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UK EDITION BEYOND THE ORDINARY BEST OF THE FESTS T FO UR MUST-SEE ACTS WHO’LL
UK EDITION
BEYOND THE ORDINARY
BEST OF
THE FESTS
T
FO UR MUST-SEE
ACTS WHO’LL
ROCK YOUR
SUMMER

IN SEARCH OF THE RIGHT STUFF IN NASA’S ASTRONAUT SCHOOL

WINNING THE

OF THE RIGHT STUFF IN NASA’S ASTRONAUT SCHOOL WINNING THE SPACE RACE FINDING THE EDGE CLIFF

SPACE RACE

STUFF IN NASA’S ASTRONAUT SCHOOL WINNING THE SPACE RACE FINDING THE EDGE CLIFF DIVER GARY HUNT
STUFF IN NASA’S ASTRONAUT SCHOOL WINNING THE SPACE RACE FINDING THE EDGE CLIFF DIVER GARY HUNT

FINDING

THE EDGE

CLIFF DIVERASTRONAUT SCHOOL WINNING THE SPACE RACE FINDING THE EDGE GARY HUNT ON BEATING HIGH ANXIETY Follow

GARY HUNTSCHOOL WINNING THE SPACE RACE FINDING THE EDGE CLIFF DIVER ON BEATING HIGH ANXIETY Follow us

ON BEATINGTHE SPACE RACE FINDING THE EDGE CLIFF DIVER GARY HUNT HIGH ANXIETY Follow us on facebook

HIGH ANXIETY Follow us on facebook
HIGH ANXIETY
Follow us
on facebook

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theredbulletin

JULY 2017

£2.50

VIDEO STABILIZATION WATERPROOF VOICE CONTROL

VIDEO STABILIZATION

WATERPROOF

VOICE CONTROL

VIDEO STABILIZATION WATERPROOF VOICE CONTROL

NASA (COVER)

CONTRIBUTORS

NASA (COVER) CONTRIBUTORS Justin Bastien Whenever we need a photographer who can handle tough conditions, we

Justin Bastien

NASA (COVER) CONTRIBUTORS Justin Bastien Whenever we need a photographer who can handle tough conditions, we

Whenever we need a photographer

who can handle tough conditions, we call Californian Bastien. He’s swum in the icy waters of the Pacific for us and shot eagle hunters in Mongolia. This time we sent him to the Johnson Space Center, NASA's astronaut boot camp. Bastien's opinion after three days in the heart of the US space programme:

"Astronauts are heroes. Period." PAGE 30

"Astronauts are heroes. Period." P A G E 3 0 Andrew Woffinden The London-based fashion and

Andrew Woffinden

The London-based fashion and portrait photographer is used to working with exceptional women, shooting the likes of Oscar-nominee Naomi Harris forheroes. Period." P A G E 3 0 Andrew Woffinden Esquire for the Observer . Still,

Esquire

for the Observer. Still, up-and-coming pop star Dua Lipa impressed him. “She has such a cool vibe,” he says. “She's really confident and knows exactly what she wants.” PAGE 4 4

and rap music’s enfant terrible M.I.A.

EDITORIAL

The outer limits

Space. In terms of exploration, discovery, risk, reward and pushing the boundaries of human experience, there is no greater adventure. In every way, it is the ultimate trip. However, in more than 50 years of manned space flight, just under 550 people have earned a ticket for that journey. In this issue we travel to Houston, to NASA’s astronaut boot camp to identify the key ingredients that separate regular folk from those with the right stuff. Exploring the limits of experience can also be a mission conducted in inner space, as exemplified by drum-and-bass legend Goldie, who swapped the celebrity merry-go-round for a voyage deep into self via bikram yoga. He’s emerged with a remarkable new solo album, his first in 18 years. Finally, for diver Gary Hunt, going to the edge is a literal challenge, but with six Red Bull Cliff Diving World Series titles to his credit, it’s one the Briton has mastered with exceptional skill. As he prepares to battle for a seventh, we find out how he plans to push the boundaries of the sport even further and why the only fear of falling he now has to deal with is that of slipping into routine. We hope you enjoy the issue.

06

of falling he now has to deal with is that of slipping into routine. We hope

THE RED BULLETIN

of falling he now has to deal with is that of slipping into routine. We hope

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CONTENTS

July

FEATURES

30

NASA boot camp

US astronauts aren't made in space, but an hour south of Houston, Texas. The Red Bulletin goes to space school

44

Dua Lipa

The pop newcomer with the singles chart in her pocket

50

Kitesailing

How one man overcame his dyslexia and took his fledgling sport – and sustainable energy – to the next level

58

Goldie

The yoga-loving, MBE-awarded, drum-and-bass don returns

64

Gary Hunt

Plunging from a 27m-high platform is all in a day's work for the British cliff-diving champion

68

Festival highlights

Red Bull TV is airing some of the summer's top music events. Here's who to look out for, according to giants of the scene

74

Colombia to Argentina

Two men, four wheels, 10,685km, 49 days, one gruelling ride

Two men, four wheels, 10,685km, 49 days, one gruelling ride 08 44 FULLY FOCUSED Singer and

08

men, four wheels, 10,685km, 49 days, one gruelling ride 08 44 FULLY FOCUSED Singer and model

44

FULLY FOCUSED

Singer and model Dua Lipa doesn't do contingency plans. She has her eye on one prize only: pop success

FULLY FOCUSED Singer and model Dua Lipa doesn't do contingency plans. She has her eye on

NASA, ANDREW WOFFINDEN, RED BULL CONTENT POOL

30

STAR PUPILS

NASA, ANDREW WOFFINDEN, RED BULL CONTENT POOL 30 STAR PUPILS What does it take to become

What does it take to become an astronaut? We spend three days at NASA boot camp and get the expert advice of its space veterans, instructors and graduates

THE RED BULLETIN

64

DROP ZONE

For cliff-diving legend Gary Hunt, the thought of a nine-to-five office job is far scarier than any of his breathtaking leaps

BULLEVARD

Life And Style Beyond The Ordinary

12

Actor Josh Duhamel talks sons, buddies and Transformers

14

Red Bull X-Fighters hits Madrid

16

Secret garden: Cuba's Jardines de la Reina are diving heaven

18

Eiza González, bank-robbing beauty in new film Baby Driver

20

Fancy a pizza? These smart headphones have it sorted

22

Disappearing ink: the tattoo that vanishes after a year

23

The Aerion AS2: fly supersonic with your gin 'n' tonic

24

Peru's wall-mounted hotel

26

Eating local in the Faroes

28

Land Rover to the rescue

GUIDE

Get it. Do it. See it.

84

Highlights from Red Bull TV this month

86

Game-changing chronographs

88

Unmissable events for your calendar

90

Essential outdoor gear

96

Global team

98

Neymar Jr's Five comes home

for your calendar 90 Essential outdoor gear 96 Global team 98 Neymar Jr's Five comes home
for your calendar 90 Essential outdoor gear 96 Global team 98 Neymar Jr's Five comes home

09

ADVENTURE ISN’T A REHEARSAL. PREPARE ACCORDINGLY. FindMeSPOT.com/RB HELP/SPOT ASSIST S.O.S. Request help from your
ADVENTURE ISN’T A REHEARSAL.
PREPARE ACCORDINGLY.
FindMeSPOT.com/RB
HELP/SPOT ASSIST
S.O.S.
Request help from your
friends and family at your
GPS location. Or ask for
help from professional
assistance organizations.
TRACK
In an emergency, send an
S.O.S. with your GPS location
to GEOS, who facilitates
search and rescue.
CUSTOM MESSAGE
Automatically send and
save your location and
allow contacts to track your
progress using Google Maps ™ .
CHECK IN

Let contacts know where you are by sending a pre-programmed message with your GPS location.

by sending a pre-programmed message with your GPS location. Let contacts know where you are and

Let contacts know where you are and that you’re okay with a pre-programmed message.

BLEACHER + EVERARD/CONTOUR BY GETTY IMAGES

LIFE

&

STYLE

BEYOND

THE

ORDINARY

BULLEVARD

JOSH DUHAMEL “DON’T BE A RECKLESS SOUL, BE A BRAVE SOUL.”

PAGE 12

“DON’T BE A RECKLESS SOUL , BE A BRAVE SOUL.” PAGE 12 The affable action star

The affable action star returns as Captain Lennox in

Transformers:

The Last Knight 11
The Last Knight
11

BULLEVARD

 

After sitting out

he’ll play a sergeant in the

josh duhamel: Well, I’m

 

Transformers: Age of

a

little greyer, that’s for

Extinction, original series cast member Josh Duhamel returns as Lt Colonel William Lennox in Transformers: The Last Knight, the fifth film in Michael Bay’s franchise. The former model and soap opera star, now 44, has more authority figures in his future:

video game Call of Duty: WWII (out in November), and a detective investigating the murders of Tupac Shakur and Biggie Smalls in the USA Network pilot Unsolved. We called Duhamel in Los

sure. It’s not easy to be part of a [franchise] that’s this successful and global. It was a lot of fun. I remember meeting [with Bay’s] producers for a different movie and he poked his head in and goes, “I want to show you what I’m working on” – this was 2002 or 2003. And I was like, “Transformers? Like the cartoons from the ’80s? That sounds like an awful idea.” [Laughs.] But I went over there anyway just to see. And I got it immediately:

they’re completely reinventing

Another thing he just said recently: it was early spring, the lake had just thawed and the water was very cold. When

Angeles – where he lives with

this. A month or so later he calls me in to read for it; we’re

I

put my foot in, I was like,

wife Fergie, of the Black Eyed Peas – while he packed for

off to the races. I try not to take any of this stuff for granted;

“Oh my God, I can’t jump in

that. I’ll have a heart attack.”

a recent trip to London. any job that I get, I try to treat And

a recent trip to London.

any job that I get, I try to treat

And he’s like, “Come on, be a

like it’s my last. it brave soul!” So I went for it.

like it’s my last. it

it

brave soul!” So I went for it.

the Red bulletin: The first Transformers film turns 10 this year. Does your life today feel drastically different to a decade ago?

Josh Duhamel

Once sceptical of a film based on toys, the actor counts his blessings as he returns for the fifth instalment of the Transformers franchise

TAKING NOTHING FOR GRANTED

12

the Transformers franchise TAKING NOTHING FOR GRANTED 12 You studied biology, with a view to becoming

You studied biology, with a view to becoming

That’s how I want my son to approach things. Don’t be a

a

dentist. That seems

dentist. That seems

reckless soul, be a brave soul.

like a very practical plan.

like a very practical plan.

Are you directing your first

When did you decide that

movie this summer?

you wanted to become

Looks like it! I wrote it with

a professional actor? my writing partner, Jude

my writing partner, Jude

I think I always wanted to

Weng [who has directed

be an actor, I just didn’t have

episodes of Crazy Ex-

a

clue coming from North

Girlfriend, Fresh Off the Boat

Dakota how you even begin. People ask me about their kids, “How do I help them get into the business?” How about letting them finish school and grow up a little? Because you’ve gotta be

and Black-ish]. It’s based on this thing that my buddies and I do every year called the Buddy Games. We visit Montana or Minnesota – like 20 childhood friends, we’re all still very tight – and it’s

careful what you wish for. a weekend of straight-up

a

weekend of straight-up

But you can escape fame at

competition, from go-kart

your cabin in Minnesota racing to paintball to golf

racing to paintball to golf

There’s something in my

There’s something in my

and ping-pong. Wiffle ball’s

blood that says I need space

a

big one. There’s also a lot

around me. Now that my boy [Axl] is almost four, he’ll be old enough to start coming with me. It’s literally out in the middle of the woods on

of beer drinking going on. Ultimately, it’s about how important friendships are as you get older. So it’s got a sweetness about it, but it’s

this lake, and you would

also a comedy.

never, ever know it’s even

Transformers: The Last Knight

there. It’s my happy place. ever know it’s even Transformers: The Last Knight What lessons from your dad will you pass

What lessons from your dad

will you pass on to your son? there. It’s my happy place. What lessons from your dad Try to find a woman who

Try to find a woman who loves her dad. Try to find somebody who sees life from an optimistic point of view.

is in cinemas from June 22

THE RED BULLETIN

When he’s not in a suit, Duhamel likes to relax at his cabin in Minnesota
When he’s not in
a suit, Duhamel
likes to relax at his
cabin in Minnesota

THE RED BULLETIN

When he’s not in a suit, Duhamel likes to relax at his cabin in Minnesota THE

13

PIERRE-HENRI CAMY

JOERG MITTER/RED BULL CONTENT POOL, JEAN-FRANÇOIS MUGUET

14

PIERRE-HENRI CAMY JOERG MITTER/RED BULL CONTENT POOL, JEAN-FRANÇOIS MUGUET 14 THE RED BULLETIN
PIERRE-HENRI CAMY JOERG MITTER/RED BULL CONTENT POOL, JEAN-FRANÇOIS MUGUET 14 THE RED BULLETIN

THE RED BULLETIN

BULLEVARD

Freestyle motocross

An arena steeped in history, flying motocross bikes and one rider, Tom Pagès, whose goal is to relentlessly push the boundaries of the sport

MAKING MAGIC IN MADRID

THE RED BULLETIN

Trick shot: Tom Pagès takes flight at Madrid’s Las Ventas arena in 2016

The Red Bull X-Fighters

FMX competition at Madrid’s historic Las Ventas Arena

is loud – really loud. As a

competitor blips the throttle of his motocross bike ahead of a run, the volume in the stand goes up in tandem. A fan with

a chainsaw motor salutes the

rider with a matching throttle burst and the crowd responds with a roar of approval. It’s a seething cauldron of passion, an arena in the most ancient sense, where combat is intense, full of risk, but rewarded with

huge admiration from the 24,000 fans crammed into the

venerable bullring. “I get the feeling that there are more people and it’s louder every year,” says Tom Pagès, winner

of the last four events here.

says Tom Pagès, winner of the last four events here.   For many, the Frenchman  
  For many, the Frenchman   is the sport’s most heroic competitor and their deafening
 

For many, the Frenchman

 

is

the sport’s most heroic

competitor and their deafening validation is a measure of the ingenuity he brings to the event. “Creativity makes this sport interesting and playful. I

like being different. It motivates me.” His motto is simple and a courtesy to the crowd. “Would

I

ever come to Madrid without

new tricks? Never!”

new tricks? Never!”

Pagès has a tip for those who can’t be at Las Ventas on July 7, but who will be watching live on Red Bull TV. “What should you concentrate on? The tricks speak for themselves. The complexity depends on the risk and the scale. Style is important but how well the action flows is

the decisive factor.”

the decisive factor.”

redbullxfighters.com

action flows is the decisive factor.” redbullxfighters.com Tom Pagès, 32: a hero of the international FMX

Tom Pagès, 32: a hero of the international FMX scene

action flows is the decisive factor.” redbullxfighters.com Tom Pagès, 32: a hero of the international FMX

15

ANDREAS TZORTZIS

DDP IMAGES, INSIGHT MEDIA

BULLEVARD

Rare species of crocodile hide out in the mangrove islands
Rare species of
crocodile hide out
in the mangrove
islands

Divers’ delight

Think Cuba has been frozen in time since the ‘60s? Wait until you see its reefs – they’re as pristine as they always were

CUBA’S

MOST

EXCLUSIVE

PARTY

resist Caribbean spiny lobster – restricting the quota of divers to just 500 a year and transforming the Jardines into a marine park. A mere 80km offshore, the mangrove-island- dotted expanse sprawls over 1,700 square kilometres and offers the most diverse and

16

1,700 square kilometres and offers the most diverse and 16 protected diving in the world. Morays,

protected diving in the world. 1,700 square kilometres and offers the most diverse and 16 Morays, stingrays, groupers, barracudas, zebrafish and

Morays, stingrays, groupers, barracudas, zebrafish and more swarm among giant coral mountains in some of the healthiest reefs in the world. The Galapagos of the Caribbean is a time machine, and scientists believe it’s relatively unchanged since Christopher Columbus first moved through these waters (and gave the archipelago its name). But the most prized sights have an even more prehistoric pedigree – salt- water crocodiles and 2m reef sharks prowl mere inches

from your face. salt- water crocodiles and 2m reef sharks prowl mere inches For more than 20 years, Italian

For more than 20 years, Italian dive company Avalon Outdoor has owned the exclusive rights to dive, and the distance from land requires

T he diving world’s

secret has been a solid six-hour bus ride from Havana for two decades. And with Cuba and the US normalising relations, the island’s capital is bracing for fresh swells of gringos there to ogle Chevy Bel Airs and overpay for drinks. But the secret spot? It’s in no danger. With unspoiled coral reefs and incredible biodiversity, the Jardines de la Reina has been a known entity in the global diving community since 1996. That’s when the Cuban government banned all fishing in these waters – bar the

unfortunately-too-tasty-to- you to book on one of their

three live-aboard boats or their funky floating hotel. You can get in two to three dives a day in water where visibility

runs up to 20m. get in two to three dives a day in water where visibility With the Great Barrier

With the Great Barrier Reef in peril due to overheating waters and invasive human activity, sights like this may

one day be a thing of the past.

Fortunately, no matter how many Americans join Cuba’s growing tourist throngs, the Jardines’ exclusive guest list means the spectacle off the island nation’s southern coast remains, at least for now, very

much a thing of the future. nation’s southern coast remains, at least for now, very www.cubandivingcenters.com Reef, nurse and silky sharks are

www.cubandivingcenters.com

very much a thing of the future. www.cubandivingcenters.com Reef, nurse and silky sharks are abundant in

Reef, nurse and silky sharks are abundant in the archipelago

THE RED BULLETIN

of the future. www.cubandivingcenters.com Reef, nurse and silky sharks are abundant in the archipelago THE RED
WINNING. WITH. TECHNOLOGY. ++ GREG CALLAGHAN WINS IRELAND EWS 2016 AND TWEEDLOVE INTERNATIONAL 2016 RIDING

WINNING.

WITH.

TECHNOLOGY.

++

GREG CALLAGHAN WINS

IRELAND EWS 2016 AND TWEEDLOVE INTERNATIONAL 2016

RIDING A CUBE STEREO 140 29’ER

TECHNOLOGY. ++ GREG CALLAGHAN WINS IRELAND EWS 2016 AND TWEEDLOVE INTERNATIONAL 2016 RIDING A CUBE STEREO
TECHNOLOGY. ++ GREG CALLAGHAN WINS IRELAND EWS 2016 AND TWEEDLOVE INTERNATIONAL 2016 RIDING A CUBE STEREO

TOM GUISE

NINO MUNOZ

Eiza González: “I’m a fangirl, a movie freak. My favourite ever film is Reservoir Dogs

BULLEVARD

Eiza González

The From Dusk Till Dawn: The Series star on channelling real-life tragedy into scorching success in high- octane heist movie Baby Driver

THE ONE THAT GOT AWAY

18

tragedy into scorching success in high- octane heist movie Baby Driver THE ONE THAT GOT AWAY
tragedy into scorching success in high- octane heist movie Baby Driver THE ONE THAT GOT AWAY

THE RED BULLETIN

THE RED BULLETIN

A t the age of 12, Eiza González lost her father in a motorcycle accident. Fifteen years later, she’s starring in Baby Driver – a film about a getaway driver who has to listen to music all the time to drown out tinnitus caused by a car crash that took his parents at an early age. The

parallels are clear. by a car crash that took his parents at an early age. The “It definitely hit

“It definitely hit home because I saw it first-hand. It’s one of the reasons I felt a connection with the story – this addiction to the adrenalin, the rush,” González tells The Red Bulletin. “I inherited that from my father, his addiction was running cars and motorcycles. It’s my homage to him, the way I let go of a part of my life that hurts. He lost his life doing what he loved, and that makes me feel really good about it. He would

be very excited about this.” loved, and that makes me feel really good about it. He would He would be very

He would be very excited about most of the choices González has made in her life. At age 17, the Mexican actress became a sensation in two hit Latin-American TV shows –

Lola

Sueña Conmigo – both about

a teenage girl with dreams of

being a rock star. In a case of life mimicking art, González released two successful solo albums before catching the eye of director Robert Rodriguez who cast her as Santanico Pandemonium, the snake-

dancing vampire vixen, in From

Dusk Till Dawn: The Series.

Érase

Una Vez and

  For Baby Driver , where every shot is choreographed to one of the summer’s
 

For Baby Driver, where every shot is choreographed to

one of the summer’s essential soundtracks, González’ affinity for music also played a crucial role. “When we got the script we got the playlist, so I drove to my audition listening to the music. It was a chance to get what [director] Edgar Wright was feeling. It really helped

me get into character.”

me get into character.”

That character is Darling, girlfriend to Jon Hamm’s Buddy, and a bank robber for whom González channelled

a

real-life criminal. “I based

her on Candice [Martinez], ‘the cell-phone bandit’. She’s famous for walking into

banks on her phone.”

banks on her phone.”

 

González also learned to

 

fire two machine guns at the same time (“They’re goddamn heavy – you’ve got to learn to control it. I had to lift a lot weights.”) and took part in car chases with co-stars Hamm,

Jamie Foxx and Ansel Elgort.

“The reason they look so real

is

because they are real – we

were in the car 16 hours a day.”

were in the car 16 hours a day.”

Next up, Gonzalez is in Alita Battle Angel, a Japanese manga adaptation that James Cameron has been trying to make for 17 years and which he’s now placed into the directorial hands of Robert Rodriguez. “My creativeness explodes around Robert, Edgar, James – insanely talented people who actually changed filmmaking. What

I want to do in my career is

curate amazing filmmakers, because being around that energy, it’s an adrenalin rush.”

babydriver-movie.com

is curate amazing filmmakers, because being around that energy, it’s an adrenalin rush.” babydriver-movie.com 19

19

FLORIAN OBKIRCHER

VINCI

An everyday assistant with 3D audio quality. Vinci costs from $129
An everyday assistant
with 3D audio quality.
Vinci costs from $129

20

assistant with 3D audio quality. Vinci costs from $129 20 BULLEVARDBULLEVARDBULLEVARD Vinci They double up as

BULLEVARDBULLEVARDBULLEVARD

Vinci

They double up as your smart assistant, suggest music, co-ordinate your appointments and even order pizza

SPEAK TO YOUR HEADPHONES

F ive years ago, phones learned how to speak to us. Now headphones are following
F ive years ago,
phones learned
how to speak to us. Now
headphones are following
suit. The first set of smart
3D-headphones are called
Vinci and could revolutionise
the audio market thanks to
a suite of functions that go far
beyond just listening to music.
So just what can these
Bluetooth cans do? Well,
they can play whatever song
you tell them to, by voice
command, but they’re also
gesture-controllable. They’re
noise-cancelling for optimum
sound quality and work as
standalone music player, with
32GB of storage. Best of all,
though, they don’t even need
to partner with a smartphone,
being cloud-connectable, so
you can access streaming
services, calendars, and all
your favourite apps direct
from the ’phones.
The headphones’ Alexa-like
assistance will not only plan
your route to work and order
you a car-share, but on your
daily run they work as a fitness
tracker and recommend
songs to match your tempo.
And if you’re still hungry after
a night out, Vinci will find
somewhere that’s still open
and order you a pizza. With a
15-hour power reserve, they
could just become your new
constant companion.
vinci.im

THE RED BULLETIN

a pizza. With a 15-hour power reserve, they could just become your new constant companion. vinci.im

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TOM GUISE

GETTY IMAGES

Test drive a tattoo for a year and if you like it, make it permanent
Test drive a tattoo for
a year and if you like
it, make it permanent
Ephemeral art

B ody art is older than recorded history

itself. Tattoos have been found on 3,000-year-old Egyptian mummies and human bodies of all kinds ever since. But whether tribal, criminal, on soldiers, sailors or followers of fashion, the motives for inking one’s body remain the same – social status, self-expression and commitment. A tattoo, after all, is permanent. Well, not for much longer.

tattoo, after all, is permanent. Well, not for much longer. ‘Tattoo fail’ memes may soon be

‘Tattoo fail’ memes may soon be a thing of the past

Ephemeral is a New York- based start-up that promises to deliver tattoos that vanish after a year. It’s the brainchild of NYU graduate Seung Shin, who, in 2011, got a tattoo that didn’t go down well with his family. The costly and painful laser removal procedure etched the need for a better

solution into his mind.

  The technology is simple – the reason regular tattoos are permanent is because the
 

The technology is simple – the reason regular tattoos are permanent is because the dye molecules are too large for the body’s immune system to break down. Ephemeral’s ink uses smaller molecules trapped in a structure large enough to resist the immune system, but which collapses after a year. After that, a solution can be applied to remove part or all of the tattoo, or the owner can just let it fade away. And if one year is too long, Ephemeral also has three- and six-month

options in the pipeline.

options in the pipeline.

Ephemeral is opening its first tattoo parlour in New York

Now you see it, in one year you won’t. Real-deal body art with a no-regrets return policy. The only thing you won’t get back is the money you spent

THE SELF- DESTRUCTING TATTOO

City in summer 2018 – with an estimated cost of US$50 to $100 for an average-size tattoo. Good news for anyone who’s ever appeared on Tattoo Fixers, although perhaps not for makers of the show. In 3,000 years, historians may have trouble finding any 21st- century mummies with comical

Homer Simpson mouths

tattooed across their buttocks.

ephemeraltattoos.com

22

century mummies with comical Homer Simpson mouths tattooed across their buttocks. ephemeraltattoos.com 22 THE RED BULLETIN

THE RED BULLETIN

century mummies with comical Homer Simpson mouths tattooed across their buttocks. ephemeraltattoos.com 22 THE RED BULLETIN

AREK PIATEK

AERION

AREK PIATEK AERION BULLEVARD This is why Aerion’s engineers are working on new methods that can

BULLEVARD

AREK PIATEK AERION BULLEVARD This is why Aerion’s engineers are working on new methods that can

This is why Aerion’s engineers are working on new methods that can outfox physics; wave- breakers and new aerofoils could split wavefronts and limit noise. The goal is similar flight times to Concorde, but with lower fuel consumption and 50 per cent more range. You could have breakfast in London and be in New York in time for that business lunch – as long as the queue at immigration isn’t too bad.

T his is one hell of an aeroplane.

The Aerion AS2, expected to make its maiden flight in 2021, has a luxury interior, three turbofans and a maximum range of 9,816km, and, with a long-range cruise speed of Mach 1.4, travels almost twice as fast as the quickest business jet today: the Gulfstream G650. “It would save CEOs an average of 17 working days

a year,” says the company’s spokesman, Sean McGeough. There’s just one little problem the engineers need to solve first: the plane literally packs a lot of bang for the 120 million bucks it will cost to buy one. Travelling at 1.4 times the speed of sound means one hell of a racket. The passengers on board – a maximum of 12 – won’t hear the constant sonic booming, but the noise would be slightly off-putting for the people living 15,000m below. This is no problem while crossing the Atlantic, but current laws make it illegal for flights over land, where the AS2 would have to creep along at 850kph (the standard flying speed for passenger jets).

An Austrian firm has also been involved in designing the cabin of the Aerion AS2

aerionsupersonic.com Aerion AS2 Coming soon: the supersonic business jet. Perfect for anyone with $120 million
aerionsupersonic.com
Aerion AS2
Coming soon: the supersonic
business jet. Perfect for anyone
with $120 million to spare
LOWERING
THE BOOM

THE RED BULLETIN

soon: the supersonic business jet. Perfect for anyone with $120 million to spare LOWERING THE BOOM

23

FLORIAN OBKIRCHER

NATURA VIVE

BULLEVARD

FLORIAN OBKIRCHER NATURA VIVE BULLEVARD Skylodge Guests who stay at this adventure hotel in Peru sleep

Skylodge

Guests who stay at this adventure hotel in Peru sleep on a rock face 400m above the valley floor

LIFE ON THE LEDGE

on a rock face 400m above the valley floor LIFE ON THE LEDGE D o you

Do you want to take the lift up to your hotel room? Then you’ve come to the wrong place. In order to put your feet up at this hotel – three glass pods suspended on steel cables – you’re going to have to sweat. It’s a 90-minute ascent along a via ferrata – a mountain route equipped with fixed ladders and cables. Skylodge Adventure Suites opened in Peru’s Sacred Valley three years ago and has since established itself as one of the

 

world’s most extreme hotels.

comes from solar panels

We talked to the owner,

We talked to the owner, attached to the pods.

attached to the pods.

37-year-old Ario Ferri. What if we have to go to

37-year-old Ario Ferri.

What if we have to go to

THe red bulleTin: How did

the toilet in the middle

you come up with the idea

you come up with the idea of the night?

of the night?

of a hotel on a rock face? Not a problem. The pods have

of a hotel on a rock face?

Not a problem. The pods have

ario ferri: I came here nine years ago to install a via ferrata. The work took over

separate bathrooms with a toilet and sink. And there’s a 25-litre canister of water

a year and during that time

available for a quick shower

I mostly slept in portaledges

I mostly slept in portaledges every morning.

every morning.

on the rock face. I wanted

on the rock face. I wanted Is there breakfast in bed?

Is there breakfast in bed?

 

to share that wonderful

Actually, until recently there

sensation with others. was. But now there’s a fourth

sensation with others.

was. But now there’s a fourth

What mod cons can guests

pod: a dining area guests

look forward to? reach via a horizontal beam.

look forward to?

reach via a horizontal beam.

The three pods I built all have

You could say that just getting

three beds and four tables.

three beds and four tables. to breakfast is an adventure.

to breakfast is an adventure.

 

The electricity for the lamps

naturavive.com

Ready for a night of high anxiety? You can book the Skylodge Adventure Suites on airbnb.com for £358

a night (including breakfast and gourmet dinner). Tip: make

enquiries three to four months ahead

24

£358 a night (including breakfast and gourmet dinner). Tip: make enquiries three to four months ahead

THE RED BULLETIN

£358 a night (including breakfast and gourmet dinner). Tip: make enquiries three to four months ahead
LAUGAVEGUR, ICELAND Goal Zero team member Philipp Tenius crossing the volcanic highlands completely unsupported,
LAUGAVEGUR, ICELAND Goal Zero team member Philipp Tenius crossing the volcanic highlands completely unsupported,
LAUGAVEGUR, ICELAND
Goal Zero team member Philipp Tenius crossing
the volcanic highlands completely unsupported,
relying solely on the Nomad 20 and Sherpa 100 kit.
Photo by Andres Beregovich.

ROUGH

RUGGED

READY

There is more to the world than what the grid has to offer. Our products are built to help you rethink the way you venture into the world.

Learn more at GOAL ZERO .COM

JUSTIN HYNES

CLAES BECH-POULSEN

BULLEVARD

KOKS

At his remote, Michelin-starred restaurant in the Faroe Islands, chef Poul Andrias Ziska is championing truly local cuisine

NORTHERN

EXPOSURE

Like a sourly pickled gastronomic juggernaut, the vogue for Nordic food rolls on. In the never-ending

quest to distil the cuisine to its essence, the search for the ultimate taste of the north comes down to a pungent

mix of exclusivity and ultra-

local ingredients. And in

chef Poul Andrias Ziska’s

restaurant, KOKS, this mission

Nordic cuisine to the next level, sourcing everything from the islands’ meagre store. The 26-year-old has taken staple island flavours such as sorrel and sea purslane and fused them with Faroese ingredients such as skerpikjøt, mutton hung in sheds near the sea until it’s covered with a blue fungus – a fermenting

sea until it’s covered with a blue fungus – a fermenting 26 has a new champion.
sea until it’s covered with a blue fungus – a fermenting 26 has a new champion.

26

has a new champion.

has

a new champion.

Located in Kirkjubøur – a minuscule village with just 75 inhabitants at the last count – on the tiny Faroe Islands (population around 49,000), the splendidly isolated kitchen is the

technique called ræst. The only trouble is Ziska’s success has put the restaurant firmly on the foodie map

The only trouble is Ziska’s success has put the restaurant firmly on the foodie map and the Michelin award has led to a surge of interest. As a consequence, getting the chance to sample

archipelago’s first Michelin-

KOKS’ 17-course tasting

starred restaurant. menu during the islands’

starred restaurant.

menu during the islands’

short summer season could

prove nigh on impossible. menu during the islands’ short summer season could koks.fo Because of the Faroes’ remoteness and scarcity

koks.fo

Because of the Faroes’ remoteness and scarcity of resources, Ziska has taken

remoteness and scarcity of resources, Ziska has taken Ziska uses every resource the islands have to

Ziska uses every resource the islands have to offer

remoteness and scarcity of resources, Ziska has taken Ziska uses every resource the islands have to

THE RED BULLETIN

remoteness and scarcity of resources, Ziska has taken Ziska uses every resource the islands have to

ROBERT SPERL

LAND ROVER

BULLEVARD

Drone zone

Land Rover is building a lifesaver for the Red Cross, complete with its own reconnaissance drone

ULTIMATE

SEARCH

ENGINE

with its own reconnaissance drone ULTIMATE SEARCH ENGINE W hen Land Rover wanted to make the

When Land Rover wanted to make the ultimate Red Cross rescue vehicle, they turned to their Special Vehicle Operations (SVO) Department, the division created to develop performance machinery, and all the toys James Bond gets to play with. The result of SVO’s work has now arrived, under the title Project Hero. Based on the 240hp all- wheel drive Discovery, the division’s engineers have kitted it out with everything a Red Cross rescue team could need, including it’s own roof-

Red Cross rescue team could need, including it’s own roof- mounted drone, which thanks to self-centring

mounted drone, which thanks to self-centring and magnetic retention technology built into the car, can land on Project Hero while the vehicle is in motion. Operated via a simple tablet app, the drone, while airborne, can transmit live footage to the Red Cross’s emergency response teams, helping them react more quickly and effectively. The Hero, which has been developed for the Austrian Red Cross will be first deployed for a year at Erzberg in the mountainous Styria region where it will be used in simulations to develop new techniques for disaster relief and on test-runs for complex natural disaster scenarios.

Project Hero: a drone taking off from the roof of the Discovery
Project Hero: a drone
taking off from the roof
of the Discovery

landrover.com

disaster scenarios. Project Hero: a drone taking off from the roof of the Discovery landrover.com 28

28

disaster scenarios. Project Hero: a drone taking off from the roof of the Discovery landrover.com 28

THE RED BULLETIN

disaster scenarios. Project Hero: a drone taking off from the roof of the Discovery landrover.com 28
UNLEASH YOUR LEGS. I AM MORE THAN ONE www.dare2b.com
UNLEASH YOUR LEGS. I AM MORE THAN ONE www.dare2b.com
UNLEASH YOUR LEGS.
UNLEASH YOUR LEGS.
UNLEASH YOUR LEGS. I AM MORE THAN ONE www.dare2b.com
I AM MORE THAN ONE
I AM MORE THAN ONE

www.dare2b.com

ANOTHER DAY AT THE OFFICE WORDS: ANDREAS ROTTENSCHLAGER PHOTOGRAPHY: JUSTIN BASTIEN To date, fewer than
ANOTHER
DAY
AT THE
OFFICE
WORDS: ANDREAS ROTTENSCHLAGER
PHOTOGRAPHY: JUSTIN BASTIEN
To date, fewer than 220 people have qualified to conduct
spacewalks. So how do astronauts prepare for the most
dangerous mission of their careers?
NASA
SINCE 1961, NASA ASTRONAUTS HAVE BEEN TRAINING AT THE JOHNSON SPACE CENTER IN TEXAS FOR
SINCE 1961, NASA
ASTRONAUTS HAVE
BEEN TRAINING AT THE
JOHNSON SPACE
CENTER IN TEXAS FOR
THE GREATEST
ADVENTURE ANY
HUMAN BEING CAN
UNDERTAKE: SURVIVING
IN SPACE. THE RED
BULLETIN VISITS SPACE
BOOT CAMP TO QUIZ
NASA’S EXPERTS
ON TEAMWORK,
FITNESS AND ERASING
THE NOTION OF
COMFORT ZONES
IN THE NASA POOL
At the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory in Houston, astronauts
practise spacewalks in conditions similar to weightlessness in
space. There is a mock-up of the International Space Station at
the bottom of the hangar-sized pool
THE GIANT A Saturn V rocket – some 110m long – at the Rocket Park
THE GIANT
A Saturn V rocket – some 110m long – at the Rocket Park
Museum in Houston. The largest rockets ever built by NASA took
24 astronauts to the Moon and back between 1968 and 1972
35
PRECISION WORK Astronauts learn how to dock incoming objects with the International Space Station on
PRECISION WORK
Astronauts learn how to dock incoming objects with the
International Space Station on the Systems Engineering
Simulator in Houston. Pictured: a Japanese supply ship
hovering over the robotic arm of the ISS (top left)

NASA

NASA O ur journey into space starts behind a mousy-grey, wire- mesh fence. It’s 7am and

O ur journey into space starts behind a mousy-grey, wire- mesh fence. It’s 7am and we’re at the entrance to the Lyndon B Johnson Space Center, an hour’s drive south of Houston. A series of massive, faceless buildings and a network of

never-ending link roads, there is little to suggest that here on the Gulf Coast of the United States they are pushing back the frontiers of human experience. For five decades now, the NASA astronaut corps – currently 30 men and 14 women – have been learning how to survive in space here, supported by a 3,200- strong team of technicians and engineers. There is almost nowhere else on Earth where so many highly qualified people work together to solve such complex problems. Almost nowhere else does one learn so much about teamwork, self- belief, fear and taking the initiative.

The Red Bulletin spent three days talking to veterans, instructors and the high-flyers of the current crop of astronauts. The result: a NASA guide to space that also delivers expert tips for how to live life on Earth.

also delivers expert tips for how to live life on Earth. HOW TO BECOME AN ASTRONAUT

HOW TO BECOME AN ASTRONAUT

EXPERT:

CHRIS CASSIDY, 47 STATUS:

CHIEF OF THE ASTRONAUT OFFICE DAYS SPENT IN SPACE:

181

PREVIOUS CAREER:

NAVY SEAL

T he red bulletin: As Chief of the Astronaut Office, you’re one of those responsible for training

and selecting new NASA astronauts. What would we need to be particularly good at to get onto your team? chris cassidy: We’re looking for people who can get along with their colleagues, but also someone you trust has his or her side of the mission taken care of in the most complex of situations. We’re also looking for good teammates, somebody smart, capable and who’s technically sound…

Cassidy’s first launch into space in the Space Shuttle Endeavour on July 15, 2009, in
Cassidy’s first launch into space in the Space Shuttle Endeavour on July 15, 2009, in Florida

THE RED BULLETIN

Sounds tough. It’s hard. So is picking out candidates in the selection process. We don’t go by testimonials. If somebody has great grades at a fantastic university it doesn’t mean he’s going to be a great astronaut. So, what makes a great astronaut? Someone with a quick sense of being able to prioritise. When you fly into space, lots of important things are happening at the same time. An astronaut always thinks:

“What’s the next thing that could kill me?” You’ve spent 181 days in space. What was your most dangerous situation? The two re-entries back to Earth from the International Space Station (ISS). With

“WHAT’S AN ASTRONAUT’S SECRET WEAPON AGAINST PANIC? WIGGLING YOUR TOES”

45 minutes to go we were at 17,500mph, and suddenly were going at zero. The other risky time is spacewalks. You leave the protective shell of the space station to go and work on the outside of the ISS. You’re one of only two people to have got through both Navy SEAL training and the NASA astronaut selection process. What’s the secret? The trick is understanding the difference between, “I can deal with this myself,” or, “OK, I’m getting overwhelmed. I need to offload some of these tasks.” That’s all? You ask for help? Exactly. Think of people as buckets. When your bucket is full, you need to offload some of these tasks. When your bucket is empty and you’ve got capacity, you take on some of theirs. A good teammate understands and looks around to see if others need a little help. That happened in SEAL training a lot. Teamwork helps you master even the toughest tasks. Difficult tasks often pop up without warning in space. Do you teach young astronauts a trick in case they panic in spite of all they’ve learnt in training? Wiggle your toes. You’re joking! Not at all. If you wiggle your toes, it’s surprisingly relaxing. It settles you right down, at least for a second. Then you can find your bearings again.

it’s surprisingly relaxing. It settles you right down, at least for a second. Then you can

37

“WHEN YOU’RE FLYING JETS, ANY MISTAKE CAN END IN TRAGEDY. THAT STRENGTHENS YOUR NERVES.” VICTOR
“WHEN YOU’RE
FLYING JETS,
ANY MISTAKE
CAN END IN
TRAGEDY. THAT
STRENGTHENS
YOUR NERVES.”
VICTOR GLOVER,
ASTRONAUT
THE FLEET
Ellington Air Field near Houston is where NASA maintains its
20 T-38 supersonic training jets. Astronauts have to fly
at least four hours per month to hone their decision-making
skills in stress situations
39
39
HOW TO TRAIN FOR YOUR FIRST JOURNEY INTO SPACE EXPERT: VICTOR GLOVER, 41 DAYS SPENT

HOW TO TRAIN FOR YOUR FIRST JOURNEY INTO SPACE

EXPERT:

VICTOR GLOVER, 41

DAYS SPENT IN SPACE:

0

STATUS:

WAS ONE OF 8 CHOSEN FROM 6,000 ASTRONAUT APPLICANTS PREVIOUS CAREER:

F-18 FIGHTER PILOT

T he red bulletin: What makes you so special? victor glover: How do you mean?

You’re one of just eight members of the astronaut class of 2013. There were more than 6,000 applicants for those

eight positions. What do you think made them pick you? That’s difficult. NASA doesn’t give feedback. Beyond a certain point in the

selection process the résumés they have are really impressive. We’ve got military pilots with operational experience, folks that are scientists and who go down to work in Antarctica. It all comes down to two final interviews. How do NASA job interviews play out? You sit there in front of a panel of

astronauts and psychologists. In the first interview, they try to get to know you. In the second, they clinically dissect aspects of your past. It’s more a behavioural interview than a technical interview. It’s really an interview you can’t prepare for. But I bet you did prepare for it.

I tried to work a unifying theory into my

answers. That’s a good interview tip: find

a unifying theory.

What was yours? That theory was

service. I’ve been a

flight instructor and

I served my country

as a fighter pilot.

I tutored folks when I

was in high school.

I spoke a lot about my

family and raising my

four daughters. So what was different? Maybe I told a good joke. Or maybe NASA liked my poem.

Hang on a second… you had to write a poem to become an astronaut? Yes. We were told to write a poem,

Could you? Eyes fixed, gazing off into space/My mind in awe of the human race/This is all dizzying to me/Because I gave so much blood and pee/Happy to be here, via the colonoscopy place. NASA obviously liked your sense of humour. Did you have a strategy if a question was out of your comfort zone?

I don’t really have a comfort zone.

Really?

I told them about when I was flying at an air show and I made such a big mistake

I almost crashed my airplane, an F-18

Hornet, and what I learned from that. Of course a story like that is risky at a job

interview. But astronauts clearly have to deal with mistakes. And if you can speak openly about mistakes, nothing will rattle

you that easily. Once you’d made it into NASA, like every other newbie, you had to undergo the two-year astronaut candidate training programme. You make it to the final eight out of 6,000

people, and then suddenly within 24 hours you’re a rookie again. How does a high-performer like you deal

with that loss of status? Very well. It’s a challenge for everybody who comes into the astronaut training programme. But you’re learning from the best. There are astronauts in the office who have sat on top of bombs to go into space. I understand that teamwork is the most important quality for flying into space. But you still want to impress your bosses in order to get a seat. So how do you succeed as the “new guy” in the astronaut office?

I like to talk, I like to ask questions,

I want to know the details that it takes to be good. But you also want to make your commander’s life easier and be

a workload reducer. And in this job,

anybody can become your boss. It’s a very flat organisation. Where would you like to go on your first mission? There’s a good chance that someone from my class will be on the Orion some day [NASA’s latest spacecraft. The first manned flight is scheduled for 2019]. My personal dream is to walk on the Moon, which we haven’t explored so much in the last few decades. And the Moon is our interface with the Universe.

“NASA ALSO

CHECKS YOUR

CREATIVE

SKILLS. I HAD TO WRITE A POEM”

a tweet or a limerick.

A simulated tour of Mars: astronaut Victor Glover in the cockpit of the Space Exploration
A simulated tour of Mars: astronaut Victor Glover in the
cockpit of the Space Exploration Vehicle

40

A simulated tour of Mars: astronaut Victor Glover in the cockpit of the Space Exploration Vehicle

THE RED BULLETIN

THE LEGEND NASA astronaut John Young’s spacesuit for the first Space Shuttle test flight in
THE LEGEND
NASA astronaut John Young’s spacesuit for the first Space
Shuttle test flight in 1981. The American remains the only person
to have flown four spacecraft: Gemini and Apollo, the lunar
module and the Space Shuttle
Astronaut Tom Marshburn in the Virtual Reality Laboratory in Houston. “They have you spinning through
Astronaut Tom Marshburn in the Virtual Reality Laboratory in Houston.
“They have you spinning through space”
in Houston. “They have you spinning through space” HOW TO SURVIVE IN SPACE EXPERT: TOM MARSHBURN,
in Houston. “They have you spinning through space” HOW TO SURVIVE IN SPACE EXPERT: TOM MARSHBURN,

HOW TO SURVIVE IN SPACE

EXPERT:

TOM MARSHBURN, 56 STATUS:

ACTIVE ASTRONAUT

DAYS SPENT IN SPACE:

161

PREVIOUS CAREER:

FLIGHT SURGEON

T he red bulletin: You spent five

and a half months in cramped

conditions on the ISS working

with other astronauts from Canada and Russia. What’s the most important rule for living together in space? tom marshburn: Make sure your colleagues don’t have to clean up after you. Sounds like sharing a flat! But it’s true. Everybody’s got strengths and weaknesses, so you understand your own weaknesses and you account for that

Sharing personal experiences is a good way of teambuilding. Another is humour. If it is a situation that can’t be changed,

humour is a wonderful way to get around stressful times. We use that quite a bit. So you should be funny to be a good astronaut? I wouldn’t say we’re funny, but we’re people with a certain slant on life. It comes with humility. Being able to put humorous things in an uncomfortable situation. One of those happened on May 11, 2013, when you had to conduct an emergency spacewalk to repair an ammonia leak. Normally spacewalks are planned for nine weeks. You and Chris Cassidy had 36 hours. Can you train for that sort of situation? It was another good lesson in teamwork and reducing work processes. I opened my laptop on the ISS and launched the virtual reality programme. That way I could see every square centimetre of the space station from the outside and commit it to memory. There are those horrific scenes in sci-fi movies where the astronaut loses his grip when working outside the spacecraft and drifts off into space… That’s unlikely to happen because you’re tethered or attached to the ISS’s robotic arm. But we even train for that emergency in Houston, too. You put

on the VR headset and the programmers beam you to a like- for-like model of the ISS and have you spinning for about 30 seconds until you’re disorientated. You then have 30 seconds to fly back to the station with this little jetpack controller.

The toughest thing is you only have one attempt. Your first burst back in the right direction has to be very good. Are there skills you learned in space that you also use in everyday life? Totally. I can mentally turn frustration or regret into something useful very quickly. How does that work? It’s easy. Get over your ego. Frustration is often just an emotional response, not an objective one. In space you just don’t have the time to be mad if something doesn’t work out the way you wanted it to. And on Earth? The guy in front of me is slow to move off at a green light. Do I need to worry about that? About one minute? I don’t think so.

as much as you possibly can. Do your job. Don’t leave any tools behind or let them float around. The small things add up. How do you handle arguments on the International Space Station?

Give your input. But if the group consensus or your commander’s decision is not what you wanted, then dive in and embrace it anyway. The goal of a commander is to make sure that everybody has the same vision. What is a

commander’s vision in space? My commander, Chris Hadfield, had three goals: one, come back alive; two, get the mission done; three, have a good time. Number three might not sound important, but it’s key for a really prolonged mission in a stressful environment. The ISS cost $150 billion and astronauts from 18 nations have been on it so far. How does one forge a new international team each time? We try to get to know each other as well as we can before we fly and then once we’re together on board. When I celebrated Christmas on the ISS with my Russian colleagues in 2012, we told each other about our traditions from home.

“MY TIP IS GET OVER YOUR EGO. IN SPACE YOU DON’T HAVE THE TIME TO BE MAD”

42

traditions from home. “MY TIP IS GET OVER YOUR EGO. IN SPACE YOU DON’T HAVE THE

THE RED BULLETIN

BECOME A NASA ASTRONAUT* IN FOUR EASY STEPS

1. PREREQUISITES: US citizenship,

BSc in Engineering, Biology, Maths, Physics or related area. Three years of research or 1,000 hours of jet flight.

2. CANDIDATE SELECTION:

Occurs approximately every two to five years, depending on need. Apply in writing, undergo multiple medical tests and interviews. NASA hires the best (of up to 18,300 applicants) and gives them two years of basic training in Houston as Astronaut Candidates.

3. TRAINING: Includes outdoor

survival training, simulated malfunctions on a mock-up of the ISS, Russian lessons, spacewalk training in the NASA pool. In two years you become an ‘active astronaut’ and can

be deployed on missions to space.

4. MISSIONS: Working with NASA

partners (eg, SpaceX). Flights to the ISS (four launches per year with one or two US seats), the Moon (as of 2019) or Mars (in approximately 2030). * European applicants visit esa.int

(in approximately 2030). * European applicants visit esa.int HOW TO WORK OUT FOR THAT MISSION TO

HOW TO WORK OUT FOR THAT MISSION TO MARS

EXPERT:

REID WISEMAN, 41 STATUS:

ACTIVE ASTRONAUT

DAYS SPENT IN SPACE:

165

PREVIOUS CAREER:

TEST PILOT

T he red bulletin: What is the

of being an astronaut?

most physically challenging part

reid wiseman: Walking in an extravehicular mobility unit, or spacesuit, for six to eight hours. Once it’s pressurised it’s almost rigid. You can only move your arms in one direction, you can’t put your elbows up, and there’s no food, just water through a narrow straw.

Space fitness: astronauts on board the ISS work out on the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device to avoid bone atrophy in space (pictured: the same device in Houston)

bone atrophy in space (pictured: the same device in Houston) THE RED BULLETIN Sounds exhausting. It’s

THE RED BULLETIN

Sounds exhausting. It’s OK at first. But after four to five hours, you get really tired. How do you fight that in space? Double checks are incorporated into work processes as a matter of course. You make sure every movement is correct. If you can’t get the work done, phase out and come back into the Space Station. There is no harm in that. Still, it does mean interrupting a spacewalk, the planning of which has cost several million dollars. You have to have the mental fortitude. Killing yourself out there would be bad for everybody. How do NASA astronauts stay fit for physically demanding missions?

I like diversity: running, interval training, CrossFit, high-intensity training and weightlifting. Are there times when you don’t feel like working out? Totally. The trick is getting into your exercise gear. Once you’re in and you start, the rest is easy. Physical health is a sensitive area in your profession. High blood pressure can destroy an astronaut’s career. A sprained ankle can stop you going into

space. How does that affect you? It doesn’t until you’re a year away from flying into space. Then it absolutely affects you and you think about it all the time. We’ve had astronauts injuring themselves

a month before they were due to fly. You

start to build your own safety bubble. I put my bike in the shed. My family went on a ski trip. I didn’t ski. You try to live a normal life, but avoid all risks at the same time. NASA hopes to send the first astronauts

to Mars in the 2030s. Are our bodies up to spaceflights lasting years? That’s exactly what we’re trying to research right now. We just sent Scott Kelly up there for 340 days to try to understand how the body withstands weightlessness for so long. What about the mental part? Can our minds take the journey to Mars? It’s important to define expectations precisely from the get-go: six months in the spacecraft, 500 days on Mars and six months back. Then it’s mentally digestible.

Where it becomes a difficulty is if you have

a malfunction. You fly out and you spend

500 days orbiting Mars and never get to set

foot on it. We’ve had people whose time on the ISS was suddenly extended. That’s a difficult time, mentally. What did they do? They got over it and got their job done.

For updates from space, go to:

instagram.com/nasajohnson

What did they do? They got over it and got their job done. For updates from

43

“SCREW PLAN B” Words: Florian Obkircher Photography: Andrew Woffinden With three hits in the UK
“SCREW
PLAN B”
Words: Florian Obkircher
Photography: Andrew Woffinden
With three hits in the UK singles charts at the same time, Dua Lipa is
this year’s breakthrough act. The 21-year-old Anglo-Kosovan singer and
model reveals why single-mindedness has been the key to her success,
and explains how to turn disappointment into creativity
44

H ers is the very definition of the phrase ‘meteoric ascent’. In 2015, she was discovered by Lana Del Rey’s management. Last year, British media outlets such as NME and the BBC crowned her newcomer of 2016, and 12 months later she has had three singles in the UK top 15 simultaneously, each with more than 110 million YouTube views. For a firmly established star, these stats would be impressive, but for a newcomer such as Dua Lipa, who three years ago was still manning the front desk at

a London restaurant, they’re nothing short of extraordinary. Born in England in 1995, Lipa was 11 when her parents moved the family back to their native Kosovo. It was to be a surprisingly temporary repatriation. Aged just 15, she returned to London on her own, with one clear goal: a career in pop. But at a time when the music industry continues to grasp around desperately for a workable model, and in which record companies chase diminishing returns by flooding the charts with identikit acts, the air has got pretty thin at the top for genuine artists. So, how did Lipa break through? The short answer is that she bypassed the model and rebelled against the old rules of what

a pop star is meant to be. She’s approachable, insists on direct

contact with her fans, and speaks a musical language they understand. Her songs aren’t cookie-cutter examples of radio- friendly politesse. The recipe for success is to stay focused and not to consider alternative options, as the 21-year-old explains…

46

for success is to stay focused and not to consider alternative options, as the 21-year-old explains…

THE RED BULLETIN

“Empowering others is my main goal”
“Empowering
others is my
main goal”
“I’m the kind of person who needs one option only”
“I’m the kind
of person who
needs one
option only”

the red bulletin: The music industry has

been in crisis for years, reaching an audience

is increasingly difficult, and pop stardom isn’t

as glamorous as it once was. It’s a tricky landscape, so why target a career in music? dua lipa: Music has always been my one and only goal. No alternatives?

I never had a plan B. If you believe in what you’re

doing and you work really hard, things will work out. I’m a strong believer in that. Isn’t that a bit careless, considering how tough the music business is currently? You should always set your intentions on one goal. If you feel like you’ve got something to fall back on, you’ll always have that thing in your head. You

can always be like, “Well, if this doesn’t work out,

I can go and do something else.”

Many people would find that comforting… Not for me. I’m the kind of person who needs to have one option and one option only. And I just go and I work really hard. I would recommend that attitude to anyone. When did you figure out you wanted to become

a pop star?

When I went to school in Kosovo. I would get up in front of my friends and teachers and do school concerts. The second I discovered this passion,

I was like, “OK, I’m going back to London.”

How old were you when you had that realisation?

I was about 15.

And your parents were OK with you moving to London by yourself? They were like, “Are you sure you don’t want to go

to university first?” Luckily, there was another girl from Kosovo planning to do her masters in London, and my parents knew her parents. I said I would live with her, so it made the move much easier. How do you resist the temptations London has to offer when you’re experiencing the city as an unsupervised teenager?

I feel that because my parents had given me the

opportunity to have these experiences, I never had the urge to go against their word, or to do things I shouldn’t be doing. Around that time, you did all sorts of jobs in order to earn money on the side. One of those gigs was with a modelling agency… Yeah, but I was never cut out to be a model; I never got any real jobs. The agency was like, “If you lose a lot of weight, we’ll be able to put you out for more jobs.” That put me in a really bad mindset. At the same time, it inspired me to write [her 2016 single] Blow Your Mind (Mwah). Disappointment inspired you to write one of your biggest hits? All of my songs come from personal experience. Being able to take them and show other people

styling: Lorenzo Posocco make-up: Francesca Brazzo hair styling: Anna Cofone styling assistant: Megan Mandeville look 1: top: Marieyat; jaCket, trousers and boxers: Palm Angels; shoes: Manolo Blahnik look : top: Palm Angels

THE RED BULLETIN

“Writing

about your

sadness helps you

through it”

that we are all going through the same thing in one way or another, and being able to empower them, that’s my main goal. So, with your music you turn sorrow into creativity? Most of my inspiration comes from sadness. From break-ups to arguments, homesickness to missing someone, a hangover… anything can be inspiring. Most people try to avoid sadness.

But you take that emotion and turn it into something positive? Yeah, I write lyrics that are sad, but the music production has to be happy. A mixture of the two creates something completely on its own. Writing about these experiences helps you let go of those things. By taking sadness and being able to dance to it, I feel like it creates

a whole other world.

Would you encourage people to

embrace their sadness?

Absolutely. I think people should embrace all feelings. It’s important to express feelings and not be afraid to cry and let other people around you know how you feel. Confide in

a good friend or write a song. Or just

put your thoughts down on a piece of paper and never look at it again. It’s a good way of letting things out.

Is there a place for honest emotions in today’s pop industry?

I think pop music is really changing:

artists now have more creative leeway and they’re able to expand and change who they are, which

is just so much more empowering.

Take Rihanna: she’s been able to make an album like Anti, which is not something people would have expected from her. But it is essentially

pop, and it’s f--king cool to be able to reinvent yourself as an artist with every album you release. Did that feeling of creative freedom give you the confidence to call one of the songs on your debut album IDGAF – short for I Don’t Give A F--k – which is probably too explicit to be played on mainstream radio? If something is not really allowed to be heard on the radio, and someone wants to censor it, they can censor it. But right now, with the might of music-streaming services, the power is with the people and what they want to hear. And that democratisation also allows you to connect with your fans directly via social networks, so you’re no longer reliant on mainstream media… Exactly. I manage all my social media channels myself, and that’s really important to me. My fans have been with me on this journey from the very beginning. I feel very lucky to have their support. Do they appreciate your commitment? Any examples? When I was in Madrid recently, I was hanging outside with friends, and this fan came up to me and said, “You’ve helped me get over so many things, and I love listening to your music. I also got the same tattoo as

you.” I’ve got the word ‘angel’ on my shoulder – I guess it’s a metaphorical way of having someone look over me – and he had the same on his shoulder. That was really touching and overwhelming. I was like, “I’m meant to be doing this.” What advice would you, the pop

star, give to your 14-year-old self on Twitter? I would tell me to always believe in myself. I’d say, “If someone tells you that you can’t do something, you should prove them wrong. And,

obviously, forget about plan B.”

Dua Lipa’s eponymous debut album is out now; dualipa.com

prove them wrong. And, obviously, forget about plan B.” Dua Lipa’s eponymous debut album is out

49

AS A P I O N E E R I N G K I T
AS
A
P I O N E E R I N G
K I T E B OA R D E R ,
D O N
M O N TAG U E
R E L I E D
O N
DYS L E X I A
H I S
H A S
I N T U I T I O N
D E M A N D E D
O N
T H E
F I N D
WAT E R ,
N E W
A N D
H I S
H E
WAYS T O S O LV E
P R O B L E M S .
AT
T H E
I N T E R S E CT I O N
O F
T H E S E
T WO
S K I L L S
I S
T H E
CA N A D I A N ' S
M O ST
A M B I T I O U S
P R O J E CT
TO DAT E :
PA RT
R E C O R D
AT T E M PT,
PA RT
M I S S I O N
TO
R A I S E
AWA R E N E S S
O
F
A
S O U R C E
O F
A LT E R N AT I V E ,
S U S TA I N A B L E
E N E R GY
WORDS: ANDREAS TZORTZIS
PHOTOGRAPHY: BETSY PFEIFFER
FLY
LIKE
THE
WIND
50
Don Montague's kite-powered test trimaran. He's currently building an 18m version for the record attempt
Don Montague's
kite-powered test
trimaran. He's
currently building
an 18m version for
the record attempt

I T

’ S

A

L W A Y S

B

E E N

A

B O U T

 

P

R O M O T I N G

A

W A

R E N E S

S

A

N D

S H

A

R I N G

T

H

A T

T H I S

 

I S

POSSIBLE”

Since starting out in 2003, Montague has built several prototypes, the latest of which measures 9m in length and has hit speeds of 74kph

52

has built several prototypes, the latest of which measures 9m in length and has hit speeds

THE RED BULLETIN

THE RED BULLETIN

D

on Montague moves quickly from area to area as he shows us around a vast warehouse in a long-privatised Naval Air Force base on the edge of San Francisco Bay. The lifelong oarsman – and watersport’s most relentless innovator – points to bags filled with massive kites, and lifts the pontoon of the 18m mastless trimaran in which he hopes to set a world record. “Feel how light that is,” he says. Montague yanks on the chain of a roll- up door and a typical midwinter Bay Area gust blows through the building. Outside, beneath the arch of its protective canopy, is his crowning

Vancouver-born Montague made his name as a windsurfer. But it was his innovative kite designs that helped the young sport of kiteboarding expand rapidlybeneath the arch of its protective canopy, is his crowning achievement to date: a 9m trimaran

achievement to date: a 9m trimaran powered by up to 60sq-m of kite that gets up on foils almost instantly and hits speeds as high as 74kph. This impressive vessel is the culmination of years of (still ongoing) fine-tuning that began when he attached a kite to his parents’ sailboat in 1997. In the intervening years, he befriended Google founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin, who urged him to start a company – Makani Power – with the aim of using kites as a source of alternative wind power. They continue to act as investors, mentors and occasional test subjects. Montague left the company four years ago to allow himself more freedom to indulge the ideas bouncing around his hyperactive mind. These include – in no particular order – the Jetfoiler, a motorised surfboard that skims above the water; an electric- powered foiling boat, and a rapidly inflating platform that can be used as a launching point for kites, or as a marina. He also recently had the uncanny experience of being levitated in a human-sized drone. And then there's Montague’s biggest project: when the wind window allows for it later this summer, he and a crew of five other world-class sailors will depart Los Angeles for Hawaii in an attempt to beat

this summer, he and a crew of five other world-class sailors will depart Los Angeles for

53

K I T E E N E R G Y A N D I T

K I T E

E N E R G Y

A N D

I T S

POTENTIAL

So, how does kite electricity work? Makani Power – the company Montague helped found – has developed a kite outfitted with rotors that launch it 80-350m into the air. By looping slowly in a circle, the kite generates electricity, which is then transferred down a wire-packed tether to a ground station that can be accessed by the power grid. The resulting efficiencies are enormous:

the kite can generate up to 50 per cent more energy than typical wind turbines, which require a lot of land and wind at lower altitudes. So, far how off are we? “I think the world is really close,” says Montague. “There are five different groups working on this. I predict that in 10 years, it’ll actually be viable and they will be producing energy on a large scale.”

the wind-powered watercraft record for the 4,120km passage, which currently stands at three days, 18 hours and nine seconds. the red bulletin: How fast do you need to go to beat the current record? don montague: We would be pushing 35 and 40 knots (64-74kph), which is around 80-90 per cent

of the boat’s total performance. You’re pushing hard,

and that takes full concentration [so as] not to die.

If there’s an error made, everybody pays. The focus

required to go that fast is intense.

How prepared does your crew need to be?

A lot of the guys have already won the Olympics

and gone around the world a few times. They know

how to do tunnel vision and focus. I couldn’t train someone from scratch; they need a lifetime of [experience in] performance sport. Because what

I need [from each crew member] is for him to be

calm under the most extreme situations. I need him

to think and, more than that, to anticipate.

You spend 10 days of the month in Maui, but the operations base of your company, Kai Concepts, is in the Bay Area. Why? In San Francisco, you have like-minded people who are moving very quickly in a broad range of

skill sets. I was able to draw from the very best in the world. I’ve survived all these years because

I built an amazing team. I’ve always surrounded myself with much smarter people Were you always active as a kid growing up in Vancouver, Canada?

When I was 15, my father was involved in a project

in Alaska, developing really large freezing systems

on boats to process fish quickly, so I would go up

there in the summer. That was the first big travelling

I did, going somewhere really desolate – it takes five planes to get there, and there are storms. Having those experiences at a young age sets you up for how

your life will go, gravitating towards those extremes.

I thrived when that wind was blowing. The more

it blew, [the more] I was on the roof, on my belly,

hanging onto the railing with my feet sticking out.

My mother and father were freaking out, of course. Did this wild streak of yours manifest itself any other way?

I was the guy who always took the telephone apart.

I took apart everything I could find, but I didn’t

have a great background in engineering. Obviously

I didn’t go to university; I didn’t make it through

high school. I didn’t know I was dyslexic until I was

Right: the trimaran is loaded into the water in Alameda – an area chosen by Montague both for its immediate access to water and its location in the Bay Area, where he would have access to technology's top minds

40, so I was told the whole time that

I was stupid. And I was always

getting reprimanded by the family:

“Why don’t you get good grades? Why can’t you read?” So you [find

a way] to solve problems in different

ways. Here’s an example: I couldn’t learn, but I had to pass high school. This was before the era of small tape

recorders, so I took this tape recorder apart and made it real small, then

I ran a wire from it through my

long hair and into my ear. I taped everything I could [to help me] pass the final exam, because I couldn’t remember anything. The point of my story is: I found a solution. By going through the process of taping everything, eventually it got ingrained there. That’s a remarkable way of dealing with it… I’ve used similar methods to solve problems all my life. I’m always anticipating what the next move is. For example, if I was giving a speech in front of 500 or 1,000 people, I

would make the most insane videos of what I did. From an early age, I was already on the computer, editing like crazy to make this 10-minute video. Now the video is playing, the crowd is engaged… now I’m comfortable. Coping mechanisms…

I can’t remember your phone number

because all of the numbers are backwards. I can’t remember three numbers in a row. If you asked me to turn right, I’d have to stop and

think about it. But you throw me on

a board, there’s no issue, because

M

O N T A G U E

L E F

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A

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N T E D

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U T DO.

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I’M

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54

54
“ I C O U L D N ’ T T R A I N
I
C O U L D N ’
T
T
R
A
I N
A
C R E
W
M
E M B E R
F R O M
S C R A T C H ;
S
C R
A T C H ;
T H E Y N E E D A L I F E T I
T
H E
Y
N E E D
A
L
I F E
T I M E
O F
E
X P E R I E N C E
I N
P
E R F O R M
A
N C E

SPORT”

The five-man crew accompanying Montague on the record attempt will include Olympians and veterans of global circumnavigation

The steering of the kiteboat has evolved from a standard boat tiller to a hydraulic

The steering of the kiteboat has evolved from a standard boat tiller to a hydraulic system operated at the mast and from the kite control chair. Optimal operation requires a crew of three

“ I

H

A V

E

T

H I S

S A Y

E

I N G

I

L I V

B Y :

“ E

Y O U

I S

V

E R Y

D A Y

D O N ’ O N E

T L E S S

DAY

YOU

CAN”

all of the information is coming in and all of it is going out on what to do next. After high school, you ended up in Maui, where your natural skill at windsurfing earned you sponsorship. But you quickly gravitated towards the gear side of the sport, working on sail design… It’s a necessity for me to constantly design and change. I can’t ride the same thing twice – it’s not possible. You’re always trying to solve the next problem. You can imagine [what it’s like] being with people who aren’t like that. They go insane; they’re like, “Can’t we just sit on the beach?” And I’m like,

“What?!” I have this saying I live by: “Every day you don’t is one less day you can.” Then, in the late ’90s, you moved into designing sails for the totally new sport of kiteboarding…

I had already done 10 years of work on a computer

program to develop sails, and I had a whole team working on it every day, constantly improving it. So

I already had a base on [which] to do this right and

do it quickly. I immediately went into ‘Don Monster’ mode and made 300 prototypes. I was getting them out as quickly as FedEx could bring them in, and

I wasn’t even testing them because FedEx couldn’t

bring them in fast enough and I’d already moved on. That lead to all the different developments I made

that allowed the sport to grow. Sounds like you don’t do things at half speed. Where does that motivation come from? Some years, I spent more than four months a year in the factory, making it work. Nobody was asking me to do that; I just had to get it done. It’s like the Jetfoiler: nobody is asking me to make that, but I’m

in there working on it day and night so everybody can have that experience.

You’ve said that a desire to share that feeling is what led to the development of the kiteboat…

I wanted everyone to experience the kite. If you

can imagine going through the waves in a canoe, holding onto this kite, with everybody in the back,

and all the exhilaration of all this happening… they can’t believe how it feels. How did Larry Page and Sergey Brin get involved? They really believe in producing energy from kites, so they had already been down this path. If you

know them, [you’ll know] they’re constantly thinking about new ways to produce energy. It was nothing new to them when I said I had a gigawatt of power already out there

– every kitesurfer out there is making

power right now, as we speak, so of course I can make energy. So they said, “Let’s start a company and use the kiteboat as a promotional vehicle to spread the word.” It was that easy?

I did have to pitch to the top guys at

Google. I was nervous. I had my little presentation as to why we should do this, and I had only got one word in when Larry took over and said, “Yeah, Don’s amazing, we’re going to do this, and I’m going to do it if the company doesn’t want to, so let’s meet outside.” Then they left me in a little room for two minutes, and when they came back they had big smiles on their faces. They funded us $10million, right off the bat. You were with Makani Power until 2013, when you decided to leave, shortly before it was acquired by Google X. Why did you go? Our co-founder [and fellow kitesurfer] Corwin Hardham died unexpectedly at his desk. He was the leader of the team, and I was the behind-the-scenes guy. So when he passed, pretty much all of the burden was on me and other team leaders in the group. We were in the middle of negotiating at that time to bring the company into Google. Google purchased the company. It seemed like my role at that time was more babysitting than being at the forefront, testing. I can do that job, but it’s work. So I decided my skill set was more suited to pursuing the kiteboat, which was still my passion. But you stood to gain financially from an acquisition like that… Oh, I could’ve gotten tons of money and tons of stock, but it just wasn’t really what I was good at, and it wasn’t what I wanted to do. I’m not in it for the money. So, what do you hope to show with this record attempt? It’s always been about promoting awareness and sharing that this is possible, motivating people to look at kites as an energy source. Indirectly, it’s a record attempt, an ego thing; something I wanted to do. And I get everything I ever want. It just takes time, sometimes. More time.

project.kiteboat.com

I wanted to do. And I get everything I ever want. It just takes time, sometimes.

57

there is No Future

GOLDIE‘s career to date has been a long, strange journey: from a graffiti artist and drum-and-bass pioneer in the mid- 1990s to the yoga-obsessed MBE of today. Now, as he prepares to release his first album in nine years, the electronic music icon reveals how turning down Madonna might have saved his life, and why candyfloss chairs are overrated

58

might have saved his life, and why candyfloss chairs are overrated 58 WORDS: FLORIAN OBKIRCHER PHOTOGRAPHY:

WORDS:

FLORIAN

OBKIRCHER

PHOTOGRAPHY:

ALEX

DE

MORA

I nterviewing Goldie is like attempting to steer into a hurricane: no matter how hard you to try to chart the course of the conversation, the sheer power of his personality drives the discourse along unpredictable and surprising tangents. The drum-and-

bass don is a mercurial presence – in a good way. Goldie’s mind is constantly
bass don is a mercurial presence – in a good
way. Goldie’s mind is constantly racing, his
thoughts starbursts of originality and oddity;
his is a world where salt cellars and pepper
grinders become vehicles with which to
illustrate arcane theories. Like a deck of
cue cards, carefully prepared interview
questions end up discarded, flung aside
by this force of nature. His excitement comes
as no surprise, though: the 51-year-old Brit
is, after all, on the brink of unleashing his
first album in nine years.
Goldie rose to prominence in the mid-’90s
with the release of his critically acclaimed
masterpiece Timeless, becoming one of the
first drum-and-bass artists to gain mainstream
success. A double album, Saturnz Return,
followed in 1998, alongside acting parts
in films including The World Is Not Enough
and Snatch. The turn of the millennium saw
his career take a new direction, and after
appearances on TV shows such as Celebrity
Big Brother and Strictly Come Dancing
he was attracting more interest from the
newspapers than from the music community.
Then, a few years ago, Goldie pulled the
ripcord and bailed on life as a tabloid staple.
Having become obsessed with Bikram yoga,
he moved to Thailand with his family. The
new lifestyle stimulated his creativity: in a
BBC radio interview in 2014, he enthused,
“I think I’ve done more work in the last
four years than in the 10 before.” His new
album, The Journey Man, is the first fruit
of this new surge of inspiration; a return to
form that elegantly blurs the lines between
electronic music, jazz and pop.
Here, Goldie tells The Red Bulletin how
he beat his inner demons, and why heaven
means living in the moment rather than
sitting on a candyfloss chair for eternity…

60

than sitting on a candyfloss chair for eternity… 60 the red bulletin: It’s so pleasing to
the red bulletin: It’s so pleasing to see you return to music after such a
the red bulletin: It’s so
pleasing to see you return to
music after such a massive
life change. There were
obviously demons you had
to conquer along the way –
Why didn’t you take her
up on the offer?
I would have made a really
how did you manage that?
goldie: I went into therapy at
the Hoffman Institute, which
is probably the best thing I’ve
ever done. There are old ways
of dealing with addiction,
but I don’t think those ways
work in the new world. Some
people are attracted to the
12-step programme stuff,
but that doesn’t work for me.
Can you tell us more about
the Hoffman Institute?
I’m not allowed to say what
the Hoffman Process is, but
shitty album with Madonna.
And I would probably have
been found dead in a hotel
room with a needle stuck in
my arm. Instead, I decided
to commit to my own art.
You make it sound like
a simple decision…
It was, actually, because I have
12 people who sit inside me.
Um, OK… What did these
12 people say?
One said, “F--k Madonna – do
your own album!” Another
one was like, “No, you should
make commercial music –
you’re broke.” Then a third
one got involved: “I hate to
I will say this: the Hoffman
Process deals with a quantum
of aspects from both Eastern
interrupt you guys, but you
two need to stop arguing.
I think we should go for the
and Western [medicine]. A
lot of people in the West are
in denial about the Eastern
approach, which is why the
pharmaceutical companies
are so large.
How did you get to the
point where a complete
U-turn felt necessary?
artistic approach. Let’s be
calm about it. It’s in the best
interest of the boy.”
The boy?
The boy, Clifford [Joseph
Price, Goldie’s real name].
Finding the boy again – that’s
what the Hoffman Process
is basically about.
I was just sick of the way
things were. [That feeling]
started after the Mother
project [the 60-minute drum-
and-bass epic on Saturn
Returnz], where I bared my
soul. Madonna phoned me
and said, “Fly to America.
Come and do my album.”
We read that Bikram yoga
also played a part in
changing your life…
Yes, massively! We all live
in a world of selfies and
narcissism; it’s such a horrible
place. When you do Bikram
yoga, you’re in front of a
mirror. You’re looking at the

THE RED BULLETIN

ugly side of yourself. I always felt that I was the Dorian Gray of breakbeat.
ugly side of yourself. I always
felt that I was the Dorian Gray
of breakbeat.
In what sense?
Like, I have a grotesque picture
tucked away somewhere, and
every time I go astray, the
picture becomes more and
more grotesque. I see all the
shit. I see every wank, every
f--king scummy thing I did,
all of it. Yoga has helped me
to face my ugly self.
How?
You look into the mirror as
you break down because of
the heat. It’s a very cleansing
experience. I’ve seen big
people come in there with all
their super-aerobic muscles
and big egos, and after a while
you’d just see them on the
floor, confused and broken,
like children. I remember
when I was going there with
the same attitude, and Paul,
my guru, said to me, “Do me
a favour: next lesson, just
leave your ego at the door
and see how you get on.”
Did it help?
Absolutely. I learned to
breathe. I’m open now. But I’d
break for the first three years.
I walked out of my first three
lessons – I couldn’t take it.
Have these experiences
influenced the way you
approach music? Has it
made things easier?
Yes, it has become easier,
because what I do is invert.
What does that mean?
I’ll give you an example. One
of my favourite tunes of all
time is [jazz legend] Pat
Metheny’s Are You Going

THE RED BULLETIN

“I always felt I was the Dorian Gray of breakbeat“

“I always felt I was the Dorian Gray of breakbeat“ With Me?, but instead of just
“I always felt I was the Dorian Gray of breakbeat“ With Me?, but instead of just
“I always felt I was the Dorian Gray of breakbeat“ With Me?, but instead of just
“I always felt I was the Dorian Gray of breakbeat“ With Me?, but instead of just
With Me?, but instead of just covering it for the new album, I inverted it.
With Me?, but instead of just
covering it for the new album,
I inverted it. When I listened
to the tune as a kid, I always
thought the lead line was
a harmonica, and I only later
found out it’s a synthesizer.
So when I approached the
song, I was thinking, “What
if I play some real harmonica
in the back end of the track
and expand it? And what if
I use muted trumpets instead
of Pat’s guitar?” I inverted
the original and it sounds
freaky as f--k!
After a nine-year hiatus
from club music, are
you looking forward to
61

“In electronic music, you’re supposed to push things forward, not just press buttons like f--king monkeys in a circus“

62

you’re supposed to push things forward, not just press buttons like f--king monkeys in a circus“

THE RED BULLETIN

THE RED BULLETIN

One of the godfathers of drum-and-bass, Goldie co-founded the hugely influential record label Metalheadz in 1994

presenting your new album live with members of the Heritage Orchestra? The Journey Man was done

last April and May, but it wasn’t born until last weekend when

I played the new tracks live

with a band. That’s when the

songs came alive. They’re out now, like Casper [the Friendly Ghost] flying around in a house, and they’ll grow over time. And even when I’m gone, people will play them. The songs come alive when performed onstage? That’s an interesting viewpoint from someone involved in DJ culture for so long…

A lot of electronic producers

use a click track onstage, with

their music controlled by a machine. But my band plays completely live. This isn’t about hiding behind a little

black box or waving your arms in the air; it’s conducting

a small band and raising the

f--king deities. It’s what a jazz band does: you move around onstage. It’s new-age shit. How do you see the current state of electronic music?

I look at where people are

in electronic music now, and

I see them in the same way

as some dickhead with a big old mobile phone from the 1980s, and a beeper on his waist. You look like a dick! What are you doing with it? You need to commit more. In electronic music, you have

one job to do: you’re supposed

to push things forward, not

just press f--king buttons like monkeys in a circus. Every producer should ask himself, “Am I really applying my soul

to the music? Am I using the

full potential of what I can do?” You should be driving and joyriding that. But you know what? You’re not going to do that, so I’ll do it for you. But I don’t represent you. You made headlines last year when you threatened to melt your MBE in protest at the closure of legendary London nightclub Fabric. What was that about? People who think that I was actually going to melt the MBE

are missing the point. Let’s get this right for the record: it’s like your kid is nine years old and she’s won a 100m race, and you go, “That’s fantastic – let’s put your trophy away and

close all the tracks down.” The kid is destroyed, because she wants to run. If you look at David Rodigan, Pete Tong and myself, we were all given accolades for our contribution to music and community. And now they’re shutting loads of nightclubs down? How does that make sense? Why doesn’t the council make the neighbours [who have a problem with the clubs] sign

contracts with a clause that you can’t complain about music, because that’s why the f--k they moved in the area in the first place? On a more personal note, what does the future hold in store for you?

There’s this great quote of mine; I said when I was drunk at a party in Miami, but I still love it: what we do today, creates tomorrow. There is no future. Zero!

By that, do you mean we

should focus on living in

the moment? Do you know what heaven is? Heaven is hearing my wife’s voice, and my son playing; smelling the coffee machine in the morning. You know what hell is? Not being able to remember any of it when you’re gone. Do you know

what I mean? Sort of… Let’s say that you create this heaven with a candyfloss chair. Are you going to sit

in that candyfloss chair for eternity? You want to get out! And it’s the same with hell:

“You’ve been bad, so we’re going to keep on burning you!” But I don’t care – I get used to the pain after a while. So the only thing that matters is the present. That’s my whole thing.

The Journey Man is out on June 16; goldie.co.uk

the only thing that matters is the present. That’s my whole thing. The Journey Man is

63

TAKING THE PLUNGE The edge of a 27m-high platform is a terrifying place to be
TAKING
THE
PLUNGE
The edge of a 27m-high platform is a terrifying place to be – but cliff-diving legend
Gary Hunt would be more stressed out by a nine-to-five office job
Words: Matthew Ray
64
DEAN TREML/RED BULL CONTENT POOL
DEAN TREML/RED BULL CONTENT POOL

ROMINA AMATO/RED BULL CONTENT POOL

G

ary Hunt has six Red Bull Cliff Diving World Series titles to his name, and recently won gold at the fourth FINA High Diving World Cup – with a perfect 10 from the judges – cementing his status as the undisputed king of his sport. But as much as his astonishing record singles him out, it’s the Brit’s talent for inventing new, mind- bendingly complex dives that really sets him apart from the competition. However, instead of resting on his laurels, Hunt has dived even deeper into the rabbit hole, seeking to push the sport into uncharted territory. This hunger to test the limits of diving – and himself – is all the more remarkable when you consider the man behind these breathtaking achievements has a fear of heights…

66

these breathtaking achievements has a fear of heights… 66 the red bulletin: You’re a multiple Red
these breathtaking achievements has a fear of heights… 66 the red bulletin: You’re a multiple Red

the red bulletin: You’re a multiple Red Bull Cliff Diving champion – so it comes as a surprise to discover you have a bit of a fear of heights… gary hunt: Compared with a regular person, I don’t really have a fear of heights. I’m used to judging how much

I can fit into a 27m dive and imagining

throwing myself off high places, so that puts me in a different position when I’m on the edge of, say, a balcony. In that situation, I often scare myself to the point

where I think I’m going to throw myself off the edge, just because I’m so used to imagining making that jump. But this kind of feeling only came about when

I got used to being a high-diver.

So when you’re on the platform at a competition, totally focused and about to dive, you don’t feel that fear?

There’s definitely a point where you have to get into your zone. I used to go onto the platform, dressed normally, to have a look at the view beforehand, but

I would find it really scary and nerve-

racking because you can feel the wind

passing through your clothes and you know you're not ready to dive. It’s amazing how different you feel when you know you're going to dive. When

I step out onto the platform in my

swimming trunks, I feel so much more confident than if I just went up there and looked over the edge.

THE RED BULLETIN

my swimming trunks, I feel so much more confident than if I just went up there

“PERFORMING A DIVE WELL FEELS LIKE A

PIECE OF ART. YOU’VE DONE YOUR TRAINING,

Is that because you force yourself to approach the ledge differently? Do you go through a mental reset before a competition dive? With something as risky as that, you have to put yourself in the right mindset. You

can’t just flick a switch and decide, “OK, I’m going to dive off the platform now.”

I don’t have a routine. I try to break my

routine as much as possible; to not be put

off if anything goes wrong. Sometimes

I go through mental preparations like

imagining or visualisation, going through

the dives in my head before getting up there. I think it’s very important for cliff diving, because you can’t do a lot of dives; your body just can’t take it. Does your ability to control negative thoughts and the associated fear ever cross over into everyday life?

I don’t often feel frightened in everyday

life, so I don’t get the chance to control my fears there. Only when I’m watching

a scary movie!

What’s your pre-dive ritual?

I juggle. It started as a hobby, and then

I began taking juggling balls along to

diving competitions. I found it worked as

kind of a distraction – a bit like squeezing

a stress ball. I would just start juggling,

which would help me forget about the stress of the competition. It gets my brain

and my hand-eye co-ordination working, and obviously my heart pumping, too. Diving from a height of up to 27m obviously has its risks, so how do you stop yourself thinking, “What if this goes wrong and I really hurt myself?” That’s a very challenging part of high- diving. Everyone has these negative thoughts, and for some people it’s really

debilitating. It’s often on new dives that there are more doubts – and then they physically can’t jump. Has that ever happened to you? Only once on a dive, and that was because my legs were shaking. It was the first competition of the year, in Corsica. I’d done a couple of simple dives, but when I came to doing my difficult one,

I felt ready in my head, but something in my body was too nervous, and my legs just wouldn’t stop shaking.

THE RED BULLETIN

FINALLY HIT THE WATER, AND NOW YOUR

ART IS COMPLETE. NOBODY CAN CHANGE IT“

What about the doubts that begin to creep in while you’re standing there?

I do still have doubts and negative

thoughts. I think the only tactic is to try to remember the feeling of doing the dive successfully, then focus on a couple of key points. For example, when I’m doing my back-twisting optional dive I’ll only focus on the number of twists. The rest of the dive I kind of forget about. The longer you

stand on the edge of the board, the more tired you are and the more difficult it is to perform the dive. You just have to go for it. But the thrill of getting it right and feeling that perfect dive at the end, is that what keeps you coming back? Yes, it validates all the hard work. You know it’s risky. You know a lot of dives are painful. So when you actually get it right, especially in a competition, it’s payday. Performing a dive well kind of feels like

a piece of art. You’ve done your training,

finally hit the water, and now your artwork is complete. Nobody can change it. That’s very satisfying. Do you still think there’s scope for the technical difficulty to increase? We’ve seen the sport improving and the

difficulty increasing over the last five years, but I think you’ll see an even bigger change in the next five or 10, with the sport eventually being included in the Olympics. Some of the dives from five years ago are now considered intermediate. Almost everyone in the competition has ambitions for harder dives – if you’re not planning to raise your degree of difficulty, you’ll get left behind. You have six Red Bull Cliff Diving World Series titles – what’s left to prove?

I still feel like I’ve got dives that I want to learn, and the Red Bull competition is

incredible for that, because it’s a series of events where you accumulate points, so you can try new things. This year, I have a goal to use a different intermediate dive at every stop in the series. So I’ll start the season with dives I’ve already learnt, and then during the season I’ll try to learn a few more tricks to entertain people, and also to keep myself on my toes. Do you find everyday life more or less stressful since you became a high diver? After seeing my father struggle with the pressures of a nine-to-five managerial position, I vowed never to have a stressful job. As it turns out, a lot of people would say that jumping from platforms 27m high seems like one of the most nerve- racking professions imaginable. But I’m a very calm person in everyday life, and that is thanks to high diving. Have any of the lessons you’ve learned from diving crossed over into other areas of your life? The main thing I have learnt from diving, juggling and playing the piano is the satisfaction and sense of achievement from reaching goals after putting in the hours of hard work. I don’t think I was born to be a high diver, but with enough hard work and passion I made it to the highest level. You have to be willing to do what most other people won’t do. You have to go the extra mile.

The Red Bull Cliff Diving World Series 2017 begins on June 24 in Inis Mór, Ireland; cliffdiving.redbull.com

mile. The Red Bull Cliff Diving World Series 2017 begins on June 24 in Inis Mór,

67

THE INSIDER SCHEDULE FOR TRUE MUSIC FANS: RED BULL TV WILL BE BROADCASTING MANY OF
THE INSIDER SCHEDULE FOR
TRUE MUSIC FANS: RED BULL TV
WILL BE BROADCASTING MANY
OF THE WORLD’S MAJOR
FESTIVALS LIVE THROUGHOUT
THE SUMMER. HERE, SOME OF
THE WORLD’S GREATEST STARS,
PAST AND PRESENT, REVEAL
WHICH LEGENDS IN THE MAKING
SHOULD BE ON YOUR HIT LIST
WORDS: FLORIAN OBKIRCHER
One hundred and
sixty thousand
pilgrims worship
at the American
Lollapalooza stage
GETTY IMAGES/MICHAEL HICKEY
RISING FESTIVAL FORCES 69
RISING
FESTIVAL
FORCES
69
Lianne La Havas wrote her first song when she was 11 and only learned to
Lianne La Havas wrote
her first song when
she was 11 and only
learned to play guitar
when she was 18

GAVIN BOND, GETTY IMAGES (2)

PRINCE LIANNE LA HAVAS MONTREUX JAZZ FESTIVAL

PRINCE

LIANNE LA HAVAS

MONTREUX

JAZZ

FESTIVAL

“SHE IS JONI MITCHELL TO ME, THE WAY SHE TELLS A STORY, THE WAY SHE PUTS THOSE INTERESTING GUITAR CHORDS UNDERNEATH IT”

PRINCE ON LIANNE LA HAVAS (2012)

I f we were to believe the trend

ON LIANNE LA HAVAS (2012) I f we were to believe the trend researchers, this 27-year-old

researchers, this 27-year-old Briton

shouldn’t really be successful at all.

Her gentle, soulful songs often only have

a guitar for accompaniment. Age, for

example, ought to be much too fragile to

find listeners in the gimmick-laden pop

world. Thankfully, right from the get-go,

she had renowned fellow musicians

turning the spotlight on her talent. Indie

rock giants Bon Iver took La Havas along

with them on their 2011 tour of the US.

Prince († 2016) was so taken with her

that he invited her to perform live with

him on legendary US comedy show

Saturday Night Live

and in 2014 he fired

the opening shot of his UK tour from

her humble home in London. La Havas’s

second album – Blood – took her to

number 2 in the UK charts in 2015 and

with her new, more chart-friendly sound,

it’s only a matter of time before the rest

of the world also falls under her spell.

MONTREUX JAZZ FESTIVAL

June 30-July 15, Montreux, Switzerland

 

Legendary festival organiser Claude Nobs († 2013)

 

was never too strict about the jazz part in the name.

In 1967, he began inviting musicians, regardless of

 

genre, to come together once a year by Lake Geneva.

Legends such as Santana and Van Morrison have

 

been festival regulars for decades.

 

The line-up: Usher & The Roots, Lauryn Hill,

 

Kasabian, Brian Wilson, Erykah Badu, Sampha

 

montreuxjazzfestival.com

 
Badu, Sampha   montreuxjazzfestival.com   CALVIN HARRIS FIRE BEATZ ELECTRIC DAISY CARNIVAL
CALVIN HARRIS FIRE BEATZ ELECTRIC DAISY CARNIVAL

CALVIN HARRIS

FIRE

BEATZ

ELECTRIC DAISY CARNIVAL

“FIREBEATZ ARE IN MY TOP FIVE DANCE PRODUCERS RIGHT NOW. THEY HAVE MANY ORIGINAL IDEAS AND A UNIQUE UNDERSTANDING OF GROOVE”

CALVIN HARRIS ON FIREBEATZ

E nergy, groove… and fire! The Dutch electric house duo say these

are the main ingredients of their club

tracks. And in view of hits like Sausage

Fest

more. The bass rumbles, the beat is relentless and the track builds towards a crescendo before setting off an explosion. What makes Firebeatz different is the playful element of their music, regardless of how hard-core they might be. Sometimes the throbbing bass drum is interrupted by a breakbeat, or a double bass might pop up in the middle of all those synthesized sounds. The pair’s unorthodox thinking has, in recent years, brought them remix gigs with stars such as Rihanna, Justin Timberlake and Pitbull and their champion here, Calvin Harris. Not a bad launch pad to a great career. Harris is, after all, currently the world’s most successful DJ.

ELECTRIC DAISY CARNIVAL

June 16-18, Las Vegas, USA

EDC started 20 years ago with 5,000 revellers. It is now the largest dance-music festival in the world, attracting some 400,000 ravers and there are spin-off events in countries from Mexico and India to the UK. The line-up: Martin Garrix, Tiësto, Tommy Trash, Afrojack, Green Velvet, Zomboy, DJ Khaled electricdaisycarnival.com

back in 2013, we couldn’t agree

Tommy Trash, Afrojack, Green Velvet, Zomboy, DJ Khaled electricdaisycarnival.com back in 2013, we couldn’t agree 71

71

VEGARD S.KRISTIANSEN, GETTY IMAGES (3)

VEGARD S.KRISTIANSEN, GETTY IMAGES (3) JIMMY PAGE ROYAL BLOOD LOLLAPALOOZA “I WENT TO HEAR THEM IN
JIMMY PAGE ROYAL BLOOD LOLLAPALOOZA

JIMMY PAGE

ROYAL

BLOOD

LOLLAPALOOZA

“I WENT TO HEAR THEM IN NEW

YORK. THEY WERE FANTASTIC, ABSOLUTELY RIVETING. THEY’RE

SUCH FINE MUSICIANS. THEIR ALBUM HAS TAKEN THE GENRE UP

A SERIOUS FEW NOTCHES”

JIMMY PAGE (LED ZEPPELIN) ON ROYAL BLOOD

D rums, bass guitar and vocals. That’s all it takes for this British

duo to get huge festival stages rocking. In fact, it’s precisely this purist approach that makes the band so appealing. Whereas young rock musicians are increasingly turning to electronic sounds to be on trend, Mike Kerr and Ben Thatcher can still find vital inspiration in

the blues-rock bands of the 1970s. You can hear the duo’s heavy sound on a debut album that took them to number 1 in the UK charts back in 2014 and elicited comparisons with rock heroes such as Led Zeppelin and Queens of the Stone Age. Their new album, How Did We Get So Dark?, is out on June 16.

LOLLAPALOOZA

August 3-6, Chicago, USA

Rock star Perry Farrell started Lollapalooza in the ’90s as a tour of small joints in the US. It is now held in the centre of Chicago and is famous for its party atmosphere. The line-up: Chance The Rapper, The Killers, The xx, Muse, Arcade Fire, Wiz Khalifa, Big Sean lollapalooza.com

All these festivals will be broadcast live on Red Bull TV: redbull.tv

72

Fire, Wiz Khalifa, Big Sean lollapalooza.com All these festivals will be broadcast live on Red Bull
Fire, Wiz Khalifa, Big Sean lollapalooza.com All these festivals will be broadcast live on Red Bull

The main stage at Roskilde is called the Orange Stage. In 2017 it’s opening act is Danish RNB star Phlake

DRAKE POPCAAN ROSKILDE

DRAKE

POPCAAN

ROSKILDE

act is Danish RNB star Phlake DRAKE POPCAAN ROSKILDE “BLESSED TO KNOW YOU, BLESSED FOR THE

“BLESSED TO KNOW YOU, BLESSED FOR THE WISDOM YOU SHARE, BLESSED FOR THE MUSIC YOU CREATE, BLESSED TO WITNESS THE RISE OF A LEGEND“

DRAKE TO POPCAAN ON TWITTER

C aribbean sounds are big in pop right

now. Justin Bieber and Drake both use

Jamaican dancehall grooves on their

 

latest hits. They got hooked via 28-year-

old singer Andrae Sutherland, better

known in his hometown of Kingston as

Popcaan. His breakthrough on the

domestic stage came in 2010 with the

song

Clarks

. The track was so popular

that sales of the shoes shot up in Jamaica.

When Popcaan released his debut album

Where We Come From

in 2014, the world’s

trendsetters already had their eyes fixed

on him. And he didn’t disappoint. The

light, poppy, electronic beats and vocals,

gentle by the standards of dancehall,

revolutionised the Caribbean genre and

unleashed a global trend.

ROSKILDE

June 24-July 1, Roskilde, Denmark

 

At 46 years of age, Roskilde is one of the oldest

 

ongoing music festivals in the world. But its

 

organisers are known to have a good nose for talent.

Every year, the 200 performers often include many

 

of the world’s most exciting newcomers.

 

The line-up: Foo Fighters, A Tribe Called Quest,

 

Arcade Fire, Solange, The Weeknd, Justice

 

roskilde-festival.dk

 
WHEELS OF PAIN… OR HOW TO SURVIVE 10,685 KILOMETRES ON A BIKE WORDS : PATRICIA
WHEELS OF
PAIN… OR HOW
TO SURVIVE
10,685
KILOMETRES
ON A BIKE
WORDS : PATRICIA OUDIT
PHOTOGRAPHY: BIKINGMAN/DAVID STYV
Weighed down with
gear, scorched by
the sun and laid low
by illness, the duo
had to suffer to
achieve their dream
74

AXEL CARION IS NO STRANGER TO LONG-DISTANCE RIDES, HAVING PREVIOUSLY CYCLED 12,000KM IN THE BALKANS. THIS YEAR, THE FRENCHMAN SET OUT TO BEAT SCOTT NAPIER’S RECORD – 58 DAYS – FROM COLOMBIA TO ARGENTINA

NAPIER’S RECORD – 58 DAYS – FROM COLOMBIA TO ARGENTINA 110 beats per minute – their
NAPIER’S RECORD – 58 DAYS – FROM COLOMBIA TO ARGENTINA 110 beats per minute – their
110 beats per minute – their average heart rate during the record attempt 214 kilometres
110
beats per minute
– their average heart rate
during the record attempt
214
kilometres
– the average distance
travelled per day

SWEDISH TRIATHLETE ANDREAS FABRICIUS JOINED CARION IN THE ENDURANCE TEST. WOULD HIS EXPERIENCE AND TRAINING BE ENOUGH TO OVERCOME THE 74,600M OF ALTITUDE CHANGES ON THIS TOUGHEST OF BIKE TRIPS?

WOULD HIS EXPERIENCE AND TRAINING BE ENOUGH TO OVERCOME THE 74,600M OF ALTITUDE CHANGES ON THIS
74,600M OF ALTITUDE CHANGES ON THIS TOUGHEST OF BIKE TRIPS? 7,652 calories – the energy expended

7,652

calories

– the energy expended on

the heaviest day; 204,108 calories for the whole trip (average: 4,080 per day)

9 hours

and 38 minutes

– the average time spent in the saddle per day

115

watts – their average pedal power

JANUARY 3, 2017, COLOMBIA CELEBRITY STATUS GOING VIRAL IN THE ANDES In Colombia, the duo

JANUARY 3, 2017, COLOMBIA

CELEBRITY STATUS GOING VIRAL IN THE ANDES

In Colombia, the duo had their fill of lulo, the national fruit. “We ate too much. We had up to six meals a day. That had a slightly negative impact on performance! Then, in the Dabeiba area of the Colombian Andes, we encountered Luis, a local farmer, who overtook us on the climb. The video soon had 10 million views and made it into the national press. People asked for selfies everywhere we went after that!”

JANUARY 9, 2017, ECUADOR

THUNDERSTRUCK SADDLE SORE IN THE DOWNPOUR

The heavens opened just after they crossed into Ecuador, and the temperature dropped from 40°C to 7°C. “We put on all five layers of clothing we had. It was tough. Plus, for the first seven days we were suffering in the saddle, even though it had been perforated to spare the area around our privates!”

been perforated to spare the area around our privates!” JANUARY 13-26, 2017, PERU JANUARY 1, 2017
JANUARY 13-26, 2017, PERU JANUARY 1, 2017 START FEEL THE FORCE ON THE LONG AND
JANUARY 13-26, 2017, PERU
JANUARY 1, 2017
START
FEEL THE FORCE
ON THE LONG AND WINDY ROADS
CARTAGENA
Wha t can you say about the Peruvian coast?
can you say about the Peruvian coast?
It’s 2 2,400km o
,400km of monotonous desert, with
stron ng headwinds, interminable climbs and
ong headwi
descen ts, and temperatures exceeding 40°C.
nt
“180km
a day here destroys your morale.”
COLOMBIA
JANUARY 22-24, 2017, PERU
IN A DARK PLACE
THIRTY HOURS OF RIDING BLIND
days of hell for
upshot: 30 hours of cycling
is eyes closed. “At times like those,
you p p ray there’s a bar serving Inca Kola
like those, you p p ray there’s a bar serving Inca Kola ECUADOR Food poisoning an
ECUADOR Food poisoning an and three nd t Carion. The upshot: he upshot: with his
ECUADOR
Food poisoning an
and three
nd
t
Carion. The upshot:
he upshot:
with his
his e
withhiin 100km!”
PERU
he upshot: with his his e withhiin 100km!” PERU JANUARY 28, 2017, CHILE FEELING THE BURN
he upshot: with his his e withhiin 100km!” PERU JANUARY 28, 2017, CHILE FEELING THE BURN

JANUARY 28, 2017, CHILE

FEELING THE BURN INTO THE ATACAMA

Crossing the world’s driest non-polar desert, the Atacama, there were times when the pair cycled more than 120km non-stop, in 41°C heat, facing the most powerful UV rays on the planet. “They can penetrate material and get through the micro-perforations in your shorts to give you a ridiculous spotty tan that burns. If you don’t apply Factor 50 four times a day here, you’re going to burn. It never rains.”

78

tan that burns. If you don’t apply Factor 50 four times a day here, you’re going
tan that burns. If you don’t apply Factor 50 four times a day here, you’re going
tan that burns. If you don’t apply Factor 50 four times a day here, you’re going

CHILE

metres – the average daily change in altitude 21 .8 kilometres per hour – their
metres – the average daily change in altitude 21 .8 kilometres per hour – their
metres
– the average daily
change in altitude
21 .8
kilometres per hour
– their average speed
over the 50-day journey

1,452

hour – their average speed over the 50-day journey 1,452 Into the teeth of heavy headwinds
hour – their average speed over the 50-day journey 1,452 Into the teeth of heavy headwinds

Into the teeth of heavy headwinds on the fractured desert roads of the Peruvian desert

over the 50-day journey 1,452 Into the teeth of heavy headwinds on the fractured desert roads
CHILE ARGENTINA
CHILE
ARGENTINA
FEBRUARY 8, 2017, ARGENTINA THE ICE STORM BEATEN BY THE ELEMENTS The cloud was enormo
FEBRUARY 8, 2017, ARGENTINA
THE ICE STORM
BEATEN BY THE ELEMENTS
The cloud was enormo us, like nothing either
ous, like nothing either
rider had seen before But they had at least
.
seen it coming. Curra t-sized hailstones soo
nt-sized hailstones soon
became icy tennis balls
ls,
and the pair had n
and the pair had no
means of protection. “Or r
r rather, we did: a
tree, ideal in a storm! To ge
t there, we had
to manoeuvre our bikes und der a fence. There

JANUARY 31, 2017, CHILE/ARGENTINA

LOWS AND HIGHS FACING HUGE CHANGES IN ELEVATION

There were three mountain passes to get through in the Atacama, on the border of Chile and Argentina, at an altitude exceeding 4,800m. “Cycling 100km on a plateau more than 4,000m up, it’s like all bodily functions shut down.” Hallucinations and altitude sickness made it hard to focus on pedalling.

and altitude sickness made it hard to focus on pedalling. FEBRUARY 8-11, 2017, ARGENTINA ENDURANCE TES

FEBRUARY 8-11, 2017, ARGENTINA

ENDURANCE TES ON THE ROAD TO NOWHERE

Farms as far as the eye could see – an unrelentingly dreary view. There was noth

to interrupt an interminable, 700km secti

T

ing

tion
tion
was high grass whipping us, a

was high grass whipping us, a

terrifying. But that was the c

terrifying. But that was the c

was high grass whipping us, a terrifying. But that was the c
was high grass whipping us, a terrifying. But that was the c
was high grass whipping us, a terrifying. But that was the c
was high grass whipping us, a terrifying. But that was the c

and lightning

bolts crackling around the bik ke frames. It was

choice we faced:

electrocution or death by hailstones!”h

45

degrees Celsius – the highest temperature: in the Atacama Desert

of road as straight as a die. The mercury y had at least dropped again. It was now a tolerable 35°C with a slight breeze.

again. It was now a tolerable 35°C with a slight breeze. 80 − 2 degrees Celsius

80

2

degrees Celsius – the lowest temperature, as they reached Ushuaia on the last day

lowest temperature, as they reached Ushuaia on the last day FEBRUARY 19, 2017, ARGENTINA NEW RECORD:
lowest temperature, as they reached Ushuaia on the last day FEBRUARY 19, 2017, ARGENTINA NEW RECORD:

FEBRUARY 19, 2017, ARGENTINA

NEW RECORD:

49 DAYS

FOLLOWED BY A QUICK RUN!

Now in full record-attempt mode, the duo covered 2,000km in the final week. “We crossed the whole of Tierra del Fuego in a single day to get to Ushuaia. We only slept for an hour and it was -2°C. But the sun put on a magical display when we arrived. Despite our exhaustion, there was no way we could sleep. Andreas went for a run.” bikingman.com

exhaustion, there was no way we could sleep. Andreas went for a run.” bikingman.com FEBRUARY 19,

FEBRUARY 19, 2017

FINISH

USHUAIA

321 kilometres per day – the average distance travelled in the final week 391 kilometres
321 kilometres per day – the average distance travelled in the final week
321
kilometres per day
– the average distance
travelled in the final week

391

kilometres in 12 hours, 56 minutes – the duo's progress on the quickest day

416

kilometres in 16 hours, 38 minutes – their progress on the longest day

Even when in South America’s most desolate regions, doubt never entered the riders’ heads

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SUBSCRIBE NOW! THE RED BULLETIN BEYOND THE ORDINARY

THE RED BULLETIN BEYOND THE ORDINARY

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CHARLES REAGAN HACKLEMAN/LOLLAPALOOZA

CHARLES REAGAN HACKLEMAN/LOLLAPALOOZA guide Get it. Do it. See it. 17 June LET’S ROCK THE SUMMER

guide

Get it. Do it. See it.

17

June

LET’S ROCK THE SUMMER

Lollapalooza (pictured are M83 in action there last year), the Montreux Jazz Festival, the Electric Daisy Carnival, Roskilde:

four top festivals where there will be plenty of new talent on offer this year. Check them out live on redbull.tv

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where there will be plenty of new talent on offer this year. Check them out live

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See it GUIDE Experience the best in electronic dance music at EDC MUSIC , MOVES AND

GUIDE

Experience the best in electronic dance music at EDC

MUSIC, MOVES AND MAYHEM

Tickets all sold out? You don’t need to miss the best sporting action or festival line-ups – watch it all on Red Bull TV

WATCH RED BULL TV ANYWHERE

Red Bull TV is a global digital entertainment destination featuring programming that is beyond the ordinary and is available any time, anywhere. Go online at redbull.tv, download the app, or connect via your Smart TV.

To find out more, visit redbull.tv 84
To find out more,
visit redbull.tv
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The Orange Stage is at the heart of the Roskilde Festival

THE RED BULLETIN

INSOMNIAC, FLEMMING BO JENSEN/RED BULL CONTENT POOL, BARTEK WOLINSKI/RED BULL CONTENT POOL, AITOR MATAUCO/RED BULL CONTENT POOL, MIHAI STETCU/SWATCH BEACH VOLLEYBALL MAJOR SERIES/RED BULL CONTENT POOL

BEACH VOLLEYBALL MAJOR SERIES/RED BULL CONTENT POOL 17 THE RED BULLETIN to 29 June LIVE SEASON

17

THE RED BULLETIN

to 29 June LIVE SEASON OF
to 29 June
LIVE
SEASON OF

FESTIVALS

The season of festivals kicks off with the Las Vegas-based EDC, featuring the world’s most renowned dance music talent, with leading-edge production creating an unparalleled experience of sight and sound. Then there’s Roskilde, northern Europe’s largest culture and music festival. Its iconic Orange Stage, bought from the Rolling Stones, goes up at the end of July.

bought from the Rolling Stones, goes up at the end of July. June/July 18 June LIVE

June/July

the Rolling Stones, goes up at the end of July. June/July 18 June LIVE CRANKWORX LES

18

June

LIVE
LIVE

CRANKWORX LES GETS

Les Gets is nestled in the heart of the French Alps and its course at Porte du Soleil has a long history in gravity mountain biking. Will French riders Tomas Lemoine, Mehdi Gani, Antoine Bizet or Yannick Granieri take the top step of the podium on home turf?

Granieri take the top step of the podium on home turf? 7 July LIVE RED BULL

7

July

LIVE
LIVE

RED BULL X-FIGHTERS

See 12 of the best FMX riders in the world and the most enthusiastic crowd at Red Bull X-Fighters in the famous bullring of Las Ventas, Madrid. The event will be broadcast live on Red Bull TV, Red Bull TV Facebook and xfighters.redbull.com at 8pm UTC.

Red Bull TV Facebook and xfighters.redbull.com at 8pm UTC. 8 to 9 July LIVE SWATCH MAJOR

8

to 9 July

LIVE
LIVE

SWATCH MAJOR SERIES

The third stop of the season takes place where the beach meets the mountains in Gstaad, Switzerland. Players will battle on centre court not only for match victory, but also for one of the tour’s most unusual prizes — a golden cowbell.

on centre court not only for match victory, but also for one of the tour’s most

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GUIDE

Edited by Gisbert L Brunner

FOR THE LOVE OF THE GAME

It was in 1821, at the behest of avid horse- racing buff King Louis XVIII, that Parisian horologist Nicolas Mathieu Rieussec created the first stopwatch. The timepiece, which tracked the horses by marking spots of ink on its dial at the start and finish of each race, was dubbed the ‘chronograph’, from the Greek words ‘chronos’ and ‘grafis’ – literally, ‘time-writer’. Fitting that the precision timekeeping feature that transformed modern sport should be named in the language of the country where the Olympic Games were born.

The pushers next to the crown are inspired by Tudor’s original chronographs

TUDOR HERITAGE BLACK BAY CHRONO

The perfect match

The modern chronograph has long since evolved beyond ink markers. In 1844, Swiss watchmaker Adolphe Nicole developed the mechanism that could stop and reset the second hand. But Breitling is considered the undisputed pioneer, launching the first independent push-piece wrist chronograph in 1915, and helping design the first auto-chrono in 1969. In 2009, the Swiss company’s 125th anniversary, it released the Caliber B01 – a movement accurate to an eighth of a second. It’s so good that Rolex partnered with Breitling to use a variant of the movement in this timepiece by its subsidiary Tudor, modified to feature a 45-minute counter – perfect for a game of two halves. Two exceptional teams, one amazing display of sportsmanship.