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Basic Stocking Cap Knitting Pattern

(cap pattern only; download Wool Flower Tutorial to make the Winter
Garden Stocking Cap)

This is a good, basic cap pattern that can be adapted to any size head. Use it as
a base for embellishments such as the flowers on the Winter Garden Stocking
Cap, pompons, embroidery, appliques, etc.

Skill Level: Intermediate or confident beginner

Supplies:
-1 skein worsted weight yarn (I used Stitch Nation
Alpaca Love which is warm, but soft)

-16-inch size 8 circular needle Winter Garden Stocking Cap


-Size 8 double pointed needles
-Sewing thread to match yarn
-Wool felt in a variety of colors

I’m writing this pattern twice. Once in the traditional knitting shorthand, and once in a detailed manner.
I hope this helps explain anything you might not understand. Of course, you can always email me with
questions and I’ll do my best to help.

Summary Pattern
With circular needle, cast on stitches (see Step 2 to determine the number of stitches)

Work in garter stitch (*knit 1 round, purl one round*) until piece measures 1 inch

Work in stockinette stitch (K every round) until cap is as long as you want it to be

Shaping crown: Switch to dpn when there are too few st to work on circular needle
Row 1: *k8, k2 together* to end of round
Row 2: k even
Row 3: *k7, k2 together* to end of round
Row 4: k even
Row 5: *k6, k2 together* to end of round
Row 6: k even
Row 7: *k5, k2 together* to end of round
Row 8: k even
Row 9: *k4, k2 together* to end of round
Row 10: k even
Row 11: *k3, k2 together* to end of round
Row 12: k even
Row 13: *k2, k2 together* to end of round
Row 14: *k2 together* to end of round
Repeat row 14 until there are 6 stitches left (adjusting decreases as needed on the last round)

You should have 2 stitches on each of 3 dp needles.


Work I-cord on first needle: *k2, co 1, slide stitches to end of needle*. Repeat until I-cord is as long as
you want it to be.

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©Sarah Meland
Basic Stocking Cap Knitting Pattern
(cap pattern only; download Wool Flower Tutorial to make the Winter
Garden Stocking Cap)

Work I-cord on second and third needles: *k2, pickup st from base of first I-cord, slide stitches to end of
needle*. Repeat until I-cord is as long as you want it to be.

To add flowers, see Wool Flower Tutorial.

Detail Pattern

Step 1 – Check your gauge


I know you don’t want to, but you WILL have better results if you knit a swatch to test your gauge.
Usually, instructions tell you to cast on and knit to make a 4 inch square swatch. That seems like a waste
of time to me. I usually cast on 10-15 stitches (depending on the size of the yarn) then knit 5-10 rows.
Measure to to determine how many stiches (stitches) are in an inch. You can measure how many rows
are in an inch, too, but that doesn’t really matter for this project.

Step 2 – Figure out your size


You could make this for a baby, a kid, or an adult as long as you know their head size. So measure the
head you are knitting for and multiply that by the number of stitches per inch. When you have that
number, round to the nearest number that is divisible by 10. For example, if your head measurement is
18 inches and your stitches per inch (gauge) is 6 stitches per inch you multiply these two number (18 x 6)
to get 108. Round this number to 110. This is the number of stitches you will cast on.

Step 3 – Cast on stitches


In my opinion, this is the most critical part of knitting a cap. If you cast on too tightly, the hat won’t
stretch nicely and will be hard to put on and/or uncomfortable to wear. I have always used the “long
tail” method, you may prefer to use the “knitting on” method which is more elastic when stretched. If
you don’t know what I’m talking about, google the terms and you will find a ton of how-to videos.

I recommend you cast on your stitches, knit a row, then test stretch your work. If it’s too tight, recast on
now. After you have a few more rows knit, test it again. If you got your cast on row too tight, you want
to discover it early so you have less to rip out.

Using your circular needle, cast on the number of stitches you came up with in Step 2

Step 4 – Knitting the cap


First, make sure you haven’t twisted your cast on stitches. Join your work. What does this mean? For
me, I just knit the first stitch, pulling the tension tighter than I normally would. Other people tie a knot (I
hate knots in my knitting so I never-ever-ever tie knots), but this is a personal choice. What you don’t
want is to have a gap later on so make sure that first stitch is tight.

Work 1 inch in garter stitch. We are working in the round so that means you knit one row, then purl one
row.

Work body of hat in stockinette stitch (in the round, that means knit every row). I worked 5 inches of
stockinette (6 inches from cast on). My model is 3 years old, depending on the size of head you’re
working with, you may need more (for adults) or less (for babies).

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©Sarah Meland
Basic Stocking Cap Knitting Pattern
(cap pattern only; download Wool Flower Tutorial to make the Winter
Garden Stocking Cap)

Step 5 – Shape crown


Mark every tenth stitch with a stitch marker. Make sure the stitch marker for the beginning of the
round is different from the other markers. Decrease by sliding the marker from the left needle to the
right needle, knit 2 together, then knit to the next marker and repeat to the end of the round. After
you’ve worked 1 decrease round, knit 1 round even. Continue in this manner, switching to double
pointed needles when you need to, until you have 3 stitches between your markers. At this point, you
want to knit 2 together every round until you have 6 stitches left (you may need to adjust your
decreases in the final round to achieve this).

Step 6 – I-cord
I-cord is knit using two double-pointed needles. You knit across, slide the stitches to the other end of
the needle, then knit across again. You do not turn your work, but instead, you slide the stitches to the
other end of the needle. This will make a “tube.” I made my cords 3 different lengths with the longest
being about 3.5 inches long.

Starting with the first needle with 2 stitches on it, knit 2 stitches, cast on 1 stitch. For the next row, slide
your stitches to the other end of the needle and knit all three stitches. Continue in this manner until the
I-cord is as long as you want it to be. Cast off by slipping one stitch onto the right needle, knit 2
together, then pass the slipped stitch over the other. You can pull your tail through the loop to knot it
off.

Move to the next needle with 2 stitches on it for the next I-cord. Attach yarn, knit 2 stitches, then pick
up one stitch from the base of the I-cord you just finished. Now knit 3, slide your stitches to the other
end of the needle and knit the next row. Continue in this fashion until your I-cord is as long as you want
it to be, cast off as you did for the first cord. Repeat this process for final I-cord.

Step 7 – Weave in ends


Is there anyone who likes this part? Weave in all loose ends on back side of cap.

If you don’t want the I-cord, work until there are six stitches left, then thread the tail through the
remaining stitches, pull tight, knot, and weave in end.

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©Sarah Meland