Contemporary Issues 05
Total 45

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VI. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 20 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 10 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 06 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 07 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through
the following components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation


marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

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VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 The skills and gained ability to perform well in dimensions such as cost, quality,
delivery, dependability and speed, innovation and flexibility to adapt him/her to
variations in demand.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Books

1. Russell and Taylor, (Latest Edition), Operations Management, Pearson Education.


2. Lee Krajewski, Larry Ritzman and Manoj Malhotra, (Latest Edition), Operations
Management, PHI.

Reference-Books

1. Norman Gaither and G Fraizier, (Latest Edition), Operation management, Thomson


south Weston.
2. Ashwathappa and Sridhar Bhatt, (Latest Edition), Production and Operation Management,
Himalaya Publishing House.
3. Adam and Eberts, (Latest Edition), Production and Operation management, PHI.

Journal / Magazines / Newspapers

1. Supply Chain Management Review


2. The IUP Journal of Supply Chain Management
3. The IUP Journal of Operations Management
4. Harvard Business Review
5. Journal of Management Research
6. Advances in Management
7. IIMB Management Review
8. Business India
9. Economic Times,
10. Business Standard

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EE782: ENERGY AUDITING & MANAGEMENT
YEAR 1, SEMESTER 2 (University Elective – CBCS)

Credits and Hours:

Teaching Scheme Theory Practical Total Credit

Hours/week 2 - 2
2
Marks 100 - 100

A. Objectives of the Course:

Energy auditing and management is a course where a student will deal with various types of
energy conservation schemes employed in industries, power stations, domestic and commercial
areas. Also they will familiar with energy auditing and management procedures. The objectives of
the course are:

 To learn practical and theoretical elements of energy auditing and management


 To be able to assess the benefits and drivers of an energy audit and have knowledge of
the Energy Audit Process
 To understand how to plan and carry out an energy audit and be confident with the
process of reviewing energy data in the energy audit process
 To Have knowledge of the equipment and key considerations required when carrying
out an energy audit
 To be aware about the energy efficient technology and energy storage system
B. Outline of the Course:

Sr. No. Title of Unit Min. No. of Hrs

1 Electrical Energy Conservation 3

2 Electrical Energy Management 10

3 Financial Management 4

4 Energy Management & Audit 5

5 Energy Efficient Technologies In Electrical Systems 3

6 Energy Storage Systems 3

7 Case Studies. 2

Total hours (Theory): 30

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C. Detailed Syllabus:
1 Electrical Energy Conservation 3 Hours

1.1 Energy Scenario: Introduction to energy science and energy technology, various forms of
energy. Law of conservation of energy. Energy scenario of India, Introduction to global
energy scenario. Carbon credit, Energy Sector Reforms, Energy Strategy for the Future,
Energy Conservation Act 2001 and its features.

1.2 Measures for energy conservation:

Potential energy conservation opportunities in: HVAC System, Lighting systems, Motors
and Transformers.

2 Electrical Energy Management 10 Hours

2.1 Concept of energy management, Design of Energy management programmes, energy cost,
Energy planning, Energy staffing, Energy Organization, Energy Requirement, Energy
Costing, Energy Budgeting, Energy Monitoring, Energy consciousness, Energy
Management Professionals, Environment pollution due to energy use. Need of energy
planning, steps for energy planning, Energy management in industry, Energy management
cell function and objective, Energy management cell roles and responsibilities, Role of
energy manager, benchmarking, Social and economic cost benefits. Seven principals of
energy management.

2.2 Electrical System Optimization

Electricity rate tariff, key to reduction in electrical energy Consumption, Methods to


improve plant power factor, load management, conduction loss, switching loss, magnetic
loss, harmonic Compensation, Motor control, Lighting energy saving.

2.3 Cogeneration

Definition, Need, Application, Advantages, Classification, Saving potentials

3 Financial Management 4 Hours

Investment-need, Appraisal and criteria, Financial analysis techniques-Simple payback


period, Return on investment, Net present value, Internal rate of return, Cash flows, Risk
and sensitivity analysis; Role of ESCOs.

4. Energy Management & Audit 5 Hours

Introduction, Definition, Energy audit- needs, types and walkthrough energy audit.
Energy audit at unit level, Industrial Audit approaches. Procedure for energy audit and
equipments required. Comprehensive Energy audit Site testing Measurement & Analysis
of Electrical System like Induction Motors. Transformers, Illumination system, Problems

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on Energy Management.

5. Energy Efficient Technologies In Electrical Systems 3 Hours

Load Management and Maximum demand control. Electrical distribution system.


Maximum demand controllers, Automatic power factor controllers, Energy efficient
motors, Soft starters with energy saver, Variable speed drives, Energy efficient
transformers, Electronic ballast, Occupancy sensors, Energy efficient lighting controls.

6. Energy Storage Systems 3 Hours

Introduction, Demand for energy storage, Energy storage systems: heat storage- hot water,
hot solids, phase change materials; Potential energy storage: spring, compressed gas.
Pumped hydro: Flywheels. Rolling mills, Electrical and magnetic energy storage systems.

7. Case Studies. 2 Hours

D. Instructional Methods and Pedagogy

 At the start of course, the course delivery pattern, prerequisite of the subject will be
discussed.
 Lectures will be conducted with the aid of multi-media projector, black board, OHP etc.
 Attendance is compulsory in lectures which carries a component of the overall evaluation.
 Minimum two internal exams will be conducted and will be considered as a part of overall
evaluation.
 Assignments based on course content will be given to the students for each unit/topic and
will be evaluated at regular interval and its weightage may be reflected in the overall
evaluation.

E. Student Learning Outcomes:

After the completion of the course the students will be able to:

1. Analyze about energy scenario nationwide and worldwide


2. Decide about energy management in more effective way.
3. To propose the effective way for energy conservation
4. Carry out financial management.
5. Can design energy efficient technologies and provide alternative solutions for energy storage

F. Recommended Study Material:

 Text Book:
1. Amlan Chakrabarti, Energy engineering and management, PHI Learning Private Limited.
2. K. Nagabhusan Raju, Industrial Energy Conservation Techniques, Atlantic Publishers &
Distributors (P) Ltd.

 Reference Book:
1. Renewable energy sources and conservation technology By- N.K.Bansal, Kleemann
and Meliss

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 123 of 533


2. Non – conventional energy sources by G.D. Rai
3. Energy technology by S.Rao.
4. A guide to energy management by Barney L Capehart, William J Kennedy, Wayne C
Turner.

 Web Material:
1. www.energymanagertraining.com
2. www.bee-india.gov.in

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CE771: PROJECT MANAGEMENT
YEAR 1, SEMESTER 2 (University Elective – CBCS)

Credits and Hours:

Teaching Scheme Theory Practical Total Credit

Hours/week 2 - 2
2
Marks 100 - 100

A. Objective of the Course:


The course aims to provide and understanding management issues process during project
management.

 To develop an awareness of the need for project planning and management


 To apply professional attitudes and techniques to managing a project
 Provide students with a basic understanding of project management principles and
practices.
 Increase the student's ability to function effectively on a project team.
 Increase the student's ability to function effectively as a project manager.

B. Outline of the course:


Sr. Title of the unit Minimum number of
hours
No.

1 Overview of Project Management 03

2 Project Management Concepts and Techniques 03

3 Project Cost Estimation 04

4 Project Planning and Scheduling 05


5 Project Monitoring and Control 05

6 Material Management in Project 04


7 Management of Special Projects and Project Management 06
Software Tools Total hours (Theory): 30

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C. Detailed Syllabus:
1. Overview of Project Management 03 Hours
Introduction to Project Management
Overview of Project Planning, Project Estimation, Project Scheduling,
Organization and Team Structure, Risk Analysis and Management,
Resource Allocation
Project Management Process and Role of Project Manager
2. Project Management Concepts and Techniques 03 Hours
Project Screening and Selection Techniques
Structuring Concepts and Tools (WBS,ORS,LRC)
Project Planning Tools (Bar Chart, LOB, CPM and PERT)
Risk Analysis and Management
3. Project Cost Estimation 04 Hours
Types of Estimates and Estimating Methods
Project Budgeting
4. Project Planning and Scheduling 05 Hours
Dynamic Project Planning and Scheduling
Project Scheduling with Resource Constraints
5. Project Monitoring and Control 05 Hours
Monitoring Techniques and Time control system
Project Cost Control and Time cost tradeoff
6. Material Management in Project 04 Hours
Project Procurement and Material Management
7. Management of Special Projects and Project Management Software Tools 06 Hours
Management of SE/NPD/R&D/Hi-Tech and Mega Projects
Software tools for Project Management: MS Project, Primavera, Turbo
Project, Risky Project.

D. Instructional Method and Pedagogy:


 Lectures will be taken in class room with the use of multi-media presentations and black
board – mix of both.
 Assignments based on above course content will be given to the students at the end of
each chapter. Each assignment contains minimum 5 questions.
 Quizzes and Surprise tests will be conducted for testing the knowledge of students for
particular topic.

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E. Student Learning Outcomes:
Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to understand project
management process and different aspect of development process necessary for the
management of the project which includes various activities, resources, quality, cost and
system configuration etc.

F. Recommended Study Material:


 Text Books:
1. Project management: engineering, technology, and implementation by Shtub, Avraham,
Jonathan F. Bard, and Shlomo Globerson, Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1994.
2. Project Management Handbook by Lock, Gower.
3. VNR Project Management Handbook by Cleland and King.
4. Management guide to PERT/CPM by Wiest and Levy, PHI.
5. Project Management: A Systemic Approach to Planning, Scheduling and Controlling by
Horald Kerzner, CBS Publishers, 2002.
6. Project Scheduling and Monitoring in Practice by S. Choudhury,
7. Total Project Management: The Indian Context by P. K. Joy, Macmillan India Ltd.
 Reference Books:
1. Project Management for Business and Technology: Principles and Practice by John M
Nicholas, Prentice Hall of India, 2002.
2. Project Management, by N. J. Smith (Ed), Blackwell Publishing, 2002.
3. Effective Project Management by Robert K. Wysocki, Robert Back Jr. and David B.
Crane, John Wiley, 2002.
4. Project Management: A Managerial Approach, by Jack R Meredith and Samuel J Mantel,
John Wiley, 4th Edition, 2000.

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IT771: CYBER SECURITY & LAWS
YEAR 1, SEMESTER 2 (University Elective – CBCS)

Credits and Hours:

Teaching Scheme Theory Practical Total Credit

Hours/week 02 00 02
02
Marks 100 - 100

A. Objective of the Course:

The main objectives for offering the course Cyber Security are

 To under the concepts of Cybercrimes and cyber security


 To create the awareness of how to avoid becoming victims of cybercrimes.
 To provides the content which will help the students who wish to seek career in cyber
security or independent study and research in the field of cyber security.

B. Outline of the Course:

Sr Title of the unit Minimum


number of hours
No.

1. Computer and Cyber Security Basics 06

2. Security Threats 09

3. Provisions in Indian Laws in dealing with Cyber Crimes 07

4. Case Studies 08

Total hours (Theory): 30

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C. Detailed Syllabus:

1. Computer and Cyber Security Basics 06


hours
Introduction to Computers, Computer History, Software, Hardware, Classification,
Computer Input-Output Devices, Windows, DOS Prompt Commands, Basic
Computer Terminology, Internet, Networking, Computer Storage, Computer Ethics
and Application Programs, Security : Security trends –Goal, Attacks, Services and
Mechanism
2. Security Threats 09 hours
Application security (Database, E-mail and Internet), Data Security Considerations-
Backups, Archival Storage and Disposal of Data, Security Technology-Firewall and
VPNs, Intrusion Detection, Access Control. Security Threats -Viruses, Worms,
Trojan Horse, Bombs, Trapdoors, Spoofs, E-mail viruses, Macro viruses, Malicious
Software, Network and Denial of Services Attack, Security Threats to E-Commerce-
Electronic Payment System, e-Cash, Credit/Debit Cards. Digital Signature, public
Key Cryptography.
3. Provisions in Indian Laws in dealing with Cyber Crimes 07 hours
Security Policies, Why Policies should be developed, WWW policies, Email Security
policies, Policy Review Process-Corporate policies-Sample Security Policies,
Publishing and Notification Requirement of the Policies. Information Security
Standards-ISO, IT Act, Copyright Act, Patent Law, Cyber Laws in India; IT Act 2000
Provisions, Intellectual Property Law.
4. Case Studies 08 hours
Identity Management, Cyber Security and Terrorism: Case Studies, The DigiNotar
case, Deutsche Telekom, The disruption at the IT service provider Tieto, Web Based
Attacks by Symantec, Password Security

D. Instructional Method and Pedagogy:

 At the start of course, the course delivery pattern, prerequisite of the subject will be
discussed.
 Lectures will be conducted with the aid of multi-media projector, black board, OHP etc.
 Two internal exams will be conducted and average of the same will be converted to
equivalent of 15 Marks as a part of internal theory evaluation.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 129 of 533


 Assignments based on course content will be given to the students at the end of each
unit/topic and will be evaluated at regular interval. It carries a weightage of 5 Marks as a
part of internal theory evaluation.
 Surprise Tests/Quizzes/Seminar/Case Study will be conducted which carries 10 Marks
as a part of internal theory evaluation.

E. Student Learning Outcome:

Learning outcomes of the course are:

 Students will able to do classification of cybercrime, methods used to perform crime,


apply cyber security, and know the detailing of Information Technology Acts against
offences.
 Students will understand and appreciate the legal and ethical environment impacting
individuals as well as business organizations and have an understanding of the ethical
implications of IT legal decisions.
 Students will have a fundamental knowledge of Information Technologies which affect
organizational processes and decision-making.

F. Recommended Study Material:

 Reference Books:
1. Charles P. Pfleeger, Shari Lawerance Pfleeger, “Analysing Computer Security”, Pearson
Education India.
2. V.K. Pachghare, “Cryptography and information Security”, PHI Learning Private Limited,
Delhi India.
3. Dr. Surya Prakash Tripathi, Ritendra Goyal, Praveen kumar Shukla,”Introduction to
Information Security and Cyber Law” Willey Dreamtech Press.
4. Schou, Shoemaker, “ Information Assurance for the Enterprise”, Tata McGraw Hill.
5. CHANDER, HARISH,” Cyber Laws And It Protection ” , PHI Learning Private Limited
,Delhi ,India

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CA842: MOBILE APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT
YEAR 1, SEMESTER 2 (University Elective – CBCS)

Credits and Hours:

Teaching scheme Theory Practical Total Credit

Hours/week 2 - 2
2
Marks 100 - 100

A. Objective: Develop skills to describe mobile technologies, mobile environment and to


develop Android application for mobile device using Android SDK, android application
resource, application component, and Android APIs.

Prerequisites: Object Oriented Programming.

Methodology & Pedagogy: This course focuses on providing hands-on experience in designing
and development of mobile application with emphasis on the real world application and
techniques that enable smart phone based application development. Student shall also develop
applications dealing with data storage, documents sharing among applications and application
based on Google maps and integration of web service with mobile application.

Learning Outcomes:

 Describe the different mobile technologies, mobile development platform and mobile
GUI.
 Comprehend how Android applications works, their life cycle, Intents, fragments and
resources.
 Design and develop useful Android applications with compelling user interfaces by using
View, View Group, menu, and dialog elements.
 Use Android's APIs for data storage, retrieval, user preferences, files, databases, and
content providers.
 Utilize the power of background services, notifications, and broadcast receiver.
 Use Android's communication APIs for SMS, telephony and location based application.

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B. Outline of the Course:

Week Practical Description


No

1 Brief about mobile Different mobile application development platform overview


technologies and challenges in and Android architecture overview and basic components of
mobile application Android application development overview.
development and architectural
overview of an Android
platform.

2 Development of first Android Working of Android Studio IDE, Android project directory
based mobile application and structure, Dalvik Virtual Machine Overview, Android
overview of necessary Software development kit explanation, Virtual device creation
components required for and execution of first application on virtual as well as actual
development. device

3 Fundamentals of User XML based user interface designing using different available
Interface designing. layouts like Relative Layout, Linear Layout, Table Layout etc.

4 User Interface Widgets-1 Hands-on demonstration of basic widgets like- Text View,
Edit Text, Button, Toggle Button, Radio Button, Radio Group,
Check Box, Rating Bar, Seek Bar etc.

5 User Interface Widgets-2 Hands-on demonstration of composite widgets like- List View,
Spinner and Auto Complete Text View and customization of
the composite controls.

6 Activity, Activity navigation Activity life cycle, Linking Activity using Intents: start
and Intents. Activity(), Start Activity For Result().

Calling built-in applications: ACTION_MAIN,


ACTION_VIEW, ACTION_DIAL,

ACTION_SEND

7 Android Resources, Styles and Usage and implementation of different resources like
Themes. drawable, string, color, dimes, raw and animation. Creating
and Applying simple Style, Inheriting built-in Style and User
defined style, Using Styles as themes.

8 Dialogs & Menus. Hands-on demonstration of different dialogs and menus


available in Android.

9 Data Persistence Techniques. User Preferences and Database management through SQLite

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10 Broadcast Actions and Service: life cycle, create and destroy service, Alarm Manager
Services implementation. and SMS Manager. Standard Broadcast Actions.

11 PHP based web service Creation and consumption of PHP based web service.
implementation in Android

12 Simple Google Map Google Developer console usage, SHA-1 certificate creation
incorporation with Android and API-KEY creation and incorporation in Android
application. application.

Total hours (Theory): 30

 Text Books:
1. Wei-Meng Lee: Beginning Android 4 Application Development, Wiley India Pvt Ltd.

2. Mark L. Murphy: The Busy Coder‟s Guide to Android Development

Reference Books:

1. Jonathan Simon: Head First Android Development, O‟REILLY publication


2. Mark L Murphy: Beginning Android, Wiley India Pvt. Ltd.

Web References:

1. https://developer.android.com [Detail Android Development Guide]


2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SUOWNXGRc6g&list=PL2F07DBCDCC01493A
[200 android development tutorials]
3. www.androidhive.info/ [Advance application development with Android]

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PT796: FITNESS AND NUTRITION
YEAR 1, SEMESTER 2 (University Elective – CBCS)

Credits and Hours:

Teaching scheme Theory Practical Total Credit

Hours/week 2 - 2
2
Marks 100 - 100

A. Objectives of the course:


This course is intended to introduce the student with the basic concepts of health and fitness
and appraise the relative contribution of leading a physically active lifestyle. This shall
familiarize the student with different perspectives on maintaining general health and fitness
behavior and understand the nutritional information to suit individual needs and
preferences.

Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to:

1. To provide general concepts of physical education, nutrition and fitness.


2. To promote and understanding of the value of sports for life skill development.
3. Introduce nutritional principles and application to improve overall health.
B. Outline of the course:
S. No. Title of the unit Minimum number
of hours

1. Physical Education and Physical Fitness 10

2. Nutrition and Health 10

3. Sports and Life Skills Education 10

Total hours (Theory): 30

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C. Detailed syllabus:

1 PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND PHYSICAL FITNESS 10 hours


1.1. Concept of Physical Education, Meaning, Definition, Aims and Objectives of Physical Education,
Need and Importance of Physical Education
1.2 Physical Education and its Relevance in Inter Disciplinary Context
1.3 Physical Fitness Components: Type of Fitness, Health Related Physical Fitness, Performance
Related Physical Fitness
2 NUTRITION AND HEALTH 10 hours
2.1 Concept of Food and Nutrition, Balanced Diet, Food Pyramid Index
2.2 Macro and Micronutrients: Types, functions and classification system
2.3 Carbohydrates : Types, RDA data, Glycemic index, Sources of Fats, saturated, unsaturated fats,
recommended intake, importance of fat in diet, fats in health and disease
Protein: Types EAA, function, assessing quality of proteins, selecting incomplete proteins, RDA
2.4 sources.
Vitamins And Minerals: Types, functions, sources, and minerals - calcium, Phosphorus, iron,
2.5 magnesium, sodium, potassium, and chloride. Trace elements - sources and functions.
Determining Caloric Intake and Expenditure, Obesity, Causes and Preventing Measures – Role of
Diet and Exercise, Importance of hydration in exercise
3 SPORTS AND LIFE SKILLS EDUCATION 10 hours
3.1 Sports and Socialization
3.2 Physical Activity and Sport – Emotional Adjustment and Wellbeing
3.3 Substance Abuse among Youth – Preventive Measures and Remediation
3.4 Yoga, Meditation and Relaxation
3.5 Sports and Character Building
3.6 Values in Sports
3.7 Sports for World Peace and International Understanding

D. Instructional Method And Pedagogy:


 Interactive classroom sessions using black-board and audio-visual aids.
 Using the available technology and resources for e-learning.
 Students will be encouraged towards self-learning and under direct interaction with
course faculty.
 Students will be enabled for continuous evaluation.
 Case study, didactic mode of group discussions

E. Student Learning Outcomes:


Upon completion of the course, the student should be able to :
 Appraise the importance of exercise in maintenance of health and fitness.
 Objectively define health and fitness in realistic environment and inculcate habits
of physical activity, nutrition and sports as a behavior change and overall health
promotion

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F. Recommended Study Material:
 Textbooks:
1. ACSM”s “Health Related Physical Fitness Assessment Manual Lippincott Williams and
Walkins USA, 2005.
2. Siedentop.D,(1994) Introduction to Physical Education and Sports (2nd ed.), California:
Mayfield Publishing Company.
3. Corbin.Charles Beetal. C.A., (2004) Concepts of Fitness and Welfare Boston McGraw
Hill.

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NR752: EPIDEMIOLOGY & COMMUNITY HEALTH
YEAR 1, SEMESTER 2 (University Elective – CBCS)

Credits and Hours:

Teaching scheme Theory Practical Total Credit

Hours/week 2 - 2
2
Marks 100 - 100

A. Course Objectives:
Upon completing the course, students will be able to
 Familiar with epidemiologic terminology, outcome measures, and study designs; to
appreciate application of epidemiology to subfields (e.g., infectious diseases, reproductive
health, genetics); and to apply epidemiologic methods to current public health issues.
B. Outline of the Course:

Unit No. Title of Unit Prescribed


Hours
1 Introduction: 5
 Concept, scope, definition, trends, History and
development of modern Epidemiology
 Contribution of epidemiology
 Implications
2 Health Statistics: 2
 Morbidity & Mortality
3 Epidemiological approaches: 4
 Study of disease causatives (Cause & Risk)
 Health promotion
 Levels of prevention
4 Epidemiology of 10
 Communicable diseases
 Non-communicable diseases
5 Disaster: 3
 Disaster preparedness,
 Disaster management
6 Health Organizations: 6
 Voluntary health organizations
 International health agencies –WHO, World health
assembly, UNICEF, UNFPA, SIDA, US AID, DANIDA,
DFID. AusAID etc
Total 30 Hours

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C. Instruction Method and Pedagogy
The course is based on practical learning. Teaching will be facilitated by reading material,
discussion, microteaching, task-based learning, assignments, field visit and various
interpersonal activities like group work, independent and collaborative research,
presentations etc.

D. Evaluation:
The students will be evaluated continuously in the form of internal as well as external
examinations. The evaluation (Theory) is schemed as 25 marks for internal evaluation and 75
marks for external evaluation in the form of University examination.

Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through the
following components:

Marks per
Sl. No. Component Number Total Marks
incidence

1 Assignments 1 8 8

2 Internal Test/ Model Exam 1 12 12

Attendance and Class Minimum 80%


3 10
Participation attendance

Total 30

External Evaluation

The University Theory examination will be of 75 marks and will test the logic and critical
thinking skills of the students by asking them theoretical as well as application based questions.
The examination will avoid, as far as possible, grammatical errors and will focus on applications.

Marks per
Sl. No. Component Number Total Marks
incidence

1 Theory Paper 01 70 70

Total 70

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E. Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course, learners will be able to:
 Understand the epidemiologic terminology,
 Understand the health statistic
 Understand the various methods of epidemiology
 Understand the role and functions of various health agencies
 Understand the epidemiological trends in communicable and non-communicable
diseases.

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OC733: INTRODUCTION TO POLYMER SCIENCE
YEAR 1, SEMESTER 2 (University Elective – CBCS)

Credits and Hours:


Teaching scheme Theory Practical Total Credit

Hours/week 2 - 2
2
Marks 100 - 100

A. Objective of the course

Fundamentals of polymer chemistry will be introduced.

B. Outline of the course

Sr.No Title of Unit Approximate No of


Hours

1 Basic concepts of Polymer Chemistry 5

2 Chemistry of Polymerization 8

3 Kinetics of polymerization 8

4 Molecular weight and size 9

Total Hours (Theory): 30

C. Detailed syllabus:
Sr. No Title of Unit Approximate
No of Hours

1. Basic concepts of Polymer Chemistry 5

Introduction to polymers, How are polymers made, Classification of


polymers.

2. Chemistry of Polymerization 8

Chain polymerization, Step polymerization, Miscellaneous


polymerization reactions, Polymerization techniques.

3. Kinetics of polymerization 8

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i). Free – Radical chain polymerization.

ii). Cationic & anionic polymerization.

iii). Polycondensation

4. Molecular weight and size 9

Number – Average molecular weight. Viscosity – Average molecular


weight. Polydispersity and molecular weight. Significance of
polymer molecular weight. Size of polymer molecules

D. Instrumental Methods and Pedagogy:


Topics will be taught in interactive class room sessions using black-board and if required power-
point presentations will also be employed. Special interactive problem solving sessions will be
conducted. Course materials will be provided from various sources of information. Students will
be trained to measure molecular weight of polymers using appropriate instrument(s). Unit test
will be taken regularly as a part of continuous evaluation and suggestions will be given to the
students in order to do better in their performance.

E. Student Learning Outcomes/Objective:


 The programme aims at providing the basic concepts in polymer science.
 Ensuring that students acquire skills for further research in this area.

F. References:
1. A First Course in Polymer Chemistry by A. Strepikheyev , V.Derevitskaya and
G.Slonimsky ; MIR Publishers, Moscow
2. Polymer Science by V.R.Gowariker , N.V.Viswanathan and Jayadev Sreedhar, New Age
International Publishers.
3. Polymer Science and Technology of Plastics and Rubbers by Premamoy Ghosh, Tata
McGraw-Hill Publishing Company Ltd. New Delhi.

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MB651: SOFTWARE BASED STATISTICAL ANALYSIS
YEAR 1, SEMESTER 2 (University Elective – CBCS)

Credits and Hours:

Teaching scheme Theory Practical Total Credit

Hours/week 2 - 2
2
Marks 100 - 100

A. Course Objectives
The objectives of this course are:

 To enable the students to understand importance of research and statistical techniques.


 To provide hands on training of statistical software like SPSS, SYSTAT, MATLAB and other
open source software like R , WEKA, for research.

B. Course Outline
Classroom
Module
Title/Topic Contact
No.
Sessions

Introduction to Statistics
1  Research and Innovation 06
 Introduction to Statistics
 Quantitative Techniques in Research
Software # 1 - Use of Software in Research

 Introduction to the Software


 Creating Variables
 Data and its Types
 Importing Data from MS-Excel
 Transformation of Variables
2  Visual Benning 12
 Determining Validity and Reliability of Scale using CFA -
Cronbach's (alpha) : a coefficient of internal consistency
 Estimation & Hypothesis Testing:
 Parametric Tests
o Z Test
o t – Test
o Cross Tabulation and Chi – square
o One-Way & Two-Way Analysis of Variance

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Classroom
Module
Title/Topic Contact
No.
Sessions

(ANOVA)
o Pearson‟s Correlation Analysis
o Regression Analysis
o Simple & Multiple Linear Regression Analysis
o Measures of Model Fit (R and R-square Statistics)
 Non-Parametric Tests
o Mann-Whitney U Test
o Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test
o Run test
o Krushal-Wallis Test
o Spearman Correlation Analysis
Statistical Analysis Using Open Source software

 Introduction to Software
 Programming Language Basics – including creating, sub-
setting and analyzing
3  Managing your files and workspace 10
 Controlling functions (procedures or commands)
 Data Acquisition – Reading files
 Data Transformations
 Selecting variables and observations
 Writing functions (macros)
 Graphics
4 Article / Research Papers Reviews 02

Total 30

C. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise self-learning and active classroom interaction based on
students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected to prepare a detailed
session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the reading material and case
material for every session. Wherever the material for any session is drawn from sources
beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books, journals and magazines in the library,
or from websites and other resources not accessible to the students, the course
instructor should make the material available to the students well in advance, so that the
students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix will be as follows:

 Classroom / Practical Contact Sessions … About 28 Sessions

 Research Paper Discussions / Feedback … About 02 Sessions

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The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

D. Internal Evaluation
The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through the
following components:

Percentage
Sl. Marks per Total of total
Component Number
No. incidence Marks internal
evaluation

1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10

2 Assignment / Project work 1 150 150 50

3 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30

4 Attendance and Class 30 10


Participation

Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation


marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks f or the course.

E. External Evaluation
The University examination will be for 70 marks and will be based on practical computer-
based tests and a viva-voce.

F. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 Skills related to use of statistical techniques for analysis using software


 Rational decision making skills for typical business / other decisions
 Inputs for reviewing articles / research papers especially related to use of statistical
techniques and analysis based on software
G. Reference Material

 Text-book

1. Latest Manuals of Software


 Reference Books

1. David .M. Levine, Krehbiel, Berenson, P.K. Viswanathan, (Latest Edition), Business
Statistics – A First Course, (Latest Edition), Pearson Education

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MA772: DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS
YEAR 1, SEMESTER 2 (University Elective – CBCS)
Credits and Hours:

Teaching Scheme Theory Practical/Tutorial Total Credit

Hours/week 2 - 2
2
Marks 100 - 100

A. Objective of the Course:


The course is designed for Engineers, Physicists, Chemists, Mathematician. This course covers
basics of Statistics and Experimental Design.

The objectives of the course are to:

1. Understand basics of Statistical Techniques of Design of Experiment


2. Understand the applications of experimental design in practice

B. Outline of the course:


Sr Title of the unit Minimum number
No. of hours
1. Principles of Experimental Design 06
2. Statistical Concepts 06
3. Single Factor Experiments 08
4. Factorial Experiments 10
Total hours (Theory): 30

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C. Detailed Syllabus:
1 Principles of Experimental Design 06 Hours
1.1 Basic Terminologies: Types of Investigations and Experiments
1.2 Confirmatory and Exploratory Experiments
1.3 Modeling and selecting Response
1.4 Minimizing Bias and Variability
2 Statistical Concepts 06 Hours
2.1 Descriptive Statistics and Graphical Presentation
2.2 Probability Distributions, Hypothesis Tests and Confidence Intervals
2.3 Power and Sample size calculation
2.4 Experiments for Two Treatments
2.5 Linear Regression: Simple and Multiple
3. Single Factor Experiments 08 Hours
3.1 Completely Randomized Designs
3.1 Concepts of Multiple comparison
3.2 Pairwise Comparisons
3.3 Comparisons with a Control
3.4 General Contrast
4. Factorial Experiments 10Hours
4.1 Inference from Factorial Experiments
4.2 Two-Level Factorial Experiments
4.3 Definition and Estimation of Main Effects and Interactions
4.4 Statistical Analysis
4.5 Two-Level Fractional Factorial Experiments: Introduction
D. Instructional Method and Pedagogy:
 At the start of course, the course delivery pattern, prerequisite of the subject will be
discussed.
 Lectures will be conducted with the aid of multi-media projector, black board, OHP etc.
 Attendance is compulsory in lectures/laboratory which carries a 5% component of the overall
evaluation.
 Minimum two internal exams will be conducted and average of two will be considered as a
part of 15% overall evaluation.
 Assignments based on course content will be given to the students at the end of each
unit/topic and will be evaluated at regular interval. It carries a weighting of 5%.

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 Two Quizzes (surprise test) will be conducted which carries 5% component of the overall
evaluation.
E. Student Learning Outcomes:

 At the end of the course the students will be able to understand the basic concepts of Design
of Experiment.
 Student will be able to apply concepts of these course in their study of specialization

F. Recommended Study Material:

 Text Books:
1. Tamhane, Ajit C. Statistical analysis of designed experiments: theory and applications. Vol.
609. John Wiley & Sons, 2009.
2. Hinkelmann, Klaus, and Oscar Kempthorne. Design and Analysis of Experiments,
Introduction to Experimental Design. Vol. 1. John Wiley & Sons, 2008.
3. Lorenzen, Thomas, and Virgil Anderson, eds. Design of experiments: a no-name approach. CRC
Press, 1993.

 Reference Books:
1. Cox, David Roxbee, and Nancy Reid. The theory of the design of experiments. CRC Press, 2000.
2. Goupy, Jacques L. Methods for experimental design: principles and applications for physicists and
chemists. Vol. 12. Elsevier, 1993.

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PH826: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS
YEAR 1, SEMESTER 2 (University Elective – CBCS)
Credits and Hours:

Teaching scheme Theory Practical Total Credit

Hours/week 2 - 2
2
Marks 100 - 100

A. Objectives of the course:


 To acquaint the students with the basic concepts of Intellectual Property Rights;
 To develop expertise in IPR related issues,
 To sensitize the students with the emerging issues in IPR and the rationale for the
protection of IPR, and;
 To explore practical aspects repeated to patenting.

B. Outline of the course:


No. of Contact
Sr. No. Title of Unit
Hours.

1 Intellectual Property Concepts 5

2 IPR and Research 5

3 Practical aspect of patenting 10

4 IPR related treaties 5

5 Case Study 5

Total Hours (Theory): 30

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C. Syllabus Topics:
Sr.
Title of Unit Topics
No.

 Concept of property, conventional property vs. Intellectual


Intellectual Property Property
1  Basic aspect of the 8 different IPR mechanism Viz. Patents,
Concepts
Copyright, trademark, industrial design, layout design of
integrated circuits, geographical indicators, plant varieties &
trade secrets.
2 IPR and Research  Benefits of IPRs to improve the quality of research work
 Strategies for avoiding research duplications, infringements
 Indian patent act and its recent amendment with respect to
following aspect: Patentable and non-patentable inventions,
Essential criteria for filing a patent, Filling a patent in India and
abroad, Drafting of patent application
 Patent Filling and Commercialization: Procedure for patent
obtaining in India, National and International Patent Search,
Patent Analysis, Patent Drafting and Filling Procedure in India,
Patent Specification and Claims, How to right a Claim of Patent,
Practical aspect of Pre/Post Grant Issues in Patenting, Opposition of Patent
3 Granting, Infringement Analysis, Ground of Defense, Intellectual
patenting
Property Appellation Board (IPAB), International Filing: PCT
System
 Patent and Biodiversity Act
 Introduction to World Intellectual Property Organization.
(WIPO)
 Commercialization of patent: Need for Commercialization of
research and role of IPRs in research Commercialization.
 Benefit/Disadvantages of patenting to the society
 Latest Amendment/Emerging Issues in Patenting
4 IPR related treaties  Patent co-operative treaty
 Budapest treaty
5 Case Study

D. Instructional Methods and Pedagogy:


The course employs in interactive classroom session using chalk and talk teaching to
power point presentations. It also includes presentation by students on a specific topic
assigned to them by the faculty and case study discussion with various litigation,
infringement and patent rejection cases. Unit test will be conducted regularly as a part
of continuous evaluation and suggestion will be given to student in order to improve
their performance.

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E. Students Learning Outcomes/Objectives:
 At the end of the course, the student will be able to understand the fundamental
concepts of Intellectual Property Rights which further will be helpful in
understanding other advanced aspects of Patent and Trademark applications in
various scientific research and innovation.
 At the end student would gain experience in filling and drafting procedure of
Patent.
F. Recommended Study material
1. Intellectual Property Right basic Concept, by M. M. S. Khatri, Atlantic Publisher
and Distributors Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi.
2. Epstein on Intellectual Property: 5th Edition by Michael M. Epstein, Wolters
Kulwer India Pvt. Ltd. Gurgaon, India.
3. Intellectual Property Right and Human Development in India by Shabana Talwar,
First Edition, Serials Publications, New Delhi, India.
4. IPR Handbook for Pharma Students and Researchers, Parikshit Bansal, Pharma
Book Syndicate, Hyderabad, India.
5. Patents, N. R. Subbaram, Pharma Book Syndicate, Hyderabad.
6. Intellectual Property Right by Nikolaus Thumm, Springer-Verlag Publications,
Germany.
7. Intellectual Property - Patents, Copyright, TradeMarks and Allied Rights by
Cornish, Aplin and Llewelyn, Sweet and Maxwell – Thomson Publishers, New
Delhi, India
8. The Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights: A Case Book by Louis Tc. Harms,
WIPO Publishing House, Geneva.
9. Intellectual Property: From Creation to Commercialization - A Practical Guide for
Innovators & Researchers by John P., MC Manus, Oak Tree Press, Ireland.

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MB 781.3: COMMUNICATION SKILLS-2 (CS-2)
YEAR 1, SEMESTER 2
I. Number of Credits : Non Credit Course

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To train the students to become efficient readers of written material on different


aspects of life and business;
 To develop the students‟ ability to comprehend and retain the material so read
for easy recall as and when required;
 To help them improve their vocabulary of English;
 To train them to think in groups of words appropriate to situations and express
their thoughts spontaneously and comfortably in the written mode; and
 To impart skills for writing readable and effective communications.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Introduction to Written Communication Skills
1  Reading Skills 01
 Writing Skills
Reading Skills
 Basics of Reading
2 10
 Reading Techniques
 Reading Comprehension
Writing Skills
 Gathering Ideas for Writing
 Elements of Good Writing
3 14
 Creating Effective Sentences
 Understanding Words
 Creating Effective Paragraphs
Business Communication Aids
4 05
 Grammar and Syntax
Total 30

IV. Pedagogy

The course is based on experiential learning. Instructor will act more as facilitators in
helping participants through the process of learning, using discussions, role plays,
individual and group exercises, and participant presentations. The pedagogical mix will
be as follows:

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 151 of 533


 Classroom Contact Sessions ...About 28 Sessions
 Feedback of student‟s performance ...About 02 Sessions

V. Evaluation

At the end of the course the students will have to submit a written report. Certificate
will be awarded to the students who have successfully completed the course.

VI. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 The ability to read and comprehend comfortably material drawn from varied sources
and express themselves equally comfortably in writing. The course should aim at
making reading and writing enjoyable activities for students.

VII. Reference Material

Text Book

1. Guy Brook, Hart, (Latest Edition), Business Benchmark, Cambridge.


2. Jones Leo, Alexan Richard, (Latest Edition), New International Business English,
Cambridge.

Reference-Book

1. Hornby A. S., (Latest Edition), Guide to Patterns and Usage in English, Oxford University
Press.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers

1. Harvard Business Review


2. The Smart Manager

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 152 of 533


Master of Business Administration (MBA)
Programme

SYLLABI
(Semester – 3)

CHAROTAR UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 153 of 533


MB800.3: SUMMER INTERNSHIP PROGRAMME (SIP)
(PRACTICAL)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits : 4

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To enable the students to comprehend all the learning of the past one year (two
semesters) so as to develop an in-depth understanding of all general and functional areas
of management / organizations.

 To investigate in a topic relating to one of their areas of interest / streams of


specialisation, and in the process, develop a comprehensive understanding of the same in
order to prepare a conceptual / research based paper.

III. Pedagogy

For this course, each student will be placed in an organization where a faculty guide
(internal) and an organizational guide (external), if any, will provide guidance and
supervision and work on various issues jointly. The students will work on their projects
individually and not in pairs or teams. As a rule, the number of students, organization
and faculty member / guides will be allotted based on certain criteria and as per the
situation. A faculty co-guide may also be appointed for every/any student.

The investigation will be in the nature of preparation of a project and research through:

i. Study of secondary data from books, journal and magazine articles, newspaper
articles, websites, electronic and physical databases, etc.;
ii. Primary data collection through interviews, discussions, and other research
instruments. Students are encouraged to pursue research in the organisation
where they have undergone their summer internship.

The outcome of the research will be a Summer Internship Programme – Project Report which
would contain, among others, the following:

Part-I – Organizational Profile

 Introduction
 The Company / Organisation
 Functional Areas
 Decision-making
 Financial Analysis
 My learning from the study of the organisation

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Part-II – Project Study

 Area of research chosen, with reason


 Literature Review
 Problem Definition
 Research Method
 Data Collection and Analysis
 Conclusions and Recommendations, if any.
 Limitations of the study and leads for further work

The detailed format of the report will be circulated to the students at the beginning of
the end of the second semester.

IV. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through
the faculty guide on the basis of the regularity and quality of work done by the student
under his/her guidance. The internal evaluation will be for 30% of the course.

V. External Evaluation

The university examination will be based on oral presentation, review of students‟


reports and a viva-voce and will carry 70% marks for the course evaluation.

VI. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the students should have developed:

 A comprehensive understanding of the functioning of the organization, process of


undertaking / conducting systematic inquiry into a phenomenon, and the art of
writing a paper (conceptual / literature / research type) and integrating fundamental
and functional areas of management for effective strategic decision making.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 155 of 533


MB801.3: STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT (SM)
YEAR2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits : 3

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are:

 To introduce the student to competitive strategy and competitive advantage;


 To make students familiar with Michael Porter‟s concepts of value chain and the two
main sources of competitive advantage viz. Cost advantage and Differentiation;
 To expose the students to different types of strategic choices for various levels of the
business, viz. Corporate , Business , and Operational levels; and
 To develop the students‟ skills for putting strategies into actions, adopting the
appropriate strategy for competitive advantage

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Introduction to Strategic Management
 The Strategic Management Process
1 06
 External Analysis: The Identification of Industry Opportunities
and Threats
The Nature of Competitive Advantage
 Internal Analysis: Distinctive Competencies, Competitive
2 Advantage and Profitability 10
 Building Competitive Advantage through Functional Level
Strategies
Building Competitive Advantage
 Building Competitive Advantage through Business Level Strategy
 Competitive Strategy and the Industry Environment
 Strategy in High Technology Industry
 Strategy in Global Environment
 Corporate Strategy
3 o Horizontal Integration 10
o Vertical Integration
o Strategic Outsourcing
 Corporate Strategy
o Diversification
o Acquisition
o Internal New Ventures
Implementing Strategy
 Corporate Performance, Governance, and Business Ethics
4  Implementing Strategy in Companies that Compete in A Single 10
Industry
 Implementing Strategy in Companies that Compete Across

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Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Industries and Countries
 Balanced Scorecard - Use and Limitations
Strategic Thinking
5 06
 How to Think Strategically? – Tools and Exercises
6 Contemporary Issues 03
Total 45

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 22 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 10 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 05 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through
the following components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 157 of 533


The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation
marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 An understanding of the meaning of strategy and strategic management.


 An ability to think strategically; and see organisations from a holistic perspective
through Balanced Scorecard Approach.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Books

1. Chales W.L. Hill, Gareth R. Jones, (Latest Edition), Strategic Management –An integrated
Approach, Biztantra, Houghton Mifflin.
2. Michael E. Porter, (Latest Edition), Competitive Advantage, Free press.

Reference-Books

1. Arthur A Thompson Jr, A J Strickland III, John E Gamble, Arun K Jain, (Latest
Edition), Crafting and Executing Strategy, McGraw Hill.
2. Gerry Johnson, Kevan Scholes, (Latest Edition), Exploring Corporate Strategy, Pearson.
3. Adrian Haberberg, Alison Rieple, (Latest Edition), Strategic Management, Oxford.
4. Henry Mintzberg, Bruce Ahlstrand, Joseph Lampel, (Latest Edition), Strategy Safari,
Pearson.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers

1. Harvard Business Review


2. Vikalpa
3. The Smart Manager
4. California Management Review

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 158 of 533


MB802.3: LEGAL ENVIRONMENT AND PUBLIC SYSTEMS (LE&PS)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits : 3

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To enable the students to understand a few important laws, acts and regulations
affecting organisations and management operations; and
 To help the students develop insights into the provisions of some important laws
affecting decision-makers‟ processes in their roles as employees, managers or owners.
 To understand the public system, its components, functioning and relationship
between public system and business and society.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Indian Contract Act, 1872
 General Principles
 Offer and Acceptance
 Capacity to Contract
 Consent, Consideration, Performance and Discharge of Contract
1  Void, Contingent and Quasi Contracts, Special Types of Contract 07
The Sale of Goods Act, 1930
 Overview
 Conditions and Warranties
 Transfer of Ownership
 Performance of Sale
 Breach and Remedial Measures
The Companies Act, 1956
 Overview
 Formation
 Memorandum and Articles of Association
 Prospectus
2  Issue and Allotment of Capital 07
 Meeting and Proceedings
 Directors and BOD
 Account, Audit and Investigation
 Winding up
 Limited Liability Partnership, Producer Companies

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Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No. Sessions
The Negotiable Instrument Act, 1881
 Overview
 Parties to Negotiable Instruments
 Presentation
 Negotiation
3  Discharge of Parties 07
 Liability of Banker
 Dishonour of Instruments
 Protest and Noting
Law of Intellectual Property Rights
 Patent, Trademark and Copyright.
Others
 The Consumer Protection Act, 1986
4  Information Technology Act, 2000 07
 Foreign Exchange Management Act, 1999
 The Competition Act, 2002
 Indian Partnership Act, 1932
Indian Public System – Part 1
5
 Constitution of India
 Administrative System of India 07
 Central and State Government
 Components of Public System
 Public Finance
Indian Public System – Part 2
 Public System and Society
 Public System and Business
6  Indian Political System 07
 Public Sector Undertaking
 Problems and Challenges of Public System
 Important Bodies/ Institution in Indian Public System
7 Contemporary Issues 03
Total 45

IV. Pedagogy
The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 160 of 533


 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 22 Sessions
 Case Discussions … About 10 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 05 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through
the following components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation


marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the students should have developed:

 A clear understanding of a few representative commercial laws, acts, rules and


regulations affecting management decision making.
 An ability to interpret the provisions of various laws and understand their
applications in practical contexts.
 A clear understanding of the public system within which the business and society
functions.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 161 of 533


VIII. Reference Material

Text-Books
1. K. R. Bulchandani, (Latest Edition), Business Law for Management, Himalaya
Publication.
2. S. N. Maheshwari and S.K. Maheshwari, (Latest Edition), A Manual of Business,
Himalaya Publication.
3. S. S. Gulshan, (Latest Edition), Mercantile Law, Excel Books.

Reference-Books

1. P. P. S. Gogna, (Latest Edition), Mercantile Law, S. Chand Publication.


2. N. D. Kapoor, (Latest Edition), Elements of Business Law, Sultan Chand and Co.
3. C. L. Bansal, (Latest Edition), Business and corporate laws, Excel Books.
4. Akhileshwar Pathak, (Latest Edition), Legal Aspect of Business, Tata McGraw Hill Pvt.
Ltd.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers

Students and faculty members are advised to read the Bare Acts and discuss in the
classroom. They may also refer to other standard law books and are advised to read
newspapers / magazines on law and public systems so as to keep themselves updated on
the major developments/changes taking across India and world.

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MB803.3: MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS (MIS)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits : 3

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To develop an understanding of Management Information System, its concepts and


business, the key learning objectives are:
 To understand the role of the information systems (IS) function in an organization.
 To develop an insight as to how information systems influence business strategy.
 To develop the ability to contribute meaningfully towards information system
selection.
 To help the students how to use MI Systems for gaining competitive advantage.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Organization Management and the
Networked Enterprise

 Information Systems in Global Business


 IS in the Enterprise (How Businesses use
Information Systems?)
1  Information Systems, Organizations and 08
Strategy
 Contemporary Approaches in Information
Systems
 Part I Project: Analyzing Business Processes
for an Enterprise System

Information Technology Infrastructure


(Obtain a Bird’s Eye View of Contemporary
Technologies and Infrastructure required to
Implement an IS.)

2  IT Infrastructure and Emerging Technologies 08


and its Platforms.
 Foundation of Database and Information
Management
 Telecommunications, the Internet and Wireless
Technology

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 163 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No. Sessions
 Part II Project: Creating a New Internet
Business

Enterprise Information Systems and Key


System Applications of Modern Age

 E-Commerce: Digital Markets, Digital Goods


3  Business Processes and Enterprise Applications 08
 Knowledge Management
 Part III Project: Designing an Enterprise
Information Portal

Information Security (Understand the


Importance and Issues related to the
Protection of an Organization’s Information
Assets)
4 08
 Security and Control
 Risk Assessment
 Ethical and Social Issues
 Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems

Development of Information System

 Business Process Re-engineering and


5 Information Systems 06
 System Development
 The Open Source of Development
 International Information System

Building and Maintaining Information


System
6  Building Information System 04
 Project Management: Establishing the Business
Value of Systems and Managing Change

7 Contemporary Issues 03

Total 45

IV. Pedagogy

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 164 of 533


The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 23 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 09 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 05 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.Classroom

V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through
the following components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level Evaluation


Marks for the course. The institute level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 165 of 533


 A sound understanding and the appreciation of the concepts of MIS including
learning how to design MIS for different departments of an organization.
 The ability gain knowledge about latest technologies in the field of
telecommunication, networks and Database.

VIII. Reference Materials

Text-Books

1. Loudon, Kenneth C. and Loudon, Jane P., (Latest Edition), “Management Information
Systems: Managing the Digital firm”, Pearson Publication.
2. O‟Brien, (Latest Edition), “Management Information Systems – Managing Information
Technology in the Business Enterprise”, Tata McGraw Hill.
3. Stephen Haag, Maeve Cummings, Amy Philips, (Latest Edition), “Management
Information Systems – For the Information Age”, Tata McGraw Hill.

Reference-Books

1. W. S. Jawadekar, (Latest Edition), “Management Information Systems”, Tata McGraw


Hill.
2. Ephraim Turban, Dorothy Leidner, Ephraim McLean, James Wetherbe, (Latest
Edition), “Information Technology for Management – Transforming organizations in the Digital
Economy”, Wiley Publication.
3. S.A. Kelkar, (Latest Edition), “Management Information Systems – A Concise Study”, PHI
Publication.
4. McLeod, Raymond and Schell, George P., (Latest Edition), “Management Information
Systems”, Pearson Publication.
5. Miller, (Latest Edition), “MIS Cases: Decision Making with Application Software”, Pearson
Publication.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers

1. Computer Express, Digichip, PC World, Computer Shopper, Dataquest etc.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 166 of 533


MB804.3: ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND MSMEs (EMSMEs)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits : 3

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To enable the students to understand the meaning of entrepreneurship,


intrapreneurship, and MSMEs.
 To provide insights into the challenges and joy of being an entrepreneur.
 To reinforce the importance of practicing entrepreneurial and leadership skills as
organisational managers.
 To bring out the role and importance of entrepreneurs and MSMEs in in developing
and developed economies as drivers of employment and growth.
 To familiarise the students with MSME Act; and to help them adapt corporate
management practices to MSMEs.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title / Topic
No. Sessions
Entrepreneurship and Free Enterprise
 Entrepreneurship and New Venture Opportunities
 Entrepreneurship and Innovation
 Entrepreneurship for Small Business
 Corporate Entrepreneurship
 Social Entrepreneurship
1  Entrepreneurship, Management, Administration – Similarities and 06
Differences
 Personal Attributes for Entrepreneurial Success
 Role of Entrepreneurship Development Schemes and Programmes
 Entrepreneurial Stages and Cycles – Some Models
 Roles of Mentors and Incubators, Entrepreneurship Lab etc.
Sources of Ideas for New Ventures
 Importance of Learning Attitude
 Media, Secondary Data, Primary Research, etc.
 Creativity and Idea Generation Tools and Techniques
o Brain Storming
2 04
o NGT
o Delphi
o Synectics
o Morphological Analysis
o Bionics, etc.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 167 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title / Topic
No. Sessions
Entrepreneurial Challenges and Enablers
 Business Plan – Contents, Importance, Pre-Requisites for an
Effective Business Plan
 Markets and Market Development
 Finance and Resource Mobilisation – Different Sources, Including
3 Venture Capital and Private Equity 08
 HR Challenges – Availability of Talent, Retention, Compensation,
Etc.
 Legal and Government Challenge
 Supportive Measures and Policies of Governments
 Public Bodies for Entrepreneurial Support
Introduction to MSMEs
 MSME as Understood in India and Developed Countries
 Guidelines of RBI and NABARD
4  Nature and Contribution of MSMEs 06
 An Overview of MSME Structure and their Relationship to
Corporate and Large Business Houses
 MSME Classification on the Basis of Various Criteria
Legal Framework and Environment of MSMEs
MSME Management Challenges
 Markets
5  Finance 13
 Human Resources
 Regulations, Systems and Procedures
 Capacity – Physical, Intellectual and Technical or Technology
Case Studies of Successful Entrepreneurs and Unsuccessful
6 Entrepreneurs and Failed Ventures – Lessons for New 04
Entrepreneurs
7 Contemporary Issues 04
Total 45

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 168 of 533


 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 23 Sessions
 Case Discussions … About 10 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 04 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated through the following
components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation


marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcome

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 A clear understanding of the concept of entrepreneurship; and


 An appetite for being innovative, creative and entrepreneurial.
 An integrated understanding of the rationale for co-existence of MSMEs along with
large businesses;
 An appreciation of the importance of MSMEs in developing and developed countries;
and
 An ability to distil management principles relevant to MSMEs from corporate
management practices.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 169 of 533


VIII. Reference Material

Text-Book

1. David Holt, (Latest Edition), Entrepreneurship – New Venture Creation, PHI.

Reference-Books

1. Zimmerer, et. al., (Latest Edition), Essentials of Entrepreneurship and Small Business
Management, PHI.
2. Hisrich, et. al., (Latest Edition), Entrepreneurship, TMH

Magazines / Journals / Newspapers

1. Business India
2. Business World
3. Business Standard
4. The International Journal of Entrepreneurship
5. The Smart Manager
6. Indian Management
7. Harvard Business Review
8. California Management Review
9. Academy of Management Review

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 170 of 533


MARKETING
MANAGEMENT
ELECTIVES

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 171 of 533


MB810.3: CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR AND TECHNOLOGY (CBT)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits: 4

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To expose the students to the different aspects of consumer behaviour and provide
an insight into the consumer decision making process and factors that influence it.
 To provide the students an overview of different consumer decision making models
by undertaking marketing research in hitherto known and unknown areas of
consumer behaviour.
 To make the students understand the basic concepts of consumer behaviour through
real-life examples and cases;
 To understand the internal forces, external influences and processes that go on to
affect consumer behaviour, the challenges generated for the marketers and the
strategies which could be implemented.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Introduction
 The Impact of Digital Revolution on Consumer Behaviour
1 09
 Consumer Research
 Market Segmentation
Consumer as an Individual
 Consumer Motivations
 Personality and Consumer Behaviour
2  Consumer Perceptions 12
 Consumer Learning
 Consumer Attitude Formation and Change
 Communications and Consumer Behaviour
Consumer in their Socials and Cultural Settings
 Reference Groups and Family Influences
 Social Class, Culture and Sub-Culture and Consumer
3 09
Behaviour
 Cross-cultural Consumer Behaviour: International
Perspective
The Consumer Decision Process
4  Consumer Influence and Diffusion of Innovation 09
 Consumer Decision-Making and Beyond
Understanding Consumer Behaviour through and CPA,
RTI, etc.
5 06
 Consumer Protection Act / Councils: Rights of the Consumer
 Right to Information and Consumer Behaviour

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 172 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Use of Technology in Marketing
 Internet Marketing
 Web Based Marketing Strategies and Business Models
 Networking, Customer Support and Online Quality Services,
6 06
Etc.
 Consumer Behavior Insights on Layout and Design of the
Website
 Direct Marketing Strategies Under Customized Marketing
7 Project / Cases Presentations 06
8 Contemporary Issues 03
Total 60

IV. Pedagogy
The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. In addition to these,
every student is expected to undertake a marketing research project chosen by the
instructor and present a written and oral report. The pedagogical mix will be as follows:
 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 27 Sessions
 Case Discussions … About 13 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 09 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 09 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions
The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.
V. Internal Evaluation
The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated through the following
components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 173 of 533


The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation
marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 A clear understanding of the factors that influence consumer decision making and
marketing strategies that stimulate such behaviour. They should be able to appreciate
this technology for marketing of goods/ services.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Book

1. Leon Schiffman and Leslie Kanuk, (Latest Edition), Consumer Behaviour, Pearson
Education, Low Price Edition / PHI.

Reference-Books

1. Satish Mishra and S. H. Kazmi, (Latest Edition), Consumer Behaviour, Text and Cases
by Excel Books.
2. S. Ramesh Kumar, (Latest Edition), Conceptual Issues in Consumer Behaviour by Pearson
Education.
3. Suja R. Nair, (Latest Edition), Consumer Behaviour in Indian Perspective, HPH.
4. Solomon, (Latest Edition), Consumer Behaviour, Pearson Education.
5. Hawkins, Best Coney, (Latest Edition), Consumer Behaviour, TMH.
6. Loudon and Della Bitta, (Latest Edition), Consumer Behaviour, Concepts and Application,
TMH.
7. Blackwell, Miniard and Engel, (Latest Edition), Consumer Behaviour, Concepts and
Application, Thomson-Southwestern.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers

1. Indian Journal of Marketing


2. ICFAI Marketing Mastermind
3. Marketing Mastermind
4. Indian Management
5. Journal of Consumer Behaviour
6. Journal of Consumer Research
7. Economic Times- Brand equity

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 174 of 533


MB811.3: INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATION (IMC)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits : 4

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To help students to understand various concepts of advertising and sales


promotion through real-life examples and cases.
 To help students to develop understanding of integrated marketing
communication systems and processes.
 To sensitize students to the various facets of advertising, public relation and
promotion management
 To help the students develop an understanding of concepts and tools like
Advertising Brief (Creative Brief), AIDA, DAGMAR, Reach, Frequency, and Impact
etc. to develop proficiency in the planning of activities of an organization.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No. Sessions
1 Introduction to Integrated Marketing Communication
 IMC: Evolution and Role in Branding
 The Promotional Mix 06
 The IMC Planning Process
 Role of IMC in the Marketing Process
2 Integrated Marketing Program and Situational
Analysis
 Organizing for Advertising and Promotion
04
o The Role of Ad Agencies and Other Marketing
Communication Organizations
 Perspectives on Consumer Behaviour
3 Analysing the Communication Process
 The Communication Process 04
 Source, Message, and Cultural Factors
Objectives and Budgeting for IMC Programs
4  Establishing Objectives and Budgeting for the Promotional 04
Program
Developing Integrated Marketing Communication
Program
 Creative Strategy: Planning and Development
 Creative Strategy: Implementation and Evaluation
5  Media Planning and Strategy 18
 Evaluation of Broadcast, Print and Support Media
o Direct Marketing
o The Internet and Interactive Media
o Sales Promotion

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 175 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No. Sessions
o Public Relations, Publicity and Corporate
Advertising
o Personal Selling
Monitoring, Evaluation, and Control
 Measuring the Effectiveness of the Promotional Program
 International Advertising and Promotion
6 10
 Regulation of Advertising and Promotion
 Evaluating the Social, Ethical, and Economic Aspects of
Advertising and Promotion
Project Presentations
 Usage and Impact on Children via Advertisements
 Ethics in Advertising
7  Sex in Advertising 10
 Laws Related to Deceptive Advertising
 Impact of Globalization on Advertising
 Relevance and usage of Puffery in Advertisements
8 Contemporary Issues 04
Total 60

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasize participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. In addition to these,
students are expected to undertake a project chosen by the instructor and present the
same. The pedagogical mix will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 36 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 08 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 06 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 08 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 176 of 533


V. Internal Evaluation
The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated through the following
components:
Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation


marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcome


At the end of the course, the student should have developed:
 A clear understanding of functioning of an advertising department / agency and the
roles managers assume for managerial performance.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Book

1. Belch and Belch, (Latest Edition), Advertising and Promotion: An Integrated Marketing
Communications Perspective, Tata McGraw Hill Publication

Reference-Book

1. Clow and Black, (Latest Edition), Integrated Advertising, Promotion and Marketing
Communications, PHI.
2. Kazmi and Batra, (Latest Edition), Advertising and Sales Promotion, Excel Books.
3. Batra, Myers and Aaker, (Latest Edition), Advertising and Management, Pearson
Education.
4. S. A. Chunawalla, (Latest Edition), Advertising, Sales and Promotion Management, HPH.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers


1. Pitch
2. Economic Times - Brand equity
3. Business Line - Catalyst

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 177 of 533


MB812.3: SALES AND DISTRIBUTION MANAGEMENT (SDM)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits : 4

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To acquaint students with concepts, tools & techniques of sales.


 To develop skills of personal selling.
 To develop the skills of managing and leading a sales force.
 To devise the suitable channels of distribution in the contemporary scenario
 To manage the performance of the channels in the changing environment

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Introduction to Sales Management, Personal Selling and
Marketing Strategy
1  Sales Management and the Business Enterprise 04
 Sales Management, Personal Selling, and Salesmanship
 Setting Personal-Selling Objectives
Organising the Sales Effort
2  The Effective Sales Executive 02
 The Sales Organisation
Sales Force Management
 Personal Selling in the Selling Field
 Recruiting Sales Personnel
 Selecting Sales Personnel
 Planning Sales Training Programs
3  Executing and Evaluating Sales Training Programs 12
 Motivating Sales People
 Compensating Sales Personnel
 Managing Expenses of Sales Personnel
 Sales Meetings and Sales Contests
 Controlling Sales Personnel: Evaluating and Supervising
Controlling the Sales Effort
 The Sales Budget
4  Quotas 08
 Sales Territories
 Sales Control and Cost Analysis
Marketing Channel
5  Introduction to Marketing Channel 08
 Function and Channel Structures
 Channel Relationship

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 178 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No. Sessions
 Channel Design and Implementation
Channel Design: Demand, Supply and Competition
 Service Output and Supply Side Analysis
6  Membership Issues 08
 Gap Analysis
 Vertical Integration
Channel Implementation and Performance Measurement
 Channel Power
 Managing Channel Conflict
 Channel Implementation Issues
 Strategic Alliances and Legal Constraints on Channel Policies
7 in India 14
Institution for Channels
 Retailing
 Wholesaling
 Franchising
 Logistics and Supply Chain Management
8 Contemporary Issues 04
Total 60

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 30 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 08 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 12 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 08 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 179 of 533


V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated through the following
components.

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation


marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 Skills to know how to apply the concepts of Sales in organisations.


 The ability to plan, organise, manage and coordinate territories and intermediaries
for organisations.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Books

1. Still, Condiff and Govoni, (Latest Edition), Sales Management-Decisions, Strategies and
Cases, PHI.
2. Stern, Ansary and Coughlan, (Latest Edition), Marketing Channel, PHI or Pearson.

Reference-Books

1. David Jobber, Geoff Lancaster, (Latest Edition), Selling and Sales Management, Pearson
Education.
2. Spiro. Stanchart and Rich, (Latest Edition), Salesforce Management, Tata McGraw Hill.
3. Tanner, Honeycutt, Erffmeyer, (Latest Edition), Sales Management- Shaping Future Sales
Leaders, Pearson Education.
4. Tapan K Panda and Sunil Sahadev, (Latest Edition), Sales and Distribution Management,
Oxford.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 180 of 533


5. B. S. Sahay, (Latest Edition), Supply Chain Management, Macmillan.
6. Havaldar and Cavale, (Latest Edition), Sales and Distribution Management, Tata
McGraw Hill.
7. Venugopal Pingali, (Latest Edition), Sales and Distribution Management in Indian
Perspective, Response Book.
8. Dent Julian, (Latest Edition), Distribution Channel, Kogan Page.
9. Rosenbloom Bent (Latest Edition), Marketing Channel, Thomson Publication.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers

1. Sales and Marketing Management


2. Economic Times
3. Business Standard – The Strategies

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 181 of 533


MB813.3: STRATEGIC MARKETING (S-MKTG)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits : 4

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To develop a clear understanding of a range of concepts of relevance to strategic


marketing management, marketing strategy and marketing planning such as market
segmentation together with the ability to apply such terminology in the context of
real world situations.
 To develop ability to undertake strategic marketing analyses, using a range of
appropriate techniques and to apply such techniques to actual company/market
based examples.
 To develop ability to consider a range of strategic marketing options and critically
choose between them.
 To develop ability to select from various marketing activities in an appropriate way
for a given marketing scenario.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Introduction
 Understanding Strategic Marketing: Principles, Process and
1 Hierarchy 09
 Internal Competences or Organizational Capabilities
 The External Environment or Analysis
 Constructing Plans and Selecting Strategies
Market Strategies
 Product-Market Strategies for Consumer Goods, Business-to-
2 Business and Services 12
o Characteristics various Markets
o Segmenting, Target Market and Positioning
o Strategies for various Markets
Competition, Competitive Advantage, Growth Strategies
 Competitor Analysis
3  Sustainable Competitive Advantage 09
 Growth Strategies: Product Market Development and
Diversification
Specialized Strategy Applications
 Applications
4 o Innovation Strategy 06
o Recession Marketing Strategy
o Strategic Rural Marketing
o Relationship Marketing

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 182 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Specialized Strategy Consolidation and Evaluation
 Consolidation
5 o Marketing Strategy and Profit 06
 Evaluation
o Critical Success Factors / Criteria
Strategic Marketing for Non-Profit Organizations
 Developing Customer Orientation
 Understanding Target Audience
6  Organizing Resources 06
o Attracting Human Resources: Staff and Volunteers
o Working with Private Sector
 Developing and Controlling Marketing Mix
7 Project / Cases Presentations 08
8 Contemporary Issues 04
Total 60

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. In addition to these,
every student is expected to undertake a marketing research project chosen by the
instructor and present a written and oral report. The pedagogical mix will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 28 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 08 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 09 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 12 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 183 of 533


V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated through the following
components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation


marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 A clear understanding of and exposure to strategic marketing principles, plans;


products based strategies for consumer goods, B2B and service markets and learn
strategic aspects for non-profit organisation.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Book

1. A Nag, Strategic Marketing, (Latest Edition), Macmillan Publishers India Ltd.

Reference-Books

1. Douglas West, John Ford and Essam Ibrahim, (Latest Indian Edition), Strategic
Marketing, Oxford University Press.
2. Allan R Andreasen, Philip Kotler, (Latest Edition), Strategic Marketing for Non-profit
Organizations, Pearson Education.
3. Colin Gilligan and Richard M.S. Wilson, (Latest Edition), Strategic Marketing Planing,
Butterworth-Heinemann – an imprint of Elsevier.
4. David A Aaker, (Latest Edition), Strategic Market Management, John Wiley and Sons,
Inc.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 184 of 533


5. Mark E. Parry, (Latest Edition), Strategic Marketing Management, Tata McGraw-Hill
Publishing Co. Ltd.
6. Musadiq A Sahaf, (Latest Edition), Strategic Marketing, Prentice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd.
7. Ferrell and Hartline, (Latest Edition), Strategic Marketing, Cengage Learning India Pvt.
Ltd.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers

1. Indian Journal of Marketing


2. ICFAI Marketing Mastermind
3. Marketing Mastermind
4. Indian Management
5. The Strategists
6. The Hindu – Business Line – Archives
7. Economic Times- Brand equity

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 185 of 533


MB814.3: RURAL MARKETING
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits : 4

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To provide an overview of rural markets and emerging perspectives of rural


marketing.
 To understand the buying behaviour, the consuming pattern, the need and wants of
the rural consumer.
 To provide some of the challenges and opportunities that the rural market holds for
the Companies

III. Course outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No sessions
Introduction to Rural Marketing
 Definition and Scenario
1 06
 Nature and Scope
 Opportunities and Challenges
The Rural Marketing Environment
 The Evolution of Rural Marketing
 The Rural Environment
2 06
 The Rural Economic Environment
 The Rural Economic Structure
 The Rural Infrastructure
Rural Consumer Behaviour and Marketing Research
 Fundamentals of Consumer Behaviour
 Factors influencing Consumer Behaviour
3  The Buyer Decision Process 08
 The Rural Marketing Research Process
 Tools used in Rural Marketing Research
 Field Procedure and Rural Realities
Selecting and Attracting Markets
 Concepts and Process
4  Segmentation 06
 Target
 Positioning
Rural Marketing Mix
 Product Strategy
 Pricing Strategy
5 10
 Distribution Strategy
 Communication Strategy

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 186 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No sessions
Applications
 Marketing of Consumer Products
6  Marketing of Agri Inputs 10
 Marketing of Services
 Agricultural Marketing
The Future of Rural Markets
 Changes in Pattern
 Emerging Segments
7 08
 Technology and Innovation
 Rural Innovations
 Marketing of Rural products
8 Contemporary Issues 06
Total 60

IV. Pedagogy
The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 35 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 10 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 10 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 03 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

V. Internal Evaluation
The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated through the following
components.
Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 187 of 533


The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation
marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 The ability of applying the concepts of Sales in organisations.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Books

1. Badi, R V., and Badi, (Latest Edition), N.V., Rural Marketing, Himalaya Publishing
House.
2. Kashayp Pradeep, (Latest Edition), Rural marketing, Pearson Education.

Reference-Books

1. Singh. S., (Latest Edition), Rural Marketing, Vikas Publishers.


2. Kashyap, P., and Rant, S., (Latest Edition), The Rural Marketing, Biztantra.
3. Rahman, H. U., (Latest Edition), Rural Marketing, Himalaya Publishing House.
4. Gopalaswamy, T. P., (Latest Edition), Rural Marketing, Vikas Publishing House.
5. Dogra and Ghuman, (Latest Edition), Rural Marketing-Concepts and Practices, Tata
McGraw-Hill.
6. Krishnamacharyulu and Ramkrishnan, (Latest Edition), Rural Marketing- Text and
Cases, Pearson Education.
7. Sanal Kumar, (Latest Edition), Rural Marketing, Sage Publications.
8. S. S. Acharya and N. L. Agarwal, (Latest Edition), Agricultural Marketing in India -
Oxford and IBH Publishing Co Pvt Ltd.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers

1. ICFAI Marketing Mastermind


2. Marketing Mastermind
3. Indian Journal of Rural Marketing
4. The Strategists

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 188 of 533


FINANCIAL
MANAGEMENT
ELECTIVES

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 189 of 533


MB820.3: FINANCIAL DECISION ANALYSIS (FDA)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits : 4

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To acquaint students with financial theories and practical problems arising in


organisations.
 To make students understand how organizations make value optimizing
financial decisions, and reflectively and critically assess the ethical issues arising
from these decisions.
 To equip students with financial analysis skills in the facilitation of strategic
decision making.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Financial Aspects of Project Appraisal
 Present Values
 Values of Bonds and Common Stocks
1  NPV Leads to Better Investment Decisions 08
Project Analysis
 Sensitivity Analysis
 Real Options and Decision Trees
Risk and the Cost of Capital
 Projects Costs of Capital
 Measuring the Cost of Equity and Debt
2  Setting Discount Rates Without Beta 08
Risk Analysis in Capital Budgeting
 Sources and Perspectives of Risk
 Various Techniques and Models for Analysis
 Risk Analysis in Practice
Capital Investment Strategy
 Market Values
 Economic Rents and Competitive Advantage
Financing and Valuation
3 08
 The After-Tax Weighted-Average Cost of Capital
 Valuing Businesses
 Using WACC in Practice
 Adjusted Present Value

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 190 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Working Capital Management
4  Cash Budget Simulation 08
 Discriminant Analysis and Customer Classification
 Advances in Inventory Management
Payout Policy
5  Choice of Payout Policy 08
 Dividend Payments and Stock Repurchases
 The Payout Controversy
Leasing and Hire Purchase
 Types of Leases
 Rationale for Leasing
6  Mechanics of Leasing 08
 Leasing as a Financing Decision
 Hire-Purchase Arrangement
 Choice between Lease and Hire-Purchase
Value Based Management
 Methods and Key Premises of VBM
7  Marakon Approach 08
 Alcar Approach
 McKinsey Approach
 BCG Approach
8 Contemporary Issues 04
Total 60

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 37 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 10 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 05 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 191 of 533


V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated through the following
components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation


marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 An ability to explain how organisations make value optimising financial decisions,


and reflectively and critically assess the ethical issues arising from these decisions.
 Demonstrate a clear conceptual understanding of the fundamental financial theories
relevant to financial decision making.
 Critically analyse and evaluate various financial models and decision making
techniques and their impact on different constituencies of stakeholder.
 Apply financial analysis skills in the facilitation of strategic decision making.
 Assess the features of alternative and diverse sources of finance and critically
evaluate their appropriateness under different circumstances.
 Evaluate elements of risk, return and value in a range of strategic operational
financial decisions and understand the implications in regulatory and governance
terms of the consequences of doing so.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Books

1. Brealy and Myers, (Latest Edition), Principles of Corporate Finance, Tata McGraw
Hill.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 192 of 533


2. Prassana Chandra, (Latest Edition), Financial Management Theory and Practice,
Tata McGraw-Hill Education.

Reference-Books

1. Alan C. Shapiro and Sheldon, (Latest Edition), Modern Corporate Finance, Pearson
Education
2. I. M. Pandey, (Latest Edition), Financial Management, Vikas Publication.
3. Rajiv Shrivastava and Anil Misra, (Latest Edition), Financial Management, Oxford
University Press
4. Brigham and Ehrhardt, (Latest Edition), Financial Management, Theory and Practice,
Thomson South-Western
5. James C. Vanhorne, (Latest Edition), Financial Management and Policy, PHI.
6. Pandey and Bhat, (Latest Edition), Cases in Financial Management, Tata McGraw-Hill
(CFM).
7. Robert F. Bruner, (Latest Edition), Case Studies in Finance, Tata McGraw-Hill. (CSF)

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers

1. Finance India
2. Indian Economy Review
3. The Economist
4. Economics and Political Weekly
5. Harvard Business Review
6. Journal of Finance
7. Business Newspapers
 Business Standard
 The Economic Times
 Financial Express

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 193 of 533


MB821.3: MANAGEMENT OF FINANCIAL SERVICES (MFS)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits: 4

II. Course Objective

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To enable the students to understand the working of Indian Financial System as a


whole.
 To provide detailed insight into the range of various financial services available and
their role, importance and functioning.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Indian Financial System and Components
 Financial System
1  Indian Instruments 08
 Financial Markets
 Financial Institutions
Banking Services
 Indian Banking System
 Banking Products and Services
2  Aspects of Bank Management 08
 Risk Management in Banking
 Asset – Liability in Banking
 Management of NPA
 Technology and CRM in Banking
NBFC
 Functions
 Prudential Norms for NBFCs
 Development Financial Institutes
Asset/Fund Based Financial Services
3  Hire Purchase Finance 08
 Lease Finance
 Bills Discounting
 Factoring and Forfeiting
 Housing Finance
 Infrastructure Finance
Fee Based Advisory Financial Services
 Issue Management
4  Stock Broking and PMS 08
 Credit Rating
 Custodial and Depository Services

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 194 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Insurance Services
 Introduction
 Principles of Insurance Services
 Economics of Insurance
5  Life Insurance 08
 General Insurance
 Reinsurance
 Insurance Sector Reforms
 Liberalization of Insurance Sector
Specialized Financial Services
 Mutual Funds
 Merchant Banking
6  Investment Banking 08
 Securitization
 Trade Finance
 Venture Capital
 Microfinance
Regulatory Aspect of Financial System
7  Institutional Framework 08
 Legal Framework
8 Contemporary Issues 04
Total 60

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 32 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 12 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 08 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 195 of 533


V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through
the following components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation


marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcome


At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 A clear understanding of the Indian financial system as a whole and its functioning.
He / she will also be able to understand various services offered in the financial system
and its role, usefulness and interrelation with other components of the system.
 A keen desire for reading news of economic and financial changes/developments on a
regular basis, and engaging in discussion and critical evaluation of such
developments.
 An ability to appear for different banking examinations includingJAIIB and CAIIB.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Books
1. Dr. S. Gurusamy, (Latest Edition), Financial Services and System, Thomson Publication.
2. Bharti Pathak, (Latest Edition), Indian Financial System, Pearson Education.
3. H.R. Machhiraju, (Latest Edition), Indian Financial System, Vikas Publishing.
4. Padmalatha Suresh and Justin Paul, (Latest Edition), Management of Banking and
Financial Services, Pearson education.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 196 of 533


Reference-Books

1. Nalini Purva Tripathy, (Latest Edition), Financial Service, Prentice-Hall of India.


2. M.Y. Khan, (Latest Edition), Financial Services, Tata McGraw Hill publication.
3. K. Sasidharan and Alex Mathews, (Latest Edition), Financial Services and System, Tata
McGraw Hill
4. H.R. Machiraju, (Latest Edition), Merchant Banking, New Age International
Publishers.
5. Madhu Vij and Swati Dhawan, (Latest Edition), Merchant Banking and Financial Services,
Tata – McGraw Hill.
6. Thummuluri Siddaiah, (Latest Edition), Financial Services, Pearson education.

Apart from the above mentioned books, students are also requested to regularly read the
business daily, watch the business channels and refer to the important and useful web
sites.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers

1. Journal of Financial Services Research


2. Indian Journal of Finance

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 197 of 533


MB822.3: SECURITY ANALYSIS AND INVESTMENT
MANAGEMENT (SAIM)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits : 4

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To enable the students to understand various types of financial market in India as


well as abroad.
 To enable the students to understand various securities, their features and their
valuation and creation & monitoring the performance of the portfolio.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/ Topic
No. Sessions
Financial Markets
 Money Market
 Debt Market
 Government Security Market
1 08
 Foreign Exchange Market
 Derivatives Market
 Commodities Market
 Primary and Secondary Market.
Securities and their Valuation-I
 Securities
2  Term Structure of Interest Rate 08
 Risk and Return
 Equity Share Valuation
Securities and their Valuation-II
 Preference Share Valuation
3 08
 Bond Valuation
Bond Portfolio
Security Analysis and Portfolio Design
 Fundamental Analysis
4 08
 Technical Analysis
 Financial Planning
 Taxation Aspect in Investment
Portfolio Management
 Optimal Portfolio
 Capital Asset Pricing Model and Arbitrage Pricing Model
5 08
 Efficient Market and Efficient Market Hypothesis
 Portfolio Performance Evaluation
 Investment Strategies
6 Derivatives 10

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 198 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/ Topic
No. Sessions
 Types of Derivatives (Forward, Future, Options and Swaps)
 Mechanism of Derivatives
 Trading and Valuation of Derivative
 Derivatives Investment Strategies and Risk Management
 Development of Derivatives in India
Advanced Topics
 International Securities Market
7  Effects of Global Factors on Indian Securities Markets 06
 ADR, GDR, FDI, FII, Etc.
 Regulations of Securities Market and Investor Protection
8 Contemporary Issues 04
Total 60

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 32 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 12 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 08 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

V. Internal Evaluation
The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through
the following components:
Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 199 of 533


The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation
marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 A clear understanding of various financial markets in the country as well as across


the globe. They will be able to understand how the financial markets functions and
play a very important role in the growth and development of sound financial system.
 An ability to understand the features , pros and cons of various securities, their
valuation, selection of securities, construction of portfolio and its performance
measurement.
 The understanding related to capital markets, derivative instrument, mutual fund
etc… students are also expected to be able to appear and pass certificates exams
conducted by National Stock Exchange, Bombay Stock Exchange and National
Institute of Security Market (established by SEBI), to enhance the placement and
career opportunities.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Books

1. Prasanna Chandra, (Latest Edition), Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management, Tata-
McGraw Hill
2. Reilly and Brown, (Latest Edition), Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management,
Thomson publishing.
3. V. K. Bhalla, (Latest Edition), Investment Management, Sultan Chand and Co.
4. Dhanesh Khatri, (Latest Edition), Security Analysis and Portfolio Management, Macmillan
publication.
5. Fischer and Jordan, (Latest Edition), Security Analysis and Portfolio Management,
Prentice-Hall of India.

Reference-Books

1. Sudhindra Bhat, (Latest Edition), Security Analysis and Portfolio Management, Excel
Books.
2. Ranganatham and Madhumathi, (Latest Edition), Investment Analysis and Portfolio
Management, Pearson Education
3. Dr. S. Gurusamy, (Latest Edition), Financial Market and Institutions, Thomson
Education.
4. Clifford Gomez, (Latest Edition), Financial Markets, Institutions and Financial Services,
Prentice –Hall of India
5. NSE‟s Certification for Capital Market (Dealer) Modules (CMDM) workbook.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 200 of 533


Apart from the above mentioned books, students can refer to any book on the subject
matter to have a better understanding. Students are required to read business dailies,
refer to important websites and watch the business new channels on regular basis.
Discussing the contemporary development on the subject matter in the classroom is the
integral part of the overall teaching pedagogy and will carry due weightage on the
evaluation components.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers

1. The Journal of Portfolio Management.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 201 of 533


MB823.3: FINANCIAL REPORTING, ANALYSIS AND CORPORATE
GOVERNANCE (FRA&CG)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits : 4

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To understand the financial reports. Compute ratios and analysis of the annual
report.
 To analyse and interpret the financial reports to evaluate the financial position of the
company, and take proper decision.
 To enable the students to understand the meaning of corporate governance and its
core principles.
 To spell out in detail the structures and processes in corporate governance generally
envisaged for implementation as a concept.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topics
No. Sessions
Financial Reports
 Conceptual Framework of Financial Statements
 Income Statement
 Balance Sheet
1  Cash Flow Statements 08
 Reading and Understanding other Financial Reports,
Auditors‟ Report and Directors‟ Report
 Segment Reporting
 Generally Accepted Accounting Principles
Indian Accounting Standards for:
 Valuation of Assets Under Finance Lease and Intangible
Assets
2 08
 Asset Impairment
 Accounting for Liabilities
 Cost Accounting
Financial Statement Analysis
 Horizontal Analysis
 Common Size Analysis
3  Trend Analysis 08
 Earnings Per Share Analysis
 Ratio Analysis
 Analysis of Cash Flow Statement
Auditing
4  Roles of Auditors 08

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 202 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topics
No. Sessions
 Auditing Process
 Understanding Audit Reports
 Guidelines of ICSI and ICAI
Global Financial Reporting Standards
5  GAAPs and IFRSs, IAS 08
 Indian GAAP and US GAAP
Introduction to Corporate Governance
 History of Corporate Governance
6  Introduction: Corporate Governance 08
 Corporate Governance and Compliance Requirements
 Best Boards
Corporate Governance and Other Sectors
 Corporate Governance and Banking Sector
7  Corporate Governance and Public Enterprises 08
 Emerging legal Framework
 Study of Indian vs. Global Scenario
8 Contemporary Issues 04
Total 60

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 42 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 10 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 02 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 04 Sessions
 Feedback … About 03 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 203 of 533


V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated through the following
components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation


marks for the course. The institute level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 The ability to understand and interpret financial statements for various forms of
businesses.
 The ability to analyse and interpret the data contained in these statements for
improved decision-making.
 The understanding the Corporate Governance structures and systems and their
importance.
 The ability to analyse business environment in the context of Corporate Governance
Systems.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Books

1. I. M. Pandey, (Latest Edition), Financial Management, Vikas Publications.


2. N. Gopalsamy, (Latest Edition), A Guide to Corporate Governance, New Age
International (P) Limited.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 204 of 533


Reference-Books

1. Prassana Chandra, (Latest Edition), Financial Management Theory and Practice, Tata
McGraw-Hill.
2. Ambrish Gupta, (Latest Edition), Financial Accounting for Management: An Analytical
Perspective, Pearson Education.
3. D. S. Rawat, (Latest Edition), Students‟ Guide to Accounting Standard, Taxmann.
4. S. K. Bhattacharya, John Dearden, (Latest Edition), Accounting for Management, Vikas
Publishing House.
5. N Ramchandran, Ram Kumar Kakani, (Latest Edition), Financial Accounting for
Management, Tata McGraw- Hill.
6. Harrison, Horngren, (Latest Edition), Financial Accounting, Pearson Education
7. Stice and Stice, (Latest Edition), Financial Accounting- Reporting and Analysis, Cengage
Learning.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers

1. Business Line
2. Mint
3. The Economic Times
4. Financial Express
5. Business Standard
6. Harvard Business Review

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 205 of 533


MB824.3: TAXATION MANAGEMENT (TM)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits : 4

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To acquaint the students with individual and corporate taxation and various tax
planning concepts leading to better grasp of the issues regarding corporate decision
making.
 To provide knowledge of tax planning with respect to direct tax and indirect tax laws
applicable in managerial decisions making.
III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Topics
No. Sessions
Income Tax
 Basic Concept
 Definitions
 Chargeability
1  Scope of Income Tax 08
o Residential
o Income
 Tax Evasion, Avoidance, Planning, Exemption, Deduction, Rebate
and Relief
Computation of Taxable Income of Individual- Concepts
 Heads of Income
o Salaries
o Profits and Gains from Business or Profession
o Capital Gains
2 o Income from Other sources 08
o Deductions and Exemptions
 Submission of Return and Procedure of Assessment
 PAN and TAN
 Preliminary Ideas of Deduction and Collection of Tax at Source
 Advance Payment of Tax
Tax Planning
 Concept and Application
3  For setting up New Business Units 08
 Tax Incentives and Export Promotion Schemes
 Other Applicable Tax Benefits and Exemptions
Tax Management
 Computation of Income and Return of Income Tax
4  Filing Procedure, e-filing 08
 Assessment, Reassessment, Appeals, Revisions, Review
Rectifications, Settlement of Cases

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 206 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Topics
No. Sessions
 Special Procedure for Assessment of Search Cases
 E-commerce Transactions, Liability in Special Cases
 Penalties, Fines and Prosecution
Introduction to GST
 Basic Concepts
Service Tax
5 08
 Introduction, Nature of Service Tax, Service Provider and Service
Receiver, Registration and Related Issues
 Negative List of Services, Exemptions and Abatements
Customs Act and Valuation
 Basic Concepts
Central Excise Act, 1944
6 08
 Definitions
 Chargeability
 Valuation
VAT / Sales Tax Act
7 08
 Basic Concepts
8 Contemporary Issues 04
Total 60

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 48 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 10 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 02 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 207 of 533


V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated through the following
components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation


marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 A conceptual understanding and knowledge of tax planning with respect to direct tax
and indirect tax laws applicable in managerial decisions making.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Books

1. V K Singhania, (Latest Edition), Direct Tax planning and Management, Taxmann. Delhi.
2. V .S. Datay, (Latest Edition), Elements of Indirect Taxes, Taxmann Delhi.

Reference-Books

1. Prasad Bhagwati, (Latest Edition), Income Tax Law and Practice, Vishwa Prakashan.
2. Santaram R., (Latest Edition), Tax Planning by Reports, Taxman.
3. Prasad, Bhagabati, (Latest Edition), Direct Tax Law and Practice, New Age Publication
Delhi.
4. Merhotra, H. C., (Latest Edition), Direct Taxes Planning, Sahitya Bhavan.
5. Srinivas E. A., (Latest Edition), Corporate Tax Planning, TMG.
6. Lakhotia R. N., (Latest Edition), Corporate Tax Planning, Vision Publications.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 208 of 533


7. Ahuja, Girish and Gupta, Ravi, (Latest Edition), Systematic Approach to Income Tax;
Central Sales Tax, Bharat Law House.
8. Datey V. S., (Latest Edition), Indirect Taxes-Law and Practice, Taxmann Publications.
9. Lakhotia R. N., (Latest Edition), How to Save Wealth Tax, Vision Book.
10. Palkhiwala, (Latest Edition), Income Tax, Tripathi Publication.
11. Dr. Vinod K Singhania, (Latest Edition), Corporate Tax Planning and Business Tax
Procedures with Case Studies, Taxmann.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers

1. Journal of Accounting and Taxation


2. Tax Management International Journal

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 209 of 533


© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 210 of 533
HUMAN
RESOURCE
MANAGEMENT
ELECTIVES

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 211 of 533


MB830.3: STRATEGIC HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
(SHRM)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits : 4

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To enable students to differentiate between HR and strategic HR and the various


practices and processes associated with it.
 To help students to understand the strategic role of HR in building the competency
of the organization.
 To provide students with sufficient exposure to the contemporary concepts of the
industries and enable them to think strategically before taking decision related any
HR process.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topics
No. Sessions
Introduction to Strategic Role of HRM
 An Investment Perspective of HRM
 Factors Influencing How “Investment Oriented” The
1 Organization is 08
 Impact of Technology
 Workforce Demographic Change and Diversity
 Model of Strategy
 The Process of Strategic Management
The Evolving Strategic Role of HRM
 Strategic HR VS Traditional HR
 Barriers to Strategic HR
2  Models of SHRM 10
 Approaches to the Development of HR Strategies
 Approaches for Attaining Strategic Fit
 The Strategic Role of HR Function
Human Resource Planning
3  Nature, Objective, Process and Models of HRP 06
 Link to Business Planning
 Design and Redesign of Work Systems with respect to Change
Recruiting, Training and Developing
 Recruitment and Selection
4  Training Process – Planning and Strategizing Training 08
 Strategic Choice – Training, Development and Performance
Improvement
 Methods of Executive Development

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 212 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topics
No. Sessions
 Evaluation of Training Programmes
Performance Management
 Strategy and Performance Appraisal Process
 Performance Management Cycle
5  Myths and Realities of HRD 10
 Concepts and Principles
 Balance Score Card Approach to Performance Management
 Performance Appraisal and its Methods
Managing Employee Relations
 Unions and Strategic Collective Bargaining
6  Change and Restructuring 08
 Strategic Approach to Compensation and Benefits
 Strategic Approach to Industrial Relation
 Strategic Development of Human Resources
Employee Separation
7  Reduction in Force 06
 Turnover
 Retirement
8 Contemporary Issues 04
Total 60

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 32 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 12 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 08 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 213 of 533


VI. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through
the following components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute – Level evaluation
marks for the course. The Institute – level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks of the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 The abilities of strategic thinking and decision making while dealing with human
resources within and outside the organization.
 An understanding of different ways of dealing with workers as well as employees
within the organization.
 A critical insight of different issues related to management of human resources.

VII. Reference Material

Text-Book

1. Mello A. Jeffrey, (Latest Edition), Strategic Human Resource Management by South –


Western Thomson, Learning Publication.

Reference-Books

1. Mabey, Christopher, Salaman, Graeman and Storey John, (Latest Edition), HRM: A
strategic Introduction, Oxford, Blackwel Business.
2. Armstrong Michael, (Latest Edition), Handbook of strategic Human Resource Management:
A Guide to Action, Crest Publishing House in arrangement with Kogan Page Ltd.
(India).

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 214 of 533


Journals / Magazines / News Papers

1. Journals and magazines in HRM like Human Capital


2. Management Review – IIM Bangalore
3. Vikalp – IIM Ahmedabad
4. Asian Journal of Management Cases
5. Harvard Business Review
6. Global Business Review

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 215 of 533


MB831.3: ORGANIZATIONAL AND CHANGE DEVELOPMENT
(OCD)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits : 4

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of the course are as follows:

 To enable the students to understand the significance of systems, process and


culture of the organization in organizational development.
 To make understand the students the way organizations and change work.
 To help to understand the issues and concerns involved in organizational
development while addressing the change management.
 To develop basic skills of the students as future of OD practitioners.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title / Topic
No. Sessions
Introduction to Organizational Development
 Field of OD
1  History and Definitions of OD 05
 Values, Assumptions and Beliefs of OD
 Characteristics of OD
Foundations of OD
 System Theory
2  Action Research Model 06
 Interventions
 Characteristics and Classification of OD Intervention
OD Consultant
 Choosing the OD Consultant
 Role of the OD Consultant
3 08
 Competencies of the OD Consultant
 Ethical Issues in OD Consulting
 Organizational Power and Politics and its Impact on OD

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 216 of 533


Leading and Managing Change
 Meaning of Change
 Overview of Changing Activities
 Motivating Change
 Creating a Vision
4 08
 Developing Political Support
 Managing Planned Change
 Assessing Change Forces
 Managing the Transition
 Sustaining Momentum
Human Interventions– Types
 Individual Interventions
5  Training Experiences 10
 Team Interventions
 Inter-Group Interventions
 Third Party Peace Making Intervention
Other Interventions
 Structural Interventions
 Socio Technical System as an Intervention
6  Work Redesign 10
 Quality of Work Life
 Total Quality Management
 Reengineering
 Comprehensive OD Interventions
Issues in Consultant-Client Relations
7 08
 OD Consultant, Role, Skills and Dilemmas
8 Contemporary Issues 05
Total 60

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 32 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 12 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 08 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 217 of 533


The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through
the following components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation


marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 The ability to demonstrate group facilitation skills that foster a wide range of ideas
and perspectives; create an inclusive culture for diverse human beings; keep a group
focused on its purpose and tasks.
 The ability to demonstrate teamwork skills, including the abilities to coordinate
high performing teams; building trust with constituencies, plan team meetings and
processes; delegate responsibilities and tasks; follow-up and hold teammates
accountable; and coach teammates to be more effective.

VIII. Reference Materials

Text-Books

1. French W. and Bell C., Adapted by Vohra, (Latest Edition), Organization Development,
Pearson Education.
2. Cummings T. and Worley C., (South Western, Latest Edition) Essential of OD and
Change, Pearson Education.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 218 of 533


Reference-Books

1. S. Ramanarain, T. V. Rao, Kuldeep Singh, (Latest Edition), OD Interventions


and strategies, Response books, Sage Publications.
2. S.K. Batra, (Latest Edition), Managing Change and Organization Development, Deep
and Deep Publications, New Delhi.

Journals / Magazines / Newspaper

1. Journal of Organization Development


2. International Journal of strategic human management
3. Asian Journal of Management Cases
4. Harvard Business Review
5. Global Business Review
6. South Asia Economic Journal
7. Indian Management
8. Management Review-IIM Bangalore
9. Vikalp-IIM Ahmedabad

Websites

1. http://www.codhyd.org/
2. http://www.odsynergy.com/od-synergy-tools.html

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 219 of 533


MB832.3: INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS (IR)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits : 4

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To enable the students to understand the legal dimensions of managing Human


Resources within the organization.
 To help students to understand the significance of managing the industrial relations
and the role played by intermediaries in the same.
 To help students to understand the various acts and laws governing industrial
relations.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Background to Industrial Relations
 Understanding / Appreciating Industrial Relations
 Approaches to Industrial Relations
 Forms of Industrial Relations
1  Evolution of Industrial Relations in India 05
 Trade Unionism in India
 Employers or Management Association
 Changing profile of Major Stakeholders of Industrial Relations
in India
Management of Conflict in Industry
 Conflict Resolution / Dispute Resolution
2  Collective Bargaining 08
 Management of Discipline
 Principle of Natural Justice and Negotiations
 Role of Lok-Adalat
Background of Labour Legislation
3  Introduction to Labour Legislations 05
 Indian Constitution and Labour Legislations
 ILO and its Influence on Labour Legislations in India
Protective and Regulative Legislations
 The Trade Unions Act, 1926
4  The Industrial Employment (Standing Order) Act, 1946 10
 The Industrial Disputes Act, 1947
 The Factories Act, 1948

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 220 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Wage Legislations
 The Payment of Wages Act,, 1936
5  The Minimum Wages Act, 1948 09
 The Equal Remuneration Act, 1976
 The Payment of Bonus Act, 1965
Social Security Legislations
 The Employee Provident Funds and Miscellaneous Act, 1952
6  The Employee State Insurance Act, 1948 10
 Workmen‟s Compensation Act, 1923
 The Maternity Benefit Act, 1961
 The Payment of Gratuity Act, 1972
Miscellaneous Legislations
 Contract Labour (Regulation and Abolition) Act
7  Sexual Harassment – A Legal Perspective 07
 Child Labour (Prohibition and Regulation) Act,, 1986
 The Apprentices Act, 1961
8 Contemporary Issues 06
Total 60

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 32 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 12 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 08 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 221 of 533


V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through
the following components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation


marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 The ability to understand the different aspects of maintaining healthy industrial


relations within the defined legal framework.
 The ability to gain knowledge of all important laws and acts governing the
industrial relations.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Book

1. B. D. Singh, (Latest Edition), Industrial Relations and Labour Laws, Excel Books.

Reference-Books

1. C. B. Mamoria, (Latest Edition), Dynamics of Industrial Relations, Himalayan Publishing


House.
2. N. D. Kapoor, (Latest Edition), Industrial Laws, Sultan Chand and Co.
3. Taxman‟s Labour Law, (Latest Edition), Taxmann Allied Services (P) Ltd.
4. S. C. Srivastava, (Latest Edition), Industrial Relations and Labour Laws, Vikas
Publication.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 222 of 533


5. Ajay Garg, (Latest Edition), Labour Laws-One should know, A Nabhi Publication.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers

1. Indian Management
2. Management Review-IIM Bangalore
3. Vikalp- IIM Ahmedabad
4. Human Capital
5. http://lljlibrary.com(Online Journal)

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 223 of 533


MB833.3: HUMAN RESOURCE AUDITING (HRA)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits : 4

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To develop an appreciation towards optimum utilization of human resource through


understanding and developing conceptual clarity on human resource auditing and
accounting.
 To identify the process and benefits associated with auditing human resource and its
activities.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No. Sessions
1 Introduction
 HR as Assets
 Definition of Human Resource Accounting 05
 HRA – Concepts, Methods and Applications
 Human Resource Accounting vs. Other Accounting
2 Human Resource Costs / Investments
 Human Resource Costs
 The Monetary Value Approach 08
 Non-Monetary Value Based Approaches
 Investment in Employees
 Human Resource Development through Investment
3 Return on Investments
 Development of HR ROI through High Performance
Employees 05
 Measurement of Group Value
o The Likert and Bowers Model
o Hermanson‟ Sun Purchased Goodwill Model
4 Human Resource Accounting System
 Developing Human Resource Accounting System 10
 Implementation of Human Resource Accounting System
 Integration with other Accounting System
5 Human Resource Score Card
 HR Score Card 09
 Constituents of HR Score Card
 HR Score Card as an Instrument in HR Audit
6 Human Resource Audit
 Role of Human Resource Audit in Business Environment 10
 HR Audit Objectives, Concepts, Components, Need,

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 224 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Benefits and Importance
 Methodology and Instruments of HR Audit
 The Audit Process
 Issues in HR Audit
Human Resource Audit Report
7  HR Audit Report – Purpose 07
 Report Design – Preparation of Report
 Use of HR Audit Report for Business Improvement
8 Contemporary Issues 06
Total 60

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 32 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 12 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 08 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through
the following components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 225 of 533


The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation
marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 The ability to audit the various HR processes and find out the discrepancies in the
record/s for improvement.
 The ability to demonstrate the ability of accounting the human resources with the
help of effective tools like balance score card.
 The ability to understand the ways in which the audit reports are generated and will
also develop an ability to read and comprehend the audit reports.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Book

1. Eric G. Flamholtz Kluwer, (Latest Edition), Human Resource Accounting – Advances In


Concepts, Methods and Applications, Academic publishers.

Reference-Books

1. Udai Pareekh and T. V. Rao, (Latest Edition), Designing and Managing Human Resource
Systems / 3e, Oxford/ IBH.
2. William B. Werther and Keith Davis, (Latest Edition), Human Resource Management and
Personnel Management, McGraw-hill.
3. K. Aswathappa, (Latest Edition), Human Resource Management and Personnel Management,
McGraw-Hill.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers

1. Indian Management
2. Management Review-IIM Bangalore
3. Vikalp-IIM Ahmedabad
4. Human Capital

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 226 of 533


MB834.3 : OCCUPATIONAL TESTING (OT)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits : 4

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To help students to develop an understanding of different types of psychological


tests involved in assessment of an individual which may eventually help during
different phases of recruitment, selection and manpower management.
 To provide theoretical background for supplementing the psychological tests used
for assessment.
 To help students to interpret the results obtained through the psychological tests.
 To develop a perspective about the intricacies and ethics of use of psychological
tests.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Introduction to Occupational Testing
 Concept and Need of Occupational Testing
 Pros and Cons of Occupational Testing
 Psychological Testing and their Categories
1 05
 Theory and Issues in Psychological Testing
 Assessment Centers
 Integration of Profiles
 Use of Occupational Testing in Competency Mapping
Intelligence Testing
 Theoretical Background
 Significance of Intelligence Testing
2 08
 Types of Psychological Tests used for Testing the
Intelligence
 Application of Intelligence Tests
Aptitude Testing
 Theoretical Background
 Significance of Aptitude Testing
3 08
 Types of Psychological Tests used for Testing the Aptitude
(D.A.T.)
 Application of Aptitude Tests
Personality Testing
 Theoretical Background
 Significance of Personality Testing
4 10
 Types of Psychological Tests used for Testing the
Personality (Multi-factor Personality Tests, 16.P.F.,
FIRO B)

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 227 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No. Sessions
 Application of Personality Tests
Self-Report Inventories
 Theoretical Background
5  Significance of Self-Report Inventories 08
 Types of Self-Report Inventories (M.M.P.I)
 Application of Self-Report Inventories
Typological Tests
 Theoretical Background
6  Significance of Typological Testing 08
 Types of Typological Tests (M.B.T.I.)
 Application of Typological Tests
Projective Techniques
 Theoretical Background
7  Significance of Projective Techniques 08
 Types of Projective Techniques (T.A.T.)
 Application of Projective Techniques
8 Contemporary Issues 05
Total 60

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 32 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 12 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 08 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 228 of 533


V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through
the following components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation


marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcome

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 The ability to demonstrate the knowledge gained through the course and apply the
same in carrying out any research in the area of HR or OB.
 The ability to understand the significance of different psychometric tests and will be
able to identify the relevant area of their application.

VII. Reference Material

Text-Books

1. Anne Anastasi, (Latest Edition), Psychological Testing, Pearson Pubications.


2. Udai Pareekh, (Latest Edition), Training Instruments in HRD and OD.
3. Robert Kaplan, Ennis Saccuzzo, (Latest Edition), Psychological Testing: Principles,
Applications and Issues, Cengage Learning.
Reference-Books

1. Mike Bryon, (Latest Edition), The Ultimate Psychometric Test Book, Kogan Page.
2. Liam Healy, (Latest Edition), Psychometric Tests for Dummies, John Wiley and Sons.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers


1. Psychological Assessment, ISSSN: 1040-3590

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 229 of 533


© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 230 of 533
INFORMATION
TECHNOLOGY
MANAGEMENT
ELECTIVES

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 231 of 533


MB840.3: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN BUSINESS
MANAGEMENT (ITBM)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits : 04

II. Course Objectives


The objectives of this course are as follows:
 To introduce the concept of Information Technology applications affecting
business enterprises, governments, consumers and people in general.
 To understand how IT shapes future businesses and be prepared to contribute to
enterprise architecture.
 To recognize the risks and benefits of digitized processes and think strategically
about whether to perform those processes internally or externally.
 To realize the impact of globalization and be prepared to lead change.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title / Topic
No. Sessions
Introduction
 Understanding Business Organizations
1  Understanding Development Organizations 04
 Organizational Management and Control
 Commonality in Business and Development Organizations
Constituents of IT Applications in Business
 Tactical Applications in Business
2  Strategic IT Applications in Business 10
 Information Technology Applications in Management Functions
 Practical Approach for Managers in Identifying Right IT Applications
Systems Approach to Organizations
 Managing Data and Information
3  Information System Evolution and Modelling 10
 Information System (Identification, Design and Development)
 Information System Quality
Understanding Information Technologies
 Understanding and Planning Information Technologies
4  Hardware, Software and Databases 10
 Network and Communication
 Planning Information Technologies Infrastructure
Enterprise Data Management
 Accounting
 Commercial Management
5  Forecasting 08
 Warehousing
 DRP (Distribution Resource Planning)
 Human Resources Management

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 232 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title / Topic
No. Sessions
 CMMS (Computerized Maintenance Management System)
 MRP (Material Requirement Planning)
 FCS (Finite Capacity Scheduling)
 WFMS (Workflow Management Systems)
 CRM (Customer Relationship Management)
 SCM (Supply Chain Management)
E-governance, Business Data Communications and Networking
 Case Study of Banking System
 Case Study of University System
6  Other Sector Based Case Studies 10
 Introduction to Computer Networks
 Sharing Resources
 Overview of Networking Models
Introduction to Search Engine Optimization for Business
7 02
Management
8 Contemporary Issues 06
Total 60

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 32 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 12 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 08 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 233 of 533


V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated through the following
components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation marks for
the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total marks for the
course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcome

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 The ability to understand the opportunities to create business value from IT.
 A practical understanding of the way business value is created from IT, and the
potential barriers.
 The ability to expand a series of frameworks to help non-IT managers gain
confidence in managing IT and its business impacts.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Book
1. Misra, Harekrishna, (Latest Edition), Information Systems Management in Business and
Development Organizations (Text and Cases), PHI Learning.
Reference-Books
1. Adikesavan, T. A., (Latest Edition), Information Technology: Best Practices and Applications
in Business, PHI Learning.
2. Nickerson Robert C., (Latest Edition), Business and Information Systems, PHI Learning.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers


1. International Journal of Information Technology and Management, Inder Science
Publishers

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 234 of 533


2. Journal of Information Technology Management (JITM)
3. The IUP Journal of Information Technology
4. International Journal of Information Sciences and Application
5. ACM Journal on Emerging Technologies in Computing Systems
6. International Journal of Mobile Communication & Networking

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 235 of 533


MB841.3: MANAGEMENT OF SOFTWARE PROJECTS IN IT (MSPIT)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits : 04

II. Course Objectives


The objectives of the course are as follows:
 To demonstrate an understanding of steps needed to build and maintain effective
development teams.
 To understand the procedures needed to monitor, control and report upon an IT
development project.
 To comprehend the ways in which appropriate quality attributes of the products
of an IT development project can be assessed and assured.
 To explore software project management activities from product concept
through development based upon best practices.

III. Course Outline


Module Classroom Contact
Title / Topic
No. Sessions
Introduction to Software Project Management
 Project Definition
 Contract Management
1 04
 Activities Covered by Software Project Management
 Overview of Project Planning
 Stepwise Project Planning
Project Procurement Management
 Planning Purchase and Acquisitions
 Planning Contracting
 Requesting Seller Responses
2 10
 Selecting Sellers
 Administering and Closing the Contract
 Using Software to Assist in Project Management
 Outsourcing
Project Evaluation
 Strategic Assessment
 Technical Assessment
 Cost Benefit Analysis
3 10
 Cash Flow
 Forecasting
 Cost Benefit Evaluation Techniques
 Risk Evaluation
Activity Planning
 Project Schedule
 Sequencing and Scheduling Activities
4 10
 Network Planning Models
 Forward Pass
 Backward Pass

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 236 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title / Topic
No. Sessions
 Activity Float
 Shortening Project Duration
 Activity on Arrow Networks
 Risk Management
 Hazard Identification and Analysis
 Risk Planning and Control
Monitoring and Control
 Creating Framework
 Collecting the Data
 Visualizing Progress
5  Cost Monitoring 08
 Earned Value
 Prioritizing Monitoring
 Getting Project Back to Target
 Change Control
Advanced Methods and Tools of Project Management
 CPM/PERT
 Design Structure Matrix
6  System Dynamics 08
 Critical Chain
 Discrete Event Simulation
 Earned Value Management
Project Risk Management
 Risk Management Planning
 Common Sources of Risk in Information Technology Projects
 Risk Identification
7  Qualitative Risk Analysis 04
 Quantitative Risk Analysis
 Risk Response Planning
 Risk Monitoring and Control
 Using Software to Assist in Project Risk Management
Contemporary Issues
8 06
 Introduction of any One Tool for Software Project Management
Total 60

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 237 of 533


advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 32 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 12 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 08 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated through the following
components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation marks for
the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total marks for the
course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcome

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 The ability to understand approaches for managing and optimizing the software
development process.
 The ability to understand the unique considerations of the software development
life cycle that impact project management.
 An awareness of the need for project planning and management.
 The ability to apply professional attitudes and techniques to managing a project
Reference Material

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 238 of 533


VIII. Reference Material

Text-Books

1. Hughes, Bob and Cotterell, Mike, (Latest Edition), Software Project Management,
McGraw-Hill.
2. Cadle J. and D. Yeates, (Latest Edition), Project Management for Information Systems,
Pearson Prentice Hall.

Reference-Books

1. Kathy Schwalbe, (Latest Edition), Information Technology Project Management, Thomson


Publication.
2. Jack Marchewka, (Latest Edition), Information Technology Project Management Providing
Measurable Organizational Value, Wiley India.
3. Stellman and Greene, (Latest Edition), Applied Software Project Management, Wiley
India.
4. Richard Thayer and Edward Yourdon, (Latest Edition), Software Engineering Project
Management, Wiley India.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers

1. International Journal of Project Management, International Project Management


Association, Elsevier.
2. Journal of Software Project Management and Quality, International Science Press.
3. Project Management Journal, Wiley.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 239 of 533


MB842.3: SYSTEM ANALYSIS AND DESIGN (SAD)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits : 04

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To understand role of systems analysis and design within various systems


development lifecycles
 To develop an awareness of the different approaches that might be taken to
systems analysis and design
 To understand the activities of the systems analyst and systems designer, and
apply some current techniques

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom
Title / Topic
No. Contact Sessions
Systems Analysis and Design Life Cycle
 Requirements Determination
 Requirements Specifications
 Feasibility Analysis
 Final Specifications
 Hardware and Software Study
1  System Design 04
 System Implementation
 System Evaluation
 System Modification
 Role of Systems Analyst
 Attributes of a Systems Analyst
 Tools used in System Analysis
Information Gathering
 Strategies
 Methods
 Documenting Study
2 10
 System Requirements
 Specification from Narratives of Requirements to
Classification of Requirements as Strategic, Tactical,
Operational and Statutory
Feasibility Analysis
 Deciding Project Goals
 Examining Alternative Solutions
3  Cost – Benefit Analysis 10
 Quantifications of Costs and Benefits
 Payback Period
 System Proposal Preparation for Managements

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 240 of 533


Module Classroom
Title / Topic
No. Contact Sessions
 Tools for Prototype Creation
Tools for Systems Analysts
 Data Flow Diagrams
 Case Study for use Of DFD
 Good Conventions
4 10
 Leveling of DFDS
 Leveling Rules
 Logical and Physical DFDS
 Software Tools to Create DFDS
Structured Systems Analysis and Design
 Procedure Specifications in Structured English
5  Decision Tables for Complex Logical Specifications 08
 Specification Oriented Design Vs. Procedure Oriented
Design
Data Oriented Systems Design
 Entity Relationship Model
 E-R Diagrams
6 08
 Relationships Cardinality and Participation
 Normalizing Relations
 Various Normal Forms and their Need
E-Commerce Transactions and security
 Introduction of Open Source E-Commerce Platforms
 Encryption Methods
7  Symmetric and Asymmetric Encryption 04
 Digital Signature
 Certifying Authorities for Signatures
 Legal Status of E-Commerce Transactions
8 Contemporary Issues 06
Total 60

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:
 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 32 Sessions
 Case Discussions … About 12 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 08 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 241 of 533


The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

IV. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated through the following
components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation marks for
the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total marks for the
course.

V. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VI. Learning Outcome

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 The ability to learn to design methodology for databases and verifying their
structural correctness.
 The skills to implement databases and applications software primarily in the
relational model.
 The ability to learn how to use querying languages, primarily SQL, and other
database supporting software.
 The ability to apply the theory behind various database models and query languages.
 The ability to learn how to implement the security and integrity policies relating to
databases.
 The ability to work in group settings to design and implement database projects.

VII. Reference Material

Text-Books

1. Whitten, Bentaly and Barlow, (Latest Edition), System Analysis and Design Methods,
Galgotia Publication.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 242 of 533


2. Kenneth E Kendall and Julie E Kendall, (Latest Edition), System Analysis and Design,
PHI Publication.

Reference-Books

1. Hoffer, (Latest Edition), Modern Systems Analysis and Design, Pearson Education.
2. Kendall and Kendall, (Latest Edition), Systems Analysis and Design, Prentice-Hall.
3. Whitten, J. L., (Latest Edition), System Analysis and Design Method, Tata McGraw-Hill.
4. Awad E. M., (Latest Edition), System Analysis and Design, Galgotia books.
5. Jalota, Pankaj, (Latest Edition), An Integrated Approach to Software Engineering, Narosa
Publishing House.
6. Sommerville, (Latest Edition), Software Engineering, Pearson Education.
7. Pfleeger, (Latest Edition), Software Engineering: Theory and Practice, Pearson Education.
8. Pressman R. S., (Latest Edition), Software Engineering: A Practitioner's Approach,
McGraw-Hill.
9. Elias M. Awad, (Latest Edition), System Analysis and Design, Galgotia Publication.
10. Kenneth E Kendall and Julie E Kendall, (Latest Edition), System Analysis and Design,
PHI Publications.
11. Grienstein and Feinman, (Latest Edition), E-commerce –Security, Risk Management and
Control, TMH Publications.
12. Ankit Fadia, (Latest Edition), Encryption-Protecting your Data, Vikas Publication.
13. Singh B, (Latest Edition), Network Security, PHI Publication.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers

1. The IUP Journal of Information Technology


2. International Journal of Information Sciences and Application
3. ACM Journal on Emerging Technologies in Computing Systems
4. International Journal of Mobile Communication and Networking
5. ACM Transactions on Internet Marketing

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 243 of 533


MB843.3: ERP SYSTEMS: TECHNOLOGY PLANNING AND
IMPLEMENTATION (ERP: TPI)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits : 04

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To help students to understand the generic approach to enterprise resource


planning systems and their interrelationships, covering all functional areas of
management.
 To build skill and knowledge for better management of an enterprise systems.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title / Topic
No. Sessions
Introduction to ERP
 Integrated Management Information Seamless
Integration – Supply
 Chain Management
 Integrated Data Model
1  Benefits of ERP 08
 Business Engineering and ERP
 Definition of Business Engineering
 Principle of Business Engineering
 Business Engineering with Information
Technology
Business Modeling for ERP
 Building the Business Model
 Role of Consultant
2 06
 Vendors and Users
 Customization
 Precautions
ERP Implementation
 ERP Implementation an Overview
3  ERP Post Implementation Options 04
 ERP Implementation Technology
 Guidelines for ERP Implementation
ERP and the Competitive Advantage
 ERP domain MPGPRO
 IFS/Avalon
4 10
 Industrial and Financial Systems
 Baan IV SAP
 Market Dynamics and Dynamic Strategy

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 244 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title / Topic
No. Sessions
Commercial ERP Package Description
 Multi-Client Server Solution
5 10
 Open Technology
 User Interface Application Integration
Architecture
 Basic Architectural Concepts
6  The System Control Interfaces Services 10
 Presentation Interface
 Database Interface Cases
7 Case Studies and Project Presentations 08
8 Contemporary Issues 04
Total 60

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 32 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 12 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 08 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions
The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated through the following
components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 245 of 533


The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation
marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcome

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 The ability to understand the concept and process of Enterprise Resource Planning
Systems and Re-engineering and Enterprise Resource Planning Systems.
 The ability to exhibit knowledge of Planning, Design, and Implementation of
Enterprise Resource Planning Systems along with ERP modules.
 The ability to successfully manage an ERP Project and will be effectively dealing with
the issues involved in Supply Chain Management and the e-Marketplace

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Books

1. Vinod Kumar Garg and N.K. Venkita Krishnan, (Latest Edition), Enterprise Resource
Planning, Concepts and Practice, PHI.
2. Sumner, Mary, (Latest Edition), Enterprise Resource Planning, Pearson Education.

Reference-Books

1. S Sadagopan, (Latest Edition), Enterprise Resource Planning, PHI.


2. Alexis Leon, (Latest Edition), Enterprise Resource Planning, Tata McGrew Hill.
3. Jose Antonio Fernandz, (Latest Edition), The SAP R/3 Handbook, TMH.
4. Lau, (Latest Edition), Enterprise Resource Management, McGraw Hill.
5. Daniel E O‟Leary, (Latest Edition), Enterprise Resource System: Systems, Lifecycle,
Electronic Commerce, and Risk.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers

1. Journal of Information Technology, IBIMA Publishing


2. Business Process Management Journal, Emerald Insight

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 246 of 533


MB844.3: RELATIONAL DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS
(RDMS)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits : 04

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To provide basic understanding of the RDBMS and SQL and the skills to make
use of these in business organizations.
 To equip the students with the relevant quantitative tools and techniques for
application in solving managerial problems
 To study the physical and logical database designs, database modeling,
relational, hierarchical, and network models

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title / Topic
No. Sessions
Introduction to Databases and Transactions
 Database System
 Purpose of Database System
1 13
 View of Data
 Database Architecture
 Transaction Management
Data Models
 The Importance of Data Models
 Basic Building Blocks
2 08
 Business Rules
 The Evolution of Data Models
 Degrees of Data Abstraction
Relational Database Management Systems
 History
 Advantages and Limitations of RDBMA
3 04
 Users of RDBMS
 Software Modules in RDBMS
 Architecture of RDBMS
Modeling Techniques
4  Different Types of Models 10
 Introduction to ERD
Types of Databases
 Hierarchical Database
5 10
 Network Database
 Relational Database
6 Normalization 05

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 247 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title / Topic
No. Sessions
 Advantages and Disadvantages of Normalization
 1NF-2NF-3NF Rules With Examples
 Anomalies
 SQL Commands
 Basic Structure
 Set Operations
 Aggregate Functions
 Null Values
 Nested Sub Queries
 Views
 Complex Queries
 Modification of the Database
 Joined Relations
 Data-Definition Language
 Embedded SQL and Dynamic SQL
 Exercises
Introduction to Object Oriented Database
 Concept
 Object Binding in Oracle
 Class
 Attribute
7 05
 Methods
 Object Type
 Declaring and Initializing
 Methods
 Alter and Drop Type
8 Contemporary Issues 05
Total 60

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:
 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 32 Sessions
 Case Discussions … About 12 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 08 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 248 of 533


The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated through the following
components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation


marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation :

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcome

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 The ability to design and develop a conceptual model of a database from user
requirements, with ER diagramming techniques and translate the ER model to a
Relational model.
 The ability to define and implement relations using tables using Oracle database.
 An understanding to apply the theory of normalization to reduce the
redundancies in the data tables.
 The ability to learn to define business rules and constraints using schema
definitions in RDBMS.
 The ability to apply the knowledge of transactions, concurrency and locking to
analyze transactions for serializability.
 The ability to analyze the given user requirements, design, implement,
demonstrate and present a database-intensive application, to class

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 249 of 533


VIII. Reference Material

Text-Book

1. Silberschatz, Korth, Sudarshan, (Latest Edition), DATABASE System Concepts, BPB


Publication.

Reference-Book

1. Coleman, Pat and Peter Dyson, (Latest Edition), Internets, BPB Publication.
2. Keen, Peter and Mark McDonald, (Latest Edition), The E-Process Edge, Tata
McGraw – Hill.
3. Oberoi, Sundeep O, (Latest Edition), Security and You, Tata McGraw-Hill.
4. Ricart, Alberto Manuel and Stephen Asbury, (Latest Edition), Active Server Pages,
IDG Books.
5. Rich, Jason R., (Latest Edition), Starting an E-Commerce Business, IDG Books.
6. Samantha Shurety, (Latest Edition), E-business with Net Commerce, Addison Wesley.
7. Schneider Robert D. and J. R. Garbus, (Latest Edition), Optimizing SQL Server 7, N.J.,
Prentice – Hall.
8. Desai, (Latest Edition), An Introduction to Database System, Galgotia.
9. Ullman and Widom, (Latest Edition), First course in Database Systems Pearson
Education.
10. C. J. Data, (Latest Edition), An Introduction to Database Systems, Narosa Publishers.
11. D. Kroenke, Database Processing, Galgotia.
12. Henry F.korth, Abraham, (Latest Edition), Database System Concepts, McGraw Hill.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers

1. The IUP Journal of Information Technology.


2. International Journal of Information Sciences and Application.
3. ACM Journal on Emerging Technologies in Computing Systems.
4. International Journal of Mobile Communication & Networking.
5. ACM Transactions on Internet Marketing.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 250 of 533


HEALTH CARE
MANAGEMENT
ELECTIVES

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 251 of 533


MB850.3: HEALTH ECONOMICS AND SOCIAL POLICY (HESP)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits : 4

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To develop an understanding of the relevance of economic concepts to the health care


sector.
 To describe the system of health care financing and delivery arrangements in the health
care sector.
 To impart an understanding the role of economic factors in the development of public
policy concerning health and health care.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom
Title/Topic
No. Contact Sessions
The Relevance of Economics in Health and Medical
Care
1  Using Economics to Study Health Issues 06
 Analysing Medical Care Markets
 Economic Evaluation in Health Care
Demand Side Considerations
 Demand for Health and Medical Care
 The Market for Health Insurance
Supply Side Consideration
2 06
 Managed Care
 The Physician‟s Service Market
 The Hospital Service Market
 The Market for Pharmaceuticals
Health Care Policy and Programmes
 Health Education and Environmental Sanitation
3  Health Development as A Determinant to Socio-Economic 10
Development
 National Health Programmes
Public Policy in Medical Care Delivery
 Policies that Enhances Access
4  Policies to Contain Costs 10
 Lessons for Public Policy
 Medical Care Systems Worldwide
Financing Health Care
 Uncertainty and Health Insurance
 Compulsory Insurance
5 08
 Patient Payment
Economic Evaluation and Priority Setting
 Non-Monetary Effects and Monetary Benefits

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 252 of 533


Module Classroom
Title/Topic
No. Contact Sessions
 Costs and Discounting
Social Welfare
 Social Policy
6 07
 Healthcare and Social Development
 Public and Social Policy
Health Policy Formulation
 Factors
 Determinants
7 07
 Other Sectoral Issues
 National Health Policy
 Review of Different Committees
Contemporary Issues
 International Perspective
8 04
 Alternative Approaches to Meet Basic Health Needs in
Developing Countries
Total 60

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 32 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 12 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 08 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 253 of 533


V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through
the following components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation


marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 An appreciation of the relevance and principles of economics for effective health


care delivery.
 A keen desire for reading news of economic and financial changes / developments on
a regular basis, and engaging in discussion and critical evaluation of such
developments with respect to health care industry.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Books

1. James W Henderson, (Latest Edition), Health Economics and Policy, South Western
Educational Publishing.
2. Chatterice, Meera, (Latest Edition), Implementing Health Policy, Manohar.

Reference-Books

1. Jan Abel Oslen, (Latest Edition), Principles in Health Economics and Policy, Oxford
University Press.
2. S.L.Goel, (Latest Edition), Health Care Policies and Programmes, Deep and Deep
Publications Pvt Ltd.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 254 of 533


3. Latest reports of Ministry of Health and Welfare, Government of India

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers


1. Journal of Health Economics
2. Health Economics Review
3. International Journal of Health Planning and Management

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 255 of 533


MB851.3: HOSPITAL PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT (HPM)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits : 4

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To develop an understanding of the general health care planning and administration


sector.
 To describe the system of health care administration and delivery arrangements in the
hospitals.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Hospital Planning
 Concept of Planning
 Guiding Principles in Planning Hospital Facilities and
Services
1  Regional Planning and Factors to be Emphasised 06
 Steps in Hospital Planning
 Planning Team and Stages of Project Estimation
 Architect Brief and Master Plan
 Selection of Site and Decision on Land, Space, and Utilities
Outpatient Services
 Objectives, Functions, Location
 Design and Layout
 Policy and Procedures
 Organisation, Staffing, Equipment and Facilities
 Key Result Areas and Performance or Quality Indicators
 Daily Planning and Scheduling of Work
 Managing Time
 Waiting Time and Total Time Spent by a Patient
 Specialty, Sub-specialty and Super Specialty Clinics
2  Diagnosis, Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy 08
 Emerging Concepts
o Day Care
o Reservation
o Appointment by Phone
o Medico-Social Works
o Patient Counselling
 Other Facilities
o Pharmacy
o Gifts Shop
o Prayer or Meditation Room

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 256 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Trauma Care: Emergency and Casualty Services
 Objective, Function, Location
 Design and Layout
3 10
 Policy and Procedures
 Organisation, Staffing, Equipment and Facilities
 Key Result Areas and Performance or Quality Indicator
Disaster Management
 Principles and Classification
 Life Saving Drugs
4  Ambulance and Paramedic Services 10
 Medico Legal Procedures
 Forms and Registers to be Maintained
 Communication System
Inpatient Service
 Objective, Function, Location
 Design and Layout
 Policy and Procedures
5 08
 Organisation, Staffing, Equipment and Facilities
 Key Result Areas and Performance or Quality Indicators
 Admission, Transfer, Billing and Discharge Procedures
 Managing Death
Intensive Care Units
 Objectives
 Functions, Location, Design and Layout-Policy and
6 Procedures 08
 Organisation, Staffing, Equipment and Facilities
 Key Result Areas and Performance or Quality Indicators
 Types of ICUs
Operation Theatre
 Objectives, Functions, Location
 Design and Layout
 Policy and Procedures
 Organisation, Staffing, Equipment and Facilities
 Key Result Areas and Performance or Quality Indicators
 Daily Planning and Scheduling
7 04
 Determinants of number of Operating Rooms
 Zoning and Aseptic or Sterile Techniques
 Clinical Protocols
 Sub-Stores
 CSSD
 Immediate Postoperative Recovery Rooms
 Safety Issues
8 Contemporary Issues 06
Total 60

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 257 of 533


IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 32 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 12 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 08 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through
the following components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation


marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 258 of 533


VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 An appreciation of the relevance and principles of healthcare planning and


administration.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Book

1. G.D. Kunders, (Latest Edition), Designing for Total Quality in Health Care, Prism Books
Pvt. Ltd., Bangalore.

Reference-Books

1. B.M. Sakharkar, (Latest Edition), Principles of Hospital Administration and Planning,


Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers Pvt. Ltd.
2. C.M. Francis and et al., (Latest Edition), Hospital Administration, Jaypee Brothers
Medical Publishers Pvt. Ltd.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers


1. International Journal of Health Planning and Management
2. Health Policy and Planning Journal

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 259 of 533


MB852.3: ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH MANAGEMENT AND
SAFETY PLANNING (EHMSP)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits : 4

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To understand and identify significant gaps in the current knowledge base concerning
the health effects of environmental agents and identify areas of uncertainty in the risk-
assessment process.

 To examine health issues, scientific understanding of causes, and possible future


approaches to control of the major environmental health problems in industrialized and
developing countries.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Human Impact on the Environment
 Environment-Human Interaction
1 06
 Environmental Impact on Humans
 Safety, Health and Environment
Exposure, Dose, Response
2  Environmental Toxicology 08
 Environmental Carcinogenesis
Environmental Health Economics and Policy
3  Risk Assessment and Management 10
 Indoor and Outdoor Air Pollution
Monitoring for Safety, Health and Environment
 Occupational Safety
 Principles and Practices
4  Occupational Health 10
 Bureau of Indian Standards on Safety and Health : 14489 –
1998 and 15001-2000
 ILO and EPA Standards
Hazardous Waste Management
 Solid Waste Handling and Disposal
 Liquid Waste Handling
5  Collection and Disposal 08
 Water Treatment and Distribution
 Planning and Organising for Safety and Waste Management
 Legal and Social Aspects of Waste Management
Safety, Health and Environment (SHE) Education and
6 Training 08
 SHE : Element of Training Cycle

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 260 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No. Sessions
 Assessment of Needs
 Techniques of Training, Design and Development of
Training Programs
 Competence Building Technique (CBT)
 Relevance of WTO regarding Safety, Health and
Environment
Accident and Incident Investigation: Reporting and
Analysis
 Philosophy, Purpose, Process and Types of Investigation
 Identifying the Key Factors and the Immediate and Basic
Causes
 Corrective Action
7  Agencies Investigating Accident 04
Accident Reporting
 Report Forms, Writing Reports, Essential Elements
 Accident and Incident Analysis
 Standard Classification of Factors Associated with
Accident
 Methods of Collating and Tabulating Data, Record Keeping
8 Contemporary Issues 06
Total 60

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 32 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 12 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 08 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through
the following components:

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 261 of 533


Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation


marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 An integrated understanding of strategic operations and its applicability to health


care and environmental policies.
 A keen interest in observing health issues, scientific understanding of causes, and
possible future approaches to control of the major environmental health problems.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Book

1. Yassi, A., Kjellstrom, T., de Kok, T., Guidotti, T. L. (Latest Edition), Basic
Environmental Health, New York: Oxford University Press.

Reference-Books

1. Blumenthal, D. S., and Ruttenber, A. J., (Latest Edition), Introduction to Environmental


Health, New York: Springer.
2. Nadakavukaren, A., (Latest Edition), Our Global Environment: A Health Perspective,
Prospect Heights: Waveland Press, Inc.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers


1. International Journal of Health Planning and Management
2. Healthcare Management Science

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 262 of 533


MB853.3: HEALTH CARE MARKETING (HM)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits : 4

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To provide foundational knowledge of the principles of marketing and their particular


application in health.
 To develop an understanding of the marketing activities in a healthcare sector.
III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Elements of Successful Marketing
 Strategic Marketing Process
1 06
 Organising for Marketing
 Requirements for Organisational Marketing Success
The Environment of Marketing Strategy
 Economic Factor
 Technological Factors
2 08
 Social Factors
 Competitive Factors
 Regulatory Factors
Understanding the Consumer
 Buying Behaviour
3  Marketing Research 10
 Marketing Segmentation
 Developing Customer Loyalty
Marketing Mix
 Product Strategy
4 10
 Price
 Distribution
Promotion
 The communication Model
 Promotional Mix
5 08
Advertising
 Developing Advertising Campaign
 Working with Advertising Agencies
Sales and Sales Management
 New Business Selling
 Missionary Selling
6 08
 Personal Sales Process
 Sales Approaches
 Managing the Sales Functions

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 263 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Controlling and Monitoring
 Sales Force Control
 Advertisement Control
7 04
 Consumer Satisfaction Control
 Components of a Measuring System
 Marketing Audit
8 Contemporary Issues 06
Total 60

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 32 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 12 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 08 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through
the following components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 264 of 533


The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation
marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 An appreciation of the relevance and principles of marketing concepts to healthcare


system.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Book

1. Eric N. Berkowitz, (Latest Edition), Essentials of Healthcare Marketing, Jones & Bartlett
Learning.

Reference-Books

1. John L. Fortenberry, Jr., (Latest Edition), Health Care Marketing: Tools and Techniques,
Jones and Bartlett Learning.
2. John L. Fortenberry, Jr., (Latest Edition), Cases in Health Care Marketing: Tools and
Techniques, Jones and Bartlett Learning.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers


1. International Journal of Health Planning and Management.
2. International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 265 of 533


MB854.3: FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT OF HEALTH INSTITUTIONS
(FMHI)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits : 4

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To provide students with the ability to application of quantitative financial


analysis to investment, financing, and operating decisions in the health care
sector.
III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Evolution of Healthcare Financial Management
 Healthcare Financial Management
1  Profitability and Productivity Study 06
 Comparison of Management Accounting and General
Accounting
Fundamentals of Sound Healthcare Financial
Management
2 08
 Organisation Development of Hospitals
 Organisation Structure Add it to Chart of Accounts
Cost Characteristics of Health Institutions
 Major Cost Classification
 Primary Cost Classification
 Secondary Cost Classification
3 10
 Break Even Analysis
 Contribution and Contribution Margin
 Margin of Safety
 Zero Based Budgeting
Production Units and Performance Evaluation
 Macro Production Units
 Micro Production Units
4  Cost Allocation 10
Volume Forecasting
 Least Square
 Multiple Regression Analysis
Budgetary Control Process
 Functional Budgeting
5 08
 Budget Control Programme
 Preliminary Budget and Cost Finding Connection
Capital Expenditure Planning
6  Fixed Asset 08
 Working Capital Management

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 266 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No. Sessions
 Evaluation of Capital Expenditure
Cash Forecasting and Management
 Cash Management Process
7  Revenue Budgeting 04
 Wage and Salary Budgeting
 Non-Wage and Salary Budgeting
8 Contemporary Issues 06
Total 60

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 32 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 12 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 08 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through
the following components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 267 of 533


The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation
marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 An appreciation of the relevance and principles of financial management concepts to


healthcare system.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Book

1. Allen G. Herkimer, (Latest Edition), Understanding Hospital financial Management, An


Aspen Publication.

Reference-Books

1. David Edward Marcinko, Hope Rachel Hertico, (Latest Edition), Financial


Management Strategies for Hospitals and Healthcare Organizations: Tools, Techniques, Checklists
and Case Studies, CRC Press.
2. Michael Nowicki, (Latest Edition), The Financial Management of Hospitals and Healthcare
Organizations.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers


1. International Journal of Healthcare Financial Management

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 268 of 533


PROJECT AND
INFRASTRUCTURE
MANAGEMENT
ELECTIVES

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 269 of 533


MB860.3: PROJECT FORMULATION AND EXECUTION (PF&E)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits : 4

II. Course Objectives:

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To expose the students to the basics of project preparation;


 To acquaint the students with different tools & techniques available to formulate,
initiate, monitor and control the project; the same should be effectively used in execution
of the project.

III. Course Outline:

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No Sessions
Introduction to Project Management
 Definition of the Project and Programme
1  Characteristic of the Projects and Programme 03
 Classification of the Projects and Programme
 Project Life Cycle
Project Conceptualization
 Project Ideas and Sources
2 09
 Techniques for Project Idea Generation
 Firs-Cut or Broad-Brush Screening of Ideas
Project Formulation
3  Project Goals and Objectives 09
 Various Dimension of the Project
Project Initiation
 Project Management Maturity
 Project Selection Criteria and Methods
4  Types of Project Selection Models 09
 Risk Consideration in Project Selection
 The Project Portfolio Process
 Projects Bids and RFPS (Request For Proposals)
Project Monitoring
 The Planning Monitoring and Control Cycle
5  Information Needs and Reporting 09
 Earned Value Analysis
 Computerized PMIS
Project Control
 The Fundamental Purpose of Control
6 09
 Typed of Control
 Design of the Control System

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 270 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No Sessions
 Control of Change and Scope Creep
 Control: Primary Function of the Management
Project Auditing
 Purpose of Evaluation
 The Project Audit
7 09
 The Project Audit Life Cycle
 Essentials of Audit or Evaluation
 Measurement
8 Contemporary Issues 03
Total 60

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 32 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 12 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 08 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through
the following components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 271 of 533


The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation
marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 The ability to understand the importance of Project monitoring are evaluation students
are expected to monitor & evaluate the project through various tools and methods.
 The ability to learn the project control techniques and effectively implement the same
 The ability to understand the importance of the project audit, preparing project audit
reports and presents the same.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Books

1. Jack Meredith and Samuel Mantel, (Latest Edition), Project Management, Wiley India
Edition.
2. Project Management Institute, (Latest Edition), Project Management Body of Knowledge
(PMBOK Guide), Project Management Institute.

Reference-Books

1. Rory Burke, (Latest Edition), Project Management, Wiley India Edition.


2. Prasanna Chandra, (Latest Edition), Project Facts, Tata McGraw-Hill Education.
3. Rajendra Mishra, (Latest Edition), Project Facts, Excel Books Publishers.

Journal / Magazine / News Paper

1. The International Journal for Project Management

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 272 of 533


MB861.3: SOCIAL PROJECTS AND INFRASTRUCTURE (SPI)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits : 4

II. Course Objective

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To understand government policies and problems of Social Infrastructure in


India.
 To help students to get acquainted with the knowledge of labour forces and the
legislative framework related to them.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No Sessions
Understanding Social Infrastructure
 Nature and Scope of Social Infrastructure
Poverty and Poverty Alleviation Programme
1  Poverty Line 06
 Incidence of Poverty
 Causes of Poverty
 Major Poverty Alleviation Programme
Labour Force and Employment Policy
 Work Force Participation Rates
 Occupational Structure
2  Nature and Extent of Unemployment in India 10
 Causes of Unemployment
 Government Policies to Tackle Unemployment
 Employment Policy in Eleventh and Twelfth Five Year Plan
Labour Welfare: Legal Framework and Initiatives
 Need for Social Security
3 10
 Legislations Pertaining to Labour
 Labour Related Organisations or Activities or Schemes
Human Development Index
 Human Development Indicators
4 10
 Social Security: Conceptual Framework
 Social Security in India‟s Constitution and Present Status
Education and Training
 Education as Critical Input
5 09
 An Inclusive Development Model for Health, Education, and
Housing Sectors
Public Private Partnership and Social Infrastructure
 Foundation of E-Government
6 06
 A PPP Model for Medical Education and Tertiary Healthcare
 PPP Model for Village Primary Health Care Centres

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 273 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No Sessions
 PPP Model in Vocational training
Models for Solid Waste Management in India
 Models in Vogue under PPP
7  SWM through External Funding Support 05
 Capital Investment by Service Provider and Cost Sharing by
Community for SWM
8 Contemporary Issues 04
Total 60

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 32 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 12 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 08 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through
the following components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total
of total
Component Number per
No. Marks
internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100
The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation
marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 274 of 533


V. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VI. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 The basic understanding of Social Infrastructure projects, and government policy


and regulations about Social Infrastructure projects.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Book

1. Jetli K. Narindar and Sethi Vishal, (Latest Edition), Infrastructure Development in India-
Post-Liberlisation Initiatives and Challenges, New Century Publications.

Reference-Book

1. Brett m. Frischmann, (Latest Edition), Infrastructure: the social value of shared resources,
Oxford University Press.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers

1. Journal of Infrastructure Development


2. Journal of Economic Policy Reform
3. Journal of Social and Economic Development

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 275 of 533


MB862.3: INFRASTRUCTURAL PROJECTS (IP)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits : 4

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To provide an overview of the importance of infrastructure management as


necessitated by the economic development – Indian and International context.
 To discuss policy perspectives relating to infrastructure development
 To familiarize with the issues relating to development of physical infrastructure

III. Course Outline


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No Sessions
An overview of Basic Concepts Related to Infrastructure
1 03
 Introduction to Infrastructure
Economic Reforms and Infrastructure Development
2 09
 Infrastructure Development in India's Reforms
Sectoral Infrastructure Development i.e. Transport, Power,
Water Supply and Sanitation1
 An Overview of the Power Sector in India
 An Overview of the Water Supply and Sanitation Sector in India
 An Overview of the Road, Rail, Air and Port Transportation Sectors
3 09
in India
 An Overview of the Telecommunications Sector in India
 An Introduction to Special Economic Zones.
 Sectoral issues in Ports
 Sectoral Issues in Rural and Urban Infrastructure2
Formulation of Infrastructure Projects
4  An Integrated Framework for Successful Infrastructure Planning 09
 Infrastructure Management Systems and Future Directions
Financing Issues in Infrastructure, Projects Management and
Development
5 09
 Mapping and Facing the Landscape of Risks in Infrastructure
Projects
6 Private Involvement in Infrastructure 09

1
Above mentioned sectors can be discussed in line with the aspects/ issues such as: Environmental
Aspect, Political Aspect, Social or Cultural Aspect, Technological Aspect, Administrative or Bureaucratic Issues,
Financial Issues, Legal or Regulatory Aspects, Global or Cross Country Aspect, Issues Relating to Basic or
Supportive Inputs, Economic Aspect, Ecological Issues, Management or HR Issues, Supply Chain Management,
Public-Private Partnership, Other Relevant Aspects or Issues
2
Faculty will draw the study material from various sources on the given topics. Various government
reports, developmental studies and sectoral reports can be a part of the study material.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 276 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No Sessions
 A Historical Overview of Infrastructure Privatization
 The Benefits of Infrastructure Privatization
 Problems with Infrastructure Privatization
Infrastructure Related Issues
 Tendering Systems and Procedures
 Infrastructural Contracts
 Land Acquisition
7 09
 Issues of Foreign Direct Investment and Infrastructure
 Infrastructure Regulators and Compliances
 Environmental Regulations and Impact Assessment, Infrastructure
and Competition Issues
8 Contemporary Issues 03
Total 60
IV. Pedagogy
The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 32 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 12 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 08 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions
The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through
the following components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 277 of 533


The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation
marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII.Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 An understanding of the basic concepts related to Infrastructure and Financial


Management of Projects.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Book

There is no single text/ reference book suggested by the faculty. However, faculty will
draw the study material from various sources on the given topics. Various government
reports, developmental studies and sectoral reports can be a part of the study material.
Field visits and export talk by guest faculty will provide necessary inputs to the students
giving them the opportunity to explore the topics further in depth.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers

1. Journal of Infrastructure Development


2. Journal of Economic Policy Reform
3. Journal of Social and Economic Development

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 278 of 533


MB863.3: INTRODUCTION TO INFRASTRUCTURE POLICY FOR
DEVELOPMENT (IIPD)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits: 4

II. Course Objectives:

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To understand the various policies designed related to infrastructure and


development and measure the impact of the policy design.
 To understand the economic aspects of infrastructure using the tools of economic
analysis in deciding the optimal level of infrastructure provision.

III. Course Outline


Module Classroom
Title/Topic
No. Contact Sessions
Introduction: Infrastructure Policy and Development
 Economic Importance of Infrastructures
1  Economic Impact of Public Infrastructures 06
 Demand and Supply Effects
 Spill Over Effects
Infrastructures and Economic Growth
2  Models used to Investigate the Relationship between 10
Infrastructure and Productivity
 Data Problems and Key Findings
Decision-Making on Infrastructure Provision
3  Cost Benefit Analysis 10
 Beyond Financial Appraisal
Models of Public-Private Infrastructure Management
 The Problem of Monopoly in Infrastructure Provision and
4 the Range of Possible Solutions 10
 Public Provision of Infrastructures and Reasons for
Privatization
Infrastructure Regulation And Competition
5  Infrastructure Regulation: Rate of Return and Price Cap 10
Vertical Unbundling and the Introduction of Competition
Policy Framework
6  National Level Infrastructure Policy 10
 State Level Infrastructure Policy
 Addressing Policy Issues
7 Contemporary Issues 04
Total 60

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 279 of 533


IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 32 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 12 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 08 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

V. Internal Evaluation
The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through
the following components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100
The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation
marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 An understanding of economic aspects of infrastructure

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 280 of 533


 An understanding of various government infrastructural policies
VIII. Reference Material

Text-Book

There is no single text/ reference book suggested by the faculty. However, faculty will
draw the study material from various sources on the given topics. Various government
reports, developmental studies and sectoral reports can be a part of the study material.
Field visits and export talk by guest faculty will provide necessary inputs to the students
giving them the opportunity to explore the topics further in depth.

Journal / Magazine / Newspapers

1. The International Journal for Project Management

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 281 of 533


MB864.3: LEARNING PROJECT MANAGEMENT THROUGH
SOFTWARE (LPMS)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits: 4

II. Course objectives:

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To learn Windows-based project management software package


 To learn preparing project plan and tracking it to its completion.
 To learn Microsoft project calendar controls, allocation of resources, production of
PERT, GANTT charts. Resource charts, calendar charts and other reports

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Introduction to MS Project
 Overview of User Interface
 Creating New Project
 Working with Tasks
1 o Creating Manual Scheduled Task 05
o Creating Automatic Scheduled Task
o Linking Tasks
o Creating a Summary Task
o Updating Task Process
Project Planning
 Setting Up a Project File
 Identifying the Work to Be Done
 Building a Schedule
2 05
 Building a Team for Project
 Assigning Resources to Tasks
 Setting Up a Project Budget
 Reviewing and Fine-Tuning Your Plan
Tracking Status
 Methods for Tracking Status.
 Preparing to Update Your Project
 Obtaining Status Data
 Updating Schedule Status in Project
3  Updating Project Costs
05
Evaluating and Correcting Project Performance
 Scheduled, Baseline, and Actual Values.
 Is the Project on Time?
 Is the Project Within Budget?
 Earned Value Analysis
 Getting Back on Track

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 282 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No. Sessions
 Managing Changes in Project
Reporting on Projects
 An Overview of Project‟s Reports
 Working with Graphical Reports
 Working with Visual Reports
 Printing Views to Report Project Information
Closing a Project
 Obtaining Project Acceptance
 Tying Up Loose Ends
 Producing Project Closeout Reports
 What to Do with Project Information
Project Power Tools
Working on More Than One Project
 Managing Multiple Projects
 Sharing Resources Among Projects
 Exchanging Data Between Programs
 Copying Information
 Importing and Exporting Data
4 05
 Integrating Project and Outlook
Linking and Embedding
 Understanding Linking and Embedding
 Linking and Embedding Project Data
 Linking and Embedding Data into Project
 Working with Linked and Embedded Objects
 Hyperlinking to Information
Customizing Project
 Filtering Through Information
 Grouping Project Elements
 Defining Own Fields
Customizing the Ribbon and Quick Access Toolbar
 Customizing the Quick Access Toolbar
 Customizing the Ribbon
 Sharing a Custom Ribbon and Quick Access Toolbar
Reusing Project Information
5 10
 Understanding the Types of Templates
 Storing Project Settings and Elements
 Sharing Custom Elements
 Building Templates for Projects
Saving Time with Macros
 Recording Macros
 Running Macros
 Viewing and Editing Macro Code
 Learning More About Programming Project
6  SAP Based Project Management Module
08
 Open ERP- Project Management Module

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 283 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No. Sessions
7 Introduction to Open Softwares
 Tuleap Open ALM
 OrangeScrum
 MyCollab-Project
 ProjectLibre 11
 LibrePlan
 OpenProject
 ]project-open[
 Redmine
8 Open Source Project Management Software for Small
Business
 Bitrix24
 Trello
 Plan Project Management Software
11
 Asana
 MeisterTask
 GanttProject
 Producteev
 Freedcamp
Total 60

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 32 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 12 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 08 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through
the following components:

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 284 of 533


Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100
total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation marks
for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total marks
for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 70 marks and will be based on practical
computer-based tests and a viva-voce.

VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 Proficiency in software based projects.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Book

There is no single text/ reference book suggested by the faculty. However, faculty will
draw the study material from various sources on the given topics. Various hand-outs can
be a part of the study material. Field visits and export talk by guest faculty will provide
necessary inputs to the students giving them the opportunity to explore the topics
further in depth.

Journals / Magazines/ Newspapers

1. The International Journal for Project Management

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 285 of 533


© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 286 of 533
FAMILY BUSINESS &
ENTREPRENEURSHIP
MANAGEMENT
ELECTIVES

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 287 of 533


MB870.3: LEADERSHIP SKILLS (LS)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits: 4

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To define what leadership is and how it is applied at all levels of organizational


management.
 To understand the basics of leadership and management.
 To determine what is necessary to lead teams and organizations, and how to
integrate this with business management.
 To become adept at assessing leadership traits and qualities in ourselves and
others
 To learn how to develop leadership in ourselves and others.
 To appreciate the importance of organization culture and the leader‟s role in
establishing it.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Introduction
 What are Leadership Skills?
 A Born Leader
1  Traits of Successful Leader 08
 Why Leadership?
o Managerial Roles
 Importance of Leadership
Leading Vs Managing
 Roles and Relationships
2 08
 Developing Personality for Effective Leading Roles
 Authority Vs. Responsibility
Leading the Team
3  Delegation and Acceptance 08
 Mentoring
Leadership–Styles, Models and Philosophy
4  Leadership Styles
08
 Leadership Models
 Leadership Philosophy
The Essence of Supportive Leadership
5  The 21st Century Demand
08
 Leadership Competency Model
 Integrating, Cultivating and Rewarding Employees
The Essence of Empowering Leadership
6 08
 Understanding the Needs, Motivation and Behaviour of

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 288 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Your Employees
 Developing, Strengthening and Practicing the Empowerment
Skills.
Multiple Intelligence of Leadership
 Cognitive Intelligence
 Emotional Intelligence
 Social Intelligence
7 08
 Cultural Intelligence
 Moral Intelligence
 Spiritual Intelligence
 Practical Interplay and Expression of Multiple Intelligence
8 Contemporary Issues 04
Total 60

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 32 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 12 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 08 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 289 of 533


V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through
the following components:

Percentage
Marks
Total of total
Sl. Component Number per
Marks internal
No. incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation


marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 An understanding of leadership and its nuances


 The ability to asses self and others for leadership traits
 The ability to grow to a 360o leader.
 An understanding of what leaders do to be successful.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Books

1. MTD Training, (Latest Edition), Leadership, Bookboon.


2. Douglas L. Jones, Empowering Leadership, (Latest Edition), Bookboon.
3. Walter Baets, Erna Oldenboom, (Latest Edition), Value Based Leadership in Business
Innovation, Bookboon.

Reference-Book

1. Roger Gill, (Latest Edition), Theory and Practice of Leadership, Sage Publications India Pvt.
Ltd.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers


1. HBR Issues on Building Leadership Skills

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 290 of 533


MB.871.3: BUSINESS REGULATIONS AND START-UP FINANCING
(BRSF)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits: 4

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To understand the business regulations in India.


 To provide an understanding of the main areas needed to know about in order to
run a successful business.
 To provide students information that will help them develop the knowledge,
understanding and skills associated with starting a small business.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Industrial Acts and Legislations
 Companies Act
 Industrial Disputes Act
1 08
 Industries Development and Regulation Act
 Trade Unions Act
 Contract Law
Laws relating to Intellectual Property Rights (IPRs)
2  IPR and WTO 08
 India and IPR
Key Regulations
 Environment
 Exports and Imports
3 08
 Occupational Health and Safety
 Man Power
 Competition Protection
Finance and Economics Concepts
4
 Financial Planning and Management 08
 Financial Statements and Analysis
Creating a Budget, Breakeven, What You Need to
5 Show an Investor?
08
 Estimating Funding Needs
 Creating A Basic Financial Model and Budget
Angle and Venture Funding
6  Definition 08
 Methods
Alternative Sources of Funding
7  Crowd sourcing 08
 Foundations

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 291 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No. Sessions
 Corp Venture
8 Contemporary Issues 04
Total 60

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 32 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 12 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 08 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through
the following components:

Percentage
Marks
Total of total
Sl. Component Number per
Marks internal
No. incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation


marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 292 of 533


VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 The understanding of the economic importance of entrepreneurs, enterprise and


small business start-ups.
 The ability to understand the importance of a well-researched and well-constructed
business plan.
 The ability to construct a business plan to attract potential lenders and
investors.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Books

1. Philip J. Adelman, Alan M. Marks, (Latest Edition), Entrepreneurial Finance, Pearson


Education.
2. William J. Stolze, (Latest Edition), Start Up Financing: An Entrepreneur's Guide to
Financing a New or Growing Business, Career Pr Inc.
3. Sara Williams, (Latest Edition), The Financial Times Guide to Business Start Up: The most
Comprehensive Annually Updated Guide for Entrepreneurs, Pearson Education.
4. Burns, P. (Latest Edition), Entrepreneurship and Small Business, Palgrave Macmillan
Publishers Ltd.

Reference-Book

1. Naeem Zafar, (Latest Edition), Finance Essentials for Entrepreneurs A Simple Guide to
Understanding and Creating Financial Statements for Your Business

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers


1. SME World

Websites

 http://business.gov.in/starting_business/pricing.php

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 293 of 533


MB.872.3: CREATIVITY, INCUBATION AND INNOVATION (CII)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits: 4

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of the course are as follows:


 To understand the purpose, processes and tools of creativity and innovation.
 To discern appropriate strategies for implementing ideas.
 To appreciate the challenges that members of society and specifically
entrepreneurs in today‟s ever changing, diverse, and global environment.

II. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No. Sessions
What are Creativity, Incubation and Innovation
 Creativity
1  How Business Incubators Work 08
 Innovation
 Innovation = Creativity + Commercialization
The Business Incubator Players
 The Property Developers
 Government and Local Government
 The Academics
 The Corporate Venturers
2  The Entrepreneurs 08
 The Venture Capitalists
 The Business Angels
 The Consultants
 Variations on a Theme
 Incubator Associations
Creativity Tools and Techniques
 Lateral Thinking
 Enablers and Barriers to Creativity
3 08
 Creative Personality
 Brainstorming
 Entrepreneurial Creativity
Creativity and Creative Groups
 Three Components of Individual Creativity
4
 Characteristics of Creative Groups 08
 Time Pressure and Creativity
 Steps for Increasing Your Own Creativity
Types of Innovation
5
 Incremental and Radical Innovation 08
 Factors that Favor Incremental Innovation

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 294 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No. Sessions
 Innovations in Processes
 Service Innovations
Idea Generation
 New Knowledge
 Tapping the Ideas of Customers
6 08
 Learning from Lead Users
 The Role of Mental Preparation
 How Management can Encourage Idea Generation
Moving Innovation to Market
 The Idea Funnel
7 08
 Stage-Gate Systems
 Extending Innovation through Platforms
8 Contemporary Issues 04
Total 60

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 32 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 12 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 08 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 295 of 533


V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through
the following components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation


marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 The ability to understand the concepts of building blocks of innovation.


 The ability to understand processes and methods of creative problem solving:
observation, definition, representation, ideation, evaluation and decision making.
 Their creative and innovative thinking skills.
 The ability to learn to practice and value teaming, communication, and diversity.
 The ability to understand risk taking, paradigm shift, and paradigm paralysis.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Books

1. William and Sons, (Latest Edition), Managing Creativity and Innovation: Practical
Strategies to Encourage Creativity, Harvard Business School Press.
2. Bettina von Stamm, (Latest Edition), Managing Innovation, Design and Creativity, John
Wiley & Sons, Inc.
3. Edited by Meredith Erlewine and Ellen Gerl, (Latest Edition), A Comprehensive Guide
to Business Incubation National Business Incubation Association NBIA Publications.
4. Colin Barrow, (Latest Edition), Incubators: A Realist's Guide to the World's New Business
Accelerators, John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 296 of 533


Reference-Books

1. Shlomo Miatal and D.V.R. Seshadri, (Latest Edition), Innovation Management-


Strategies, Concepts and Tools for Growth and Profit, Sage Publications.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers


1. International Journal of Innovation, Creativity and Change

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 297 of 533


MB.873.3: MANAGEMENT OF TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION
(MTI)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits: 4

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To understand the dynamics of technological innovation


 To be familiar with how to formulate technology strategies
 To know how to implement technology strategies.
 To understand how to manage ideas in a technological based organization.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Introduction
 Technology for Survival and Growth
1 08
 Innovate or Abdicate
 Change or Perish
Science and Technology
 Scientific Discovery
 Technology
 Differences between Science and Technology
2 08
 Types of Technologies
 Technology Portfolio
 Technology Life Cycle
 Globalization of Technology
Management of Technology
 Strategic Management of Technology
3  Strategic Technology Management System 08
 Technology Forecasting
 Technology Generation
Asset Protection and Timing of Innovation and
Technology
4  Methods to Protect Technological Knowledge 08
 Patents, Secrets, Etc.
 Models and Strategies of Market Timing for Innovations
Technology Maturity, Obsolesce and Discontinuities
5  Technology Maturity
08
 Technology Obsolescence
 Technological Discontinuities
International Technology Transfer and Know-How
6 08
 Internationalization and Management of Innovation
7 Introduction to New Product Development (Internal 08

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 298 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Technology Transfer) and Open Innovation New
Product Development (NDP)
8 Contemporary Issues 04
Total 60

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 32 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 12 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 08 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through
the following components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation


marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 299 of 533


VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 The ability to understand the management of technology and innovation and work
for instance in the area of business development, strategic projects or innovation
management in his/her organization.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Books

1. Vijay Kumar Khurana, (Latest Edition), Management of Technology and Innovation, Ane
Books Pvt. Ltd.
2. Schilling, M, (Latest Edition), Strategic management of technological innovation. McGraw-
Hill.

Reference-Books

1. Robert Burgelman, (Latest Edition),Strategic Management of Technology and Innovation,


McGraw-Hill/Irwin
2. Khalil, Tarek, (Latest Edition), Management of Technology: The Key to Competitiveness and
Wealth Creation, Boston, MA: McGraw Hill Irwin.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers

1. Journal of Business Venturing


2. Technological Forecasting and Social Change

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 300 of 533


MB874.3: SOCIAL ENTREPRENEUSHIP AND MANAGEMENT (SEM)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits: 4

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of the course are as follows:

 To understand the field of social entrepreneurship and many of the opportunities,


challenges, and issues faced by social entrepreneurs
 To understand and appreciate the role of (and need for) social entrepreneurship in
building a sustainable society.
 To acquire the knowledge, skills, tools and techniques needed to become an
entrepreneur in the social sector.
 To understand how to develop sustainable “business” model for building a social
enterprise that can make a difference

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Defining Social Entrepreneurship
 What is Social Entrepreneurship
1  Who are the Pioneers 08
 What does A Social Entrepreneur Do?
 Social and Business Entrepreneurship
Understanding the SE Terrain
2 08
 Sector Studies
Social Entrepreneurs’ DNA
3  Social Enterprise Cases 08
 Global v/s Local
Managing a Social Venture
 The Challenge of Managing Business Professional‟s V/S
Social Activists.
4
 Managing Operations 08
 Accounting in A Non Profit Context
 Marketing Social Entrepreneurship
 Hybrids, Partnerships and Alliances
5 Measuring Social Impact
08
 Delivering The Promises
Understanding Risk: The Social Entrepreneur, and
6 08
Risk Management
Envisioning an Innovative Society
7  How is Social Entrepreneurship Changing Minds? 08
 Governments Role
8 Contemporary Issues 04
Total 60

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 301 of 533


IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 32 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 12 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 08 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated on a continuous basis through
the following components:
Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation


marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 302 of 533


VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 The knowledge of the famous cases and stories of social entrepreneurs.


 The ability to analyze the goods and bad‟s of SEs, and potentially able to provide
consultancy.
 The students will also learn to participate in social entrepreneurship, e.g.
volunteering, entering competition, internship etc.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Books

1. David Bornstein, (Latest Edition), How to Change the World. New York: Oxford
University Press.
2. David Bornstein, (Latest Edition), Social Entrepreneurship: What Everyone Needs to Know.
Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press.
3. Justine C. Law and James J. Baderman, (Latest Edition), Everyday Legends: The Ordinary
People Changing Our World, the Stories of 20 Great UK Social Entrepreneurs. WW
Publishing.
4. Willie Cheng, (Latest Edition), The world that changes the world: how philanthropy,
innovation, and entrepreneurship are transforming the social ecosystem. John Wiley & Sons.

Reference-Books

1. Rob John, Skoll Centre Working Paper: Beyond the Cheque: How Venture Philanthropists
Add Value. UK: Said Business School, University of Oxford.
2. J. Gregory Dees, Jed Emerson, Peter Economy, (Latest Edition), Enterprising
Nonprofits. A Toolkit for Social Entrepreneurs, John Wiley and Sons.
3. Alex Nicholls, (Latest Edition), Social Entrepreneurship: New Models of Sustainable Social
Change, Oxford University Press.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers

1. Journal of Social Entrepreneurship


2. International Journal of Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation
3. Social Enterprise Journal

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 303 of 533


© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 304 of 533
TOURISM
AND HOSPITALITY
MANAGEMENT
ELECTIVES

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 305 of 533


MB880.3: PRINCIPLES AND CONCEPTS OF TOURISM AND
HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT (PCTHM)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits : 4

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To develop an understanding of basic concepts of tourism and hospitality


management.
 To make the students aware of the significant contribution of tourism and
hospitality industry.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom
Title/Topic
No. Contact Sessions
Conceptual Framework of Tourism and Hospitality
Industry
 Tourism and Hospitality
o Concept, Meaning, Nature and Scope
 Definition and Differentiation
o Tourist
1 o Travellers 05
o Visitor
o Transit Visitor
o Excursionist
 Leisure, Recreation and Tourism and their
Interrelationship
 Greening of the Hospitality Industry
The Tourism System
 Tourism Resource
 Attraction
 Product
 Market
 Industry
 Destination in the Context of Tourism
 Components of Tourism
2 10
 Intermediaries and Suppliers
 Types and Typologies of Tourism
 Medical, Adventure and Educational Tourism
 Approaches to Study Tourism
 Elements of Tourism
 Attraction
 Accessibility
 Accommodation

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 306 of 533


Module Classroom
Title/Topic
No. Contact Sessions
 Concept and Types of Tourism Products
 Characteristics of Tourism Products
Historical Dimensions of Tourism
 Travel and Tourism through the Ages
o Early Travels
o „Renaissance‟ and
3 o „Age of Grand Tours‟ 08
o Emergence of Modern Tourism
o Concept of „Paid holiday‟
 Understanding Tourism Motivations
 Concept of Heritage Management
Commercialization of Tourism and Hospitality
Business
 Factors Affecting Growth and Development of
International and National Tourism
4 08
 Concept of Push and Pull Factors in Tourism
 Impacts of Industrialization and Technological
Advancements on Tourism and Hospitality Industry
 Destination Creation
Infrastructure in Tourism and Hospitality Business
 Tourism Infrastructure
o Types, Forms and Significance
5 08
 Transport Sectors
o Modes and Relative Significance
 Other Support Infrastructures required for Tourism
Tourism Demand and Supply
 Concept of Demand and Supply in Tourism
6 08
 Unique Features of Tourist Demand
 Constraints in Creating Ideal Destination
Significance of Tourism and Hospitality Industry
 Economic Impacts of Tourism and Hospitality Business
o Income and Employment
o Multipliers of Tourism
o Balance of Payments
o Foreign Exchange Etc.
7  Socio-Cultural Impacts of Tourism and Hospitality 08
Business
o Cultural Exchange Among Nations and
International Understanding
 Impacts of Tourism and Hospitality Business on Ecology
and Environment.
 Emerging Forms of Tourism
8 Contemporary Issues 05
Total 60

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 307 of 533


IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 32 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 12 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 08 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated through the following
components:

Percentage
Marks
Total of total
Sl. Component Number per
Marks internal
No. incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation


marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 308 of 533


VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 Clear exposure and understanding of the basic concepts of tourism and hospitality
management.
 Insights into the historical dimensions, role of infrastructure and significance of
tourism and hospitality industry.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Books

1. Cooper, C. Fletcher, J. Gilbert, D. and Wanhill, S., (Latest Edition), Tourism: Principles
and Practice, Addison Wesley Longman Publishing, New York.
2. Mishra, S. N. Sadual S. K., (Latest Edition), Basics of Tourism Management, Excel Books.

Reference-Books

1. Prasad, V. and Sundari V. B. T., (Latest Edition), Travel and Tourism Management, Excel
Books.
2. Raj. K., (Latest Edition), Modern Dictionary of Tourism, Ivy Publishing House.
3. Seth, P. N. Bhat, S., (Latest Edition), An Introduction to Travel and Tourism, Starling
Publishers.
4. Krishnan, K. K., (Latest Edition), Managing Tourist Destination: Development, Planning,
Marketing, Policies, Kanishka Publishers Distributors.
5. Bhatia, A. K., (Latest Edition), Tourism Development: Principles and Practices, Starling
Publishers Pvt. Ltd.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers

1. The Management of Hospital and Tourism Enterprise.


2. Asia on Tour: Exploring the Rise of Asian Tourism, Tim Winter

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 309 of 533


MB881.3: TOURISM POLICY, DESTINATION PLANNING AND
DEVELOPMENT (TPDPD)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits : 4

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To develop an understanding of basic concepts of Tourism Policy, Planning and


Development.
 To make the students aware about the different types of tourism planning.
 To increase understanding of the steps taken by Indian Government for Tourism
development in India.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Tourism Policy
 Concept of Policy
1  Role of Government, Public and Private Sectors in 05
Formulating Tourism Policy
 National Tourism Policy 1982 and 2002
Tourism Planning
 Planning
o Concept
o Definition
o Nature
o Process
 Tourism Planning
o Concept
2 10
o Need
o Objective
o Goals
 Levels and Types of Planning
 Tourism Planning Principles
 Importance of Planning in Tourism
 Steps in Tourism Planning
 Planning, Staffing and Evaluation
Approaches of Planning in Tourism
 Planning Approaches for Different Form of Tourism
3  Eco Tourism 08
 Urban Tourism
 Rural Tourism
Destination Planning
4 08
 Ways and Benefits of Destination Planning

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 310 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No. Sessions
 Planning for the Development of a Tourist Destination
 Impacts of Unplanned Tourism Development on a Tourist
Destination
Process of Destination Planning
 Significance of Defining Objectives, Background Analysis and
5 08
Detailed Research in the Destination Planning Process
 Destination Planning Process
Development of Tourism in India
 Plans and Policies of the Government of India for the
6 Development of Tourism Sector 08
 National Action Plan for Tourism (NAPT) 1992: Objectives
and Strategies.
Constraints of Developing the Tourism Sites
 Challenges Faced during the Implementation of Tourism
Development Plans.
7 08
 Role of State and Central Government in Allocating Funds
for Tourism Development
 Benefits of Developing the Tourism Sites
8 Contemporary Issues 05
Total 60

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 32 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 12 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 08 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 311 of 533


V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated through the following
components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation


marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 The ability to understand of tourism policies, short term and long term tourism
planning and the constraints and challenges associated with it.
 The ability to understand the development aspects involved in tourism
management.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Books

1. Inskeep, E., (Latest Edition), Tourism Planning: An Integrated and Sustainable Development
Approach, Van Nostr and Reinhold, New York.
2. Sharma, J. K., (Latest Edition), Tourism Planning and Development, New Delhi.

Reference-Books

1. Mukhopadhyay S., (Latest Edition), Tourism Economics, ANE Books, New Delhi.
2. Sharma. K. K., (Latest Edition), Planning For Tourism, New Delhi.
3. Sinha, R. K., (Latest Edition), Tourism: Strategies, Planning and Development, New Delhi.
4. UNWTO, (Latest Edition), National and Regional Tourism Planning: Methodology and Case
Studies, Thomson Learning, UK.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 312 of 533


Journals / Magazines / Newspapers

1. Journal of Tourism and Hospitality Management, ISSN 2328-2169.


2. South Asian Journal of Tourism and Heritage, ISSN 0974-5432.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 313 of 533


MB882.3: INDIAN TOURISM AND HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT
(ITHM)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits : 4

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To familiarize students with the important tourism destinations in India.


 To help students to understand the relevance and importance of famous tourism
destinations in India.
 To help students to understand the significance of developing Indian tourism
destinations.
 To help students to understand emerging trends in tourism industry.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Indian Tourism Diversity
 India as Tourism Destination
1  Man Made Tourism Resources 05
 Architectural Heritage
o Forts, Palaces, Monument
Indian Culture and Traditions
 Culture and Tradition
o Folklore, Cuisine, Costume
 Religions
2 o Jainism, Islam, Hinduism, Christianity, Sikhism 08
 Dance and Music
 Handicrafts
 Fairs and Fests
 Important Destinations in India
Natural Tourism Resources
 National Parks
 Wild Life Sanctuaries
 Biosphere
 Reserves
 Mountains
3 08
 Beaches
 Islands
 Back Water
 Inland Water Ways
 Adventure Tourism
 Aero Based Tourism

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 314 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Perspectives of Tourism and Hospitality Management in
Selected States of India with respect to the following
details:
 Profile of the State
o Brief History
o Major Destinations
o Archaeological
o Historical
o Heritage
o Religious
o Natural Resources
4  Other Major Cities 14
 Arts, Crafts and Shopping
 Folk Music and Dances
 Fairs and Festivals
 Adventure Sports and Special Interest Tours
 National Parks and Wildlife Sanctuaries
 Cuisine
 Major Circuits and Packages
 Popular Tourist Festivals Organized for the Promotion of
Tourism
 Other Places of Interest Like Major Museums, Adventure
Sports, Forts, Palaces etc.
Heritage Management
 Assessing the Economic Evaluation of Heritage Sites
 Need and Significance of Developing the Heritage Sites
5  Constraints Faced during the Heritage Management 06
 Role of Government and Local Authorities in Heritage
Management
 Educating Local People in regards to Heritage Management
6 Role of National Organizations Engaged in Heritage 06
Management
Dynamism of Indian Tourism and Hospitality Industry
 Emerging Form of Tourism in India
o Responsible
o Alternative
o Rural
7 08
o Agro Tourism
 Sustainable Tourism
o Eco Tourism
o Medical Tourism
o Village Tourism
8 Contemporary Issues 05
Total 60

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 315 of 533


IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 32 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 12 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 08 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated through the following
components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation


marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 316 of 533


VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 Clear understanding and exposure to the details of Indian Tourism industry and
its significance.
 The ability to think strategically in expanding the tourism business in India by
capitalizing the natural and cultural diversity of India.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Books

1. Basam A.L., (Latest Edition), Wonder – That Is India, Pan Macmillan.


2. Bryn Thomas, (Latest Edition), Lonely Planet, Lonely Planet Publications.
3. Asif Iqbal Fazili, (Latest Edition), Tourism in India Planning and Development, New Delhi.

Reference-Books

1. Bhagawati, A. K., Bora, A. K., Kar, B. K., (Latest Edition), Geography of Assam, Rajesh
Publishers, Latest Edition, New Delhi.
2. Bora, Sheila and M. C., (Latest Edition), The story of Tourism: An Enchanting Journey
through Indias‟ North- East, USB Publishers Distributors Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi.
3. Romila Chowla, (Latest Edition), Cultural Tourism and Heritage, Arise Publishers, New
Delhi.
4. I. C. Gupta, (Latest Edition), Tourism Products of India, Gian Publishing House, New
Delhi.
5. Acharya Ram, (Latest Edition), Tourism and Cultural Heritage of India, RBSA Publishers,
Jaipur.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers

1. Journal of Tourism and Hospitality Management, ISSN 2328-2169.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 317 of 533


MB883.3: LEGAL ASPECTS OF TOURISM AND HOSPITALITY
MANAGEMENT (LATHM)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits : 4

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To enables students to know the government rules and regulations to set up a


business in tourism and hospitality industry.
 To create awareness among students about service industry related laws like
contract act, industrial legislation and tourism related laws.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom
Title/Topic
No. Contact Sessions
Role of Indian Government
 Regulatory Framework of Tourism and Hospitality Industry
1 in India. 05
 Role of Ministry of Tourism in India.
 State Level Tourism Development Corporation
Introduction to Indian Acts Applicable to Tourism and
Hospitality Industry
 Minimum Wages Act
2  Workmen‟s Compensation Act 10
 Payment of Gratuity Act 1972
 Payment of Bonus Act 1966
 Employee State Insurance Act
Consumer Protection Laws
 Entertainment Laws
 No Smoking Laws
3  Behavioural Rules and Restrictions in Public Areas 08
 Foreign Exchange Regulation Act
 Procedure for Customer Grievance Redressal
 Role of State and National Commission
Tourism Laws in India
 The Wildlife Protection Act 1980
4  Antiquities and Art Treasures Act 1972 08
 Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act 1958
 Sustainable and Preservation Act
Laws related to Tourists in India
 Citizenship Act
5  Passport Act 08
 Foreigners Registration Act
 Import Export Control Act

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 318 of 533


Module Classroom
Title/Topic
No. Contact Sessions
Tourism related Procedures and Guidelines
 Customs
 FERA Act
6 08
 Reserve Bank of India – Guidelines
 Government Procedures
 Tourism Regulations of Government
Laws and Regulations in Tourism and Hospitality Sector
 Laws and Regulations related to Transport Sector
7 08
 Laws and Regulations related to Hospitality Sector
 Laws and Regulations relating to Travel Agency
8 Contemporary Issues 05
Total 60

IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 32 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 12 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 08 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.
V. Internal Evaluation
The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated through the following
components:
Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 319 of 533


The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation
marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 The understanding and insights to the tourism and hospitality business related
legislative framework with more emphasis on the role played by Ministry of Indian
Tourism and State governments to promote the tourism activities in India.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Books

1. M. C. Metti, (Latest Edition), Hotel, Restaurant and Travel Law, Anmol Publications. Pvt.
Ltd.
2. Gary and Chawla, (Latest Edition), Mercantile law, Anmol Publications. Pvt. Ltd.
3. Gary and Chawla, (Latest Edition), Business Law, Anmol Publications. Pvt. Ltd.
4. Tulsian, (Latest Edition), Business Law, Anmol Publications. Pvt. Ltd.

Reference-Book

1. Bare Acts for the Acts covered in Course Syllabus.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 320 of 533


MB884.3: FRONT OFFICE MANAGEMENT (FOM)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits : 4

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To help students to know the basic functions of front office management.


 To help students to understand the emergencies and critical issues to be handled in
Tourism and Hospitality business.

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No. Sessions
Front Office Basics
 Front Office – House Keeping
 Front Office Organization Charts
 Front Office Personnel
1 05
 Job Descriptions of Front Office Staffs
 Inter Departmental Relationship between Front Office and
Other Departments
 Qualities of Front Office Staff
Reservations
 Types of Reservation
o Guaranteed Reservation
o Non-Guaranteed Reservation
o Travel Agents Reservation
o Corporate Reservation
o Group Reservation
 Source of Reservation
2 10
 Importance of Reservation
 Methods of Reservation
 On-Line and Off-Line Bookings
 Basic Reservation Activities
 Reservation Records and Documents
 Reservation Charts
 Computerized Reservation System
 Reservation Cancellation Terms and Conditions
Registration
 Registration Activities
 Pre-Arrival Registration
3  Maintenance of Registration Records 08
 Flow of Guest Information between Front Office and Other
Departments
 Walk-In Guests

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 321 of 533


Module Classroom Contact
Title/Topic
No. Sessions
 Guest with Non-Guaranteed Reservation
 Guest with Guaranteed Reservation
Functions of Front Office Accounting System
 Types of Accounts
 The Front Office Accounting Cycle
 Creation and Maintenance of Accounts
4 08
 Settlement of Accounts
 Types of Settlement , Cash Settlement, Credit Settlement
 Methods of Handling Guest Accounts
 Manually and Computerized Accounting
Tariff Structure and Payment Handling
 Basis of Charging
 Hubbart Formula
 Different Types of Tariffs
 Rack Rates
5  Discounted Rates for Corporates, Airlines, Groups and 08
Travel Agents
 Alliance Maintenance
 Maintaining Executive Longue
 Foreign Currency Handling
 Forms of Payments
Complaint Handling
 Emergency Procedures
 Medical Emergency, Theft, Death, Fire
 Dealing with Drunken Guest
 Dealing with Guest Problems
 Telephone
6 o Services 08
o Equipment
o Procedure
o Manners
 Telex and Fax Messages
o Equipment and Procedures
 Safety Locker Management
Sector Specific Front Office Management
7  Hotel 08
 Aviation
8 Contemporary Issues 05
Total 60

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 322 of 533


IV. Pedagogy

The course will emphasise participatory and individual learning through active
classroom interaction and students‟ prior preparation. The course instructor is expected
to prepare a detailed session-wise schedule, showing the topics to be covered, the
reading material and case material for every session. Wherever the material for any
session is drawn from sources beyond the prescribed text-book, reference books,
journals and magazines in the library, websites and other resources accessible to the
students, the course instructor should make the material available to the students well in
advance, so that the students can come prepared for the classes. The pedagogical mix
will be as follows:

 Classroom Discussion of Concepts and Applications … About 32 Sessions


 Case Discussions … About 12 Sessions
 Management Exercise / Stimulations /Games … About 08 Sessions
 Student‟s Presentations … About 06 Sessions
 Feedback … About 02 Sessions

The exact division among the above components will be announced by the instructor at
the beginning of the semester as a part of detailed session-wise schedule.

V. Internal Evaluation

The students‟ performance in the course will be evaluated through the following
components:

Percentage
Marks
Sl. Total of total
Component Number per
No. Marks internal
incidence
evaluation
1 Quizzes 3 10 30 10
2 Case Analysis and / or Presentation 2 45 90 30
3 Assignment / Project Work 1 60 60 20
4 Internal Tests 2 45 90 30
5 Attendance and Class Participation 30 10
Total 300 100

The total marks will be divided by 10 and declared as Institute-level evaluation


marks for the course. The Institute-level evaluation will constitute 30% of the total
marks for the course.

VI. External Evaluation

The University examination will be for 3 hours and will be based on a written paper
carrying 70 marks. The paper will centre on the application to managerial decision-
making at the firm level. There will be one major integrated case.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 323 of 533


VII. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should have developed:

 A clear understanding of the basic functions of front office management like


reservation, registration and account keeping.
 The ability to learn the strategies to deal with the customers in critical situations.

VIII. Reference Material

Text-Books

1. Peter Abbott, (Latest Edition), Front Office Procedures and Management, Butterworth-
Heinemann.
2. S. K. Bhatnagar, (Latest Edition), Front Office Management, Frank Bros. and Co.
Publishers Ltd., New Delhi.

Reference-Books

1. Dennis Foster, Lake Forest, (Latest Edition), Front Office Operation and Administration,
McGraw-Hill.
2. Micheal L., Kasavama, (Latest Edition), Front Office Procedures, EIAHMA, US.

Journals / Magazines / Newspapers

1. The Management of Hospital and Tourism Enterprise.

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 324 of 533


JOURNALISM
AND MASS
COMMUNICATION
MANAGEMENT
ELECTIVES

© CHARUSAT 2016 Page 325 of 533


MB890.3: DEVELOPMENT COMMUNICATION (DC)
YEAR 2, SEMESTER 3
I. Number of Credits : 4

II. Course Objectives

The objectives of this course are as follows:

 To sensitize students with the need and issues of development


 To understand paradigms of development, and their adoption
 To have an understanding of approaches to development communication
 To understand development issues, particularly in Indian perspective

III. Course Outline

Module Classroom Contact


Title/Topic
No Sessions
Introduction to Development
 Development: Definition
1 06
 Measuring Development
 Characteristics of Developing Countries
Development Organizations and Plans
 Union or State Governments Ministries and Departments
2  Planning Commission: Five Year Plans 06
 International Organizations: UNICEF, UNDP, UNESCO,
WTO, WHO
Theories of Development
 Dominant Paradigms
o Modernization Approach
o Rostow‟s Theory of Stages of Growth
o Big Push Theory
o Theory of Unbalanced Growth
 Structuralist Paradigms
3 o Dependency Theory 12
o Theory of Raul Prebisch
o Theory of Andre Gunder Frank
o Paulo Freire Approach
 Non-Unilinear Approach
o Approaches of Gandhi and Schumacher