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Illinois State

University
IllinoisState.edu/catalog
2018-19
Undergraduate
Catalog
1

ILLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY


2018-2019
Undergraduate Catalog
Effective May 21, 2018

Board of Trustees
The Board of Trustees is the governing board for Illinois State University.
Members of the Board are as follows:

Bob Churney, Bartlett


Robert Dobski, Bloomington
Rocky Donahue, Orland Park
Julie Annette Jones, Chicago
Mary Ann Louderback, Cary
Zach Schaaab, Waterloo
John Rauschenberger, Chicago
Sharon Rossmark, Northbrook

University Administrative Officers


Larry H. Dietz, President
Jan Murphy, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost
Daniel Stephens, Vice President for Finance and Planning
Pat Vickerman, Vice President for University Advancement
Levester Johnson, Vice President for Student Affairs
John Baur, Associate Vice President for Research and Graduate Studies
Jim Jawahar, Associate Provost
Jonathan Rosenthal, Associate Provost for Undergraduate Education
Jana Albrecht, Associate Vice President for Enrollment Management
Sam Catanzaro, Associate Vice President for Academic Administration,
Policy, and Faculty Affairs
Alan Lacy, Associate Vice President for Academic Fiscal Management
Perry Schoon, Interim Associate Vice President for Global Education and
Online Initiatives
Mark Walbert, Associate Vice President for Academic Technologies
Todd McLoda, Dean, College of Applied Science and Technology
Diane Zosky, Interim Dean, College of Arts and Sciences
Ajay Samant, Dean, College of Business
Kevin Laudner, Interim Dean, College of Education
Jean M.K. Miller, Dean, College of Fine Arts
Judy Neubrander, Dean, Mennonite College of Nursing
Shari Zeck, Interim Dean, Milner Library

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


2 TABLE OF CONTENTS
Board of Trustees—1 Confidentiality—31
University Administrative Officers—1 Student Employment—31
Notification of Rights Under FERPA—4 Veterans and Military Services—31
Public Notification of Directory Tuition and Fees—32
Materials Charges—32
Information—4
Change in Schedule Policy—33
Using the Catalog—6
Housing and Dining Options—33
Undergraduate Catalog Requirements—6 Campus Living—33
Academic Terminology—6 University Housing Services—33
Departmental Abbreviations—12 University On-Campus Housing
About Illinois State University—13 Policy—33
Accreditation—13 Dining on Campus—34
Illinois State University Mission Student Access and Accommodation
Statement—13 Services—34
University Commitment to Diversity—13 Health Promotion and Wellness—34
Office of Equal Opportunity Student Health Program—34
and Access—13 Student Counseling Services—35
Disclosure of Campus Security—14 Computer and Information Security—35
Complaint Resolution —14 Student Conduct and Conflict
University Ethics Department—15 Resolution—35
Governance—15 Academic Dishonesty—35
Academic Program Information—16 Academic Opportunities—37
List of University-Wide Programs—16 English Language Institute (ELI)—37
Departmental and School Programs Honors Program—37
Listed by College—16 Admission to Honors—37
University Policies—19 Honors Program Requirements—37
Admission Policies—19 Honors Program Graduation
Admission Application and Designations—38
Projected Deadlines—19 Honors Courses—38
Contact Visit Information—19 Additional Academic Opportunities—41
Student Classifications—19 International Studies and Programs—41
Admission Guidelines—20 Semester Study Abroad Programs—42
Freshmen Admission —20 Preparation for Professional Study—42
Transfer Admission —21 Engineering—42
Second Bachelor’s Degree—22 Law—42
Former Students Seeking Health Professions—43
Admission—22 Medicine—43
Visiting Students/Unclassified Dentistry—43
Admission—23 Veterinary Medicine—44
International Student Admission—23 Undergraduate Research—44
Special Admission Programs—24 Undergraduate Teaching Assistants—44
Immunization and Medical Requirements University College—45
for Students—25 Academic Policies and Practices—46
Financial Aid—25 Degree Requirements—46
Financial Aid Office—25 General Requirements for Graduation—46
Financial Aid Application Baccalaureate Degree Programs—47
Procedures—26 Bachelor of Science Graduation
Federal Grants and Benefits—27 Requirement in Science, Mathematics
ISU Grants—27 and Technology—50
State Scholarships and Grants—27 AMALI Graduation Requirement—51
Private Scholarships—27 Graduation Procedures—52
ISU Merit-Based Scholarships—28
Loan Programs—28 General Academic Policies—54
Financial Aid Disbursement—29 Accommodation—54
Satisfactory Academic Progress—29 Course Registration and Withdrawal—54
Enrollment Changes Financial Aid Repetition of Courses—55
Eligibility—30 Final Examinations—56

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Table of Contents 3

University Grading System—57 Student Teaching Courses—109


Midterm Grades and Progress Alerts—59 Interdisciplinary Studies Courses—112
Additional Academic Requirements—60 College of Applied Science and
Conduct Code Dismissal—63 Technology—118
Proficiency and Placement Agriculture—119
Examinations—63 Criminal Justice Sciences—128
Departmental Proficiency Exams—65 Family and Consumer Sciences—133
Advanced Placement Program—67 Health Sciences—147
International Baccalaureate Diploma Information Technology—163
Programs—70 Kinesiology and Recreation—174
General Education—74 Military Science—189
General Education Requirements/ Technology—192
Options—74 College of Arts and Sciences—203
General Education Program–Illinois State Latin American and Latino/a
University—75 Studies—204
General Education Course Women’s and Gender Studies—205
Requirements—75 Biological Sciences—207
General Education Category Chemistry—217
Exemptions—80 Communication—225
Transferring General Education Communication Sciences and
Courses Illinois Articulation Disorders—235
Economics—238
Initiative—82
English—242
University-Wide Teacher Education Geography, Geology, and the
Programs—86 Environment—254
Performance-Based Assessment History—263
System—86 Languages, Literatures, and Cultures—272
Approved Teacher Education Mathematics—285
Programs—88 Philosophy—296
Clinical Experiences in Teacher Physics—301
Education—89 Politics and Government—306
Student Teaching Assignments—91 Psychology—314
Interdisciplinary Studies Programs and Social Work—320
Courses—93 Sociology-Anthropology—324
University-Wide Majors—93 College of Business—334
Major in European Studies—93 Accounting—338
Major in Interdisciplinary Studies—94 Finance, Insurance and Law—345
Major in University Studies—95 Management and Quantitative
University-Wide Minors—96 Methods—350
African-American Studies—96 International Business—355
African Studies—96 Marketing—358
Children’s Studies—97 Business Teacher Education—362
Civic Engagement and Responsibility—98 College of Education—366
Cognitive Science—99 Educational Administration and
Ethnic Studies—99 Foundations—367
European Studies—100 Special Education—368
Interdisciplinary Studies—101 Teaching and Learning—375
International Studies—102 College of Fine Arts—387
Latin American, Latino/a Studies—103 Arts Technology Program—388
Middle Eastern and South Asian Art—390
Studies—104 Music—406
Native American Studies—104 Theatre and Dance—429
Peace and Conflict Resolution Mennonite College of Nursing—441
Studies—105 Nursing—442
Urban Studies—106
Women’s and Gender Studies—106
University-Wide Courses—108

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


4 FERPA and Public Notification of Directory Information

education records, except to the extent that


FERPA authorizes disclosure without
NOTIFICATION OF RIGHTS consent.
UNDER FERPA AND PUBLIC The University discloses education records
NOTIFICATION OF without a student’s prior written consent
DIRECTORY INFORMATION under the FERPA exception for disclosure
to school officials with legitimate educa-
Notification of Rights Under FERPA for tional interests. A school official is a
Postsecondary Institutions: person employed by the University in an
administrative, supervisory, academic or
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy research, or support staff position
Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights (including law enforcement unit personnel
with respect to their education records. These and health staff); a person or company with
rights include: whom the University has contracted as its
agent to provide a service instead of using
(1) The right to inspect and review the University employees or officials (such as
student's education records within 45 days of an attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a
the day the University receives a request for person serving on the Board of Trustees; or
access. a student serving on an official committee,
such as a disciplinary or grievance com-
A student should submit to the mittee, or assisting another school official
University Registrar a written request in performing his or her tasks.
that identifies the record(s) the student
wishes to inspect. The University official A school official has a legitimate
will make arrangements for access and educational interest if the official needs to
notify the student of the time and place review an education record in order to
where the records may be inspected. If fulfill his or her professional respon-
the records are not maintained by the sibilities for the University.
University official to whom the request
was submitted, that official shall advise Upon request, the University also discloses
the student of the correct official to education records without consent to
whom the request should be addressed. officials of another school in which a
student seeks or intends to enroll.
(2) The right to request the amendment of the
student’s education records that the student (4) The right to file a complaint with the
believes are inaccurate, misleading, or other- U.S. Department of Education concerning
wise in violation of the student’s privacy rightsalleged failures by the University to comp-
under FERPA. ly with the requirements of FERPA. The
name and address of the Office that
A student who wishes to ask the administers FERPA is:
University to amend a record should
write the University official responsible Family Policy Compliance Office
for the record, clearly identify the part of U.S. Department of Education
the record the student wants changed, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW
and specify why it should be changed. Washington, DC 20202-5901

If the University decides not to amend the Public Notification of Directory


record as requested, the University will Information:
notify the student in writing of the decision
and the student’s right to a hearing regard-
At its discretion, Illinois State University may
ing the request for amendment. Additional
provide “directory information” in accordance
information regarding the hearing pro- with the provisions of the Family Educational
cedures will be provided to the student Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA).
when notified of the right to a hearing.Directory information is defined as that
information which would not generally be
(3) The right to provide written consent considered harmful or an invasion of privacy if
before the University discloses personally disclosed. Designated directory information at
identifiable information from the student's Illinois State University includes the follow-

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


FERPA and Public Notification of Directory Information 5

ing: student’s name*, address (local and name for employment purposes, is available
home), telephone listing (local and home), on the Human Resources website or by
Illinois State University email address, date contacting them directly at (309) 438-8311.
and place of birth, major field of study, dates Questions regarding use of a preferred name
of attendance, grade level, enrollment status should also be directed to the above offices.
(e.g. undergraduate or graduate, full-time or
part-time), participation in officially
recognized activities or sports, weight or
height of members of athletic teams, target
graduation date, degrees, honors and awards
received, and the most recent educational
agency or institution attended. Students may
block the public disclosure of directory
information by notifying the Office of the
University Registrar in writing prior to the
first day of classes.

Please consider very carefully the


consequences of a decision to withhold
directory information. A non-disclosure
block will call for Illinois State University
not to release any of this “directory
information;” thus, any future requests for
such information from non-institutional
persons or organizations will be refused.

Illinois State University will honor your


request to withhold directory information but
cannot assume responsibility to contact you
for subsequent permission to release this
information. Regardless of the effect upon
you, Illinois State University assumes no
liability as a result of honoring your
instructions that such information be
withheld.

Although the initial request may be filed at


any time, requests for non-disclosure will be
honored by the University until removed, in
writing, by the student.

*The name included on the student’s ISU


application (the student’s legal name) is the
name used for directory information
purposes. If a student has also entered a
preferred name in the Campus Solutions and/
or HR system, that preferred name will be
used ONLY for specific internal University
operations and will not be used as directory
information. To change your name for
directory information purposes, you must
change your legal name in the system.
Information on how to do this is available at
the University Registrar website or by
contacting the Registrar directly at (309) 438
-2188. If you are also an employee,
information on how to change your legal

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


6 USING THE CATALOG
The statements in this catalog are for graduate under new requirements published
informational purposes only and should not be while he or she is in attendance at the
construed as the basis of a contract between a University. A student who changes to new
student and Illinois State University. The Undergraduate Catalog requirements, how-
course offerings and requirements of the ever, must meet all the requirements including
University are continually under review and General Education and graduation require-
revision. This catalog presents those in effect at ments, in that catalog.
the time of publication. Courses listed in this
publication are subject to revision without COURSE PREREQUISITES
advance notice and are not necessarily offered
each term or each year. Course prerequisites in effect at the time of
publication are printed in this catalog.
Information regarding changes will be However, prerequisites may change over
available in the Offices of the University time and do not depend on catalog year. The
Registrar, the Provost, the colleges, major registration system will enforce prerequisites
departments, and schools. It is especially in effect at the time of registration.
important that each student note that it is his or
her responsibility to be aware of current Academic Terminology
graduation requirements for a particular degree In reading this catalog, you may encounter some
program. words or phrases that are unfamiliar. The
following list defines terms frequently used
Undergraduate Catalog Requirements within the Illinois State community and will help
you more easily understand information you will
For a student who attends at least one term of receive from the University.
each academic year, graduation requirements
are specified in the Undergraduate Catalog for Academic Affairs One of the four major
the year of entry to the University. If atten- divisions of the University, headed by the
dance is not continuous, a student must meet Vice President and Provost, that focuses on
the requirements specified in the Under- educational needs of students.
graduate Catalog in effect when he or she
reenters the University. If such a student Academic Good Standing A minimum
continues in the curriculum chosen originally, cumulative grade point average of 2.00,
the hours earned in meeting the requirements which is required for continued enrollment in
of the original program may typically apply to the University.
the hour requirement of a revised program. In
some rapidly advancing fields, students may be Academic Year The per iod of time
required to repeat courses where content has commencing with the fall semester (16
changed significantly. weeks) and continuing through the spring
semester (16 weeks) and summer term (12
In all instances, the University may adjust weeks).
graduation requirements to ensure that each
graduate of a teacher preparation curriculum Advanced Placement Program Sponsor ed
meets the course requirements for an Illinois by the College Board, this program allows
Teaching License. students to be awarded credit or exemptions
from required courses based on test scores.
A student who transfers from an Illinois
public community college to this university Alumni Individuals who have attended or
may choose to meet graduation requirements graduated from a particular college or
specified in the Illinois State University university.
Undergraduate Catalog in effect at the time
the student entered the community college if
Audit The completion of a cour se taken
(1) attendance was not interrupted (not
without credit. It does not count toward full-
including summer terms), and (2) transfer to
time student status for financial aid and other
Illinois State occurred within nine months of
purposes.
attendance at the community college.
Board of Trustees The gover ning body for
Since University programs are constantly Illinois State University.
evaluated and improved, a student may

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Academic Terminology 7

Campus Solutions Student Infor mation diploma school or Associate Degree nursing
System software that supports registration courses are “held in escrow” for the student
and managing students’ progress toward their until successful completion of three specified
degrees. Nursing upper-division courses at Illinois State
University.
Career Campus Solutions ter m for
undergraduate or graduate status. Finance and Planning One of the four
major divisions of the University, headed by
Clinical Experience Par t of a pr ogr am the Vice President for Finance and Planning,
that allows for observation, participation, that focuses on financial management and
studies of individual pupils or clients, planning.
individual field work, and practicums both
General Education Program Thirty-nine
on and off campus.
credit hours of integrated foundation courses
that must be completed to obtain a bacca-
College Level Examinations Program
laureate degree.
(CLEP) A pr ogr am that allows students
to receive credit by examination rather than Grade Point Average (GPA) The total
completing coursework. number of grade points divided by the total
graded semester hours attempted at Illinois
Credit Hour A standard unit of measuring State University.
coursework; credit hours are assigned to a
particular course and count toward graduation,
Hold A block that may prevent a student
except in remedial courses. Typically a course
from receiving a service or performing an
that meets for three hours a week is worth three
action, for example a financial hold may result
credit hours. in a student not being allowed to register or
receive a transcript. Campus Solutions refers to
Cross-listed Course A cour se offer ed by
a hold as a “negative service indicator.”
more than one department, but treated as one
course for credit purposes. Honors Program A program designed to
serve the needs of academically talented,
Curriculum A pr ogr am of study cover ing high-achieving students.
the entire undergraduate or graduate career
and designed to satisfy the requirements for a Illinois Articulation Initiative (IAI) A
degree. statewide agreement among more than 100
public and selected private institutions, design-
Dean The highest administr ative officer of
ed to facilitate transfer between colleges and
a college.
universities within the state.
Department Chairperson An administrative Illinois Board of Higher Education (IBHE)
officer holding faculty rank; responsible for the The board that oversees and coordinates all
primary unit of academic organization. public higher education in Illinois.
Enrollment Verification Under gr aduate Independent Study Intensive study in a
students for fall and spring are considered special area of the student’s interest under the
full-time if they are enrolled 12.0 or more direction of a faculty member. Each individual
semester hours, half-time if they are investigation is to culminate in a comprehensive
enrolled fewer than 12.0 but at least 6.0 written report and/or examination and/or artistic
semester hours, and part-time if they are project. A maximum of 6 semester hours may be
enrolled fewer than 6.0 semester hours. applied toward graduation.
Undergraduate students for summer are
considered full-time if they are enrolled 6.0 Institute Federal- and state-sponsored (or
or more semester hours, half-time if they similar) short-term programs requiring treatment
are enrolled fewer than 6.0 but at least 3.0 of subject matter of a special nature, often for
semester hours, and part-time if they are special groups. Courses taught as institutes are
enrolled fewer than 3.0 semester hours. designated by the number 397.
Escrow Credit The pr actice of holding the Interdisciplinary A pr ogr am or cour se
placement of courses until the successful that spans two or more academic disciplines.
completion of specified courses. For example,

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


8 Academic Terminology

Matriculation The point at which a Seventy-five (75) Hour Limit on


student is formally admitted to the university Undeclared Student Status: Illinois State
and eligible to enroll in classes. University requires all students to have a
declared major upon completion of 75 hours
Midterm Grades ar e collected for all new of college-level coursework, including
first-year students as well as for some other transfer credit.
student groups to allow for early intervention
to increase student success. Student Affairs One of the four major
divisions of the University, headed by the
Milestone Pr ogr am r equir ements that ar e Vice President of Student Affairs, that
not credit-bearing but may serve as focuses on personal and nonacademic needs
prerequisites for courses. of students.
Nontraditional Student A student who Syllabus A document descr ibing the ob-
does not fit the typical profile of under- jectives, outcomes, assessment activities, and
graduate students. structure of a course.
Office of University Registrar An aca- Term Campus Solutions ter m for
demic service unit that maintains academic “semester.”
records, awards transfer credit, and provides
enrollment verification, transcripts and Transcript The Univer sity’s official r ecor d
course registration. Student questions can be of credit or degrees awarded, including the
answered in 107 Moulton. courses taken by a student and the grades
received in each course.
Prerequisite Specific r equir ements that
must be completed prior to enrolling in a Transfer Day Program Specifically desig-
given class, program, or field of study. nated days for transfer students to meet with an
academic advisor and to complete advance
Preview A r equir ed two-day program held registration.
during the summer to orient new freshmen
students and their families to campus. Unit Campus Solutions ter m for “semester
hour” and “credit hour.”
Professional Practice Pr ofessional Pr actice
consists of academic/career related work University Advancement One of the four
experiences completed for credit either on major divisions of the University, headed by
campus or at a place of business. They may the Vice President for University
or may not be salaried. A maximum of 16 Advancement, that focuses on public
credit hours may count toward graduation. outreach and fundraising.
Provost The Vice Pr esident for Academic University College An academic unit that
Affairs who is responsible for all academic provides academic support to all students,
matters. advising all freshmen and undeclared stu-
dents, and special populations of under-
School Director An administr ative officer
graduate students such as pre-health students,
holding faculty rank; responsible for the
international students, and student-athletes.
primary unit of academic organization.
University College provides academic sup-
Semester A semester at Illinois State is port and tutoring to all students as well as
the 16-week academic session offered each programs and services that assist students in
fall and spring. making the transition to the University.
University College also oversees the Inter-
Semester Hour See “cr edit hour .” disciplinary Studies Major and Minor and the
and University Studies Major.
Seminar A r egular meeting of students,
under the guidance of a faculty member, in Welcome Week A var iety of social activities
which each conducts research and exchanges scheduled at the beginning of the fall semester
information, problems, and results through to integrate students into campus life.
informal lectures, reports, and discussion.

Session See “semester .”

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Academic Terminology 9

Program and Course Explanations A maximum of six semester hours of


independent study may be applied toward
UNITS OF INSTRUCTION graduation.

Major: A cohesive combination of courses, Institute: Federal- and state-sponsored (or


including introductory, intermediate, and similar) short-term programs requiring treat-
advanced coursework that designates a ment of subject matter of a special nature, often
student’s primary area of specialization. for special groups. Institutes are designated by
Majors are designated on university the number 397.
transcripts.
Internet Courses: Cour ses deliver ed
Minor: A combination of courses designed primarily over the internet either in real time
to provide a cohesive introduction to an area of (synchronously) or on the student’s schedule
study beyond the major. Minors are designated (asynchronous) but within a specified period
on university transcripts upon receipt of degree. of time.

Professional Practice: Professional Practice


Plan: Campus Solutions ter m for “major .”
consists of one or more credit-generating,
Sequence: A subdivision of a major /minor academic/career related, salaried or non-
in which there are specific requirements. salaried work experiences. Professional Prac-
Sequences of the same major or minor tice work sites are located on the Illinois
generally share a common core within a State University campus and with business,
major or minor. Sequences are designated on industry, government, and other agencies and
university transcripts upon receipt of degree. organizations outside the University. Profes-
sional Practice courses are designated by the
Subplan: Campus Solutions ter m for a numbers 198, 298, 398, 498, and 598.
“sequence.”
Seminar: A r egular meeting of students,
Concentration: A subdivision of a major under the guidance of a faculty member, in
without specific requirements that is provided which each conducts research and exchanges
for advisement only. Concentrations are not information, problems, and results through
designated on university transcripts. All in- informal lectures, reports, and discussions.
formal curricular recommendations made by
Temporary Course: Tempor ar y cour ses
departments and schools (such as emphases,
are approved by the curriculum committees
tracks, areas of study, specializations, etc.)
for a time period not to exceed three years.
should be considered concentrations. Concen-
Temporary courses often are used to
trations are advisory only; no approval process
experiment with a new curricular design, to
is required.
take advantage of the skills of a faculty
member who will be at the University for a
COURSE OFFERINGS limited period, or to respond to particular
interests of students. Temporary courses are
Contract: Contr act educational ser vices, designated by the numbers 189, 289, 389,
programs and courses are delivered through 489, and 589. Temporary courses may not be
mutual contract to a business site for a required within a major or sequence.
specific cohort or business entity.
Topics Course: An or ganization of subject
“Decimalized” Course: A cour se with matter and related learning experiences
different subtopics but standard learning composed of identifiable subdivisions of
outcomes, for example, History 104 may topics. Each topic is of sufficient significance
examine different regions. Campus Solutions to be treated separately as a unit of
replaces the decimal by an “A” so HIS instruction for an entire semester or term.
104.01 appears as HIS 104A01. The content of the course varies by semester.
Independent Study: Intensive study in a Workshop: Intensive and applied wor k on
special area of the student’s interest under special problems in one or more subject
the direction of a qualified member of the areas. Workshop opportunities are provided
faculty. Each individual investigation is to on special problems not covered in any
culminate in a comprehensive written report regular University courses. Workshops are
and/or examination and/or artistic project.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


10 Academic Terminology

generally designated by the numbers 193, instructor, the department chair/school


293, 393, 429, and 493. director, and the Graduate School, advanced
undergraduates may be permitted to enroll in
COURSE INFORMATION 400-level courses for undergraduate credit
only. Those credits will not apply to a
The University operates on the semester graduate degree. Details are on the standard
plan. The credit value of all courses is stated override form.
in terms of semester hours. Ordinarily, a
semester hour is assigned for a 50-minute Seniors seeking to enroll in 400-level
class meeting per week for the semester; courses for graduate credit prior to
therefore, a course valued at three semester graduation must first apply and be
hours generally meets three periods weekly. provisionally admitted to a graduate degree
In laboratory courses, at least two 50-minute program at Illinois State. Additional rules
periods per week are ordinarily required for and restrictions apply. See instructions for
each semester hour of credit. “Seniors Taking Graduate Courses for
Graduate Credit” in the Admission to
Course Availability: Some courses listed in Master’s Programs section of the Graduate
the Undergraduate Catalog may not be Catalog.
available each year. Students should consult
the major department or school or the 500-599 Courses limited to advanced grad-
University website at My.IllinoisState.edu for uate or doctoral students.
class availability. Questions concerning
scheduling of courses should be referred to the COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
department chairperson or school director.
The following information is given for each
Course prerequisites in effect at the time course: course number (three or five digits
of publication are printed in this catalog. preceding the title); course title; and credit
However, prerequisites may change over value in semester hours. The University may
time and do not depend on catalog year. The cancel or add course offerings after publication
registration system will enforce prerequisites of this Undergraduate Catalog depending upon
in effect at time of registration.  the adequacy of enrollment and availability of
faculty. Following the above information, a
brief description of the course, any pre-
COURSE NUMBERING
requisites, restrictions on enrollment, and any
Each course bears a distinguishing number special considerations are noted. A course pre-
for identification and indication of its requisite is knowledge or experience a student
academic level. The numbering system is as is required or recommended to have prior to
follows: enrolling in a course.

100-199 Lower-division undergraduate Sample Course Listing:


courses, primarily for freshmen and
102 MUSIC THEORY
sophomores.
2 sem. hrs.
200-299 Upper-division undergraduate Continuation of common practice syntax;
courses, primarily for juniors and seniors. A emphasis on formal analysis and
student normally should have completed at composition of common practice idioms.
least 45 semester hours before enrolling in a Prerequisites: MUS 101 or consent Theory
course at this level. Coordinator.

The course number, “102,” indicates that the


300-399 Advanced undergraduate courses.
course is primarily for freshmen and
Open to juniors, seniors, and sometimes
sophomores. The “2 sem. hrs.” following the
graduate students. A student normally should
title, indicates the credit value in semester
have completed at least 75 semester hours
hours. A brief description of the course is
before enrolling in a course at this level.
provided in the paragraph following the
400-499 Graduate courses. See the Graduate semester hours. The information after
Catalog. Courses at this level are for “Prerequisites” indicates the required
graduate students. With approval from the background for enrolling in the course. In the
example given, a student must have passed

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Academic Terminology 11

Music 101 or have consent of the Materials charge optional indicates an


Coordinator of Music Theory prior to optional fee charge for course materials.
enrollment in 102. Course title revisions or
a change in the course number are indicated Multiple enrollments allowed indicates
by a “formerly” statement. Additional that a course may be taken for credit more
information about the course is available in than once if different content is planned;
the particular departmental or school office. however, there may be a maximum amount
of credit specified for the course.
Terms Used in Course Descriptions:
Not for credit if had (cour se) means that
Also offered as (cr oss-listed course) means content overlap exists between the specified
that the specified courses are identical and courses and that students should not be able
are thus considered interchangeable in to count both toward graduation. Such
meeting all requirements. Credit can only be courses are not, however, considered
earned in one of the specified courses. interchangeable in meeting all requirements.

Concurrent registration required (or Not for credit major/minor means that
recommended) means that concurrent the credit from this course may not be
registration in two courses is required (or applied to the major or minor program
recommended). requirements.

Consent of the department advisor The Variable credit courses ar e those cour ses
advisor(s) of the department offering the leading to differing number of credit hours.
course must give consent before a student For example: Student Teaching (STT 399)
may register for the course. has variable credit hours from 1-16. A
student should plan with the advisor the
Consent of the department chair The number of hours to be sought in a variable
chairperson of the department offering the credit course.
course must give consent before a student
may register for the course.

Consent of the instructor The cour se


instructor must give consent before a
student may register for the course.

Consent of the school director The


director of the school offering the course
must give consent before a student may
register for the course.

Formerly offered as indicates a cour se


previously offered under a different number
or title. The course is interchangeable with
the previous course number or title.

Includes Clinical Experience indicates


that certain Clinical Experiences in the
student’s field are required in the course.

Junior standing Students ar e classified as


having Junior Class Standing when they
have 60 credit hours completed. For
registration purposes we allow hours in
progress at Illinois State to count towards
the 60 credit hours to satisfy prerequisites.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


12 Academic Terminology

DEPARTMENT, SCHOOL, AND KNR Kinesiology and Recreation


UNIT ABBREVIATIONS LAL Latin American and Latino/a
Studies
The following abbreviations for department, LAN Languages, Literatures, and
school, and subject offerings are used both Cultures
in the program requirement descriptions and CHI Chinese
in the course descriptions throughout this
FRE French
Undergraduate Catalog.
GER German
ITA Italian
ACC Accounting
JPN Japanese
AGR Agriculture
LAT Latin
ANT Anthropology
POR Portuguese
ART Art
SPA Spanish
ATK Art Technology
MAT Mathematics
BSC Biological Sciences
MKT Marketing
BE Business Education
MQM Management and Quantitative
BUS Business Core
Methods
CHE Chemistry
MSC Military Science
COM Communication
NUR Nursing
CJS Criminal Justice Sciences
PHI Philosophy
CSD Communication Sciences and
PHY Physics
Disorders
POL Politics and Government
ECO Economics
LGS Legal Studies
EAF Educational Administration and
Foundations PSY Psychology
ENG English SED Special Education
FCS Family and Consumer Sciences SOC Sociology
FIL Finance, Insurance and Law SWK Social Work
GEO Geography, Geology, and the TCH Teaching and Learning
Environment TEC Technology
HIS History THD Theatre and Dance
HON Honors DAN Dance
HSC Health Sciences THE Theatre
IDS Interdisciplinary Studies WGS Women’s and Gender Studies
INB International Business
IT Information Technology

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


About Illinois State University 13

ABOUT ILLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY

ACCREDITATION beyond.
Illinois State University is accredited by Adopted by Academic Senate, May 7, 2008.
the Higher Learning Commission, one of
six regional accrediting bodies for higher UNIVERSITY COMMITMENT TO
education recognized by the United States
DIVERSITY
Department of Education. For further in-
formation regarding this accreditation
contact the Higher Learning Commission Diversity is one of five core institutional
at 230 South LaSalle Street, Suite 7-500, values underlying strategic planning and
Chicago, Illinois 60604-1411, phone (800) implementation of programs and services at
621-7440 or (312) 263-0456; email Illinois State University. Goals and
info@hlcommission.org; or visit the Com- strategies for maintaining and increasing the
diversity of students, faculty, and staff at
mission website at hlcommission.org/.
Illinois State are articulated in the university
strategic plan, Educating Illinois. Illinois
The teacher preparation unit and its pro-
State affirms and encourages community
grams are accredited by the National
and a respect for differences by fostering an
Council for Accreditation of Teacher Edu-
inclusive environment characterized by
cation, which, in 2013, consolidated with
cultural understanding, ethical behavior, and
the Teacher Education Accreditation
social justice. The University supports a
Council to become the Council for the
diverse faculty and staff who mentor a
Accreditation of Educator Preparation.
diverse student population. The University
Teacher preparation programs at Illinois
endeavors to provide opportunities for all
State are also annually approved by the
students, staff, and faculty to participate in a
Illinois State Board of Education.
global society.
Numerous programs of study at Illinois State
hold discipline-based accreditation. A list of OFFICE OF EQUAL
specialized accreditation bodies with which
OPPORTUNITY AND ACCESS
the University is associated is available at
provost.illinoisstate.edu/planning/
Illinois State University, as an equal
accreditation/program/.
opportunity/affirmative action employer,
complies with all applicable federal and
The University holds institutional mem-
state laws regarding affirmative action,
berships in the American Council on Edu-
nondiscrimination, and anti-harassment.
cation, the American Association of State
Illinois State University is committed to a
Colleges and Universities, the American As-
policy of equal opportunity for all persons
sociation of Colleges for Teacher Education,
and does not discriminate on the basis of
and the Council of Graduate Schools.
race, color, religion, pregnancy, sex,
national origin, sexual orientation, order
ILLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY of protection, gender identity and expres-
MISSION STATEMENT sion, ancestry, age, marital status, dis-
ability, genetic information, unfavorable
We at Illinois State University work as a diverse military discharge, or status as a veteran in
community of scholars with a commitment to employment, educational programs and
fostering a small-college atmosphere with large- activities, or admissions. Inquiries regard-
university opportunities. We promote the ing equal opportunity or affirmative action
highest academic standards in our teaching, at Illinois State may be directed to the
scholarship, public service and the connections Office of Equal Opportunity and Access at
we build among them. We devote all our (309) 438-3383.
resources and energies to creating the most
supportive and productive community
possible to serve the citizens of Illinois and

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


14 About Illinois State University

DISCLOSURE OF CAMPUS information below is intended to provide both


SECURITY AND CAMPUS CRIME institutional and external contact information
STATISTICS to current and prospective students.
Illinois State University is committed to the
Harassment and discrimination: The
safety and welfare of the campus
Office of Equal Opportunity and Access
community. Campus safety and security at
(EqualOpportunity.illinoisstate.edu) addres-
Illinois State University is a shared respon-
ses all issues related to the policies and
sibility. The best protection against campus
procedures for addressing discrimination and
crime is an aware, informed, and alert
harassment. Refer to the Anti-Harassment
campus community (students, faculty, staff,
and Non-Discrimination Policy Complaint
and visitors) who report crime and sus-
Procedures for information on reporting and
picious behavior in a timely manner and use
filing a complaint (policy.illinoisstate.edu/
reason and caution during their daily
conduct/1-2-1).
activities.
Concerns regarding faculty: When a
The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus
student has an issue or complaint regarding a
Security and Campus Crime Statistics Act
faculty member relating to an academic
is a federal law that requires colleges and
course or program the following steps are
universities to disclose certain timely and
recommended:
annual information about campus crime
and security policies. Information con- 1. Address the concern directly with the
tained in the Annual Security Report in- faculty member.
cludes criminal and fire statistics for the 2. If the concern cannot be sufficiently
past three years of reports of incidents that addressed with the faculty member, the
occurred on campus, in certain off-campus student should contact the Chair of the
buildings or property owned or controlled Department or Program Director.
by the University, and on public property
within or immediately adjacent to campus. 3. If the concern cannot be sufficiently
The Annual Security Report also includes addressed with the Chair or Program
policies and statistics required by the Director, the student should contact the
federal Violence Against Women Act relat- Office of the Dean of the College.
ed to sexual assault, domestic violence, When addressing complaints with faculty,
dating violence, and stalking. In addition, students are also encouraged to review the
the Report contains information on other following documents:
University policies and procedures related
to campus security, emergency manage-  Code of Student Conduct
ment, crime reporting, and other resources deanofstudents.illinoisstate.edu/conflict/
available to students. Effective fall of conduct/code/
2017, the University will also provide a  Academic Dishonesty (Plagiarism)
report that includes information on campus deanofstudents.illinoisstate.edu/conflict/
sexual violence impacting the University conduct/code/academic.php
community as required by the Illinois
Preventing Sexual Violence in Higher  Grade Challenge Policy
Education Act. provost.illinoisstate.edu/downloads/
FinalCourseGradeChallengeProcedure.pdf
The Annual Security Report and Fire Safety is
available on the Campus Safety and Security Concerns regarding staff members: When
website at: Security.IllinoisState.edu. If you have a student has an issue or complaint regarding
any questions or would like to request a paper copy a staff member the following steps are
of the report, please contact the Illinois State recommended:
University Police Department at (309) 438-8631. 1. Address the concern directly with the staff
member.
COMPLAINT RESOLUTION 2. If the concern cannot be sufficiently
addressed with the staff member, the
Federal regulations require institutions of student should contact the staff member’s
higher education to make public contact direct supervisor.
information for filing complaints. The

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


About Illinois State University 15

Internal resource: Dean on Duty GOVERNANCE


(DeanofStudents.illinoisstate.edu/contact/
dean) - All students have access to the Dean The Academic Senate is the primary governing
on Duty in the Dean of Students Office to body of the University. The Senate acts in
ask for advice and assistance in navigating legislative and advisory roles with regard to
concerns and complaints. The Dean on Duty University policies involving faculty and
is available every Monday-Friday 8 a.m. - students, academic programs and planning, and
4:30 p.m. for walk-ins or phone consultations University concerns. Based upon the concept
in the Students Services Building, Room 387 of shared governance, the 62-member Senate’s
or call 309-438-2008. representatives consist of 31 faculty members,
the composition of which is 29 tenure/tenure
External resources: track faculty members, one non-tenure-track
 The State of Illinois - Illinois Board of
faculty member and one faculty associate from
Higher Education the Laboratory Schools; 21 students, including
the Student Body President; one representative
ibhe.org/ConsumerInfo/complaint.htm.
from the Civil Service Council and one
 The Higher Learning Commission, Illinois representative from the Administrative Profes-
State University’s regional accreditor sional Council. Additionally, the ex-officio
hlcommission.org/General/contact- representatives are the President of the
us.html. University, three Vice Presidents, one Assoc-
iate Vice President, a representative from the
Online or Distance Education Complaint Deans Council, a representative from the
Resolution: Students enr olled in Online or Chairs and Directors Council, and the Student
Distance Education are encouraged to Trustee.
contact:
Through the Academic Senate and its external
 The Technology Support Center for committee system, students, faculty, staff and
technical problems: administrators share in the study and de-
ITHelp.illinoisstate.edu). velopment of policy. Students are encouraged
 The instructor for academic concerns or to participate in the Senate-appointed com-
referral to learning resources. mittees and councils such as the Academic
Planning Committee, Athletics Council,
 The department chair or school director Council for Teacher Education, Council on
for concerns that cannot be resolved by General Education, Honors Council, Library
the instructor or Technology Support Committee, Reinstatement Committee, Text-
Center. book Affordability Committee, University
If the issue cannot be resolved through the Curriculum Committee, University Hearing
resources listed above, information regarding Panel and University Appeals Board. Students
the complaint processes for each state of also participate as members of college and
residence is listed in the Complaint departmental councils and curriculum com-
Resolution section of the Illinois State mittees, and serve on search committees for the
Consumer Guide (illinoisstate.edu/consumer- evaluation of administrative applicants and on
guide). ad hoc committees. Application forms for
committees for faculty are sent out annually to all
faculty from the Academic Senate Office, Campus
UNIVERSITY ETHICS OFFICE Box 1830, Hovey 408; (309) 438-8735; email:
acsenate@IllinoisState.edu. Applications for stu-
Any student, faculty, or staff member who dents are available at the Student Government
believes they have witnessed a violation of Association Office, (309) 438-8971.
the State Officials and Employees Ethics Act
should report the violation immediately to
the University Ethics Office at (309) 438-
2339 or ethics@illinoisstate.edu.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


16 About Illinois State University

Academic Program Information Exercise Science: undergraduate minor, B.S.


Family and Consumer Sciences:
Illinois State University offers a variety of undergraduate minor, B.A., B.S., M. A.,
academic majors and minors. Academic M.S.
degree programs and minors, listed by Fashion Design and Merchandising: B.A.,
College, are outlined below. B.S.
Food, Nutrition, and Dietetics: B.A., B.S.
UNIVERSITY-WIDE PROGRAMS Graphic Communications: B.S.
Health and Wellness Coaching:
African-American Studies: undergraduate
minor undergraduate minor
African Studies: undergraduate minor Health Information Management: B.S.
Children’s Studies: undergraduate minor Health Promotion and Education: B.S.,
B.S.Ed.
Civic Engagement and Responsibility:
undergraduate minor Human Development and Family Science:
B.A., B.S.
Cognitive Science: undergraduate minor
Industrial Technology: B.S.
Ethnic Studies: undergraduate minor
Information Systems: undergraduate minor,
European Studies: undergraduate minor; B.S., M.S.
B.A.
Interior Design: B.A., B.S.
Interdisciplinary Studies: undergraduate
minor; B.A., B.S. Kinesiology and Recreation: M.S.
International Studies: undergraduate minor Medical Laboratory Science: B.S.
Latin American and Latino/a Studies: Military Science: undergraduate minor
undergraduate minor Network and Telecommunications
Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies: Management: B.S.
undergraduate minor Physical Education: B.S., B.S.Ed.
Native American Studies undergraduate Public Health: undergraduate minor
minor Recreation and Park Administration:
Peace and Conflict Resolution Studies: undergraduate minor, B.S.
undergraduate minor
Renewable Energy: B.S.
University Studies: B.A., B.S. Safety: undergraduate minor, B.S.
Urban Studies: undergraduate minor Technology: undergraduate minor, M.S.
Women’s and Gender Studies: undergraduate Technology and Engineering Education: B.S.
minor
College of Arts and Sciences
DEPARTMENTAL AND SCHOOL
PROGRAMS LISTED BY COLLEGE African-American Studies: undergraduate
minor
College of Applied Science and African Studies: undergraduate minor
Technology Anthropology: undergraduate minor, B.A.,
B.S., M.A., M.S.
Agriculture: undergraduate minor, B.S., M.S.
Applied Economics: M.A., M.S.
Athletic Coaching: undergraduate minor
Audiology: Au.D.
Athletic Training: B.S.
Biochemistry: B.S.
Computer Science: undergraduate minor,
B.S. Biological Sciences: undergraduate minor,
B.S., M.S., Ph.D.
Construction Management: B.S.
Biological Sciences Teacher Education: B.S.
Criminal Justice Sciences: undergraduate
minor, B.A., B.S., M.A., M.S. Chemistry: undergraduate minor, B.S., M.S.
Cybersecurity: B.S. Chemistry Education: M.S.C.E., M.C.E.
Engineering Technology: B.S. Children’s Studies: undergraduate minor
Environmental Health: undergraduate minor, Civic Engagement and Responsibility:
B.S. undergraduate minor

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


About Illinois State University 17

Classical Studies: undergraduate minor Religious Studies: undergraduate minor


Clinical-Counseling Psychology: M.A., M.S. School Psychology: S.S.P., Ph.D.
Cognitive Science: undergraduate minor Social Work: B.S.W., M.S.W.
Communication: M.A., M.S. Sociology: undergraduate minor, B.A., B.S.,
Communication Sciences and Disorders: M.A., M.S.
undergraduate minor, B.S. Spanish: undergraduate minor, B.A.
Communication Studies: undergraduate Speech-Language Pathology: M.A., M.S.
minor, B.A., B.S. Teaching English to Speakers of Other
East Asian Studies: undergraduate minor Languages: undergraduate minor
Economics: undergraduate minor, B.A., B.S. Urban Studies: undergraduate minor
English: undergraduate minor, B.A., M.A., Women’s and Gender Studies: undergraduate
M.S. minor
English Studies: Ph.D. Writing: undergraduate minor
Environmental Studies: undergraduate minor
European Studies: undergraduate minor, College of Business
B.A.
Accountancy: undergraduate minor, B.S.,
French and Francophone Studies:
M.S., Integrated B.S./M.P.A.
undergraduate minor, B.A.
Business Administration: undergraduate
Geography: undergraduate minor, B.A., B.S.
minor, B.S., M.B.A.
Geology: undergraduate minor, B.S.
Business Analytics: undergraduate minor
German: undergraduate minor, B.A.
Business Education: B.A., B.S., B.S. Ed
Gerontology: undergraduate minor
Business Environment and Sustainability:
History: undergraduate minor, B.A., B.S., undergraduate minor
M.A., M.S.
Business Information Systems: B.S.
Hydrogeology: M.S.
Finance: B.S.
Italian Studies: undergraduate minor
Financial Planning: undergraduate minor
Journalism: B.A., B.S.
Insurance: undergraduate minor
Languages, Literatures, and Cultures: M.A.
International Business: undergraduate minor,
Latin American and Latino/a Studies: B.A., B.S.
undergraduate minor
Management: B.S.
Legal Studies: undergraduate minor, B.A.,
Marketing: B.S.
B.S.
Organizational Leadership: undergraduate
Mass Media: undergraduate minor, B.A.,
minor
B.S.
Mathematics: undergraduate minor, B.A., Risk Management and Insurance: B.S.
B.S., M.S.
College of Education
Mathematics Education: Ph.D.
Middle Eastern and South Asian Bilingual Education: undergraduate minor
Studies: undergraduate minor College Student Personnel Administration:
Molecular and Cellular Biology: B.S. M.S.
Native American Studies: undergraduate Early Childhood Education: B.S., B.S.Ed.
minor Educational Administration: M.S., M.S. Ed.,
Peace and Conflict Resolution Studies: Ed.D., Ph.D.
undergraduate minor Elementary Education: B.S., B.S.Ed.
Philosophy: undergraduate minor, B.A. Middle Level Teacher Education: B.S.,
Physics: undergraduate minor, B.S. B.S.Ed.
Political Science: undergraduate minor, B.A., Reading: M.S.Ed.
B.S., M.A., M.S. Special Education: B.S.Ed., M.S., M.S.Ed.,
Psychology: undergraduate minor, B.A., Ed.D.
B.S., M.A., M.S. Teaching and Learning: M.S., Ed.D.
Public Relations: B.A., B.S.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


18 About Illinois State University

College of Fine Arts


Art: undergraduate minor, B.A., B.S., B.F.A,
M.A., M.S., M.F.A.
Arts Technology: B.A., B.S., M.S.
Dance: undergraduate minor
Film Studies: undergraduate minor
Jazz Performance: undergraduate minor
Music: undergraduate minor, B.A., B.S.,
M.M.,
Music Education: B.M.E., M.M.Ed.
Music Performance: B.M.
Theatre: undergraduate minor, B.A., B.S.,
M.F.A.
Theatre Studies, M.A., M.S.

Mennonite College of Nursing


Nursing: B.S.N., M.S.N., Ph.D.
Nursing Practice: D.N.P.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


19
UNIVERSITY POLICIES
Admission Policies phone or email.

ADMISSION APPLICATION AND Address:


PROJECTED DEADLINES Illinois State University
Office of Admissions, 201 Hovey Hall
Illinois State University maintains a small Campus Box 2200
college environment within a large Normal, IL 61790-2200
university. We value personal attention for Phone: (309) 438-2181
each and every student and our commitment Toll free: (800) 366-2478
to individuals begins with the recruitment Email: Admissions@IllinoisState.edu
and admission processes.
Websites: 
Illinois State seeks a highly-motivated,
academically well-prepared, and diverse Admissions.IllinoisState.edu
student body. Admission to the University is IllinoisState.edu/Apply
competitive. Applying during the preferred IllinoisState.edu/Visit
filing period is encouraged as the University
has the right to limit enrollment due to space STUDENT CLASSIFICATIONS
availability in major programs and overall
student capacity. Please refer to the Beginning Freshman, also known as First
Admissions website for more information Time in College (FTIC): The following
and detailed dates and deadlines. will classify a student as a new beginning
freshman (FTIC):
All prospective new students and students
wanting to return to the University after time 1. A person who has never attended any
away should apply for admission to Illinois college or university since graduating
State University at IllinoisState.edu/Apply. from high school. A student earning
college hours while in high school will be
Criminal Activity and Disciplinary classified as a new beginning freshman.
Disclosure: Illinois State Univer sity is 2. A person who enrolls at any college or
committed to maintaining a safe and university during the summer term
positive environment for all members of immediately following high school
the University community. Therefore, at graduation and then enrolls during the
the time of application, applicants will be subsequent fall term at Illinois State
required to disclose information regarding University will be classified as a
criminal background. In addition, appli- beginning freshman.
cants must report misconduct that resulted
in disciplinary separation from a previous 3. A person who graduates early from high
school or university. These cases will be school, attends a college or university
reviewed by the University prior to an during the spring term, and begins at
admission decision being made. Such Illinois State the following fall will be
disclosure does not automatically disqual- considered a beginning freshman if the
ify an applicant. For additional infor- high school transcript lists the graduation
mation, please contact the Office of date as May or June.
Admissions.
Transfer Student: The following will
classify a student as a transfer student:
VISIT AND CONTACT
INFORMATION 1. A person who has enrolled at any college
or university after graduating from high
The Office of Admissions encourages school, whether or not any work was
students and families to visit campus. Daily completed (except for students who
Campus Visits, Transfer Student Visits, classify as beginning freshmen under
Open Houses and appointments with an number 2 or 3 under the Beginning
Admission Counselor are available. For Freshman section).
more information or to make a visit 2. A person who graduates early from high
reservation, visit the Office of Admissions school and attends a college or university
website or contact the Admissions Office by during the spring term and begins at

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


20 University Policies

Illinois State the following fall will be  ACT/SAT scores and subscores
considered a transfer student if the high  Academic Personal Statement (optional):
school transcript lists the graduation date please visit Admissions.IllinoisState.edu
as December or January. for additional information.
Former Illinois State Student/Readmit: A Applicants must also show successful
person who wishes to return to Illinois State completion of the following:
after one or more semesters away from  English – 4 years
campus.
 Mathematics – 3 years of high school
math: traditional (algebra, geometry,
Visiting Student/Unclassified Undergrad-
algebra II), or integrated math 1, 2, and 3
uate: A per son who does not have a
bachelor degree and desires to take classes at  Natural science – 2 years with laboratories
the University without working toward a  Social science – 2 years
degree.
 *Foreign language or fine arts – 2 years of
International Student: A per son who is one foreign language or 2 years of fine
neither a United States citizen nor a United arts
States permanent resident.  Electives – 2 years
*NOTE: All students in the College of
Undocumented Student: A per son who
Arts and Sciences must satisfy a foreign
lives in the United States with no document-
language graduation requirement that may
tation stating U.S. citizenship or legal
be met by: 3 years of the same foreign
residency.
language in high school or completion of
the second semester or higher of college-
ADMISSION GUIDELINES level foreign language with a passing
grade or equivalent proficiency as
The following sections outline the determined by examination. Students who
admissions guidelines for the admission have completed one semester of college
categories previously listed. Please note that foreign language credit may elect to
catalog year does not govern admission satisfy this requirement by studying
requirements to the University or to an abroad in an approved program in a non-
individual’s specific major. These require- English speaking country. American Sign
ments can change every year based upon the Language may be used to fulfill this
competitiveness of the applicant pool and the requirement by transfer credit or by
space availability at the University and in proficiency.
each major program. Only graduation
requirements are governed by catalog year. General Equivalency Diploma in Lieu
of High School Diploma
PROGRAM SPECIFIC
ADMISSION CRITERIA Applicants who use general equivalency
diploma (GED) test results in lieu of a high
Illinois State University regulates admission school diploma are required to submit GED
to designated programs when the number of test results reflecting the standard of 150 on
students seeking admission exceeds the four tests and a total score of 600 or better.
available educational resources of the Applicants must also submit ACT or SAT
department or school. Supplemental selection test scores.
criteria for admission may need to be met for
specific majors. FINALIZING ADMISSION

FRESHMAN ADMISSION  Admission decisions are conditional until


high school graduation and academic
Illinois State considers the following when preparation is verified on final transcripts.
making an admission decision: Admission may be revoked if satisfactory
completion of minimum course specific
 Grade point average requirements and graduation are not

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


University Policies 21

confirmed by the high school transcript.  Withholding information or giving false


 Withholding information or giving false information to the University may make a
information to the University may make a student ineligible for admission to the
student ineligible for admission to the University or subject to dismissal.
University or subject to dismissal.
Transferability of Course Credit
TRANSFER ADMISSION
 After admission to Illinois State, the
Office of the University Registrar will
Illinois State considers the following when
determine how much transfer credit will
making admission decisions:
be given and how it may be used to fulfill
 Cumulative college grade point average Illinois State’s curricular requirements.
and, for some academic programs, Transfer credit from community colleges
prerequisite college coursework. For these is limited to 70 semester hours; credit
requirements, visit the following website: from four-year colleges and universities is
IllinoisState.edu/transferprogramrequirements. limited to 90 semester hours. Additional
 Good academic standing from last school credit for military service may be
attended. considered.
 If fewer than 24 college semester hours  Students who have completed an A.A.
completed at the time of application, high from any regionally accredited post
school courses, high school grade point secondary institution or the Illinois
average, and ACT/SAT scores. Articulation Initiative General Education
Core Curriculum (IAI GECC) at an
 Proof of high school graduation or a accredited, participating Illinois college or
passing score on GED exam, if requested. university will be considered to have met
 Optional: an academic personal statement the Illinois State University General
explaining circumstances that affected Education requirements.
collegiate academic performance.  Students who have completed an A.S.
 Illinois State requires all students to have from an accredited, participating Illinois
a declared major upon completion of 75 college or university must complete the
hours. Due to this policy, transfer students IAI GECC either as part of their A.S.
are encouraged to apply to a major degree or by completing the GECC at ISU
program of study. Transfer students with a or by transfer credit. All distribution
high amount of transfer credit will be requirements of each GECC category
carefully reviewed and evaluated on a case must be followed; that is, both a
by case basis for admissibility to the humanities and a fine arts course must be
University and to their intended major. completed and at least two different
disciplines must be represented in Social
and Behavioral Sciences.
Illinois State generally uses all grades shown
on all college transcripts to determine an  Students who have completed an A.S.
admission grade point average. However, for from any regionally accredited post-
repeated courses, only the last repeated grade secondary institution outside the state of
will be used in calculating the grade point Illinois will be considered to have met the
average for admission. Remedial (non-credit) Illinois State University General
coursework is not used in calculating the Education requirements.
admission GPA.  Students completing an A.A. or A.S. will
also have junior class standing. Illinois State
FINALIZING ADMISSION University accepts the AAT degree as a
baccalaureate-oriented degree when the
 Admission decisions are conditional until AAT degree includes the IAI transferable
final transcripts are received and core. For more information regarding the
satisfactory completion of courses is IAI GECC visit iTransfer.org.
confirmed. Admission may be revoked if  Transfer students who transfer credit from
this information is not verified by the final participating Illinois colleges or universities
official transcript(s).

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


22 University Policies

that satisfies some but not all requirements catalog should be used to determine
of the IAI GECC may satisfy Illinois State graduation requirements.
General Education requirements by com-
pleting requirements for the IAI GECC at Illinois State considers the following when
Illinois State or by completing the Uni- making decisions on readmission:
versity’s own General Education program.
Other students must complete Illinois State’s  Students must have left Illinois State
General Education program. University in good academic standing.

 Illinois State generally accepts transfer  If coursework is completed since leaving


courses with earned grades of D. How- Illinois State, a minimum 2.00 GPA is
ever, certain courses in some major pro- required for all college coursework
grams may require a grade of C or better. completed and good academic standing
When a student who pursues one of these must be shown from the last institution
majors transfers D grade course credit that attended. Please note that many majors
is equated to an Illinois State course require higher GPA standards and pre-
requiring a grade of C or better, the stu- requisite college coursework for admis-
dent will have to repeat the course to sion.
satisfy the major program requirements. Visit Admissions.IllinoisState.edu/Returning
to view the admission requirements for
specific majors.
SECOND BACHELOR’S DEGREE
 If on probation or dismissed, students may
A student who has already received one be considered for reinstatement or for the
bachelor’s degree from Illinois State Uni- New Start readmission program. Supple-
versity or from another regionally accredited mental information may be requested to
college or university may receive a second determine eligibility.
bachelor’s degree at Illinois State University
upon completion of degree requirements. Visit Admissions.IllinoisState.edu/
Students must meet the admission require- Returning to learn more about these
ments for the major selected and meet readmission options.
appropriate deadlines.  If dismissed for disciplinary reasons,
students should contact the Office of
Second bachelor degree seeking students are Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution
required to fulfill degree requirements as for disciplinary clearance. Readmission
listed in the catalog at the time of admission cannot be considered until clearance is
to the second bachelor degree program. The given.
program of studies completed for the second
degree must include at least 32 semester
hours of coursework taken after the granting New Start Policy: Students who leave
of the first degree, of which 30 hours must be Illinois State in a degree program with less
taken in residence at Illinois State. At least than a 2.00 cumulative grade-point average
24 of the 32 hours completed toward the (GPA) may be considered for readmission
second degree must be at senior college-level through the New Start Policy. Applicants
(courses numbered 200 and above). admitted through this policy will begin with
a new cumulative GPA calculated from the
point of their reentry.
FORMER ILLINOIS STATE
STUDENTS SEEKING Students may be considered for readmission
READMISSION through the New Start Policy after being
away from the University for one full year
Students who have been absent from the (example: a student who last attended the
University for one or more semesters must University during the fall 2016 term may not
apply for readmission. Early application is be considered for reenrollment through the
encouraged as it may not be possible to offer New Start Policy until the spring 2018 term)
readmission for the term requested due to and only when the requirements of one of the
space limitations. Readmitted students following New Start categories are met:
should consult the section on Undergraduate Nontraditional Student, Veteran, or Com-
Catalog Requirements to determine which munity College Transfer. These categories are

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


University Policies 23

described in detail in the Academic Policies Transfer students may be admitted without
and Practices section under the heading submitting transcripts from schools pre-
“Additional Academic Requirements” in this viously attended if they have not been in
catalog and at Admissions.IllinoisState.edu/ attendance at a college or university two
Returning. years prior to the semester for which they
have applied. If attendance has been within
Students may exercise New Start only once. two years, students must submit transcripts
Such students will have “New Start” indicating a cumulative grade point average
indicated on their transcript. New Start will of 2.00 on a 4.00 scale and be in good
affect only the cumulative GPA. All grades standing at the last school attended. Adult
earned at Illinois State, regardless of when Learners who, at some later time, wish to
earned, will be used in the calculation of the become candidates for a degree must com-
major GPA, the minor GPA, and graduation plete a minimum of 12 semester hours at
honors. Students who are admitted through Illinois State, apply for admission as a
the New Start Policy will be admitted on degree seeking student, and meet university
academic probation and be required to admission requirements for the desired
participate in Project Success (see the program.
Academic Policies and Practices section for
further information). Students who reenter INTERNATIONAL STUDENT
under the New Start Policy must follow the ADMISSION
Undergraduate Catalog in effect at the time
of reentry. To be eligible for graduation, a Illinois State considers the following when
student must earn at least 30 semester hours making an admission decision:
at Illinois State University after exercising
New Start.
Freshman Admission:
VISITING STUDENT/  Grade point average
UNCLASSIFIED ADMISSION  English proficiency or ACT/SAT score

Individuals desiring to take a class or classes Applicants must also earn the equivalent of a
at Illinois State as a visitor without working U.S. high school diploma from a recognized
toward a specific degree at Illinois State may international institution of secondary or high
be admitted as unclassified students. school level, or will do so prior to enroll-
Applicants may be required to provide ment.
evidence showing prerequisite background
for the course(s) desired. Unclassified stu- Transfer Admission: 
dents must maintain the same standard of  Cumulative college grade point average,
performance as degree-seeking students. and for some academic programs, pre-
Unclassified students who wish to become requisite college coursework; for these
candidates for a degree at some later time requirements, visit the following web-
must apply for admission as a degree seeking site: IllinoisState.edu/
student and must meet published require- transferprogramrequirements
ments for admission into the desired
program. Students who hold a baccalaureate  Good academic standing from last school
degree from a regionally accredited college attended
or university are not eligible for the  If fewer than 24 college semester hours
unclassified undergraduate status. are completed at the time of application,
high school grade point average
Adult Learner Program: All per sons 25  English proficiency
years of age or older prior to the first day of
class for any given semester may be
Illinois State requires all students to have a
considered for admission as an Adult
declared major upon completion of 75 hours.
Learner. Admission as an Adult Learner is an
Due to this policy, transfer students are
unclassified/non-degree seeking student
encouraged to apply to a major program of
status. Freshmen may be admitted without
study. Transfer students with a high amount
presenting ACT or SAT scores and without
of transfer credit will be carefully reviewed
proof of high school diploma and/or GED.
and evaluated on a case by case basis for

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


24 University Policies

admissibility to the University and to their SPECIAL ADMISSION PROGRAMS


intended major.
The University may admit a limited number
Upon receipt of all necessary materials, the of applicants who show the potential for
Office of Admissions will review the success in collegiate work but who do not
application file for an admission decision. meet all the regular admission standards. The
Students who are admitted will be sent a special admissions programs are as follows:
Certificate of Eligibility (I-20) for Non-
immigrant (F-1) student status with the Adult Learner Program: All per sons 25
notification of acceptance. years of age or older prior to the first day of
class for any given semester may be
Eligibility: considered for admission as an Adult
International students must: Learner. See the Visiting Student/
Unclassified area of the Admission Policies
 Earn a total score of 79 on the internet section.
based test (iBT) Test of English as a
Foreign Language (TOEFL), a 550 on the
Concurrent Admissions Program (ConAp)
paper based TOEFL or total score of 6.5
for Army and Army Reserve Enlistees:
on the International English Language
The Concurrent Admission Program (ConAp)
Testing (IELTS) assessment. International
is a partnership between the Army Recruiting
freshman students may substitute the ACT
Command and over 1,900 participating
or SAT for the English proficiency exam.
colleges to mutually advance the goals of
International transfer students may have
lifelong learning and postsecondary education
the English proficiency exam requirement
for Future Soldiers. This program allows
waived if they’ve acquired 60 semester
individuals enlisting in the Army or Army
hours while attending a college or univer-
Reserve who are part of the Future Soldier
sity located in the U.S. and have been
program to declare their intent to enroll at a
residing in the U.S. for at least one year at
college or university at the time of their
the time of admission. enlistment. The Future Soldier submits a
 Submit a declaration of finances showing College Referral and Intent to Enroll form to a
source of support and official document- ConAp college stating his/her intent to enroll
ation of funds available for the first year’s during or after their enlistment. The college
expenses. Financial proof is required for acknowledges the intent to enroll form and
all students seeking F-1 status. sends information about the college to the
Future Soldier.
International applicants who meet all other
academic criteria for admission but whose The ConAp form provides guidelines about
scores do not meet the minimum standards applying for admission, preparing for the
for English proficiency may be admitted to a academic experience, beginning college
degree program. In such cases, students will work during enlistment, and staying in touch
be required to attend courses at the English with the college. Please note that individuals
Language Institute (ELI) at their own ex- must apply to Illinois State by using the
pense and remain in the program until their standard application process, and individuals
English proficiency has improved to a level must meet admission requirements in effect
required for University enrollment. at the time of their enrollment. In addition, a
DD214 showing honorable discharge is
Finalizing Admission:  required as part of ISU’s application process.
 Admission decisions are conditional until Dual Enrollment Program: Offer s quali-
final transcripts and other supporting fied high school students an opportunity to
documents are received. take college-level classes. Dual Enrollment
 Withholding information or giving false students are evaluated on a case-by-case
information to the University may make a basis. If admitted, they are given unclassified
student ineligible for admission to the student status and are advised by University
University or subject to dismissal. College. They cannot be full-time students
while still in high school and must take
classes offered on campus.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


University Policies 25

Talent Program: Applicants who demon- Information and further instructions for
strate an outstanding talent in art, music, meeting the stated requirements will be pro-
theatre, dance, forensics, or athletics. vided via future communication from Student
Health Services for all incoming students.
Veterans Program: Applicants who wer e Student Health Services recommends com-
Illinois residents at the time of entrance into pletion of the immunization information as
the Armed Forces, who present a discharge soon as possible. Students not in compliance
for other than dishonorable reasons showing with the immunization requirements by the
completion of at least a one-year active tour 10th class of the first semester will have
of duty in the Armed Forces, and whose first subsequent semester registrations blocked and
attendance at a college or university after be assessed an administrative non-compliance
discharge is at Illinois State can be con- fee.
sidered for admission through this program.
Further information can be obtained by
Inquiries regarding these programs should be calling Student Health Services at (309) 438-
directed to the Office of Admissions, 201 7559 or by visiting the website at
Hovey Hall, Illinois State University, HealthServices.IllinoisState.edu.
Campus Box 2200, Normal, IL 61790-2200,
(800) 366-2478 or Admissions.IllinoisState.edu Financial Aid
and should specify the particular program of
interest. Students who attend the University may be
eligible to receive financial aid in the form
Immunization and Medical of loans, scholarships, tuition waivers, grants
Requirements for all Students and employment. In addition to funds re-
ceived through gift aid and loans, many
All students admitted to Illinois State Illinois State students seek employment to
University are required, by College Immun- help cover expenses.
ization Code (77 III.Adm.Code 694), to
provide documentation of the following: Students interested in applying for financial
 Two Measles, Mumps and Rubella assistance may contact the Financial Aid
(MMR) vaccines given on or after the first Office.
birthday for students born after January 1,
1957. FINANCIAL AID OFFICE
 A combination of 3 shots for DTP/Dtap/
Td/ or Tdap. One must be a Tdap. One 101 Hovey Hall, (309) 438-2231
must be within the last ten years. Email: FinancialAid@IllinoisState.edu
 One Meningococcal conjugate vaccine Website: FinancialAid.IllinoisState.edu
after the age of 16 for new students under
the age of 22 as of the first day of class. All students are encouraged to apply for
(Meningitis B and Menomune do not meet financial aid by completing the Free Appli-
this requirement). cation for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).
This application determines eligibility for
All immunization dates must be signed/
state, federal and institutional financial aid,
certified by a physician or public health
including federal student loans.
official. All immunization records must be
submitted in English.
General Information
Please note that a physical examination is
not required. International students are Financial aid counselors are available
required by University regulations to have Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to
TB screening within ten days of their arrival 4:30 p.m. In addition, you may access
on campus. The Student Health Services also information on the Financial Aid Office website
at FinacialAid.IllinoisState.edu. Information on
strongly recommends that all students have
the website includes:
immunization against Hepatitis B (a series of
three injections).
 Office hours, phone number and location;
information concerning the application

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


26 University Policies

process, cost of attendance and aid loans.); not be in default on a Perkins


programs available to students; Loan or any federally guaranteed loan;
 FAFSA on the Web, which allows you to  not owe a repayment to a federal grant
file the Free Application for Federal program;
Student Aid electronically;
 make satisfactory progress toward a
 Financial Aid forms and worksheets degree as defined by Illinois State Uni-
available to download; versity (See Satisfactory Academic Pro-
 scholarship searches; gress); and
 important dates for your calendar;  be registered with Selective Service, if you
 a link to the portal so that you can check are a male at least 18 years of age, born
the status and progress of your aid after 1959, and not currently an active
application; member of the U.S. Armed Forces.
 Entrance and Exit Loan Counseling; NOTE: A student may not r eceive feder al
 commonly asked questions and answers. or state financial aid from more than one
institution at the same time.
Institutional and Financial Assistance
Information for Students APPLICATION PROCEDURES

The law (the Higher Education Act of 1965, To be considered for financial aid at Illinois
as amended, and regulation 34 CFR 668) State University, you must complete and
requires Illinois State University to notify submit the Free Application for Federal
enrolled students and the parents of Student Aid (FAFSA), or the Renewal
dependent enrolled students annually of the FAFSA, based on the following time table:
availability of the following information:
 your rights under the Family Education In September Renewal aid applicants will
Rights and Privacy Act; be sent an email notification for FAFSA on
 your right to a deferment of repayment of
the Web if they provided a valid email
your Federal Direct Loan for Peace Corps address on the current year’s FAFSA.
or volunteer service;
In October Complete the FAFSA on the
 financial aid available at Illinois State
website www.fafsa.ed.gov.
University;
 information about Illinois State University; The priority FAFSA filing date for Illinois
State University is November 15 each year.
 the graduation rate of degree-seeking, full- The federal processor must receive your
time undergraduate students at Illinois
application by this date to insure your
State University;
application receives full consideration for all
 an annual campus security report; and, financial aid programs. If your FAFSA is
 a report on athletic program participation received after November 15, you will be
and financial support data. considered for financial aid programs for
which you are eligible and that have
General Eligibility Criteria remaining funds.

To qualify for federal or state financial aid In October After you r eceive your Student
programs, you must: Aid Report, you must review it for accuracy.
 be a United States citizen or be an eligible
non-citizen; The income and asset information provided
on the FAFSA determines your financial aid
 submit the Free Application for Federal eligibility. Be sure to use Illinois State's Title
Student Aid (FAFSA) to the federal IV school code: 001692. There is no separate
processor; institutional application for financial aid at
 be enrolled for a minimum of 6 hours (half Illinois State. You will need to submit an
-time status) per semester (Students not additional application for summer aid (see
pursuing a degree or unclassified students Financial Aid for Summer Session).
are not eligible for financial aid, including

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


University Policies 27

Financial Aid for the Summer Session: If ILLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY


you are enrolled for at least six hours of GRANT
coursework, you may apply for financial aid.
The application form for the Summer  ISU Access Grant
Session will be available in the Forms and
Publications section of the STATE SCHOLARSHIPS AND
FinancialAid.IllinoisState.edu website in GRANTS
early March.
 MIA-POW Scholarship
Data from your FAFSA will be used to
determine your eligibility for aid for the  University Employee Dependent Partial
summer session. Aid funds for the summer Tuition Waiver
session are very limited. Direct Loan funds
are available only if you have remaining loan You and/or your parents must meet residency
eligibility for your class level. requirements based on regulations from the
Illinois Student Assistance Commission
(ISAC) to be eligible for the following
Verification: The Depar tment of
programs.
Education’s regulations require the Financial
Aid Office to verify the accuracy of financial
 Monetary Award Program (ISAC MAP
data for some aid applicants. We call this
Grant)
process “verification.” If your application is
selected for verification, you will be notified  State of Illinois ROTC Scholarship
via email and asked to provide supporting
documentation. A list of requested items will Consult the ISAC website at
also be posted to your “To-Do List” in your collegeillinois.org, or call 1-800-899-ISAC
Student Service Center. Responding to our (4722) to obtain additional information about
requests for documentation in a timely the following scholarships, including how to
fashion is important to avoid delays in apply and application deadlines.
processing your award notice and/or
 Illinois National Guard Grant
disbursing your financial aid.
 Illinois Veteran Grant (IVG)
TYPES OF AID AVAILABLE  Illinois Special Education Teacher Tuition
Waiver (SETTW)
For additional information on the types of  Minority Teachers of Illinois Scholarship
Financial Aid listed, please visit
FinancialAid.IllinoisState.edu. PRIVATE SCHOLARSHIPS

FEDERAL GRANTS AND BENEFITS Many students utilize private scholarships to


supplement their financial aid award pack-
Federal grants and benefits are considered age. You may also contact clubs, found-
"gift aid," and do not need to be repaid. ations, organizations, corporations and
Grants commonly received by Illinois State churches from your hometown for scholar-
students are: ships. The scholarship donor determines the
eligibility criteria. You are encouraged to use
 Federal Pell Grant the Illinois State University Scholarship page
on the Financial Aid Office home page at
 Federal Supplemental Educational
FinancialAid.IllinoisState.edu. Avoid search
Opportunity Grant (FSEOG)
services or "consultants" who charge a fee
 Survivors’ and Dependents’ Educational and/or promise positive results.
Assistance Program
 Veterans’ G.I. Bill
 Federal Teach Grant

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


28 University Policies

ILLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY After your loan is processed, you will receive
MERIT-BASED SCHOLARSHIPS an award letter and information on
completing an electronic Master Promissory
Merit-based scholarships are awarded to new Note (MPN), if you have not already done
beginning freshmen and transfer students. In so. Read the information carefully. Before
order to be considered for a merit-based loan proceeds will be credited to your
scholarship as a new student, applicants must account, the MPN and entrance loan
be admitted to the University. counseling (see below) must be completed.

For more information about merit-based Because of its participation in the Direct
scholarships for new students, please contact Loan program, Illinois State receives loan
the Office of Admissions by telephone at (800) proceeds directly from the U.S. Department
366-2478 or visit the Office of Admissions of Education. Your loan proceeds will be
website at Admissions.IllinoisState.edu. In applied to your university charges.
addition, the Scholarship Resource Office,
housed within the Financial Aid Office, will Loan Counseling: Students who ar e fir st-
assist students in their search for private or time Direct Loan borrowers are required to
institutional scholarship dollars. Contact the attend Federal Direct Loan entrance loan
Scholarship Resource Office by telephone at counseling before loan proceeds are credited
(309) 438-2740 or visit their website at to the student's account. You may meet this
FinancialAid.IllinoisState.edu/scholarships. requirement by completing loan entrance
counseling at StudentLoans.gov.
Academic and Non-Academic Scholarship
Programs: Some academic depar tments If you attended entrance counseling at
and various University organizations and non another school, you must sign a statement
-academic departments offer scholarships to verifying that you previously met the
new and continuing students based on aca- requirement. The purpose of entrance
demic accomplishments. You can explore the counseling is to inform you of your
availability of these scholarships by visiting responsibilities and rights as a borrower.
the Financial Aid Office website.
Exit Information: Before you graduate, or if
LOANS your enrollment status drops below 6 hours per
semester, you will be sent information concerning
Federal Direct Student Loan Program: Direct Loan exit counseling, which outlines loan
You must complete the Free Application for repayment, consolidation, and deferment options.
Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to receive a You may also get this information from the Exit
loan. The Financial Aid Office will deter- Counseling link on the Financial Aid Office
mine your eligibility for all other aid pro- website: FinancialAid.IllinoisState.edu. Repayment
grams prior to processing your loan. Because of your Direct Loan begins six months after you
Illinois State is a participant in the Federal leave the University or drop below half-time status.
Direct Loan program, a loan application from
a bank or other lender is not required. Nursing Student Loan: Students enr olled
at least half-time in the Nursing Program and
There are two kinds of direct loans: who demonstrate need by filling the FAFSA
subsidized and unsubsidized. If you are are eligible for a Nursing Student Loan. The
eligible for the subsidized loan based on cumulative loan limit is $13,000 and repay-
financial need, the interest on the loan is paid ment begins nine months after the student
for you as long as you are enrolled half-time ceases to be enrolled at least half-time.
(a minimum of 6 hours per semester). The Interest during repayment includes 5 percent
unsubsidized loan is not based on financial interest and the maximum repayment period
need and requires that you make quarterly is ten (10) years.
interest payments on the loan while you are
enrolled. If you choose to defer payments Federal Direct PLUS Loan: Par ents of
while you are in school, the interest will be dependent students may apply for the Parent
added to the principal of your loan Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS).
(capitalized). To apply for a PLUS loan the parent
borrower must go to the StudentLoans.gov

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


University Policies 29

website and follow the directions for SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC


applying for a PLUS loan. The parent PROGRESS
borrower must complete and sign a Direct
PLUS Master Promissory Note. All students who receive federal and state
financial aid must meet federal and institutional
The PLUS loan application process is completely standards for satisfactory academic progress in
electronic - a credit check will be conducted at the order to establish and retain aid eligibility.
time of on-line application, and results will be Students receiving athletic or other University-
communicated to the parent and the school during administered awards must also meet the
this application process. If the loan is denied due to satisfactory academic progress standards that
adverse credit, the parent will be given options for have been established by the awarding entity.
obtaining an endorser. A parent may borrow up to
the cost of attendance less any other financial aid Satisfactory academic progress for federal and state
the student is receiving. In order to determine financial aid programs is based on three measures:
eligibility, parents and students must file the Free cumulative grade-point average, completion rate
Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). based on credit hours completed compared to
attempted, and a maximum timeframe for degree
“Alternative” Loans: Alternative or private completion. The following describes the Uni-
loans are for students and parents who are versity’s standards for each of these three
not eligible for the federal programs of measures, and when these standards are reviewed:
financial aid, or who need additional funds to
meet educational expenses. In order to Cumulative Grade-Point Average (GPA):
determine eligibility, students/parents must Undergraduate students must maintain a
file the Free Application for Federal Student minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 based on
Aid (FAFSA). If you have any questions credits earned at Illinois State University.
about your eligibility for financial aid to The first time a student’s GPA is below 2.0,
attend Illinois State, contact your financial the student is placed on Academic Probation
aid counselor. and Financial Aid Warning and continues to
be eligible to receive financial aid. If the
FINANCIAL AID DISBURSEMENT student does not raise the GPA to 2.0 in the
following semester of attendance, or the
If the amount of financial aid exceeds charges, you GPA falls below 2.0 in a subsequent sem-
will receive a refund of the balance. Refund checks ester, the student is Academically Dismissed
are mailed from the Student Accounts Office and loses financial aid eligibility.
throughout the academic year for aid in excess of
amounts owed the University. Students are Completion Rate: All students ar e r e-
encouraged to sign up for direct deposit through quired to complete a minimum of sixty-seven
Student Accounts in My.IllinoisState.edu. You percent (67%) of the credit hours attempted
should be prepared to buy books and have “start at Illinois State University. Courses with a
up” funds for the beginning of the semester. grade of D or higher, as well as CR or P,
count as completed. Credit hours attempted
It is important to keep your local and (but not earned) include audits, incompletes,
permanent address information current with withdrawals, and repeated or failed classes.
the Office of the University Registrar.
University offices use this information to A student who does not complete a minimum of
contact you. (For example, the Student sixty-seven percent (67%) of credit hours
Accounts Office will use your local address attempted will be suspended from financial aid
to send a refund check to you.) If there is no eligibility until his or her completion rate im-
local address on file with the Registrar, cor- proves to at least sixty-seven percent (67%).
respondence will be sent to your permanent The completion rate for students readmitted
home address. to the University under the New Start pro-
gram is calculated beginning with the credit
You may update your address in person at hours attempted/completed during the term
the Office of the University Registrar Service for which the student was readmitted. Trans-
Center, 107 Moulton Hall, or by accessing fer student completion rate is calculated by
My.IllinoisState.edu. counting transferred hours as hours attemp-
ted and completed. Only hours attempted and
not completed at Illinois State University are

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


30 University Policies

counted in the formula. to the student including a Satisfactory Academic


Progress Appeal Form.
Maximum Time Frame: The maximum
timeframe for the completion of a degree is The Satisfactory Academic Progress Appeal
limited by federal regulations to 150% of the Form must include reasons for failure to
published length of the degree program. This achieve good academic standing and any
is equivalent to a maximum number of credit applicable documentation, including a plan
hours that includes transfer credits and all of study. Appeal Forms must be submitted to
attempted credit hours at Illinois State the Financial Aid Office and are reviewed by
University. Credit hours attempted includes the Reinstatement Committee. For the
completed credits, audits, incompletes, Completion Rate standard, students can also
withdrawals, and repeated or failed classes. restore aid eligibility by earning enough
The maximum number of credits allowed for additional hours to meet the 67%
a subsequent degree program at ISU requirement.
excludes the credits from any previous
degree(s) earned at ISU. If the student is not meeting the GPA
standard, University College first sends the
The maximum number of credit hours for student a “warning” letter. If the student
which a student is eligible to receive fails to meet the GPA standard a second
financial aid is 180. The maximum number time, University College sends the student a
of credit hours for which a student pursuing dismissal letter, including instructions for
a second undergraduate degree is eligible to writing and submitting a petition for
receive financial aid is 90. Hours transferred reinstatement. The petition must be
to Illinois State University are counted as submitted to University College by the date
hours earned. stated on the dismissal letter.

Review of Progress Standards: Cumu- ENROLLMENT CHANGES AND


lative GPA is reviewed at the end of each FINANCIAL AID ELIGIBILITY
period of enrollment, fall semester, spring
semester, and the summer session, for both Reduction in Hours: Reducing your cr edit
financial aid eligibility and for continued hours has implications for both your aid
enrollment at Illinois State University. eligibility for the current semester and future
terms. Your aid eligibility is based on the
Completion rate is reviewed upon
number of credit hours for which you are
submission of a financial aid application (the
enrolled on census day, usually the Friday of
FAFSA), and at the end of each period of
the second week of classes. If your aid was
enrollment, including the summer session.
distributed based on full-time enrollment (12
The Financial Aid Office sends a “warning
credits undergraduate; 9 credits graduate) and
letter” to any aid recipient who has not
you drop to part-time on or before census day,
completed 67% of hours attempted. If an aid
your aid may be reduced. If you drop after the
recipient does not meet the 67% standard at
day withdrawal grades are assigned, the
the end of any subsequent term, the student
withdrawal grades will reduce your percentage
will be placed in violation and aid will be
completion rate, which is part of the standards
suspended.
of Satisfactory Academic Progress for the
receipt of financial aid. These standards are
Maximum timeframe is reviewed upon
posted on the financial aid website 
submission of a financial aid application (the
FinancialAid.IllinoisState.edu.
FAFSA), and at the end of each enrollment
period, including the summer session. The
Financial Aid Office sends a “warning letter” Withdrawal: Feder al r egulations state
to any aid recipient who is within 15 hours that financial aid is earned by attending
of reaching the maximum attempted hour for class. You have not earned 100 percent of
your financial aid until you have attended 60
his or degree program.
percent of the term. If you withdraw before
this date, a portion of your financial aid has
Notification/Appeals: If financial aid eligibility not been earned. The unearned portion is
is suspended as a result of failure to meet the equal to the percentage of the term
completion rate or maximum timeframe remaining on the date of withdrawal. Your
standard, the Financial Aid Office sends a letter financial aid eligibility will be recalculated

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


University Policies 31

based on your actual period of attendance - must indicate an interest in “work-study" on


you may be asked to repay a portion of the the FAFSA and demonstrate need. The federal
aid that had been distributed to you. government pays 70 percent of a Work-Study
student’s earnings, while the employer pays the
Failure to Earn Credit: If you fail to ear n balance. A student employed 10-15 hours per
credit for any of your classes (receive grades of week can expect to earn between $2,000 and
F, W, I and/or NC), federal regulations require $2,500 a year. Work-Study students find work
the Financial Aid Office to assume you stopped on-campus (food service, library, Bone Student
attending your classes. In order to retain any of Center, departmental offices) or in nonprofit,
your financial aid, you must provide proof that off-campus agencies (hospitals, youth centers,
you attended classes. If you did stop attending charitable agencies and libraries). Another
class, you are treated as an unofficial Federal Work-Study program is the America
withdrawal. This means that the midpoint of Reads/America Counts initiative in which
the term is used as your last date of attendance students are employed as reading tutors in local
and your aid eligibility is reduced by up to 50 elementary schools.
percent. This will result in you owing funds
back to the university unless you can
Students go directly to the employer for an
provide documentation of attendance past
the 60 percent point of the term. interview and, if hired, must complete state
and federal withholding tax forms in the
Payroll Office, 100 S. Fell Ave, 239 Uptown
CONFIDENTIALITY AND THE Crossing, Suite E. The student is not per-
RELEASE OF INFORMATION mitted to earn more than the Work-Study
eligibility determined by federal regulations.
The Financial Aid Office will release
information from your financial aid appli- Regular Student Employment: Those stu-
cation file to parties within the University if
dents who desire to work on or off-campus
their inquiry is related to your attendance at
may seek part-time employment with the
Illinois State. Inquiries from off-campus
agencies and/or landlords will be answered University or off campus. These jobs gen-
by Financial Aid Office staff only if you erally pay the minimum wage. Hours vary,
have submitted a signed written request. To and may be less flexible than Federal Work-
protect the confidentiality of your records, Study positions.
the Financial Aid Office will require proper
identification from the requesting party Finding a Job: Both Feder al Wor k Study
before releasing any of your information. and regular student employment part-time
Appropriate documentation of any release of job openings are accessible through student
information will be placed in your financial employment at IllinoisState.edu/jobs. The
aid file. Career Center, located in the Student Ser-
vices Building, room 185, can offer assist-
STUDENT EMPLOYMENT ance with off-campus part-time job searches.
Call (309) 438-2200 for more information.
Students enrolled for six or more semester
hours may work part-time at Illinois State
University. Eligible student employees VETERANS AND MILITARY
usually work 10 to 15 hours per week while SERVICES
classes are in session. Students working at
Illinois State University earn a minimum of 112 Moulton Hall, (309) 438-2207
$8.25 per hour. This pay rate is subject to veterans.illinoisstate.edu
change by action of the federal government,
the state, or the institution. The Office of Veterans and Military Services
advises military-connected students on mat-
Federal Work-Study Program: This ters related to military related educational
federally sponsored program enables students benefits and payments. For more infor-
with demonstrated financial need to earn a mation, visit the Veterans and Military
portion of their expenses while they are Services website Veterans.IllinoisState.edu.
enrolled at Illinois State. To be initially
awarded Federal Work-Study the applicant

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


32 University Policies

TUITION AND FEES application. A student who is not a resident


of Illinois pays an out-of-state differential
Tuition, fees, on-campus housing charges charge per credit hour. All other fees are the
and dining charges are determined by action same for non-residents. A student under 18
of the Board of Trustees on a yearly basis. years of age is considered a non-resident if
the student’s parents are not legal residents
Tuition and fees other than health insurance of Illinois. A student over 18 years of age is
are assessed at a per semester hour rate. considered a non-resident if the student is not
Health insurance is assessed to all students a legal resident of Illinois. A student who
enrolled for nine or more semester hours. begins as a non-resident may later qualify for
Upon being first enrolled in a degree pro- resident status. Additionally, select students
gram at Illinois State University, tuition rates receive an alternate rate of tuition of 1.0
for undergraduate students will be locked for times the current in-state rate, including:
a four-year period. Certain degree programs students admitted from Iowa, Indiana,
qualify for the locked rate to be extended Kentucky, Michigan, Missouri and
beyond the four-year period. Tuition and fees Wisconsin; students who meet the
are subject to change by action of the Board of eligibility requirements (as set for the
Trustees and the General Assembly. For additional specific fall term in question) for our
information, refer to the Student Accounts website at principal scholarship programs, namely the
StudentAccounts.IllinoisState.edu. Presidential, University, Redbird, Transfer
Student Scholarship, or Phi Theta Kappa
Summer Session Costs: The summer Scholarship; students who are identified by
session costs for tuition and fees are assessed a unit (College of Fine Arts, Forensics,
at a per semester hour rate. Students enrolled Gamma Phi Circus) through their selective
for six or more semester hours will be processes (audition, portfolio, etc.) based
charged the current rate for health insurance. upon a specific talent. Guidelines for
qualifying and special circumstances may
Auditors: Students who take all cour ses as be found on the University Registrar’s
auditors without credit are charged at the website Registrar.IllinoisState.edu.
current rate per semester hour for tuition and Personnel within the Office of the
fees. Auditing a class does not count toward University Registrar are responsible for
full-time student status for financial aid and determining residency.
other purposes.
Payment of Tuition and Fees: The
Materials Charges: Mater ial char ges University offers a registration installment
listed under CourseFinder on the internet or plan for the payment of tuition and fees for
on the My.IllinoisState.edu registration the fall, spring, and summer semesters. For
system are automatically charged to the those selecting that option, a registration
student’s account. A student may supply his installment fee per semester will be assessed,
or her own materials and request the with approximately one-fourth due in
instructor, in writing, to reduce the materials August, September, October, and November
charge. for the fall semester, one-fourth due in
January, February, March, and April for the
spring semester and one-third due in May,
Resident and Non-Resident Status: An June, and July for the summer semester. The
applicant or enrolled student is classified
Student Accounts website gives further
either as a resident of Illinois, a non-resident,
information and lists specific dates.
or a foreign student. Residency for tuition
purposes is different from residency for
voting, taxing purposes, or residency Withdrawal and Reduction of Tuition and
requirements of on-campus doctoral Fees: A r egister ed student who officially
programs. withdraws from the University may receive a
reduction of tuition and fees according to the
following schedule:
A student must be a U.S. citizen or have been
approved for U.S. Permanent Resident status
 If withdrawal is prior to the first regularly
in order to be considered as an Illinois
scheduled class day, tuition and fees are
resident. An individual’s residency status is
reduced by 100%.
based on information from the admission

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


University Policies 33

 If withdrawal is within the first fifteen hardship, or institutional error.


calendar days starting with the first
regularly scheduled class day, tuition and A student may receive a reduction of all
fees are reduced by 100% and a service tuition and fees if the University declares
charge will be added to the student him or her ineligible for enrolled status prior
account. to the first day of regularly scheduled class.
 If withdrawal is after the fifteenth
calendar day, please see the current year For questions regarding changes to or
billing information brochure at cancellation of housing contracts, please visit
StudentAccounts.IllinoisState.edu for a housing.illinoisstate.edu.
current schedule.
For questions regarding changes to or
cancellation of a dining plan, please visit
The University may designate an abbreviated
withdrawal policy for summer session, dining.illinoisstate.edu.
special courses, and short courses.
Students or parents who believe that
individual circumstances warrant exceptions
All notifications of withdrawal from the
from published policy may appeal to the
University must be in person with photo ID to
Associate Vice President for Student Affairs.
the Registrar Service Center, 107 Moulton
Hall, between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday
through Friday, or in writing and addressed to Housing and Dining Options
Office of the University Registrar, Illinois State
University, Campus Box 2202, Normal, IL
61790-2202, faxed to (309) 438-8652, or
CAMPUS LIVING
emailed from the student’s Illinois State
University email account to University Housing Services
Registrar@IllinoisState.edu. Office of Residential Life Building
Website: Housing.IllinoisState.edu
Phone: (309) 438-8611
Changes in Schedule Policy: A student
who drops a course will be charged
according to the following schedule: Students with disabilities who need a special
accommodation to reside in university
residence halls or apartments are asked to
 If the reduction is on or before the
contact the Director of Student Access and
fifteenth calendar day after the first
Accommodation Services, 350 Fell Hall at
regularly scheduled class day, tuition and
(309) 438-5853.
fees are reduced by 100% except for
health insurance.
University On Campus Housing Policy:
 If the reduction is after the fifteenth, but The University regards on campus housing
no later than the thirtieth calendar day as an important part of university life and
after the first regularly scheduled class requires students to live in University
day, the student will be charged 75% of housing their first two years out of high
tuition and 100% of fees. school.

The student may receive a reduction of the The University may grant exemptions to
insurance fee if the student demonstrates move off campus for certain categories of
equal or better insurance coverage and students based on guidelines related to mar-
completes the written application on or ital status, proximity of home to campus, and
before the fifteenth calendar day after the other pertinent factors. Requests to live on
first regularly scheduled class day. Contact campus may also be granted for students who
the Student Insurance office for specific are not required to live on campus under the
information. University On Campus Policy, but wish to
live in the residence halls or Cardinal Court.
Pursuant to guidelines established by the
University, part or all of a student’s tuition Additional university owned housing options
and fees may be reduced because of the include apartments at 209 and 211 North Fell
student’s death or disability, extreme Avenue, 302 North School Street and 300

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


34 University Policies
Shelbourne Drive. For information about eligibility for services, establishes
these options, the University On Campus accommodations, and develops plans for
Housing Policy, exemption or request to live providing accommodations through an
on campus process, students should refer to interactive process with students.
the University Housing Services website
Housing.IllinoisState.edu. Steps to receiving reasonable accommo-
dations: It is a student’s r esponsibility to
participate in the interactive process by (1)
DINING ON CAMPUS
self identifying to SAAS as a person with a
disability or medical/mental health condition,
Event Management, Dining, and
(2) completing a Request for Services form,
Hospitality and (3) providing documentation of disability
John Green Building or medical/mental health condition. Once the
Website: Dining.IllinoisState.edu Request for Services form and document-
Phone: (309) 438-8351 tation are submitted, the Review Committee
will evaluate and determine eligibility. The
All students living in traditional residence student will be notified via email and asked
halls (Haynie, Hewett, Manchester, Watter- to schedule an intake appointment to learn
son, Wilkins, and Wright) are required to how to access their accommodations.
purchase a meal plan. Students living in
Cardinal Court have the option to purchase a Confidentiality of information is an important
meal plan. A limited number of meal plans component of SAAS. Information provided to
are available each semester for students the office is considered confidential and will be
living off campus. Dining centers are open to used for the purpose of establishing appropriate
all students, faculty, staff, and guests of the accommodations and ensuring effective imple-
University. mentations. All provided information will be
protected against misuse by others.
Any student with a special dietary need, in-
cluding a food allergy, is encouraged to contact STUDENT HEALTH PROGRAM
Dining’s registered dietitian to make arrange-
ments for this accommodation. Requests may
Illinois State University provides a broad
be directed to EMDH@IllinoisState.edu.
spectrum of health and wellness services
designed to help students attain academic
STUDENT ACCESS AND success.
ACCOMMODATION SERVICES
Health Promotion and Wellness: Pr ovides
350 Fell Hall public health-focused information, resources,
Phone: (309) 438-5853 and programs to help students achieve
FAX: (309) 438-7713 balance and form positive life habits for
Sorensen: (309) 319-7682 future success.
Website: StudentAccess.IllinoisState.edu
Email: AbleISU@IllinoisState.edu Student Health Services: Pr ovides pr i-
mary medical and psychiatric care, clinical
Illinois State University provides a welcoming laboratory testing, and digital radiology in a
and inclusive atmosphere for individuals with clinic fully accredited by the Accreditation
disabilities and/or medical/mental health Association for Ambulatory Health Care.
conditions. Students receive equal access and Student Health also operates a full-service
opportunity in accomplishing their educational, pharmacy that dispenses prescription medi-
personal, and professional goals. As a unit of cations and over-the-counter products at low
the Dean of Students Office under the Student prices.
Affairs Division, Student Access and Accom-
modation Services (SAAS) is the designated The student health insurance fee provides a
office to provide accommodation services for student health and accident insurance plan
individuals with disabilities and/or medical/ designed to meet the needs of students
mental health conditions under the Americans without other insurance or to complement
with Disabilities Amendments Act and Section other insurance. The plan has a $50 deduct-
504 of the Rehabilitation Act. SAAS obtains ible (waived if covered by other insurance), a
and maintains documentation, determines $1,250 out of pocket maximum, and provides

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


University Policies 35

world-wide coverage. The student health Student Computer Ownership Initiative: 


insurance is compliant with the Patient All new students to the University are
Protection and Affordable Care Act and required to bring a personal computer that
meets the Federal requirement of having meets the University’s published minimum
health insurance. hardware and software standards. For
mobility and flexibility reasons, laptops are
Student Counseling Services: Pr ovides a strongly recommended. No student will be
full range of personal and emotional prevented from attending classes based on an
counseling services on a voluntary, strictly inability to purchase a computer. Different
confidential basis to individuals, couples, and options for financing a computer may be
groups. Student Counseling is fully explored, including adding the cost of a
accredited by the International Association of computer to a student’s “total cost of
Counseling Services and offers workshops attendance” through the Financial Aid
and a variety of outreach programs on mental Office. Assistance, help, specifications, and
health issues. more information on the policy can be found
at TechZone, Bone Student Center 2nd floor,
Medical and mental health providers are or TechZone.IllinoisState.edu.
professionals licensed and/or board certified
in their respective fields. STUDENT CONDUCT AND
CONFLICT RESOLUTION
For complete information concerning the
above services, please consult the following Student Services Building, Room 120
websites: Campus Box 2440; (309) 438-8621 Email:
StudentConductAndConflictResolution@I
Health Promotion and Wellness: llinoisState.edu
Wellness.IllinoisState.edu Website: DeanOfStudents.IllinoisState.edu
Student Health Services:
HealthServices.IllinoisState.edu Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution, a
Student Counseling Services: unit in the Dean of Students Office,
Counseling.IllinoisState.edu coordinates the University’s student conduct
(social and academic conduct) and conflict
Student Health Insurance Plan: resolution services. Student conduct matters
HealthServices.IllinoisState.edu/Insurance are reviewed both by administrative staff and
by the University Hearing Panel. Appeals are
COMPUTER AND reviewed by the University Appeal Board, the
INFORMATION SERVICES Dean’s Appeal Board, and administrative staff.

For students engaged in conflicts with other


Administrative Technologies
members of the community, conflict reso-
Technology Support Center
lution services are also available, such as
Website: ITHelp.IllinoisState.edu
conflict coaching, restorative justice con-
Phone: (309) 438-HELP
ferencing and facilitated dialogues. Med-
iation is available in many cases where the
Appropriate Use Policy: The Univer sity’s parties agree to attempt to develop a solution
Appropriate Use Policy establishes the to satisfy both/all parties.
appropriate use of computing and
telecommunication networks, computing
equipment, and technology resources. Users ACADEMIC DISHONESTY
must agree to abide by this policy prior to
gaining access to Illinois State resources. The Students are expected to be honest in all
policy includes provisions for the observance academic work.
of all copyright laws. The full text of the
appropriate use policy is available at the A student’s attachment of his or her name on
following website: Policy.IllinoisState.edu. any academic exercise shall be regarded as
assurance that the work is the result of the
student’s own thought, effort, and study.
Violations include such behavior as:

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


36 University Policies

a. Possessing or utilizing any means of In cases of group assignments, unless other-


assistance (books, notes, papers, articles, wise indicated by the instructor, all parties to
third parties, etc.) to complete any the assignment are responsible for the
assignment, quiz, or examination unless submission of any final product, and bear
specifically authorized by the instructor. responsibility for the integrity of the product.
Students are prohibited from conversation Students participating in group projects may
or other communication in examinations be held responsible for the actions of other
except as authorized by the instructor. group members unless it can be established
b. Acting with the intent to deceive the that a group member was not aware, and
person in charge, such as falsifying data or reasonably could not have been aware, of
any material that violates University expect-
sources, providing false information, etc.
ations.
c. Plagiarizing. For the purpose of this
policy, plagiarism is the unacknowledged Academic integrity expectations apply to all
appropriation of another’s work, words, or forums used for the collection and
ideas in any themes, outlines, papers, dissemination of knowledge, including in the
reports, speeches, computer programs, classroom, written and electronic assign-
artwork, musical scores, performance, or ments, online participation, field work, and
other academic work, regardless of intent. publications.
This includes all forms of intellectual
property that can be copyrighted, patented, For the purpose of this policy, it should be
or trademarked, whether published or noted that the University holds graduate
unpublished. Students must ascertain from students to a higher standard given the
the instructor in each course the academic rigor of graduate programs and the
appropriate means of documentation and/ fact that students in graduate programs are
or attribution. already degreed students. As such, graduate
d. Submitting the same paper for more than students may face more severe levels of
one University course or academic sanctioning for academic misconduct, and
requirement without the prior approval of may also face repercussions in their
the instructors. A student may only submit academic departments and assistantships.
an assignment once during their affiliation
with the University unless provided For more information, visit Student Conduct
explicit permission of the instructors. and Conflict Resolution website at: 
e. Willfully giving or receiving unauthorized DeanOfStudents.IllinoisState.edu/Conflict.
or unacknowledged assistance on any
assignment. This may include the
reproduction and/or dissemination of test
materials. Both parties to such collusion
are considered responsible.
f. Substituting for another student in any
academic assignment.
g. Being involved in the unauthorized
collection, distribution, advertisement,
solicitation, or sale of term papers, research
papers, or other academic materials
completed by a third party.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


37

ACADEMIC OPPORTUNITIES

ENGLISH LANGUAGE INSTITUTE HONORS PROGRAM


REQUIREMENTS
Intensive English Program at English
Language Institute (Fell Hall) Honors students are required to maintain a
(309) 438-2072; Email: minimum cumulative Grade Point Average
ELI@IlllinoisState.edu; or (GPA) of 3.30 and are required to complete
Website: ELI.IllinoisState.edu  one Honors Learning Experience each
semester.
Illinois State University’s English Language
Institute (ELI) is an intensive English Honors Seminar: All students admitted to
program that offers both small classes and the Honors Program will take an Honors
individual attention to meet the educational Seminar in their first semester. Successful
needs of English language learners. ISU’s completion of HON 102A17 and meeting
ELI program uses an academic and com- GPA requirements is required to continue in
municative approach to language learning, a the Honors Program.
combination of teaching methods that focus
on both practical learning and the special Honors Probation: Students whose cum-
needs of adult language learners. ulative GPA falls between 3.00 and 3.29 will
be placed on Honors Probation, which
Although admission to ELI does not allows them the opportunity to raise their
guarantee subsequent admission to a degree GPA while enjoying the benefits of the
program at the University, ELI students who Honors Program. Students on Honors
attain a satisfactory TOEFL score can be Probation have up to two semesters to raise
admitted to a degree program at the their cumulative GPA to 3.30 or higher.
University, provided they also meet the other While on probation, students must achieve at
requirements for admission. least a 3.30 semester GPA. Students who fail
to meet these requirements or whose
International applicants who meet all other cumulative GPA falls below 3.00 will be
academic criteria for admission but whose academically ineligible to continue in the
TOEFL score is less than 550 (paper-based) Honors Program.
or 79 (iBT) may be allowed to take a class
on campus. In such cases, students will be Participation Requirements: Honor s stu-
required to continue to attend courses at the dents who have classes on campus are
English Language Institute (ELI), although required to complete one Honors Learning
their schedules will be adjusted to Experience each semester. Honors experi-
accommodate the hours of the university ences that are credit-generating may not be
class. Students who are interested in taking taken passing/not passing (P/NP) and must
university classes or applying to a specific result in a grade of C or better. Students who
program should speak with the Director as complete multiple Honors Learning Exper-
soon as possible. iences in one semester may “bank” one
experience to use in a future semester. Only
Honors Program one Honors Learning Experience can be “in
the bank” at a time. Honors experiences are
Director: Rocio Rivadeneyra not required in the summer; however, a
summer Honors experience can be banked if
Honors Program Building the bank is “empty.” When students are
207 South Main Street completing a semester off campus, they are
Campus Box 6100, Normal, IL 61790- not required to complete an Honors Learning
6100; Phone: (309) 438-2559 Experience. Off-campus semesters may
Website: Honors.IllinoisState.edu include: study abroad, student teaching
(registration in STT 399), fall semester of
Professional Development School Internship,
field-based semesters for special education

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


38 Academic Opportunities

(not practicum), full-time internships, or full- Honors Program Scholar: To achieve this
time clinical rotations (e.g., medical lab designation, students must earn a minimum
science). 3.30 cumulative GPA at the time of
graduation; participate in the Honors
Suspension for Non-Participation: Students Program a minimum of 3 semesters;
who do not complete an Honors Learning successfully complete a minimum of three
Experience and do not have one “banked” Honors Learning Experiences; and continue
are placed on Honors Suspension for the to complete an Honors Learning Experience
following semester. Students lose the each semester in the Honors Program
privilege of early registration during the through graduation. “Honors Program
Suspension semester. In order to regain good Scholar” is indicated on the transcript and in
standing, students must complete an Honors the Commencement Booklet. Honors
Learning Experience during the Suspension Program Scholars wear red cords at
semester. Students do not have to make up commencement.
the missed experience. There is only one
Suspension semester; if a student fails to Honors in the Major: Students must be a
complete an experience in a future semester, member of the Honors Program in good
she or he will be ineligible to continue in the standing at the time of graduation, which
Honors Program. includes having a 3.30 cumulative GPA and
completion of one Honors Learning Exper-
Honors Learning Experiences: Students ience per semester in the program. Students
can choose from six types of Honors must have a minimum 3.50 major GPA at the
Learning Experiences: Honors Sections time of graduation. Departments and schools
of regular courses, Honors Contracts, partner with the Honors Program to specify
Honors Seminars, Honors Research the types of Honors Learning Experiences
(Honors Independent Study, Honors required to achieve this designation.
Undergraduate Research, or Honors Requirements are available on the Honors
Thesis), Honors Explorations, or
Program website. “Honors in the Major” is
Honors Travel. A variety of Honors
noted on the transcript, in the Com-
Learning Experiences is encouraged.
mencement Booklet, and on the diploma.
Presidential Scholars: Students who were
selected as Presidential Scholars as incoming Honors Courses (HON) 610
freshmen are members of and must fulfill
Honors Program requirements. In addition, 102 HONORS SEMINAR
Presidential Scholars complete a series of four 1-4 sem. hrs.
unique Honors Seminars: HON 102A17,
202A75, 202A76, and 202A77. Successful Interdisciplinary sessions for students in
completion of these seminars, in addition to the Honors Program. Presented by one or
general university graduation requirements, is more specialists on the topic, explores a
required for graduation. “Presidential Scholar” semester theme. Multiple enrollments are
is noted on student transcripts and in the allowed if the topic is different for a
Commencement Booklet. Presidential Scholars maximum of 6 hours. Formerly HONORS
wear silver cords at commencement. COLLOQUIUM. Topics are listed below.
102A17 HONORS MINDSET SEMINAR
HONORS PROGRAM 1 sem. hr.
GRADUATION DESIGNATIONS Introduction to the Honors Program.
Students explore the Honors Learning
Honors students receiving undergraduate Framework to apply it throughout their
degrees may earn one or more Honors undergraduate careers. Formerly IDS
designations, based on the Honors Learning 102A17 HONORS FRESHMA N SEM -
Experiences students choose to complete. INAR. Materials charge optional.
The following designations are recorded Prerequisite: Admission to the Honors
permanently on student transcripts, and some Program.
are noted on diplomas.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Academic Opportunities 39

202 ADVANCED HONORS SEMINAR 299 HONORS INDEPENDENT STUDY


1-3 sem. hrs. 1-6 sem. hrs.
Presented by a specialist focusing on a An Honors student investigates a topic of
semester’s topic for students in the Honors interest within their discipline under the
Program. Formerly IDS 202 A DVA NCED guidance of a faculty member. Multiple
HONORS COLLOQUIUM. Multiple en- enrollments are allowed; maximum of 6
rollments are allowed if the topic is hours may be applied toward graduation.
different (see the following topics). Limit of 9 hours HON 299 and 395
202A75 ADVANCED HONORS combined may count toward graduation.
SEMINAR: INTERDISCIPLINARY Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor,
INVESTIGATIONS department chair or school director, and
1 sem. hr. Honors Program.
This course for Presidential Scholars will 395 HONORS THESIS
focus on interdisciplinary connections and 1-6 sem. hrs.
ways disciplines can inform and influence
each other. Formerly IDS 202A75. Intensive research in a special area of the
Prerequisites: HON 102A17; consent of the student’s major. Each individual project
Honors Program. is to culminate in a comprehensive
written thesis and an oral defense of the
202A76 ADVANCED HONORS
thesis. Maximum of 6 hours may be
SEMINAR: INNOVATION AND applied toward graduation. Limit of 9
INQUIRY hours of HON 299 and 395 combined
1 sem. hr. may count toward graduation. Formerly
IDS 395. Prerequisites: Consent of the
This course for Presidential Scholars will
instructor, department or school, and the
address topics of critical thinking, problem
Honors Program. The same prerequisites
solving, academic investigations, and re-
apply to the following discipline-specific
search. Formerly IDS 202A76 ADVANC- Honors Thesis courses.
ED HONORS SEMINAR: CRITICAL
THINKING AND INQUIRY. Prerequisites: 395A01 HONORS THESIS:
HON 102A17; consent of the Honors ECONOMICS
Program. 1-6 sem. hrs.
202A77 ADVANCED HONORS Intensive research in Economics. Each
SEMINAR: LEADERSHIP IN ACTION individual project is to culminate in a
1 sem. hr. comprehensive written thesis and an oral
This course for Presidential Scholars will defense of the thesis. Formerly IDS
study the critical qualities of successful 395A01. Prerequisites: Consent of the
leaders and facilitate an applied leadership instructor, department chair or school
experience. Formerly IDS 202A77. Pre- director, and the Honors Program.
requisites: HON 102A17; consent of the 395A02 HONORS THESIS: ENGLISH
Honors Program. 1-6 sem. hrs.
285 HONORS UNDERGRADUATE
Intensive research in English. Each
RESEARCH
individual project is to culminate in a
1-6 sem. hrs.
comprehensive written thesis and an oral
An Honors student assists a faculty member defense of the thesis. Formerly IDS 395A02.
on the faculty member’s research project. Prerequisites:  Consent of the instructor,
Multiple enrollments are allowed; maximum department, and the Honors Program.
of 6 hours. Formerly IDS 285. Prerequisite:
Consent of the Honors Program. 395A03 HONORS THESIS: PSYCHOLOGY
1-6 sem. hrs.
286 HONORS UNDERGRADUATE
RESEARCH II Intensive research in Psychology. Each
1-6 sem. hrs. individual project is to culminate in a
Continuation of HON 285. Multiple comprehensive written thesis and an oral
enrollments are allowed; maximum of 6 defense of the thesis. Formerly IDS 395A03.
hours. Formerly IDS 286. Prerequisite: Prerequisite:  Consent of the instructor,
HON 285. department, and the Honors Program.

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40 Academic Opportunities

395A04 HONORS THESIS: 395A10 HONORS THESIS: ART


MATHEMATICS 1-6 sem. hrs.
1-6 sem. hrs. Intensive research in Art. Each individual
Intensive research in Mathematics. Each project is to culminate in a comprehensive
individual project is to culminate in a written thesis and an oral defense of the
comprehensive written thesis and an oral thesis. Formerly IDS 395A10. Prereq-
defense of the thesis. Formerly 395A04. uisite:  Consent of the instructor, school,
Prerequisite:  Consent of the instructor, and the Honors Program.
department, and the Honors Program.
395A11 HONORS THESIS: HISTORY
395A05 HONORS THESIS:
1-6 sem. hrs.
COMMUNICATION SCIENCES
AND DISORDERS Intensive research in History. Each
1-6 sem. hrs. individual project is to culminate in a
comprehensive written thesis and an oral
Intensive research in Speech Pathology and defense of the thesis. Formerly IDS 395A11.
Audiology. Each individual project is to Prerequisite:  Consent of the instructor,
culminate in a comprehensive written thesis
department, and the Honors Program.
and an oral defense of the thesis. Formerly
IDS 395A05 HONORS THESIS:  SPEECH 395A12 HONORS THESIS: FRENCH
PATHOLOGY AND AUDIOLOGY. Pre- 1-6 sem. hrs.
requisite: Consent of the instructor, depart- Intensive research in French. Each individual
ment, and the Honors Program. project is to culminate in a comprehensive
395A06 HONORS THESIS:  written thesis and an oral defense of the
ANTHROPOLOGY thesis. Formerly IDS 395A12. Prerequisite: 
1-6 sem. hrs. Consent of the instructor, department, and
Intensive research in Anthropology. Each the Honors Program.
individual project is to culminate in a 395A13 HONORS THESIS: GERMAN
comprehensive written thesis and an oral 1-6 sem. hrs.
defense of the thesis. Formerly IDS 395A06.
Intensive research in German. Each
Prerequisite:  Consent of the instructor,
department, and the Honors Program. individual project is to culminate in a
comprehensive written thesis and an oral
395A07 HONORS THESIS: BIOLOGY defense of the thesis. Formerly IDS 395A13.
1-6 sem. hrs. Prerequisite:  Consent of the instructor,
Intensive research in Biological Sciences. department, and the Honors Program.
Each individual project is to culminate in a 395A14 HONORS THESIS: POLITICS
comprehensive written thesis and an oral
AND GOVERNMENT
defense of the thesis. Formerly IDS 395A07.
Prerequisite:  Consent of the instructor, 1-6 sem. hrs.
school, and the Honors Program. Intensive research in Politics and
395A08 HONORS THESIS: Government. Each individual project is to
COMMUNICATION culminate in a comprehensive written
1-6 sem. hrs. thesis and an oral defense of the thesis.
Formerly IDS 395A14. Prerequisite: 
Intensive research in Communication. Each Consent of the instructor, department, and
individual project is to culminate in a the Honors Program.
comprehensive written thesis and an oral
defense of the thesis. Formerly IDS 395A08. 395A15 HONORS THESIS: SPANISH
Prerequisite:  Consent of the instructor, 1-6 sem. hrs.
school, and the Honors Program. Intensive research in Spanish. Each
395A09 HONORS THESIS: individual project is to culminate in a
PHILOSOPHY comprehensive written thesis and an oral
1-6 sem. hrs. defense of the thesis. Formerly IDS
395A15. Prerequisite:  Consent of the
Intensive research in Philosophy. Each instructor, department, and the Honors
individual project is to culminate in a
Program.
comprehensive written thesis and an oral
defense of the thesis. Formerly IDS 395A09.
Prerequisite:  Consent of the instructor,
department, and the Honors Program.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Academic Opportunities 41

395A16 HONORS THESIS: MUSIC 395A21 HONORS THESIS: PHYSICS


1-6 sem. hrs. 1-6 sem. hrs.
Intensive research in Music. Each individual Intensive research in Physics. Each
project is to culminate in a comprehensive individual project is to culminate in a
written thesis and an oral defense of the comprehensive written thesis and an oral
thesis. Formerly IDS 395A16. Prerequisite:  defense of the thesis. Formerly IDS
Consent of the instructor, school, and the 395A21. Prerequisite:  Consent of the
Honors Program. instructor, department, and the Honors
Program.
395A17 HONORS THESIS:
395A22 HONORS THESIS:
CHEMISTRY
BILINGUAL/BICULTURAL
1-6 sem. hrs. EDUCATION
Intensive research in Chemistry. Each 1-6 sem. hrs.
individual project is to culminate in a Intensive research in Bilingual-
comprehensive written thesis and an oral Bicultural Education. Each individual
defense of the thesis. Formerly IDS project is to culminate in a
395A17. Prerequisite:  Consent of the comprehensive written thesis and an oral
instructor, department, and the Honors defense of the thesis. Formerly IDS
Program. 395A22. Prerequisite:  Consent of the
395A18 HONORS THESIS: instructor, department, and the Honors
GEOGRAPHY, GEOLOGY, AND Program.
THE ENVIRONMENT
1-6 sem. hrs. Additional Academic Opportunities
Intensive research in Geography, Geology,
and the Environment. Each individual INTERNATIONAL STUDIES AND
project is to culminate in a comprehensive PROGRAMS
written thesis and an oral defense of the
thesis. Formerly IDS 395A18. Pre- 236 Fell Hall, Phone: (309) 438-5276
requisite:  Consent of the instructor, Website:
department, and the Honors Program. InternationalStudies.IllinoisState.edu
395A19 HONORS THESIS: CRIMINAL The Office of International Studies and
JUSTICE SCIENCES Programs (OISP) is the focal point for
1-6 sem. hrs. international activities at Illinois State
University. The University’s full scope of
Intensive research in Criminal Justice
international activitiesundergraduate, grad-
Sciences. Each individual project is to
uate, professional, research and trainingare
culminate in a comprehensive written
coordinated by this office. The primary
thesis and an oral defense of the thesis.
mission of OISP is to promote and provide
Formerly IDS 395A19. Prerequisite: 
international learning, teaching, research and
Consent of the instructor, department, and
service opportunities that foster the
the Honors Program.
development of global competencies to
395A20 HONORS THESIS: advance the global dimension of the
BIOCHEMISTRY/MOLECULAR University’s mission.
BIOLOGY
1-6 sem. hrs. Study Abroad (SA): The mission of the
Intensive research in Biochemistry/ study abroad office is to provide high quality
Molecular Biology. Each individual international education programs to Illinois
project is to culminate in a comprehensive State students by serving as a liaison
written thesis and an oral defense of the between the university community and
thesis. Formerly IDS 395A20. Pre- learning opportunities abroad. Our education
requisite:  Consent of the instructor, abroad programs are designed to be diverse
school, and the Honors Program. and affordable while cultivating students’
critical thought, intellectual and social
growth, as well as fostering development as
a global citizen.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


42 Academic Opportunities

English Language Institute (ELI): The NOTE: Consult with an advisor in Inter -
intensive English language program provides national Studies for additional information.
integrated academic learning experiences to
international students whose first language is Preparation for Professional Study
not English to develop their listening,
speaking, reading and writing skills to
ENGINEERING
succeed in an academic environment.
Illinois State University Physics Department
International Student and Scholar directs a joint Engineering/Physics program
Services (ISSS): ISSS pr ovides pr ogr ams shared with a partner engineering university
and advising services to assist international such as the University of Illinois or Bradley
students and scholars in achieving their University. Students begin at Illinois State
academic, professional, and personal goals and transfer to their chosen partner
while contributing to the achievement of the engineering university after completing 90
global dimension of Illinois State semester hours. Students receive a B.S. in
University’s mission. Engineering from the partner university upon
completion of their Engineering
International House (I-House): International requirements. They receive a second B.S. in
House is a multicultural living and learning Physics from Illinois State upon transferring
center for American and international students back 30 approved hours from the engineering
at Illinois State. The I-House program provides university. Students major in Engineering
a structure for international student community Physics while at Illinois State.
development and intercultural education
through both formal and informal social, The Engineering Physics program is listed
cultural and educational activities and under the Physics programs section of the
initiatives. Undergraduate Catalog. Engineering Physics
majors benefit from small class size and
Management Development International close student-faculty interactions in the
(MDI): Management Development Inter - Physics Department. This five-year program
national conducts professional certificate and offers greater depth than the average
diploma training programs, as well as custom engineering curriculum and provides
-designed training programs, in a variety of students with the additional problem solving
fields for international clientele. Programs and scientific foundations needed to design
are offered on-site at Illinois State and at the rapidly changing technologies of the
many other locations around the world. future. Due to the sequential nature of
engineering curricula, it is important that
SEMESTER STUDY ABROAD appropriate course selections be made.
Interested students should contact the
PROGRAMS
Department of Physics at (309) 438-8756 or
Study Abroad provides year-round info@phy.IllinoisState.edu early in their
orientations, consultation and advisement, academic careers for help in developing an
and follow-ups to assist students and appropriate plan of study.
program directors on a continuous basis
before, during and after their study abroad LAW
experience. Law schools do not require any specific
courses or undergraduate majors. A com-
Study Abroad Course mittee of the Association of American Law
Schools has recommended that the prelaw
230 UNDERGRADUATE STUDY student keep in mind three basic objectives in
ABROAD
planning an undergraduate program:
1-18 sem. hrs.
education for articulate oral and written
Take a variety of coursework in another expression; education for greater under-
country. Students who participate through standing of human institutions and values;
Illinois State University’s Study Abroad and education to develop the skills of
office will be evaluated for ISU graduation conceptual analysis. The committee has
requirements, such as residency hours. emphasized the need for a broad, liberal
May be repeated if content differs. education that develops the student’s
Courses may not be taken P/NP.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Academic Opportunities 43

intellectual interests rather than an education Psychology (6 hours)


directed too pointedly toward later Sociology 106
professional training and practice. Statistics (3 hours)
Other specific course requirements usually
Students planning to apply for admission to are met by completion of the General
law school should consult the University’s Education program. It should be understood
prelaw advisor, Dr. Meghan Leonard, that a careful selection of general education
Department of Politics and Government, and elective courses beyond the specific
mleonar@ilstu.edu for information about the admission requirements can make the
Law School Admissions Test and for applicant more competitive.
assistance in selecting and applying to
suitable law schools. Students should anticipate the completion of
the requirements for a bachelor’s degree with
HEALTH PROFESSIONS the following approximate timetable:
1. Completion of specific course
Students who plan to apply to Health
requirements by the end of the junior year.
Professional School usually major in
Molecular and Cellular Biology, Biological 2. Medical College Admission Test taken in
Sciences or Chemistry because several the spring of or the summer following the
specific Pre-Health course requirements can junior year.
be applied toward a major in these fields. 3. Medical College application process
While students can choose to major in begins in the summer preceding senior
another discipline, they should be aware that year.
many first year Biology and Chemistry
courses are reserved for students in majors Dentistry: Admission policies of individual
which require them. dental schools are set forth in Official Guide
to Dental Schools which can be purchased at:
Minimum admission requirements to colleges
adea.org/officialguide.
of medicine, dentistry, and veterinary medicine
are discussed below. Further information about In addition to the completion of the General
admission procedures to these and other health- Education program, the following courses
related professional colleges can be obtained would meet the minimum specific course
by making an appointment with the Pre- requirements for Illinois dental schools:
Professional Advisor by calling (309) 438-
7604, or by going to the website Biological Sciences 181, 182, 196, 197,
UniversityCollege.IllinoisState.edu/advising/ 260
preprofessional. English 101 and 145
Chemistry 140, 141, 230, 231, 232, 233
Medicine: Admission r equir ements of and 242 or 342
individual medical colleges can be found in Physics 108, 109
Medical School Admissions Requirements -
United States and Canada. Students can see Statistics (3 hours)
the following website for information on how Students should anticipate the completion of
to acquire the MSAR: aamc.org/students/ the requirements for a bachelor’s degree with
applying/requirements/msar/. the following approximate timetable:
Specific course requirements of medical 1. Completion of specific course
schools in the state of Illinois may be met by requirements by the end of the junior year.
taking the following courses: 2. Dental Admission Test taken during the
spring or summer preceding senior year.
Biological Sciences 196, 197, 200 level
course 3. Dental college application process is
Chemistry 140, 141, 230, 231, 232, 233 begun in the summer preceding the senior
and 342 year.
English and Speech (9 hours)
Mathematics 145 is recommended
Physics 108, 109 Veterinary Medicine: Students who plan

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


44 Academic Opportunities

to apply to programs of Veterinary Medicine accomplishment are showcased each spring


often choose majors in Biological Sciences, in the University Research Symposium
Chemistry, or Animal Science. The sponsored by the Graduate School. Students
prerequisite courses needed to apply to must be enrolled and engaged in research
programs in Veterinary Medicine vary, under the direction of a faculty mentor.
however the following prerequisite courses The symposium recognizes and promotes
are often required: student research, scholarship and creative
achievement by providing a professional
Biological Sciences 196, 197 setting in which students present. In addition to
Chemistry 140, 141, 230, 231, 232, 233, and recognizing and encouraging research this
342 event will also provide professional
Mathematics 145 is recommended development experience. Presenters at the
Physics 108, 109 symposium are eligible to apply for small
grants to assist with the cost of research and/or
Students interested in applying to programs preparation of a poster, or travel to present
in Veterinary Medicine are advised to research at off-campus professional
consult the following website for comp- conferences. For more information about the
rehensive information about the application Research Symposium, please visit
process and to see requirements for Grad.IllinoisState.edu/symposium.
individual schools: aavmc.org.
UNDERGRADUATE TEACHING
NOTE: Students who plan to apply to ASSISTANTS
Health Professional Programs, including
Medical, Dental, Veterinary, Physician Undergraduate Teaching Assistantships
Assistant, Pharmacy, Optometry, Podiatry, (UTA) are available in nearly all departments
Occupational Therapy, and Physical Therapy of the University to juniors and seniors who
Programs are advised to register for IDS 194 have demonstrated excellence in a particular
Careers for Health Professionals, during their discipline and high overall scholastic
junior year. Contact University College at achievement. The purpose of the program is
(309) 438-7604 for more information to assist the faculty in the improvement of
regarding IDS 194. instruction and to provide UTAs with a
valuable learning opportunity.
UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
Undergraduate Research Assistantships
(URA) are available in selected departments
Research is considered a vital component in
for students who have demonstrated
the development of undergraduates at Illinois
excellence in a particular discipline with
State. All students have the opportunity and significant potential in research. The purpose
are encouraged to participate in scholarly of the program is to work closely with
research during their university experience. faculty members and to provide students
valuable opportunities for research.
As is true for all research, undergraduate
students should ensure that any research The responsibilities and nature of the UTA and
projects involving living human subjects have URA assignments are determined by the
been approved by the Institutional Review departments and colleges. Some departments
Board (IRB). Research projects involving provide the opportunity for credit to be earned
living animals require the approval of the by the UTA under a General Offerings course
Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (291 Seminar: Undergraduate Teaching
(IACUC). Research involving biohazards must Assistants). Three hours is the maximum
be reviewed by the Institutional Biosafety amount of this credit that may be allowed for
Committee (IBC). If questions exist, discuss graduation. Tuition and fees are assessed in the
this with your faculty supervisor or contact usual manner for all credit earned in the UTA
Research Ethics and Compliance in 310 and URA experiences. Application forms are
Hovey, at (309) 438-2529. available in the departmental and college
offices.
Student research, scholarship, and creative

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Academic Opportunities 45

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

324 Fell Hall, Campus Box 4060


Phone: (309) 438-3217
UniversityCollege.IllinoisState.edu

University College provides programs and


services that assist students in making
successful transitions into Illinois State
University, achieving their educational
goals, and realizing their academic potential
in the first year and beyond. In addition to
coordination of the first year experience for
new students, programs and services offered
or coordinated through University College
include:
 Academic Advisement for all first year
students, Undeclared Students, pre-
professional students, student-athletes,
international undergraduates, and other
special populations
 Instructional Services including
Developmental Mathematics, First Year
LinC, University Success Skills, and the
Transfer Student Seminar
 Orientation and Transition Services
including Preview and the Transfer Day
Program
 Julia N. Visor Academic Center
including tutoring and academic support
workshops
 University Studies and Interdisciplinary
Studies Majors and Minors
 Academic Probation, Dismissal, and
Reinstatement
 Retention Services including services and
programs to improve student persistence,
academic success, and graduation.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


46
ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PRACTICES

Degree Requirements natural science, mathematics, statistics,


or technology (SMT) course beyond
GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR General Education requirements. (See
GRADUATION Baccalaureate Degree Programs.)
NOTE: All gr aduates of the College
The following graduation requirements apply of Arts and Sciences must satisfy a
to all students. Meeting graduation require- foreign language graduation require-
ments is the individual responsibility of each ment that may be met by: three years of
student. The student and advisor should check one foreign language in high school; or
the student's program of courses frequently to successful completion of the second
assure that the student is fulfilling the follow- semester or higher of college-level
ing graduation requirements (all references to foreign language with a passing grade;
hours indicate semester credit hours). or equivalent proficiency as determined
A. Total Hours: The actual hour r equir e- by examination. Students who have
ment for an undergraduate degree varies successfully completed one semester of
by the program or combination of pro- college foreign language credit, may
grams that a student elects. A student elect to satisfy this requirement by
must have a minimum of 120 hours of studying abroad in an approved pro-
credit acceptable toward graduation. gram in a country whose main language
Some courses may not count toward is the same as the one studied in
graduation. These restrictions are noted college. American Sign Language may
in the course descriptions. Some cur- be used to fulfill this requirement by
ricula or combinations of fields require transfer credit or by proficiency.
additional hours. If all specified require-
ments are completed with fewer than 120 C. General Education: Ther e ar e thr ee
hours, a student must elect sufficient ways to complete General Education
additional coursework to total at least requirements at Illinois State University.
120 hours. The first way is to complete Illinois
State's General Education Program. The
A student may apply for and receive two second way is to complete the Illinois
bachelor’s degrees at the same time. To Transferable General Education Core
receive two degrees simultaneously, Curriculum available through the Illinois
two different majors are required. The Articulation Initiative (IAI). This pro-
degrees may be the same (e.g., two gram, designed for transfer students, is a
B.A. degrees) or different (e.g., a B.A. statewide agreement between participat-
degree and a B.S. degree). All specified ing colleges, universities, and some
major requirements for both degrees private schools that is designed to
must be met as well as all general facilitate timely degree completion. The
graduation requirements for both third way is to complete a baccalaureate-
bachelor’s degrees. A minimum of 150 oriented Associates Degree (A.A. or
credit hours is required to receive both A.S.) from a regionally accredited post
degrees. secondary institution. For those trans-
ferring from an Illinois college or
B. Specific B.A./B.S. Requirements: university, the A.S. degree must include
There are a variety of baccalaureate the complete IAI General Education
degrees. Students graduating from B.A. or Core Curriculum (GECC) or the student
B.S. degree programs must meet specific must complete the GECC to fulfill
requirements beyond major and other Illinois State’s General Education
graduation requirements. A student pur- requirements.
suing the B.A. degree will acquire know-
ledge of a foreign language as demon- A holder of an A.A. or A.S. degree is
strated by successful completion of LAN admitted to Illinois State University with
115 (or the equivalent). A student pursuing junior standing. (See Baccalaureate
the B.S. degree will complete a three-hour Degree Programs).

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Academic Opportunities 47

D. Major-Minor Options: Candidates for H. Residence Requirements: Unless


B.S. or B.A. degrees must complete otherwise specified in a specific
a major field of study. Completion program, at least 30 of the last 60 hours
of a second major, a minor, or a completed toward the baccalaureate
second minor is optional unless degree must be earned at Illinois State.
specified by the student's major. A
teacher education student who is a I. Time Limit for Courses as Pre-
candidate for a B.S., B.A., B.S. in requisites: Because disciplinary know-
Ed., or B.M.E. degree must ledge advances and course content
complete professional education changes as a consequence, some courses
requirements and a major approved taken seven or more years prior to an
for teacher education. Some teacher advance registration period will not
education programs require the automatically be accepted as prerequisites
completion of requirements for a for other courses. When a department or
second teaching field. school determines that applicability of a
course will lapse, it will designate this in
At least half (with a minimum of nine) of the prerequisite listing as “taken within x
the credit hours for a minor must be years.” For example, for MAT 146, the
distinct from any hours the student prerequisites might read “C or better in
counts toward a major within the same MAT 145 taken within 10 years required.
department or school. A department or
school seeking an exception must J. AMALI (formerly Global Studies):
provide convincing evidence that the Every student graduating from Illinois
resulting major/minor combination State University must have successfully
confers a breadth of knowledge that completed a course designated as a
meaningfully exceeds what the major course in the cultures and traditions of
alone would provide. This policy applies societies or peoples from Asia, the
to both first and second majors and Middle East, Africa, Latin America, or
minors. Indigenous Peoples of the World
(AMALI).
E. Senior College Hours: The senior
college hours (courses numbered 200 or K. Professional Practice and Indepen-
above) must total at least 42 hours. dent Study: A student may count no
Coursework transferred from other more than 16 hours of professional
colleges and universities is not counted practice courses (198, 298, 398) toward
as senior college credit if freshmen and graduation. Some programs allow fewer
sophomores are regularly permitted to than 16 hours. A student may count no
enroll in such work. No credit from two- more than six hours of independent
year colleges may be counted as senior study (287) credit toward graduation.
level.
L. Disciplinary Hold: A student may not
F. Grade Point Average: The grade point graduate with a disciplinary hold on his
average for all courses taken at Illinois or her record.
State University must be 2.00 (C) or
higher. In addition, the student must have BACCALAUREATE DEGREE
a grade point average of 2.00 (C) (or PROGRAMS
higher as required by certain programs)
in the courses required in the major, and Undergraduate degrees available at Illinois
State University include the Bachelor of
in the minor if the student has a minor.
Arts, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of
G. Removal of Incompletes: A student Science in Education, Bachelor of Science in
may not graduate with incomplete Nursing, Bachelor of Fine Arts, Bachelor of
grades. Each Missing (M) or Incomplete Music, Bachelor of Music Education and
grade (I) must be removed at least six Bachelor of Social Work degrees. When
weeks before December or May applying for graduation, the student indicates
commencement, or two weeks before the specific degree that he or she is qualified
August graduation if the course is to be to receive.
used in meeting graduation requirements.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


48 Academic Policies and Practices
Statement of Purpose for the Bachelor of by the successful completion of a three-hour
Arts (B.A.) Degree: The Bachelor of Arts course, beyond those required for General
degree provides for the acquisition of written Education, selected from an approved list of
and oral communication skills, creative courses that involve natural sciences,
thinking, abilities in the critical analysis of mathematics, statistics, and technology (SMT).
texts, the understanding of cultures, and a
working knowledge of social, political, and Statement of Purpose for the Bachelor of
historical contexts. The degree is typically Science in Education (B.S. in Ed.) Degree:
pursued by those students whose academic The Bachelor of Science in Education degree
emphasis in their major area of study is encourages acquisition of communication
directed toward the humanities, arts, and skills, development of analytical skills for
selected areas of the social sciences disciplines. examining and solving problems, and the
understanding of cultures with special
Statement of Requirements for the Bachelor emphasis on application to the art and
of Arts (B.A.) Degree: General Education science of teaching. The degree is typically
requirements, general require-ments for pursued by students interested in the teaching
graduation, and knowledge of a foreign profession.
language as demonstrated by successful
completion of LAN 115 (or the equivalent). Statement of Requirements for the Bachelor
A student seeking a B.A. degree takes LAN of Science in Education (B.S. in Ed.) Degree:
115 in place of Quantitative Reasoning. General Education requirements, general
requirements for graduation, and increased
NOTE: All gr aduates of the College of knowledge and skills related to professional
Arts and Sciences must satisfy a foreign standards established by the National Council
language graduation requirement that may be for the Accreditation of Teacher Education
met by: 3 years of one foreign language in (NCATE) through the successful completion of
high school, or successful completion of the professional education requirements and
second semester or higher of college-level approved teacher education major requirements.
foreign language with a passing grade, or Statement of Purpose for the Bachelor of
equivalent proficiency as determined by Science in Nursing (B.S.N.) Degree: The
examination. Students who have successfully Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree
completed one semester of college foreign provides graduates with knowledge and skills
language credit may elect to satisfy this in communication, critical thinking for
requirement by studying abroad in an analyzing and solving problems, and an
approved program in a country whose main understanding of the societal changes that
language is the one studied in college. impact health care. Courses from the
American Sign Language may be used to humanities, psychology, physical and social
fulfill this requirement by transfer credit or sciences, as well as the use of technology,
by proficiency. provide a foundation for scientific inquiry
and application of nursing knowledge and
Statement of Purpose for the Bachelor of
theories to diverse populations and settings.
Science (B.S.) Degree: The Bachelor of
Science degree provides for the acquisition Statement of Requirements for the
of oral and written communication skills and Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.)
the acquisition of analytical skills for Degree: Gener al Education r equir ements,
examining and solving problems. The degree general requirements for graduation, and
is typically pursued by those students whose
nursing field of study requirements.
academic emphasis in their major area of
study is directed towards the natural
Statement of Purpose for the Bachelor of
sciences, mathematics, statistics, or a
Fine Arts (B.F.A.) Degree: The Bachelor of
technological field. Fine Arts degree encourages the acquisition
and display of talent in the arts, with special
Statement of Requirements for the Bachelor
emphasis on aesthetic performance and
of Science (B.S.) Degree: Gener al Educa-
understanding. The degree is typically pursued
tion requirements, general requirements for
by individuals interested in the creative and
graduation, and increased knowledge of the
fine arts.
natural sciences, mathematics, statistics, and/or
technology. This knowledge is demonstrated

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Academic Policies and Practices 49

Statement of Requirements for the


Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) Degree:
General Education requirements, general
requirements for graduation, and art field of
study requirements for B.F.A. degree.

Statement of Purpose for the Bachelor of


Music (B.M.) Degree: The Bachelor of
Music degree encourages the acquisition and
display of talent in music, with special
emphasis on aesthetic performance and
understanding. This degree is typically
pursued by individuals interested in music
performance.

Statement of Requirements for the


Bachelor of Music (B.M.) Degree: Gener al
Education requirements, general require-
ments for graduation and music field of study
requirements for B.M. degree.

Statement of Purpose for the Bachelor of


Music Education (B.M.E.) Degree: The
Bachelor of Music Education degree en-
courages the acquisition and display of talent
in music, with the special emphasis on teach-
ing music. This degree is typically pursued
by individuals interested in becoming music
teachers.

Statement of Requirements for the


Bachelor of Music Education (B.M.E.)
Degree: Gener al Education r equir ements,
general requirements for graduation, music
field of study requirements for B.M.E.
degree, and professional education
requirements.

Statement of Purpose for the Bachelor of


Social Work (B.S.W.) Degree: The B.S.W.
encourages acquisition of communication
skills, development of analytical skills for
examining and solving problems; and the
understanding of social, cultural, and legal
structures with special emphasis on
application to the profession of social work.
The degree is pursued by all undergraduates
in the School of Social Work and is
recognized as the first professional degree in
the field that prepares undergraduate students
for beginning generalist social work practice.

Statement of Requirements for the


Bachelor of Social Work (B.S.W.) Degree:
General Education requirements, general
requirements for graduation, and Social
Work major requirements.

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50 Academic Policies and Practices

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE Statistics*


GRADUATION REQUIREMENT IN ECO 238 Using Regression and
SCIENCE, MATHEMATICS AND Econometric Methods
TECHNOLOGY FIL 240 Business Finance
GEO 138 Maps and Geographic
Students with a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) Reasoning*
degree must have one additional science,
mathematics, statistics, and/or technology GEO 202 Evolution of the Earth*
course (beyond the General Education GEO 207 Natural Disasters*
requirements) which must meet three GEO 211 Earth’s Dynamic Weather*
criteria: (a) courses must be three semester GEO 280 Mineralogy
hours or greater; (b) courses must list
specific prerequisites from General HSC 201 Pathophysiology I
Education courses in mathematics and/or IT 115 Reasoning About Complex
science, approved natural science Systems*
alternative courses, or courses in the IT 165 Computer Programming for
quantitative reasoning category; and (c) Scientists
course content must be mathematical, KNR 282 Biomechanics of Human
scientific, and/or technological, and must Movement
constitute a significant extension of the
MAT 121 Applied Calculus*
General Education courses that count as
prerequisites. MAT 146 Calculus II*
MAT 147 Calculus III
The courses on the following list meet the MAT 160 Elementary Discrete
graduation requirement for Science, Mathematics
Mathematics and Technology. MAT 175 Elementary Linear Algebra
AGR 157 Soil Science MQM 100 Statistical Reasoning*
AGR 203 Agriculture and the MQM 227 Operations Management
Environment* PHI 112 Language, Logic and
AGR 271 Foods of Animal Origin Mathematics*
AGR 282 Anatomy and Physiology of PHY 109 College Physics II
Livestock and Companion Animals PHY 111 Physics for Science and
AGR 315 Financial Management and Engineering II
Analysis of the Agribusiness Firm PHY 117 Numerical Reasoning in Nature
AGR 363 Agricultural Statistics and Technology*
BSC 145 Human Biology* PHY 205 Origin of the Universe*
BSC 160 Microbiology and Society* PHY 206 Chaos and Complexity*
BSC 170 Genetics and Society* PHY 207 Energy and the Environment*
BSC 201 Ecology POL 138 Quantitative Reasoning in
BSC 202 Human Ecology* Political Science*
BSC 211 Economic Botany PSY138 Reasoning in Psychology Using
Statistics*
BSC 219 Genetics
BSC 223 Ecology and Conservation of PSY 340 Statistics for the Social Sciences
Plants SOC 275 Social Statistics
BSC 292 Invertebrate Zoology TEC 111 Fundamentals of Power
BSC 295 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy Technology
BSC 333 Plant Diversity TEC 143 Introduction to Electronics for
Data Communication
CHE 141 General Chemistry II
TEC 313 Quality Systems for Technology
CHE 204 Chemistry of Life*
CHE 220 Elementary Organic Chemistry
CHE 230/231 Organic Chemistry I/Organic * Courses also approved for General
Chemistry Laboratory Education
ECO 138 Economic Reasoning Using

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Academic Policies and Practices 51

AMALI GRADUATION FRE 314 Studies in Contemporary


REQUIREMENT Francophone Culture
FRE 325 Francophone Literature and Culture
Students must have completed at least one
course in AMALI (that is, cultures and GEO 135 World Geography*
traditions of Asia, the Middle East, Africa, GEO 235 Geography of Emerging Areas*
Latin America, or Indigenous Peoples of the
GEO 235A07 Geography of Emerging
World), (formerly Global Studies) which
must meet the following criteria: (a) the Areas: Japan Field Explorations*
course focuses primarily upon facets of HIS 104 History of Asia, Middle East,
specific cultures from these regions or these Africa, Latin America, or Indigenous
cultures in general (a minimum of 75 Peoples*
percent of the course content must deal HIS 104A01 Africa*
directly with the culture(s) from these
regions); (b) exploration of the culture(s) is HIS 104A02 East Asia*
developed in a comparative perspective HIS 104A04 Latin America*
which helps the student understand and
appreciate differences between the culture HIS 104A05 South and Southeast Asia*
(s) under consideration and cultures and HIS 104A06 Native Americans*
traditions of America; and (c) the course
includes exposure to primary writings and HIS 263 Modern Mexico
artifacts from the culture(s). HIS 265 African Civilization
HIS 266 Modern Africa
ANT 185 Cultures of the World: An
Introduction to Cultural and Linguistic HIS 267 Modern South Asia
Anthropology* HIS 271 Islamic Civilization
ANT 270 Anthropology of Gender and HIS 272 Modern Middle East
Sexuality
HIS 275 History of Japanese Civilization
ANT 278 Introduction to Asian America
HIS 276 History of Chinese Civilization
ANT 280 Cherokee Culture to 1830
HIS 282 Colonial Latin American History
ANT 294 Japanese Society and Culture
HIS 283 History of Cuba
ANT 303 Latin America in Ethnographic
Perspective HIS 307 Selected Topics in Non-Western
History
ANT 307 Japanese Diasporas, Culture, and
Identity HIS 310 Native American History
ANT 308 Japanese Communicative HIS 370 Cultures of the British Empire in
Strategies the Indian Ocean World
ANT 384 North American Archaeology HIS 373 History of Modern China
ANT 385 Media and Visual Anthropology HIS 375 History of Modern Japan
ART 275 World Arts: Visual Arts* IDS 121A29 Texts and Contexts: Native
Writers on Native Issues*
CHI 111 First-Year Chinese (Part I)
IDS 121A53 Texts and Contexts: City as
CHI 112 First-Year Chinese (Part II) Text - Lima and Cusco, Peru*
CHI 115 Second-Year Chinese (Part I) IDS 121A64 Texts and Contexts: City as
CJS 369 World Criminal Justice Systems Text - Merida*
COM 320A01 Identities in Latin American IDS 121A66 Texts and Contexts: City as
Popular Culture Text—Panama*
COM 390A01 Journalism in Latin America IDS 133A04 Study Abroad:
Introduction to Mexican Culture
ENG/LAN 206 Cultural Expressions in
Social Contexts: Women of Asia, Latin IDS 133A09 Study Abroad: Argentina
America and Africa* History, Culture and Society*
ENG 266 Native American Literature and IDS 203 Nations and Narrations*
Culture IDS 203A10 East Asia*
FCS 222 Cultural Diversity in Dress* IDS 203A15 Latin America*

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


52 Academic Policies and Practices

IDS 204 Service Learning: Meknes, GRADUATION PROCEDURES


Morocco*
JPN 111 First-Year Japanese (Part I) Application for Graduation: All students
must submit an application for graduation
JPN 112 First-Year Japanese (Part II) and pay the graduation fee in order to earn
JPN 115 Second-Year Japanese (Part I) a degree. Students with 100 or more earned
hours are eligible to apply for graduation
JPN 116 Second-Year Japanese (Part II)* and are notified to do so. Instructions on
JPN 231 Japanese Conversation and how to apply can be found at
Composition Registrar.IllinoisState.edu/graduation, or
by visiting the Registrar Service Center in
JPN 232 Advanced Japanese Reading and 107 Moulton Hall.
Composition
MUS 153 Black Music I* Each student should apply for graduation on
or before the date specified by the Office of
MUS 154 Black Music II*
the University Registrar Calendar found at
MUS 275 World Arts: Music—Non-Music Registrar.IllinoisState.edu.
Majors*
Undergraduate students must pay the $35
MUS 275A01 World Arts: Music—Non graduation fee at the time of application,
Music Majors* unless the fee is covered by an approved
PHI 207 Indian Philosophy scholarship. Scholarships can be verified
with the Student Accounts Office.
PHI 208 Buddhist Philosophy
Academic Advisement Report: The Aca-
POL 140 Introduction to the Politics of
Africa, Asia, and Latin America* demic Advisement Report is an assessment
of the undergraduate student’s academic
POL 151 Introduction to International progress toward completion of requirements
Relations for the bachelor’s degree. This report may be
POL 240 Latin American Politics requested by the student with a photo ID at
POL 245 Asian Politics the University Registrar Service Center, 107
Moulton Hall, Campus Box 2202 or by
POL 246 African Politics
viewing Academic Requirements on
POL 247 Middle Eastern Politics My.IllinoisState.edu.
POL 340 Topics in Latin American Politics
POL 345 Topics in Asian Politics To determine specific program requirements
(in addition to the general requirements for
POL 349 Topics in Middle East Politics
graduation stated above), students should
SOC 220 Global Social Change: An consult the following sections of the
Introduction to Macrosociology Undergraduate Catalog: (1) the General
SOC 320 Global Development and Education requirements; (2) the specific
Economic Change requirements for the major and minor fields
SPA 244 Cultura Hispanoamericana of study; and, if the student seeks teacher
SPA 326 Spanish American Literature: licensure, (3) the University-wide Teacher
Foundations to Late 19th Century Education program requirements in this
SPA 327 Spanish American Literature: Late Undergraduate Catalog.
19th Century to Present Day
SPA 336 Selected Topics in Spanish Double Majors: Students completing
American Literature requirements for two majors concurrently are
eligible to receive only one degree unless
THE 271 Studies of Non-Western Film and 150 or more hours have been completed.
Theatre (See B, Total Hours in the Degree
THE 271A07 Asian Film Genres Requirements section.) The degree awarded
THE 275A01 World Arts: Theatre* is based on the degree corresponding to the
primary major. One diploma is issued to the
THE 275A02 World Arts: Film*
student upon completion of both majors and
all other degree requirements. Both majors
*AMALI courses approved for are designated on the transcript at the time
General Education. the degree is awarded.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Academic Policies and Practices 53

Commencement: Degr ees ar e confer r ed appear in the Commencement program with


and diplomas awarded after the close of each the honor denoted. Diploma and transcript
semester and the summer session. notations of graduation with cum laude,
Commencement exercises are held in magna cum laude, and summa cum laude
December and May at the end of the honors are based on the cumulative GPA
semester. Undergraduate students completing after the student’s final graded semester.
degree requirements during the fall semester Honors Program Designation at Com-
participate in Commencement exercises in mencement: The following Honors Pr ogram
December; students completing degree designations are recognized in the Com-
requirements during the spring semester or at mencement program: Honors Program Scholar,
the close of the summer session following Honors Program Scholar with Merit, Honors
May Commencement may participate in Program Scholar with Distinction, Presidential
Commencement exercises in May. Under- Scholar, and Honors in the Major.
graduate students who are eligible to
graduate and want to walk across the stage in Students are recognized for these awards in
their commencement ceremony must answer the Commencement program if they fulfill
YES on the Undergraduate Application for individual designation requirements; the
Graduation and submit it by the published cumulative GPA from the semester prior to
deadline. An application must be on file and graduation is used to evaluate eligibility for
the graduation fee paid by the deadline to the designations as well as course and hour
participate in the commencement ceremony. requirements that have been completed or are
in progress. Students graduating in May or
NOTE: Students participating in Com-
August who participate in May Commence-
mencement will walk with the college in which
ment are evaluated based on the cumulative
their primary major resides. Inter-disciplinary
GPA at the end of the previous fall semester;
Studies and University Studies graduates will
students graduating in December who
walk with the College of Education.
participate in the December Commencement
For more information regarding Commence- are evaluated based on the cumulative GPA
ment, please visit the Commencement at the end of the previous summer session.
website GraduationServices.IllinoisState.edu.
Transcript and diploma (as applicable)
Degrees with Honor Distinction: A student notations of these designations are based on
must have completed at least 30 semester the cumulative GPA after the student’s final
hours at Illinois State University to be semester and the successful completion of
eligible for a degree with honor distinction. designation requirements.
Students who have an accumulated GPA of
Students who have been awarded the Robert
3.90 through 4.00 are graduated summa cum
G. Bone Scholarship are also recognized in
laude; those with a GPA of 3.80 through 3.89
the Commencement program.
are graduated magna cum laude; and those
with a GPA of 3.65 through 3.79 are Diplomas: Diplomas ar e issued to students
graduated cum laude. Diploma and transcript after completion of all degree requirements,
notations of graduation with cum laude, including major(s), minor(s), general edu-
magna cum laude, and summa cum laude cation, professional education, if applicable,
honors are based on the cumulative GPA and other specific degree requirements.
after the student’s final graded semester. Students completing requirements for two
majors concurrently are eligible to receive
Honor Distinction at Commencement: In only one degree. The degree awarded is
order to be recognized with an academic based on the degree corresponding to the
honor (summa, magna, cum laude) primary major. One diploma is issued to the
distinction at Commencement, students must student upon completion of both majors and
have completed at least 30 semester hours at all other degree requirements. Majors are not
Illinois State University and have a printed on the diploma; however, all majors
qualifying GPA (refer to Degrees with Honor and minors are printed on the official
Distinction), both based on the last graded transcript. The following honors designations
semester prior to Commencement. For print on the diploma, as applicable: honor
example, students graduating in May or distinction (summa, magna, or cum laude),
August must have both hours and GPA Honors Program Scholar with Distinction,
completed in the previous fall semester. and Honors in the Major. Diplomas are
Students meeting these requirements wear an mailed to students approximately 8 to 10
honor cord as part of their academic regalia weeks following graduation.
at Commencement, and their names will

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


54 Academic Policies and Practices
General Academic Policies each student’s individual responsibility. The
University reserves the right to void the
ACCOMMODATION registration of any student who becomes
Illinois State University provides a welcoming ineligible for enrollment.
and inclusive atmosphere for individuals with
disabilities and/or medical/mental health Registration may be accomplished during the
conditions. Students receive equal access and advance registration period or the additional
opportunity in accomplishing their educational, registration periods prior to the start of the
personal, and professional goals. As a unit of semester. New freshman may register during
the Dean of Students Office under the Student the summer Preview Program and new
Affairs Division, Student Access and transfer students may register during the
Accommodation Services (SAAS) is the Transfer Days Program. Students are
designated office to provide accommodation encouraged to register during these programs
services for students with disabilities and/or because of the wider selection of courses
medical/mental health conditions under the open to them at that time. They may also
Americans with Disabilities Amendments Act register just before the opening of the
and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. semester. For advance registration, the date
SAAS obtains and maintains documentation, and time of registration will be available on
determines eligibility for services, establishes My.IllinoisState.edu approximately one week
accommodations, and develops plans for prior to advance registration.
providing accommodations through an
interactive process with students. Confi- Withdrawal Policy—Dropping a Course
dentiality of information is an important or Courses: Students ar e str ongly advised
component of SAAS. Information provided to complete all courses in which they enroll
to the office is considered confidential and and are encouraged to avoid withdrawing
will be used for the purpose of establishing from any course after the program change
appropriate accommodations and ensuring period unless absolutely necessary.
effective implementations. All provided
The following policy applies to students who
information will be protected against misuse
by others. drop a course or courses but maintain an
enrolled status within the University: A
Please contact the Student Access and student may withdraw from a course during
Accommodation Services at: the program change period without the
withdrawal being shown on the transcript. A
Phone: (309) 438-5853
student should consult the Registrar’s
Fax: (309) 438-7713;
website at Registrar.IllinoisState.edu to
Sorensen: (309) 319-7682;
obtain specific dates.
Email: AbleISU@IllinoisState.edu.
Procedures can be found on the website
After the tenth day of classes, but prior to the
StudentAccess.IllinoisState.edu. end of the eighth week of classes during any
regular semester, a student with photo
COURSE REGISTRATION AND identification may withdraw from a full
WITHDRAWAL semester course by reporting to the Registrar
Service Center, 107 Moulton Hall. Course
Course Registration: Students at Illinois withdrawal deadline information can be
State University register through the found on the Registrar’s website at
My.IllinoisState.edu website. Help with Registrar.IllinoisState.edu.
registration may be obtained at the Registrar
Service Center, 107 Moulton Hall, or by A student should consult the Registrar
calling (309) 438-2188. For office hours, Service Center for questions regarding
visit the website Registrar.IllinoisState.edu. specific withdrawal dates during any
A student at Illinois State University is instructional term. For courses taken during a
term lasting less than a regular semester, a
responsible for following registration
procedures to assure valid registration for proportional withdrawal period will apply.
courses. Work taken in a given session must A grade of F will be given to students who
be registered for in that session. A student (1) fail to withdraw officially from a course
may not attend a class for which they are not in compliance with the above procedure, or
properly registered. A correct registration is (2) register for a course but do not complete

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Academic Policies and Practices 55

course requirements. to (309) 438-8652.


Circumstances reasonably beyond the control Regardless of the circumstances of
of the student which caused the student to be withdrawal, the student is responsible for
unable to attend classes, complete the returning any laboratory equipment and
semester, or otherwise become delinquent library materials and paying for any parking
academically may be considered for a fines. The student must contact the
possible late withdrawal upon submission of University Housing Services to obtain
a letter describing the circumstances. Proper clearance from room and board obligations
documentation is required to substantiate the and to arrange for vacating the residence hall
request. For example, if the request is based room. The student should arrange with the
upon medical circumstances, a physician's Financial Aid Office to place any scholarship
statement, hospital records, or other on leave or cancel it and make arrangements
appropriate documentation must be for future financial assistance. Arrangements
submitted with the request. If approval is for payment of loans must be made in the
granted, a grade of WX will be awarded. Office of Student Accounts. Consult the
Office of Student Accounts for information
Withdrawal Policy—Dropping All Courses: on refunds.
The following policy applies when a student
drops all courses in which he or she is A grade of F will be given to students who
enrolled, which is known as withdrawal from (1) do not attend their courses but fail to
the University. Students are strongly advised withdraw from the University before the
to complete courses in which they are specified final withdrawal date, and to
enrolled and not to withdraw from the students who (2) register for a course but do
University unless absolutely necessary. not complete course requirements. In unusual
cases, exceptions may be granted by the
Before the end of the twelfth week of classes University Registrar.
during any regular semester, a student reports
to the Registrar Service Center in 107 Repetition of Course(s): If a student
Moulton Hall or writes to the Office of the completes a course, or drops a course after
University Registrar at Campus Box 2202 to the tenth day of classes receiving a grade of
withdraw from the University. WX, he or she may repeat that course once.
For students receiving a letter grade of A, B,
If a student’s written request to withdraw C, D, or F, the course repetition must occur
from the University is granted, all grades will at Illinois State University and may not be
be assigned in the same manner and under taken under the Passing/Not Passing (P/NP)
the same provisions as the regular course option.
withdrawal guidelines. The instructor of each
course assigns a WX or letter grade as Students seeking to repeat a course a second
appropriate depending on the date and time (a third enrollment) must obtain
circumstances of withdrawal. permission from their academic advisor who
will submit a registration clearance permit
Circumstances reasonably beyond the control form to the Registrar Service Center to allow
of the student which caused the student to be the student to register in the course. When a
unable to attend classes, complete the semester, course has been repeated at Illinois State
or otherwise become delinquent academically University, the most recent grade (A, B, C,
may be considered for a possible late D, F) that the student earns will replace the
withdrawal upon submission of a letter describ- previous grade in the cumulative GPA
ing the circumstances. Proper documentation is calculation. A grade of WX, AU, I, CR, CT,
required to substantiate the request. For NC, P, NP will not replace the previous
example, if the request is based upon medical grade.
circumstances, a physician's statement, hospital
records, or other appropriate documentation The previous grade(s) will not be removed
must be submitted with the request. If from the student’s transcript, and the credit
approval is granted, a grade of WX will be hours from only the last attempt can be used
awarded. Withdrawals made by mail are toward meeting minimum hourly requirements.
addressed to Office of the University Students repeating a course to improve their
Registrar, Illinois State University, Campus GPA should be aware that many professional
Box 2202, Normal, IL 61790-2202, or by fax and graduate schools recalculate GPAs to

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


56 Academic Policies and Practices

include all courses attempted. graduate Catalog and Graduate Catalog for
academic requirements. Admission to the
Some courses may be taken for credit more University can be arranged on a visiting/
than once. These courses are indicated in the summer only basis. Further information can
catalog by “Multiple enrollments are be obtained by contacting the Office of
allowed” or “Multiple enrollments are Admissions, (800) 366-2478 or at
allowed up to a maximum of X hours,” and Admissions@IllinoisState.edu.
these courses are exempt from the repeat
policy stated above. For courses such as
these, a separate grade is recorded for each Evening and Off-Campus Classes: In
enrollment and each grade (A, B, C, D, or F) addition to courses offered during the regular
is counted toward the student’s GPA. Later school day, evening and weekend classes are
grades do not replace earlier grades for scheduled both on campus and off campus.
courses of this type. For courses offered by Illinois State
University, no differentiation is made be-
Cross-listed Course Policy: Cr oss-listed tween credits earned on campus and off
courses are offered by more than one campus. Inquiries concerning off-campus
department or school, but treated as one classes should be directed to the Office of the
course for credit purposes. A cross-listed Provost, (309) 438-7018. Non-credit work-
course will be considered as one course shops, seminars, and conferences are
regardless of the department or school scheduled by the Illinois State Conferencing
through which the student registered for the Unit, (309) 438-2160.
course. This is a general rule that applies to
all cross-listed courses taken for any purpose. FINAL EXAMINATIONS
Course Load Requirements: A full-time Final Examination date, time and room
undergraduate student carries between 12 assignments are released in My.IllinoisState
and 17 hours. Courses taken on an audit in mid-September and mid-February for the
(AU) basis do not count toward full-time current term. Students and faculty can log-in
student status. For enrollment verification to My.IllinoisState.edu and access this
purposes, 12 hours is considered full-time for information through the Final Examination
undergraduate students. A student wishing to Schedule link.
carry more than 17 hours in a semester (12
hours in summer) may seek permission to do Final examinations should be given and
so from the chairperson or director of his or taken at the scheduled times. Permission to
her major department or school (or their change the time for an examination must be
designees). The granting of this permission obtained and then arranged by the instructor.
will depend on the student’s scholastic
record. A freshman may not carry over 17 Students who are unable to take an
hours during his or her first semester. examination due to emergencies such as
illness or injury, or religious reasons should
A student considering enrolling in any
notify their instructor as soon as possible (in
classes, including extension or correspond-
advance, in the case of religious reasons) and
dence, at another college or university with
make acceptable alternative arrangements. If
concurrent registration at Illinois State
an instructor does not consider an excuse for
University should consult with his or her
missing a scheduled examination for the
advisor.
student, the student may appeal the action to
Summer Academic Opportunities: The the department chair or school director.
University is operated on the semester plan
and, in addition to its fall and spring Multiple Examinations in One Day:
semesters, provides a summer session with Students who have no more than two
courses of varying lengths, and a variety of examinations scheduled for the same day
short-term offerings. Courses are offered on will be expected to take these examinations
campus, off campus and online. Prospective as scheduled. A student concerned about
students may obtain information on summer having more than two final examinations
course availability, and other information for scheduled for the same day should address
the summer session at this concern prior to finals week. Please do
SummerSesion.IllinoisState.edu. Summer the following: (1) Download and complete
session students should refer to the Under- the Multiple Examinations form found on the

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Academic Policies and Practices 57

Registrar’s website; (2) Bring completed P Passing**—Assigned to students who


form and photo ID to the Registrar Service earn an A, B, or C grade in a course
Center, 107 Moulton Hall, to verify more they have elected to take under the
than two finals are scheduled for the same Passing/Not Passing (P/NP) option.
day; and (3) Take the form to the instructor NP Not Passing**—Assigned to students
and request that an exam be moved to a who do not earn an A, B, or C grade in
different date. It is up to the instructor and a course they have elected to take under
student to work out an agreeable alternate the Passing/Not Passing (P/NP) option.
time for the examination.
**NOTE: An under gr aduate student,
Final Examination Cancellation by the (except a first-semester freshman), who
University: If ther e is a delay in the is not on academic probation may
regular activities of the University which choose to register in some courses
results in the cancellation of Final Exams for under the option that allows the student
the day, those Final Exams will take place on to be graded on the basis of P (Passing)
Friday of finals week at the same time and or NP (Not Passing) rather than on the
room originally scheduled. basis of A, B, C, D, or F grades.
Summer Session: Final Exams for
The P/NP option is designed to
Summer Session courses take place the last
encourage students to enroll in courses
day of class.
they otherwise would not take. Some
courses, therefore, including those in a
UNIVERSITY GRADING SYSTEM student’s major or minor, may not be
taken on the P/NP option. Exceptions
Instructors assign a grade in each course for include courses in the student’s major
which the student is registered. The course or minor field that are offered only as
instructor is responsible for correcting any Credit/No Credit (CR/NC) courses. No
error in grading. more than six semester hours of work
under the P/NP option may be taken
University grades assigned to undergraduate
each semester, with a maximum of 25
courses are:
semester hours under the P/NP option
A Excellent presented for graduation. Although an
B Good entry of P (credit earned under the
C Satisfactory option) or NP (no credit earned under
D Poor, But Passing the option) will be entered on the
F Failing—Assigned to students who are student’s record, these entries are not
(1) enrolled in a course all semester but used in computing the student’s GPA.
fail to earn a passing grade, or who (2) No Group 1 course in General
stop attending a class without officially Education may be taken under the P/NP
withdrawing option. If a General Education course is
WX Withdrawal—Assigned to students who required by a student’s declared major,
officially withdraw from a course before that course may not be taken P/NP; it
the dates specified in the withdrawal must be taken for a grade.
policy
Students who plan to enter graduate or
CR Credit*—Assigned to students who do
professional schools should exercise
satisfactory work in a course which is
caution in taking courses under the P/
offered only on a Credit/No Credit basis NP option because courses completed
NC No Credit*—Assigned to students who on a P/NP basis may adversely affect
do not do satisfactory work in a course graduate admission opportunities. Such
which is offered only on a Credit/No students should consult their academic
Credit basis advisor prior to taking courses on a P/
*NOTE: Cer tain cour ses in the NP basis.
University are offered only on a Credit/ A grade of P is recorded when the grade
No Credit (CR/NC) basis. These submitted by the instructor is A, B, or
courses must be approved in advance by C. A grade of NP is recorded when the
the Office of the Provost. grade submitted by the instructor is D

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


58 Academic Policies and Practices

or F. grade, the Incomplete grade will lapse


to an F. Exceptions to this policy may
Students electing the P/NP option be granted by the University Registrar.
should do so as part of the regular
registration process. Students may not AU Audit—Important considerations: A
elect the option after the tenth day of class taken under the audit option does
classes in the semester. Students who not count toward a degree; it does not
have elected the P/NP option may count toward full-time student status for
return to the letter basis of grading financial aid and other purposes, nor
before the last date for withdrawing does it count toward total hours
from a course, as specified on the enrolled in determining registration
Office of the University Registrar’s priority. Students auditing a class will
website Registrar.IllinoisState.edu. be charged all applicable tuition and
I Incomplete—An incomplete (I) will be fees. An auditor is expected to attend
assigned to a student who is doing regularly. A student may register as an
passing work but finds it impossible, auditor in a class or classes if space is
because of reasons beyond her or his available. To audit, a student must
control (such as illness), to complete obtain a Request for Auditor
the required work by the end of the Registration form from the Registrar
term. The student must have attended Service Center or download the form at
class to within three weeks of the close Registrar.IllinoisState.edu, request the
of the semester or to within one week of instructor sign it and return the signed
the close of the summer session. form to the Registrar Service Center by
the published deadline.
The instructor may specify the time by
which the required work must be M Missing—Assigned when no grade has
completed, which may be no later than been received from the instructor after
the final class day of the corresponding the grade submission deadline has
term of the following academic year. passed.
For graduating students, an incomplete
grade must be removed at least six Grade Point Average: In calculating
weeks before December or May major and cumulative Grade Point Average
commencement or two weeks before (GPA), the grade point equivalents are 4 for
August graduation. Students will not be A, 3 for B, 2 for C, 1 for D, and 0 for all
allowed to graduate with an incomplete other grades. The 0 value of F is computed in
on their record. the student’s GPA, the 0 value of grades I,
AU, CR, NC, P, NP, M, and WX is not
The instructor should assign the computed in the student’s GPA.
Incomplete (I) grade during grade
reporting for the term. The faculty To be eligible for graduation, a student must
member should determine and have a minimum grade point average (GPA)
communicate to the student the date by of 2.00 (C) in all courses taken at Illinois
which the remaining coursework must State University for which grades of A, B, C,
be completed. (The instructor can D, F are assigned. Certain majors may
submit the School/Department require a higher GPA for graduation. State
Incomplete Grade Form found under licensure requirements in education majors
Faculty & Staff Resources at mandate that no course in which a student
Registrar.IllinoisState.edu and retain it receives a grade below a C can be used to
for departmental records.) Once the fulfill a student’s required coursework in the
student completes the remaining work, program. Failures are considered in the total
the instructor must submit a Grade number of semester hours taken in
Change Form to the Registrar’s Office. computing the GPA.
If the instructor fails to submit the The following table illustrates how grade
appropriate Grade Change Form within points are counted to determine the GPA.
one year of the assigned Incomplete

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Academic Policies and Practices 59

Grade Sem. Hrs. Sem. Hrs. Sem. Hrs. Grade


Course Grade Enrolled Earned For GPA Points

POL 105 D 3 3 3 3
BSC 145 P 2 2 0 0
COM 110 A 3 3 3 12
MUS 139 I 1 1 0 0
CHE 102 B 3 3 3 9
KNR 133 WX 1 0 0 0
IDS 106 NC 1 0 0 0
TOTALS 14 11 9 24

The GPA is computed by dividing grade points earned by semester hours


counted for GPA. In the case above, a GPA of 2.66 is calculated by divid-
ing 24 (total grade points) by 9 (semester hours for GPA). Grades of WX,
P, NP, CR, I, and NC do not affect the GPA.

Midterm Grades and Progress Alerts:


Midterm grades are requested for all new
first-year students as well as other selected
student populations for the purpose of early
academic intervention or compliance. This
report form includes a request for an indica-
tion of frequent absences as needed for
certain compliance requirements. The re-
quest will be sent to faculty in the fifth week
of the semester. A second request is sent in
the 11th week of the semester only for se-
lected student populations.

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60 Academic Policies and Practices

ADDITIONAL ACADEMIC coursework, including transfer credit. At 75


REQUIREMENTS hours earned, students who are undeclared
will have their next semester’s schedule
Class Attendance: The attendance dropped unless they successfully complete
regulation of the University is based on two an appeal process through University
principles. First, students are expected to College. To be eligible for financial aid and
attend class regularly; and second, students in order to be consistent with federal
are primarily responsible to the instructor in financial aid guidelines, Illinois State
matters pertaining to class attendance. Every students with 75 hours or more must be
student will be held responsible for class enrolled in a major program leading to a
attendance and successful completion of degree. For further information on this policy
academic work. Attendance regulations are and on finding and declaring a major, see
intended to encourage student maturity and UniversityCollege.IllinoisState.edu/
are based on the assumption that academic advising/75.
success is the student’s primary goal in
college. Major Field(s) of Study: Students may
select a major field of study at the time of
Illinois State University deeply values and admission unless the field they choose has
supports the required participation of students special admissions standards. Students who
in Sanctioned University Activities. Instructors are undeclared majors are encouraged to
will provide such students with reasonable select a major field of study as soon as
accommodations for completing missed possible. The major and minor fields of
exams, quizzes, and the like. The Office of the study available at Illinois State are described
Vice President of Student Affairs will later in this catalog. A student may complete
determine Sanctioned University Activities. It the requirements for two majors, both of
is the responsibility of the student to (1) inform which will be identified on the student’s
instructors of scheduled absences in advance, transcript provided all requirements are
(2) where possible and as soon as possible, completed in both majors and the degree is
provide a schedule of all semester absences, awarded. When a student double majors, the
and (3) arrange to complete missed classroom student indicates only one major for
work. Ultimately, students are responsible for purposes of registration. Unless otherwise
material covered in class. In the event of specified in a particular program, students
disagreement regarding this policy, the issue may use a specific course to meet
will be directed to the appropriate Associate requirements for a major and a second major.
Vice President for Academic Affairs for NOTE: Students completing r equir ements
arbitration. for two majors are eligible to receive only
one degree unless 150 or more hours have
The University will accommodate, within been completed. (See A, Total Hours in the
reason, students whose religious obligations Degree Requirements section and Double
require absence from class. Students who are Majors in the Academic Policies and
unable to attend class or take examinations Practices section).
for religious reasons should consult their
instructors in advance about alternative Change of Primary or Secondary Major:
arrangements. A student wishing to enter a second major or
change majors must apply to their desired
Class Standing: Students in a bachelor ’s major through the Apply to My Program
degree program are classified as freshmen, system which can be accessed through
sophomores, juniors, and seniors. A student MyIllinoisState.
must have completed 30 semester hours to be
classified as a sophomore, 60 hours to be Program Specific Admission Criteria:
classified as a junior, and 90 hours to be Illinois State University regulates admission
classified as a senior. Students not working to designated programs when the number of
toward a degree at Illinois State are listed as students seeking admission exceeds the
Unclassified Students. available educational resources of the
department or school. Supplementary
75 Hour Limit on Undeclared Student selection criteria for admission may need to
Status: Illinois State Univer sity r equir es be met for specific majors.
all students to have a declared major upon
completion of 75 hours of college-level

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Academic Policies and Practices 61

Dismissal from Major: If a Dismissed graduate Catalog under the appropriate


student is reinstated to the University, the department, school or program descriptions.
student will return as an Undeclared major.
The student will receive academic advise- For satisfactory progress for financial aid
ment from University College Academic purposes, see Satisfactory Academic Progress
Advisement. In order to declare a major in Policy in this catalog.
a department or school after being dropped,
the student must be accepted by the Academic Warning:  Each semester , the
department or school in which he or she University identifies students that appear to
be in jeopardy of being placed on academic
desires to be a major.
probation. These students will be notified
Minor Field(s) of Study: Students often that they are on Academic Warning. Students
elect a minor field of study. A student may on Academic Warning can contact
elect to complete the requirements for two University College for guidance on programs
minors, both of which will be identified on and services geared toward improving their
the student’s transcript upon receipt of academic standing. Information about
degree. A student wishing to enter a minor, Academic Warning can be obtained from
second minor or change minors consults with University College, 324 Fell Hall.
the academic department(s) offering the
minor. Unless otherwise specified in a Academic Probation: When students’
particular program, students may use a cumulative grade point average falls below a
specific course to meet requirements for a 2.00 on a 4.00 scale, they are placed on
academic probation. Students on academic
minor and a second minor.
probation are required to participate in Project
Certification Programs: Students who fail Success—a program designed to assist students
to maintain the specific grade point average in returning to good academic standing. If a
required by their teaching or other licensure student leaves the University after academic
or certification program may be dismissed probation, readmission to the University is
from that program. At the option of the evaluated to determine the best path to
department or school, students dropped from graduation. Information about Academic
the program may pursue a degree in their Probation and Project Success can be obtained
major or be classified as undeclared and will from University College, 324 Fell Hall.
receive academic advisement from
University College Academic Advisement. Academic Dismissal: At the end of any
To become a candidate for a licensure or semester, except for summer session, when a
certification program after being dropped, student’s cumulative grade point average is
students must be accepted by the department below a 2.00 a second or subsequent time, he
or school in which they desire to pursue a or she is dismissed from the University.
licensure or certification program.
Academic Reinstatement: Students dis-
Academic Good Standing: To maintain missed from the University may petition the
academic good standing, a student must Reinstatement Committee for permission to
achieve a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.00. continue. Petitions must be received by the
The number of semester hours completed appropriate deadlines to be considered.
includes all college work done by the Additionally, students can access petition
student. However, only the grades earned at information by visiting the University College
Illinois State are used in computing the GPA. website at UniversityCollege.IllinoisState.edu.
Students who are reinstated and elect to
“Academic Good Standing” status is necessary postpone their enrollment for a future term
for continued enrollment in the University and must reapply for that term.
may be necessary for eligibility to serve on
various University committees and for Only students who have extenuating
participation in some co-curricular activities. circumstances or errors in their academic
Academic Good Standing status does not records should plan to petition for rein-
guarantee admission to, or retention in, specific statement for the semester following their
departments, schools, or programs. Information dismissal. Students who are reinstated return
concerning admission to and retention in as Undeclared.
specific programs is listed in this Under-

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


62 Academic Policies and Practices
Former Illinois State Students Seeking 1. Non-Traditional Student Option:
Reinstatement After Dismissal: Students Former Illinois State students at least 25
wishing to return to Illinois State after being years of age may be considered for
away for one or more semesters must  (1) readmission through this option. If they
meet university-wide readmission have attended any college (including
requirements and deadlines; and (2) be Illinois State) in the three calendar years
reinstated by the University Reinstatement preceding re-enrollment at Illinois State,
Committee. Application procedures, they must have achieved at least a 2.50
reinstatement information and deadlines can GPA for that college work. Transfer credit
be found at the Office of Admissions website will be evaluated and appropriately
Admissions.IllinoisState.edu/Returning. awarded.
2. Veterans’ Option: Students who
Students who are reinstated and elect to
complete at least a one-year tour of duty
postpone their enrollment for a future term
and present a discharge for reasons other
must reapply for that term. Reinstated
than dishonorable, and whose first
students are required to participate in Project
attendance at a college or university after
Rebound—a program designed to assist
discharge is at Illinois State, may be
students in returning to Academic Good
considered for readmission through this
Standing.
option.
If a student attends any other higher
3. Community College Transfer Option:
education institution after dismissal from
Former Illinois State students who earned
Illinois State, he or she must indicate such
60 or fewer hours at Illinois State prior to
attendance on the readmission application
enrolling at a community college and who
and supply an official transcript from the
subsequently earn at least 24 hours after
other school(s). Students must have earned a
being away for one full year and earn a
minimum grade of C average (2.00/4.00) or
currently accepted associate degree (A.A.
better for all coursework taken since last
or A.S.) from a community college with at
attending Illinois State and have been in
least a 2.50 GPA may be considered for
good academic standing at the last institution
readmission through this option. Transfer
attended as a full- or part-time student. If a
credit will be evaluated and appropriately
student leaves the University after academic
awarded.
probation, readmission to the University is
evaluated to determine the best path to The application process includes the
graduation. submission of the application for admission,
official academic transcripts from all schools
Repeated failures to do satisfactory work
attended since leaving Illinois State, and a
may result in permanent exclusion from the
statement describing your potential to do well
University.
academically as described on the application.
In some cases, additional supporting
New Start: Students who leave Illinois documents may be requested from the
State in a degree program with less than a University in order to complete your
2.00 cumulative grade-point average (GPA) application. NOTE: Meeting the minimum
may be considered for readmission through requirements does not guarantee re-admission.
New Start. Applicants admitted through this Students are strongly encouraged to file an
policy will begin with a new cumulative application as soon as possible during the
GPA calculated from the point of their priority-filing period for the term for which
reentry. they are applying. Application deadlines are
posted on the Admissions website at
Students may be considered for readmission
Admissions.IllinoisState.edu/Returning and on
through New Start after being away from the
the application for admission.
University for one full year (Example: A
student who last attended the University the Students may exercise New Start only once.
Fall 2016 term may not reenroll through the Such students will have “New Start”
New Start until the Spring 2018 term.) and indicated on their transcript. New Start will
only when the requirements of one of the affect only the cumulative GPA. All grades
following New Start categories are met: earned at Illinois State, regardless of when
earned, will be used in the calculation of the

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Academic Policies and Practices 63

major GPA, the minor GPA, and graduation 1. A student may receive credit for a
honors. Students who are admitted through maximum of 18 semester hours credit
New Start return on academic probation. through CLEP General Examinations.
Students who reenter under New Start must 2. A student who desires to take the CLEP
follow the Undergraduate Catalog in effect General Examinations should do so before
at the time of reentry. To be eligible for
enrolling for classes at the University.
graduation, a student must earn at least 30
semester hours at Illinois State University 3. Credit earned through the CLEP General
after exercising New Start. Examinations shall count toward General
Education and graduation requirements
only. A student may not use the CLEP
CONDUCT CODE DISMISSAL General Examinations to raise grades or
remove failures in courses already taken.
In the event that a student takes any action
All credit for CLEP General Examinations
that creates a substantial risk such that the
health or safety of an individual may be shall be considered credit at the 100-level.
compromised and/or the operations of the 4. A student who is awarded credit in one or
University are substantially affected the more areas of the General Examinations
student may be dismissed from the should consult with his or her advisor to
University using the procedures outlined in select other appropriate basic and
the Code of Student Conduct. advanced courses.
5. A student may not receive credit for both
PROFICIENCY AND an area of the CLEP General
PLACEMENT EXAMINATIONS Examinations and previously earned
course credit in the same area. For
Students at Illinois State University may example, a student who earned course
receive credit by examination through the credit in the Fine Arts (Art, Music,
following programs: College Level Exam- Theatre and Dance) may not receive credit
ination Program (CLEP), Departmental for a General Examination in the Fine
Proficiency Examinations, the Advanced Arts area. Also, credit will not be awarded
Placement (AP) program, and the International for the General Examination areas in
Baccalaureate (IB) program. Students and which credit is earned through
prospective students are advised to plan their Departmental Proficiency Examinations,
coursework and examination attempts Advanced Placement Examinations, or
carefully because they may not receive credit CLEP Subject Examinations.
by examination for a course in which they 6. Students may take the CLEP General
have been enrolled on the tenth day of class. Examinations at Illinois State at times
scheduled by the University Testing
Illinois State University also accepts the Office or at any CLEP Open Test Center.
State Seal of Biliteracy as equivalent to LAN Students may contact the University
111 in the languages currently offered at the Testing Office, 346B Fell Hall, Campus
university. When the seal is granted in a Box 4060, (309) 438-2100, for further
language not offered at Illinois State, four information. Students who take the CLEP
(4) credit hours of lower division foreign examinations are responsible for the cost
language elective will be awarded. In all of the examination.
cases, students must request course credit for
their seal within 3 academic years after Students who have taken CLEP General
graduating from high school. Examinations at another institution may
request that scores be submitted to Illinois
CLEP General Examinations: Illinois State by contacting CLEP, P.O. Box 6600,
State University grants credit by examination Princeton, NJ 08541-6600 or telephone
toward General Education requirements for (609) 771-7865.
the College Level Examination Program
under the following guidelines:

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


64 Academic Policies and Practices

COLLEGE LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM (CLEP)

Course Name Minimum ISU Suggested Course


Grade for Credit Hours Credit
Credit Awarded
Composition and Literature:
American Literature 56 3 GE HUM
Analyzing and Interpreting Literature No Credit
College Composition 56 3 ENG 101
College Composition Modular No Credit
English Literature 56 3 GE HUM
Humanities 56 6 GE HUM & FA

Foreign Languages:
French Language Level I No Credit
French Language Level II No Credit
German Language Level I No Credit
German Language Level II No Credit
Spanish Language Level I No Credit
Spanish Language Level II No Credit

History and Social Sciences:


American Government 63 3 POL 106
History of the United States I 56-59 3 GE UST
History of the United States I 60 3 HIS 135
History of the United States II 56-59 3 GE UST
History of the United States II 60 3 HIS 136
Human Growth and Development No Credit
Introduction to Educational Psych No Credit
Introductory Psychology 52 3 PSY 110
Introductory Sociology 56 3 SOC 106
Principles of Macroeconomics No Credit
Principles of Microeconomics No Credit
Social Sciences and History 56 6 GE UST & SS
Western Civilization I 56 3 HIS 101
Western Civilization II 56 3 HIS 102

Science and Mathematics:


Biology 50-55 3 BSC 101
Biology 56 4 BSC 197
Calculus No Credit
Chemistry 56 4 CHE 110
College Algebra 55 3 MAT 119
College Mathematics 55 4 MAT 113
Natural Sciences 56 6 Gen Ed NS
Precalculus 55 4 MAT 144

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Academic Policies and Practices 65

Departmental Proficiency Examinations: 6. Credit earned in proficiency examinations


may not be used to raise grades or remove
Departmental proficiency examinations are failures in courses in which a student has
offered in most 100-level and in a limited been enrolled previously.
number of 200-level courses. The purpose
of the examinations is to allow students to 7. No course credit will be awarded for a
receive credit for knowledge acquired proficiency examination which is at a
previously and to allow students to enroll lower level than a course previously
in more advanced courses or to add enrolled in or one that substantially
breadth to their academic programs. duplicates the content of a course taken
Proficiency examinations are optional and previously.
recommended only for students who are 8. Students may take a proficiency exam-
unusually skilled in the discipline in which ination only once.
the examination is taken. Specific
information about the nature of a given 9. Students may register for only one
examination should be obtained directly departmental proficiency examination
from the appropriate departmental or each semester unless examinations are
school office. Below are University guide- approved in writing by the chairs or
lines and procedures relating to pro- directors of the departments or schools
ficiency examinations: where the courses are being offered.
10. Students with disabilities should notify the
1. The nature and content of each
appropriate departmental office of the
proficiency examination shall be deter-
need for any special accommodations
mined by the department or school in
prior to the date of the examination.
which the course is offered. Standards of
performance required for receiving 11. Students should register for an
credit in a given course also shall be examination online at the Registrar’s
determined by the department/school website at Registrar.IllinoisState.edu.
offering the course; the level and quality 12. Responsibility for the supervision and
of work required for satisfactory administration of the proficiency exam-
performance on a proficiency exam- ination program shall rest with the
ination is equivalent to that required for University Registrar or his or her designee.
a grade of C in the course.
2. Academic departments shall provide Credit for Military Service: Students who
proficiency examinations in most 100- have served at least one year of active duty
level courses that are regularly listed in and received an honorable discharge may
the Undergraduate Catalog. Students receive six semester hours of elective credit.
will find a list of courses in which To qualify for this credit, a copy of the
proficiency examinations are offered on DD214 should be presented with the
application for admission.
the Office of University Registrar’s
website Registrar.IllinoisState.edu. Advanced Placement Program: The
3. A description of each proficiency Advanced Placement Program is sponsored
examination should be available in the by the College Board. The examinations are
administered at designated high school
department or school offering the
testing centers. Students will be awarded
examination. Students should contact the
credit or exemption as indicated.
appropriate department chairperson or
school director for information about a A student who has taken Advanced Placement
specific examination, including qualifying Program examinations should request that his
experiences. or her scores be sent to the University
Registrar at Illinois State University. To
4. All Illinois State University students are request grade reports for Advanced Placement
eligible to take proficiency examinations. Examinations completed, a student should
5. Letter grades will not be assigned for write to Advanced Placement Exams, Box
proficiency examinations; therefore, the 6671, Princeton, NJ 08541-6671. In making
GPA will not be affected. the request, the student should include name,
sex, date of birth, the year in which the

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


66 Academic Policies and Practices

examination was taken, and the name and


identification number of the college to
which the grade report should be sent.
Illinois State University’s identification
number is 1319.
For more information on Advanced
Placement Exams contact the College Board
at apcentral.collegeboard.com or call 888-
225-5427.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Academic Policies and Practices 67

Advanced Placement Program


Score for Semester
Credit or Course for which Hours
Examination Exemption Credit is Allowed Awarded

Art Studio-Drawing 5, 4, or 3 ART 104 3 hours


Art Studio-General
2D Design 5, 4, or 3 ART 103 3 hours
Art Studio-General
3D Design 5, 4, or 3 ART 109 3 hours
Art History 5, 4, or 3 ART 155, 156 6 hours
Biology 5 or 4 BSCC 196 and 197 8 hours
3 BSC 101 3 hours
Calculus Test AB 5, 4 or 3 MAT 145 4 hours
Calculus Test BC 5, 4, or 3 MAT 145 and 146 8 hours
2 with AB
subscore or 3 MAT 145
Capstone Research 5, 4, or 3 ENG 101 3 hours
Seminar
Capstone Seminar 5, 4, or 3 elective 3 hours
Chemistry 5 CHE 140, 141 8 hours
4 CHE 140 4 hours
3 CHE 110 4 hours
Chinese Language 5 or 4 CHI 112, 115 8 hours
and Culture 3 CHI 112 4 hours
Computer Science
Principles 5, 4, or 3 IT 140 3 hours
Computer Science 5, 4 or 3 IT 168 4 hours
Test A
English Lang-Comp 5, 4, or 3 ENG 101 3 hours
English Lit-Comp 5, 4 ENG 125 3 hours
3 elective credit 3 hours
Environmental 5, 4, or 3 HSC 156 3 hours
Science
European History 3 Humanities 3 hours
Gen Ed elective
5 or 4 HIS 101 and 102 6 hours
French Language 5 FRE 115, 116 8 hours
and Culture 4 FRE 112, 115 8 hours
3 FRE 112 4 hours
German Language 5 GER 115, 116 8 hours
and Culture 4 GER 112, 115 8 hours
3 GER 112 4 hours

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


68 Academic Policies and Practices

Advanced Placement Program


Score for ISU Semester
Credit or Course for which Hours
Examination Exemption Credit is Allowed Awarded

Government & 5, 4 or 3 POL 140 3 hours


Politics Comparative
Human Geography 5 or 4 GEO 142 3 hours
3 elective credit 3 hours
Italian Language 5 ITA 115, 116 8 hours
and Culture 4 ITA 112, 115 8 hours
3 ITA 112 4 hours
Japanese Language 5 JPN 115, 116 8 hours
and Culture 4 JPN 112, 115 8 hours
3 JPN 112 4 hours
Latin 5 or 4 LAT 112, 115 8 hours
3 LAT 112 4 hours
Macro Economics 5, 4 or 3 ECO 105 4 hours
and Micro Economics
Macro Economics 5,4, or 3 elective credit 3 hours
Micro Economics 5,4, or 3 elective credit 3 hours
Music Listening and
Literature 5, 4, or 3 elective credit 3 hours
Music Theory 5 or 4 MUS 100, 101, 107 4 hours
3 MUS 100 1 hour
Physics Test 1 5, 4, or 3 PHY 108 5 hours
Physics Test 2 5, 4, or 3 PHY 109 5 hours
Physics Test C,
MECH 5, 4, or 3 PHY 110 4 hours
Physics Test C,
E&M 5, 4, or 3 PHY 111 4 hours
Psychology 5 or 4 PSY 110 3 hours
3 Social Science Gen Ed
Elective 3 hours
Spanish Language 5 SPA 115, 116 8 hours
and Culture 4 SPA 112, 115 8 hours
3 SPA 112 4 hours
Spanish Literature 5, 4, or 3 SPA 233 3 hours
Statistics 5, 4, or 3 MQM 100 3 hours
U.S. Government
and Politics 5, 4, or 3 POL 106 3 hours
U.S. History 5 or 4 HIS 135, 136 6 hours
3 U.S. Traditions Gen Ed
Elective
World History 5 or 4 HIS 101 3 hours
3 Humanities Gen Ed 3 hours
Elective

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Academic Policies and Practices 69

Advanced Placement Program


Illinois Articulation Initiative Courses
AP Score for Credit
Examination or Exemption IAI Course Number

Art History 3, 4 or 5 F2 902


Biology 3, 4 or 5 L1 900L*
Calculus Exam 3, 4 or 5 M1 900
Calculus AB Exam 3, 4 or 5 M1 900-O
Calculus BC Exam 3, 4 or 5 M1 900-O
Chemistry Exam 1 3, 4 or 5 P1 902 *
Chinese Language & 4 or 5 H1 900
Culture Exam
Comparative Government & 3, 4, or 5 S5 905
Politics Exam
English Literature & No IAI Credit
Composition
Environmental 3, 4 or 5 P9 901
Science Exam
European History Exam 3, 4 or 5 H2 901 or S2 902 #
European History 3, 4 or 5 H2 902 or S2 903 #
Exam
French Language & 4 or 5 H1 900
Culture Exam
German Language & 4 or 5 H1 900
Culture Exam
Human Geography Exam 3, 4 or 5 S4 900N
Italian Language & 4 or 5 H1 900
Culture Exam
Japanese Language & 4 or 5 H1 900
Culture Exam
Latin Exam 4 or 5 H1 900
Macroeconomics Exam 3, 4 or 5 S3 901
Microeconomics Exam 3, 4 or 5 S3 902
Physics Exam 1 and 3, 4 or 5 P1 900*
Physics Exam 2
Physics C: E&M Exam 3, 4 or 5 P2 900*
Psychology Exam 3, 4 or 5 S6 900

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


70 Academic Policies and Practices

Advanced Placement Program


Illinois Articulation Initiative Courses

AP Score for Credit


Examination or Exemption IAI Course Number

Spanish Language & 4 or 5 H1 900


Culture Exam
Statistics Exam 3, 4 or 5 M1 902
US Government Exam 3, 4 or 5 S5 900
US History Exam 3, 4 or 5 H2 904 or S2 900 #
US History Exam 3, 4 or 5 H2 905 or S2 901 #

World History Exam 3, 4 or 5 H2 906 or S2 912N #


World History Exam 3, 4 or 5 H2 907 or S2 913N #

NOTES: Only the Biology AP exam satisfies the labor ator y r equir ement in IAI.
# Dependent on how the sending institution categorized the course. Credit for a single exam
must be in either humanities or social sciences, not split between the two.

International Baccalaureate Diploma Program: Sponsor ed by the Inter national


Baccalaureate Organization, the program is designed to prepare students for success in the
University and beyond in a variety of subjects. A student who has participated in the Inter-
national Baccalaureate ® Diploma Programme should have his or her scores sent to the
University Registrar at Illinois State University. For more information please see the Inter-
national Baccalaureate ® Organization website - http://www.ibo.org/.

The International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Program, offers high quality two year pro-
grams of study that lead to examinations. Assessments of the examinations are reported as
a score via a diploma or individual subject certificates. Students with the appropriate
scores will be awarded proficiency for specific International Baccalaureate Program work.
In compliance with Illinois State statute, Illinois State University awards academic credit
for International Baccalaureate scores of 4 and above. For a complete listing of IB exams
and credit awarded, see the University Registrar’s website at registrar.illinoisstate.edu.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Academic Policies and Practices 71

International Baccalaureate Diploma Program


Semester Hours
IB Examination Level Score Course(s) Awarded_____
Biological Sciences SL/HL 4 or 5 BSC 101 3
Biological Sciences SL/HL 6 or 7 BSC 196 & BSC 197 8
Business & Management SL/HL 4 or higher
Elective credit 3
Chemistry SL/HL 4 CHE 102 3
Chemistry SL/HL 5 or 6 CHE 110 or General
Education Natural Science 4 or 3
Chemistry SL/HL 7 CHE 140 4
Classical Languages-Greek SL/HL 4 or 5 LAN 111 & LAN 112 8
Classical Languages-Greek SL/HL 6 or 7 LAN 115 & LAN 116 8
Classical Languages-Latin SL/HL 4 or 5 LAT 111 & LAT 112 8
Classical Languages-Latin SL/HL 6 or 7 LAT 115 & LAN 116 8
Computer Science SL 4 or higher IT 168 4
Computer Science HL 4 IT 178 3
Computer Science HL 5 or higher IT 178 & IT 254 6
Dance SL/HL 4 DAN 105 & Fine Arts 3
General Education credit
Design Technology SL/HL 4 or higher Elective credit 3
Economics SL/HL 4 or 5 ECO 103 3
Economics SL/HL 6 or 7 ECO 105 4
English A, Language & SL/HL 4 or 5 ENG 101 and General 6
Literature Education Humanities
English A, Language & SL/HL 6 or 7 ENG 101 & ENG 125 6
Literature
English A, Literature SL/HL 4 or 5 ENG 101 and General 6
Education Humanities
English A, Literature SL/HL 6 or 7 ENG 101 & ENG 125 6
English A, Literature & SL only 4 or higher ENG 101 and General 6
Performance Education Fine Arts
Environmental Systems (GEO) SL only 4 GEO elective credit 3
Environmental Systems (GEO) SL only 5 or higher GEO 100 4
Film SL/HL 4 or higher THE 170 3
Geography SL/HL 4 GEO elective credit 3
Geography SL/HL 5 or higher GEO 142 3
Global Politics SL/HL 4 or 5 General Education Social 3
Sciences
Global Politics SL/HL 6 or 7 POL 151 3
History (with or without SL/HL 4 or higher General Education Humanities 3
regional focus)
ITGS (Information Tech in a SL/HL 4 or higher IT 140 3
Global Society
Language A: French Literature; SL/HL 4 or higher FRE 213 & FRE 214 6
Lang & Lit
Language A: German Literature; SL/HL 4 or higher GER 213 & GER 217 6
Lang & Lit
Language A: Spanish Literature; SL/HL 4 or higher SPA 214 & SPA 223 6
Lang & Lit
Language A: Other Languages SL/HL 4 or higher LAN credit at 200 level 6
SL=Standard Level
HL=High Level

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


72 Academic Policies and Practices

International Baccalaureate Diploma Program


Semester Hours
IB Examination Level Score Course(s) Awarded_____
Language B: Language Acquisition
Chinese-Mandarin HL or SL 4 or 5 CHI 111 & CHI 112 8
Chinese-Mandarin HL or SL 6 or 7 CHI 115 & LAN 116 8
French HL or SL 4 or 5 FRE 111 & FRE 112 8
French HL or SL 6 or 7 FRE 115 & FRE 116 8
German HL or SL 4 or 5 GER 111 & GER 112 8
German HL or SL 6 or 7 GER 115 & GER 116 8
Italian HL or SL 4 or 5 ITA 111 & ITA 112 8
Italian HL or SL 6 or 7 ITA 115 & ITA 116 8
Japanese HL or SL 4 or 5 JPN 111 & JPN 112 8
Japanese HL or SL 6 or 7 JPN 115 & JPN 116 8
Spanish HL or SL 4 or 5 SPA 111 & SPA 112 8
Spanish HL or SL 6 or 7 SPA 115 & SPA 116 8
Other Languages HL or SL 4 or 5 LAN 111 & LAN 112 8
Other Languages HL or SL 6 or 7 LAN 115 & LAN 116 8
Language ab initio
Chinese-Mandarin SL only 4 or 5 CHI 111 4
Chinese Mandarin SL only 6 or 7 CHI 111 & CHI 112 8
French SL only 4 or 5 FRE 111 4
French SL only 6 or 7 FRE 111 & FRE 112 8
German SL only 4 or 5 GER 111 4
German SL only 6 or 7 GER 111 & GER 112 8
Italian SL only 4 or 5 ITA 111 4
Italian SL only 6 or 7 ITA 111 & ITA 112 8
Japanese SL only 4 or 5 JPN 111 4
Japanese SL only 6 or 7 JPN 111 & JPN 112 8
Spanish SL only 4 or 5 SPA 111 4
Spanish SL only 6 or 7 SPA 111 & SPA 112 8
Other Languages SL only 4 or 5 LAN 111 4
Other Languages SL only 6 or 7 LAN 111 & LAN 112 8
Mathematics Studies SL only 4 or 5 MAT 113; Placement: Take 4
Standard Level ALEKS PPL exam
Mathematics Studies SL only 6 or 7 MAT 113, MAT 150; 8
Standard Level Placement: take ALEKS
PPL exam
Mathematics, Further HL only 4 or 5 MAT 146, MAT 160; 8
Placement in MAT 147, MAT 260
Mathematics, Further HL only 6 MAT 146, MAT 160 and 12
General Education Quantitative
Reasoning; Placement in
MAT 147, MAT 260
Mathematics, Further HL only 7 MAT 146, MAT 160, MAT 175 15
and General Education Quantitative
Reasoning; Placement in MAT 147,
MAT 260
SL=Standard Level
HL=High Level

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Academic Policies and Practices 73

International Baccalaureate Diploma Program


Semester Hours
IB Examination Level Score Course(s) Awarded_____
Music-Creating HL 4 or higher MUS 205A01 2
Music-Perception SL/HL 4 or higher MUS 152 3
Music-Solo Performing (SLS) HL 4 or higher MUS 131-138 (based on 3
instrument type)
Music-Group Performance SL/HL 4 or higher MUS 180-188 (based on 1
group type)
Philosophy SL/HL 4 or higher PHI 101 3
Physics HL 4 PHY 102 3
Physics HL 5 PHY 105 4
Physics HL 6 or 7 PHY 108 & PHY 109 10
Physics SL 4 or 5 PHY 102 3
Physcis SL 6 or 7 PHY 105 4
Political Thought SL only 4 or higher General Education Social 3
Sciences
Psychology SL/HL 4 or 5 General Elective 3
Psychology SL/HL 6 or 7 PSY 110 3
Social and Cultural Anthropology SL/HL 4 ANT 185 3
Social and Cultural Anthropology SL/HL 5 or 6 ANT 186 or ANT 281 3
Social and Cultural Anthropology SL/HL 7 ANT 186 & ANT 281 6
Sports, Exercise & Health SL only 4 or higher General Elective 3
Science
Theatre SL/HL 4 or 5 General Education Fine Arts 3
Theatre SL/HL 6 or 7 THD 176A01 3
Visual Arts SL/HL 4 or 5 General Education Fine Arts 3
Visual Arts SL/HL 6 or 7 ART 176 3
World Religions SL only 4 or higher General Education Humanities 3

SL=Standard Level
HL=High Level

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


74

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS

General Education provides students with a Transferable General Education Core


broad, common foundation of study upon Curriculum available thr ough the Illi-
which to build an undergraduate education. nois Articulation Initiative (IAI). This
The program develops skills of oral and program is a statewide agreement between
written communication, logical and scientific participating public colleges and universi-
reasoning, and quantitative analysis. Courses ties and some private schools that is de-
in General Education explore ways of know- signed to facilitate timely degree comple-
ing in the various disciplines through exami- tion for students who transfer between
nation of significant historical, social, cultur- institutions. The Illinois Transferable
al, and scientific issues. Students will take General Education Core Curriculum struc-
most General Education courses during their ture consists of 12 to 13 courses (37 to 41
freshman and sophomore years, along with semester credits) distributed among five
some courses in their major or other elective subject areas. Completion of these courses
courses. at any participating institution satisfies
general education requirements for Illinois
GENERAL EDUCATION State University. The IAI Transferable
Core is presented in the section entitled
REQUIREMENT OPTIONS
General Education - Illinois Articulation
Initiative (IAI). (More information about
There are three ways to complete general
this system and participating institutions
education requirements for Illinois State
can be found at the following website:
University. These three general education
programs have different requirements and iTransfer.org.)
affect only certain types of students.
The following categories of students may
complete the Illinois Transferable General
I. The first way is to complete Illinois State
University's General Education Program. Education Core Curriculum:
The General Education Program requires 1. Transfer students (See Admissions section
13 courses (39 semester hours). of this catalog for a complete description)
who began the Illinois Transferable Gen-
The following categories of students must eral Education Core Curriculum at a par-
complete the Illinois State University Gen- ticipating IAI institution and transferred to
eral Education Program requirements: Illinois State may choose to complete the
program by enrolling in Illinois State
1. Beginning Freshmen (see Admissions
approved IAI courses presented in the
section of this catalog for complete
section entitled Illinois Articulation Initia-
definition).
tive Courses at Illinois State. Transfer
2. Students who were admitted as begin- students should note, however, that IAI
ning freshmen at Illinois State Univer- course availability may be limited.
sity, who were re-admitted and who
2. Transfer students who have completed at
have not completed a baccalaureate-
least one transfer course that is articulated
oriented associate’s degree (A.A. or
to an IAI core requirement.
A.S.) from an Illinois public communi-
ty college and are not eligible for an 3. Students who have completed the Illinois
earlier catalog. Transferable General Education Core
Curriculum at a participating IAI institu-
3. Transfer Students who have not com-
tion are considered to have met Illinois
pleted a baccalaureate-oriented associ-
State University's General Education
ates degree (A.A. or A.S.) from a re-
requirements.
gionally accredited post-secondary
institution and who are not eligible to
III. There is also a third way in which gen-
complete the Illinois Transferable Gen-
eral Education core curriculum de- eral education requirements can be met.
scribed below.
Complete a baccalaureate-oriented Associ-
ates Degree (A.A. or A.S.) fr om a r egion-
II. The second way is to complete the Illinois
ally accredited post-secondary institution.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


General Education Requirements 75

For those transferring from an Illinois col- explore and challenge themselves through
lege or university, the A.S. degree must their course choices.
include the complete IAI General Education
Core Curriculum (GECC) or the student Codes used throughout the Illinois State
must complete the GECC to fulfill Illinois University General Education Program
State’s General Education requirement. include the following:
Illinois State University accepts the AAT
FA Fine Arts
degree as a baccalaureate-oriented degree
H Humanities
when the AAT degree includes the IAI trans-
ICL Individuals and Civic Life
ferable core. LH Language in the Humanities
Any transfer student may choose to complete M Mathematics
Illinois State University's General Education NS Natural Science
Program and should speak with an academic NSA Natural Science Alternatives
advisor regarding documentation of that QR Quantitative Reasoning
change on their academic record. SMT Science, Mathematics, and
Technology
GENERAL EDUCATION SS Social Sciences
PROGRAM — ILLINOIS STATE UST United States Traditions
UNIVERSITY
The Illinois State University General
The General Education Program at Illinois Education Program consists of 13 courses:
State University is an integrated multi- Group 1 Courses (7 cour ses):
disciplinary set of courses that focuses on
the development of communication and These are courses that are specifically select-
problem-solving skills and abilities, such as ed for first-year students and concentrate on
persuasion, listening, and argumentation; developing skills in oral and written commu-
logical and quantitative thinking; and under- nication, critical analysis, and broad founda-
standing varying perspectives on issues. tions for learning in the academic disci-
These skills and abilities provide an essential plines.
grounding for work in the student’s major as —a 2-course, first year sequence integrating
well as transferable skills that will be applied composition, communication, critical
in a future career. thinking, and information fluency.

The complete General Education Program —1 course chosen from the Group 1 mathe-
consists of 13 courses (39 semester hours), matics category (M).
which is approximately one-third of the total —2 courses chosen from a four-course natu-
credits required for graduation. ral science category (NS) or natural sci-
ence alternative course (NSA) required by
Because of laboratory or recitation require- certain majors.
ments, some courses are listed as four or five
—1 course chosen from the United States
credit hours in this catalog. All four or five
Traditions category (UST).
hours will be credited toward graduation
requirements, but only three hours will be —1 course chosen from the Individuals and
credited in General Education for these Civic Life category (ICL).
courses. Group 2 Courses (6 cour ses):
Students will take most General Education These are courses suited for the first two
courses during their freshman and sopho- years of college. Depending on a student’s
more years, along with some courses in their major and interests, they may be taken in the
major or other elective courses. While some first year. Some Group 2 courses have a
specific courses are important to take as part Group 1 course as a prerequisite.
of preparation for a major (such as certain —1 course chosen from the Fine Arts cate-
mathematics or science courses), the choice gory (FA). Some courses may have pre-
of which course to take in each category is a requisites.
decision for students to make. Students are
encouraged to choose courses that will give —1 course chosen from the Humanities
category (H). Some courses may have
them the broadest possible foundation and to
prerequisites.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


76 General Education Requirements

—1 course chosen from the Social Science Students must complete at least one course
category (SS). Some courses may have from two different sciences. Certain majors
prerequisites. require a Natural Science Alternative course
—1 course from the Language in the Hu- that substitutes for the courses above. See
manities category (LH). All LH courses individual major requirements.
are writing-intensive and most require
completion of English 101. Natural Science Alternatives [NSA]
—1 course from the Quantitative Reasoning BSC 196 Biological Diversity
category (QR). All QR courses require
completion of an appropriate course from BSC 197 Molecular and Cellular Basis of
the Mathematics category. Life
—1 course from the Science, Math, and Tech- CHE 110/112 Fundamentals of Chemistry
nology category (SMT). Most courses re- and Laboratory
quire completion of at least one course from CHE 140 General Chemistry I
the Natural Sciences (NS) or Natural Sci-
ence Alternative (NSA) categories. PHY 105 Fundamentals of Physics
PHY 108 College Physics I
General Education Courses by Category: PHY 110 Physics for Science and
Engineering I
Communication and Composition
(2 courses required) United States Traditions
ENG 101 Composition as Critical Inquiry (1 course required) [UST]
ENG 101A10 Composition as Critical ENG/HIS 131 American Culture: Traditions
Inquiry and Texts
COM 110 Communication as Critical FCS/HIS/SOC 112 American Family:
Change and Diversity
Inquiry
GEO 142 Human Geography
COM 110A01 Communication as Critical
Inquiry: Classroom Communication- HIS 135 History of the United States to 1865
Teacher Education HIS 136 History of the United States Since
1865
Mathematics (1 course required) [M]
HIS/SOC 111 American Diversity:
MAT 113 Elements of Mathematical Contested Visions of the U.S. Experience
Reasoning LAL/SOC 109 Introduction to U.S. Latina/o
MAT 118 Elementary Mathematical Model- Studies
ing for Applied Science and Technology
MAT 120 Finite Mathematics Individuals and Civic Life
(1 course required) [ICL]
MAT 130 Dimensions of Numerical
ANT 176 Culture, Power, and Civic Life
Reasoning
CJS 102 Individuals, Society, and Justice
MAT 145 Calculus I
ENG 183 Rhetoric as Civic Literacy
Natural Sciences PHI 104 The Ideal of Democracy
(2 courses required) [NS] POL 101 Citizens and Governance
BSC 101 Fundamental Concepts in Biology POL 106 U.S. Government and Civic
BSC 101A01 Fundamental Concepts in Practices
Biology: For Future Elementary Teachers SOC 106 Introduction to Sociology
CHE 102 Chemistry and Society SOC 241 People in Places: Understanding
GEO 102 Principles of Geology and Developing Community
PHY 102 Atoms to Galaxies

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


General Education Requirements 77

Fine Arts (1 course required) [FA] Drumline


ART 155 Survey of Art I MUS 181A09 Basketball Drumline
ART 156 Survey of Art II MUS 182 Symphony Orchestra (strings)
ART 176 Arts and Society: Visual Arts MUS 182A02 Symphony Orchestra (winds
ART 275 World Arts: Visual Arts** and percussion)
ART 282 Art History Abroad MUS 184 Concert Choir
MUS 152 Experiencing Music MUS 185 University Men’s Glee
MUS 153 Black Music I** MUS 186 Women’s Choir
MUS 154 Black Music II** MUS 186A01 Women’s Choir
MUS 157 History of Jazz MUS 186A02 Belle Voix
MUS 176 Arts and Society: Music MUS 188 Civic Chorale
MUS 275 World Arts: Music - Non-Music MUS 239A20 Percussion Ensemble
Majors**
MUS 239A21 African Drumming and Dance
MUS 275A01 World Arts: Music - Music Ensemble
Majors**
MUS 239A70 Jazz Ensemble
THE 152 Experiencing Theatre
MUS 281 University Bands
THE 176A01 Arts and Society: Theatre
MUS 281A01 Marching Band (Big Red
THE 176A02 Arts and Society: Film Marching Machine)
THE 213 Theatre for Social Change MUS 281A02 Pep Band
THE 275A01 World Arts: Theatre**
MUS 281A03 University Band
THE 275A02 World Arts: Film**
MUS 281A05 Wind Symphony
The following courses can be counted towards MUS 281A06 Symphonic Winds
the Fine Arts category. A student must enroll
MUS 281A07 Symphonic Band
in a sufficient number of ensemble courses for
a total 3 hours to meet the 3 hour Fine Arts MUS 281A08 Big Red Marching Machine
requirement. Drumline
MUS 281A09 Basketball Drumline
MUS 121 Group Instruction in Piano
MUS 282 Symphony Orchestra (strings)
MUS 121A10 Group Piano: Non-Majors
Level I MUS 282A02 Symphony Orchestra (winds
and percussion)
MUS 139A20 Percussion Ensemble
MUS 284 Concert Choir
MUS 139A21 African Drumming and Dance
Ensemble MUS 285 Men’s Glee
MUS 139A70 Jazz Ensemble MUS 286 Women’s Choir
MUS 139A90 Madrigal Singers MUS 286A01 Women’s Choir
MUS 180 University Choir (Men’s and MUS 286A02 Belle Voix
Women’s Glee) MUS 288 Civic Chorale
MUS 181A01 Marching Band (Big Red
Marching Machine) Humanities (1 course required) [H]
MUS 181A02 Pep Band ENG 110 English Literature and Its
Contexts
MUS 181A03 University Band
ENG 130 Survey of American Literature
MUS 181A05 Wind Symphony
ENG 150 World Literature to the 14th
MUS 181A06 Symphonic Winds Century
MUS 181A07 Symphonic Band ENG 160 Introduction to Studies in
MUS 181A08 Big Red Marching Machine Women’s Writing

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


78 General Education Requirements

ENG 165 Introduction to African-American ENG 124 Film Style and Literature
Literature and Culture ENG/LAN 125 Literary Narrative
ENG 170 Foundations in Literature for FRE 116 Second Year French (Part II)
Children GER 116 Second Year German
ENG 229 Introduction to Literary Genres (Part II)
ENG 250 Literature of the Bible I IDS 121 Texts and Contexts (see Interdisci-
ENG 251 Literature of the Bible II plinary Studies for a list of course topics)
ENG 261 Women’s Literature in a Global IDS 212 European Studies: Europe Today
Context IDS 254 Religions and Cultures
ENG/LAN 206 Cultural Expressions in ITN 116 Second Year Italian (Part II)
Social Contexts: Women of Asia, Latin
JPN 116 Second Year Japanese (Part II) **
America, and Africa**
POR 116 Second Year Portuguese (Part II)
HIS 101 Western Civilization to 1500
SPA 116 Second Year Spanish
HIS 102 Modern Western Civilization (Part II)
HIS 104 History of Asia, Middle East, SPA 120 Introduction to Academic Spanish
Africa, Latin America, or Indigenous
for Spanish Speakers
Peoples**
HIS 104A01 Africa** Quantitative Reasoning
HIS 104A02 East Asia** (1 course required) [QR]
HIS 104A03 Latin America** Students pursuing a B.A. degree must com-
plete the equivalent of LAN 115 or higher
HIS 10404 The Middle East**
rather than one of these courses.
HIS 104A05 South and Southeast Asia**
BE/FIL 141 Personal Financial
HIS 104A06 Native Americans** Literacy for the College Student
HIS 107 The Making of Europe ECO 138 Economic Reasoning Using
HIS 285 History Study Abroad Statistics
IDS 112 European Studies: Introduction to GEO 138 Maps and Geographic
Europe Reasoning
IT 115 Reasoning About Complex Systems
IDS 133A09 Study Abroad: Argentina
MAT 121 Applied Calculus
History, Culture and Society MAT 131 Geometric Reasoning:
IDS 133A22 Study Abroad: Great Britain Geometry as Earth Measures
IDS 203 Nations and Narrations ** MAT 146 Calculus II
MAT 150 Fundamentals of Statistical
IDS 205A05 Africa **
Reasoning
IDS 205A10 East Asia ** MQM 100 Statistical Reasoning
IDS 205A15 Latin America ** PHI 112 Language, Logic, and
PHI 101 Basic Issues in Philosophy Mathematics
PHY 117 Numerical Reasoning in Nature
PHI 150 Science and Human Culture and Technology
PHI 202 Sex, Values, and Human Nature POL 138 Quantitative Reasoning in Politi-
PHI 224 Meaning and Religious Belief cal Science
PSY 138 Reasoning in Psychology Using
PHI 238 Rights and Wrongs
Statistics
PHI 251 Visions of the Self: A Study of
Minds and Persons Science, Mathematics, and Technology
(1 course required) [SMT]
Language in the Humanities
(1 course required) [LH] AGR 203 Agriculture and the Environment
COM/ENG/LAN 128 Gender in the ANT 102 Human Origins: An Introduction
Humanities to Biological Anthropology and

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


General Education Requirements 79

Archaeology HSC 170 Safety and Society


BSC 145 Human Biology IDS 111 Peace Studies
BSC 160 Microbiology and Society IDS 113 The Entrepreneurial Mindset
BSC 170 Genetics and Society POL 140 Introduction to the Politics of
BSC 202 Human Ecology Africa, Asia, and Latin America **
CHE 204 Chemistry of Life PSY 110 Fundamentals of Psychology
FCS/HSC/KNR 208 Dynamics of United PSY/SOC 223 Social Psychology
States Contemporary Health Issues
SOC 108 Contemporary Social Problems in
GEO 202 Evolution of the Earth Global Perspectives
GEO 207 Natural Disasters SOC 220 Global Social Change: An
GEO 211 Earth's Dynamic Weather Introduction to Macrosociology**
HSC 156 Environmental Health in the 21st WGS 120 Gender, Sex, and Power
Century: Meeting the Global Challenge
IDS 265 Introduction to Cognitive Science: **Courses with AMALI designation, indi-
Computers, Minds, Brains, and Robots cating a focus on cultures of Asia, the
IT 140 Interacting in a Digital World Middle East, Africa, Latin America, or
the indigenous peoples of the world.
IT 214 Social, Legal, and Ethical Issues in
Students not satisfying the AMALI gradu-
Information Technology
ation requirement through a major course
PHY 205 Origin of the Universe should choose one of these courses to
PHY 206 Chaos and Complexity fulfill an Illinois State University gradua-
PHY 207 Energy and the Environment tion requirement.
PHY 208 Astronomy and Space Science
Illinois State University offers several study
TEC 170 Energy for a Sustainable Future
abroad programs that feature a wide variety
TEC 275 Technology and Quality of Life of General Education courses. Interested
students should contact their academic advi-
Social Sciences (1 course required) [SS] sor or the Office of International Studies and
AGR 201 Resources, Food, and Society: A Programs.
Global Perspective
ANT/ENG/LAN 143 Unity and Diversity in Students must comply with the following
Language requirements:
ANT 185 Cultures of the World: An Intro-
duction to Cultural and Linguistic — Complete the General Education Program
Anthropology** through completion of at least 13 courses
(39 semester hours), as designated in the
ANT 297 Lost Continents and Sunken Cities program description.
CJS 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice —No Group 1 course may be taken under
Sciences the P/NP option. If a General Education
course is required by a major, that course
ECO 103 Individual and Social Choice may not be taken P/NP it must be taken
FCS 222 Cultural Diversity in Dress** for a grade.
FCS 224 Enduring Issues for Couples and —Students must complete at least one
Families course from two different sciences. Cer-
tain majors require a Natural Science
GEO 135 World Geography ** Alternative course that substitutes for a
GEO 235 Geography of Emerging Areas** Natural Science course. See individual
major requirements.
GEO 235A01 Geography of Emerging
Areas: Africa** —Depending on their major students may be
exempted from one General Education
GEO 235A02 Geography of Emerging category (maximum of one course) be-
Areas: Latin America** cause of disciplinary expertise gained in
GEO 235A04 Geography of Emerging their major listed below:
Areas: Middle East** —No First-Year Core course may be taken
GEO 235A07 Geography of Emerging under the CT/NC option.
Areas: Japan Field Explorations**

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


80 General Education Requirements

General Education Category Exemptions


by College and Major Program
College of Applied Science and Technology
AGR All major programs QR
CJS All major programs None
FCS Food, Nutrition and Dietetics None
Fashion Design and Merchandising None
Human Development and Family Resources SS
Interior Design SS
Teacher Education None
HSC Medical Laboratory Science SMT
Environmental Health QR
Health Promotion and Education ICL
Health Information Management SMT
Safety SMT
IT All major programs SMT
KNR All major programs SMT
TEC Industrial Technology SMT
Construction Management SMT
Engineering Technology SMT
Graphic Communications SMT
Renewable Energy None
Technology and Engineering Education SMT

College of Arts and Sciences


ANT All major programs None
BSC All major programs SMT
CHE All major programs SMT
COM All major programs QR
CSD All major programs SMT
ECO All major programs QR
ENG All major programs LH
GEO Geography SS
GEO Geology SMT
HIS All major programs UST
LAN French all sequences H
German all sequences H
Spanish all sequences H
LAN French all sequences H
German all sequences H
Spanish all sequences H
MAT All major programs SMT
PHI All major programs H
PHY All major programs SMT
POL All major programs ICL
PSY All major programs SS
SWK (B.S.W.) None
SOC All major programs None

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


General Education Requirements 81

General Education Category Exemptions


by College and Major Program

College of Business
All major programs SS
College of Education
SED All major programs None
TCH Early Childhood Education SS
Elementary Education QR
Middle Level Education SS
College of Fine Arts
ART All major programs FA
MUS All major programs FA
(except teacher education)
Music Teacher Education SS
THD All major programs FA
Mennonite College of Nursing
NUR All major programs NS
(one course only)

Program Assessment: Illinois State Univer sity is committed to continuous assessment of


the General Education program in an effort to gain valuable information so that necessary
improvements can be made to the curriculum. As a part of the General Education assessment
process on our campus, students may be asked by a faculty member to submit anonymously a
copy of their work to be included in the General Education Institutional Artifact Portfolio
(IAP). Submitting an artifact of student work for the General Education IAP will in no way
affect a student’s final grade on the assignment. Faculty will grade the assignment independ-
ent of the General Education IAP system. Results from the General Education IAP process
are reported in aggregate to the Council on General Education for the primary purpose of
improving the General Education program. The artifacts provided for the General Education
IAP are in no way linked to individual students. For the purpose of General Education as-
sessment, the unit of analysis is the institution, not the individual student, faculty member, or
class.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


82 Illinois Articulation Initiative

Transferring General Education WAIVERS IN THE ILLINOIS


Courses—Illinois Articulation TRANSFERABLE GENERAL
Initiative EDUCATION CORE

The Illinois Articulation Initiative (IAI) is a If a student satisfactorily completes the


statewide agreement among the more than objectives of a General Education Core area
100 public and some selected private four- but earns fewer hours than required, the
year and two-year higher education institu- remaining hours for that area can be waived.
tions. The agreement is designed to facilitate However, students must complete the mini-
students transferring between the colleges mum of 12 courses, 37 hours, and the num-
and universities in Illinois. The Illinois ber of courses required in each area of the
Transferable General Education Core curric- Core. Fractional hours can also be waived,
ulum consists of 12 to 13 courses (37 to 41 but the minimum 37 hour total is still en-
hours of credit) within a five-category des- forced.
ignation.
For those students eligible to complete the
The general requirements are as follows: Core, a transfer course articulated as an
Communication: 3 courses (9 credits) Illinois State University course approved for
Humanities and Fine Arts: 3 courses the Illinois Transferable General Education
Core Curriculum will be applied toward the
(9 credits)
Core. Any course from a participating
Mathematics: 1 to 2 courses (3 to 6 credits) school approved by an IAI curriculum panel
Physical and Life Sciences: 2 courses may be applied even if not articulated to an
(7 to 8 credits) Illinois State course. Acceptance and place-
ment of transfer credit as an elective from a
Social and Behavioral Sciences: 3 courses non-participating IAI institution is only
(9 credits) applicable to meet Illinois Transferable
General Education Core (IAI) requirements
IAI policy is presented on the website, at Illinois State University. Students should
iTransfer.org, and Illinois State University’s consult their academic advisor regarding the
implementation requirements are published application for waivers.
below. Students who transfer out of Illinois
State will be held to the requirements of Effective May 1999, a student transferring
their transfer institution. to another institution, who has completed at
least 37 semester hours, may request an
General Education Options for audit, via a transcript request, of his or her
Transferring Students records for completion of the Illinois Trans-
ferable General Education Core Curriculum.
New transfer students have the option of If complete, the University will certify com-
completing either Illinois State’s General pletion of the Illinois Transferable General
Education program or the Illinois Transfera- Education Core requirements on the Illinois
ble General Education Core Program (IAI). State transcript.
NOTE: To be eligible for IAI, at least one
transfer course must have been articulated to Students transferring to Illinois State are
an IAI core requirement. Transfer students required to fulfill all University graduation
who have satisfactorily completed at least requirements.
one course within the Illinois Transferable
General Education Core are allowed to Illinois Articulation Initiative Course
complete this program by enrolling in ap- Requirements:
proved IAI courses at Illinois State Univer-
sity. Students should note, however, that IAI Regardless of category placement, a student
course availability may be limited. may count no more than two courses from a
single discipline to fulfill the General Edu-
CLEP cation Core Curriculum requirements. Only
one course assigned to an IAI course num-
Illinois State policies on CLEP credit will be ber may be used to fulfill a requirement (For
used to meet Illinois Transferable General example, since HIS 104A01 and HIS
Education Core requirements.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Illinois Articulation Initiative 83

104A03 both carry the IAI number of H2 (limited to Elementary


903N, only one may be used). Education Majors) MAT 152 (3)
M1 904 General
Illinois State University courses approved
Education Mathematics MAT 113 (4)
for the IAI General Education Core Curric-
ulum are listed officially on the IAI website, M1 906 Finite
iTransfer.org. The following list of courses Mathematics MAT 120 (4)
is provided for convenience only. Some
courses may have been added or deleted Physical Sciences and Life Sciences
since the publication of this catalog. (2 courses, 7 semester hours)

Communication Students with appropriate preparation may


(3 courses, 9 semester hours) substitute an initial course designed for
A grade of C or better required in C1 900, science majors. One Life Science and one
ENG 101, and C1 901R, ENG 145. Physical Science course is required, of
which one must be a lab (indicated by an L,
For students with appropriate preparation, e.g. P1 901L or L1 900L).
Illinois State will waive C1 900. A minimum
of 12 courses and 37 semester hours is still llinois State
required. IAI Course Course and
Illinois State Number and IAI Title Semester Hours
IAI Course Course and
Number and IAI Title Semester Hrs.
P1 900L General
C1 900 Writing ENG 101 (3) Education Physics PHY 105 (4)
Course Sequence ENG 101A10 (3) PHY 108 (5)
P1 901L Physics
C1 901R Writing and Society PHY 102 (3)
Course Sequence ENG 145 (3)
P1 902 General
C2 900 Oral Education Chemistry CHE 110 (4)
Communication COM 110 (3)
P1 902L General
Education Chemistry CHE 112 (1)
Mathematics CHE 140 (4)
(1 course, 3 semester hours)
CHE 204 (3)
M1 900 College P1 903L Chemistry
Level Calculus MAT 121 (4) and Society CHE 102 (3)

M1 900 1 College P1 907L Introduction


Level Calculus I MAT 145 (4) to Geology GEO 102 (3)

M1 900 2 College P1 909 Earth


Level Calculus II MAT 146 (4) Systems Science GEO 100 (4)

M1 900 3 College P2 900L Calculus-based


Level Calculus III MAT 147 (4) Physics I PHY 110 (4)

M1 902 General L1 904 Human Biology BSC 145 (3)


Education Statistics ECO 138 (3) L1 906 Heredity
PSY 138 (3) and Society BSC 170 (3)
M1 902 Statistical L1 900L General
Reasoning MQM 100 (3) Education Biology BSC 101 (3)
M1 903 Mathematics L1 910L General
for Elementary Biology (majors only) BSC 196 (4)
Teaching I and II BSC 197 (4)

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


84 Illinois Articulation Initiative

Humanities and Fine Arts HF 900 Humanities


(3 courses, 9 semester hours) Survey I ENG 131 (3)
One Humanities and one Fine Arts course HIS 131 (3)
required. F1 900 Experiencing
Music MUS 152 (3)
llinois State
IAI Course Course and F1 905D Ethnic Traditions
Number and IAI Title Semester Hours In American Music MUS 153 (3)**
MUS 154 (3)**
H1 900 Foreign
F1907 Experiencing THE 152 (3)**
Language IV LAN 116 (4)
Theatre
H1 900 Italian 2nd F1 909D Ethnic Traditions in
Year Part II ITN 116 (4) American Theatre THE 154 (3)
H1 900 French F2 901 History of Western
2nd Year Part II FRE 116 (4) Art I ART 155 (3)
H1 900 German F2 902 History of Western
2nd Year Part II GER 116 (4) Art II ART 156 (3)
H1 900 Spanish F2 908 Film Appreciation THE 170 (3)
2nd Year Part II SPA 116 (4
H1 900 Japanese 2nd
Social and Behavioral Science
Year Part II JPN 116 (4)**
(3 courses, 9 semester hours)
H2 901 Western
Two disciplines must be represented from
Civilization I HIS 101 (3)+++
the following list: Anthropology (S1), Histo-
H2 902 Western ry (S2), Economics (S3), Geography (S4),
Civilization II HIS 102 (3)+++ Politics and Government (S5), Psychology
H2 903N Non- (S6), Sociology (S7), Social Psychology (S8).
Western Civilizations HIS104A01 (3)**
HIS 104A02 (3)** Illinois State
HIS 104A03 (3)** IAI Course Course and
HIS 104A04 (3)** Number and IAI Title Semester Hours
HIS 104A05 (3)**
S3 900 Principles of
H2 904 U.S. History/
Economics ECO 105 (4
Civilization I HIS 135 (3)+++
S4 900N Introduction
H2 905 U.S. History/
to Human Geography GEO 135 (3)**
Civilization II HIS 136 (3)+++
S5 900 American/
H3 910D American U.S. National
Ethnic Literature ENG 165 (3) Government I POL 106 (3)
H3 911D Literature S5 904 International
and Gender ENG 160 (3) Relations POL 151 (3)**
COM 128 (3)
S5 905 Non-Western
ENG 128 (3)
Comparative Government POL 140 (3)**
LAN 128 (3)
S5 905 Comparative
H3 912 Survey of
Government POL 141 (3)
British Literature I ENG 110 (3)
S6 900 General
H3 914 Survey of
Psychology PSY 110 (3
American Literature I ENG 130 (3
PSY 111 (4)
H4 900 Introduction to
S6 902 Life-Span
Philosophy PHI 101 (3) Developmental
Psychology PSY 213 (3)

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Illinois Articulation Initiative 85

S7 900 Introduction
to Sociology SOC 106 (3)
S7 901 Social
Problems SOC 108 (3)
S7 902 Marriage
and Family FCS 224 (3)
S8 900 Social
Psychology PSY 223 (3)
SOC 223 (3)

** Courses designated specifically to exam-


ine aspects of human diversity from a non-
U.S./non-European perspective. One such
course is a graduation requirement for Illi-
nois State University.
+++ Western Civilization (H2 901 or S2
902 and H2 902 or S2 903) and American/
U.S. History (H2 904 or S2 900 or S2 901)
can be used in the IAI category approved by
the college or university offering the course
or in the category in which the articulated
course equivalent was approved at the re-
ceiving institution.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


86
UNIVERSITY-WIDE TEACHER
EDUCATION PROGRAMS

Chair, Council for Teacher Education:  Respect for learners of all ages, with
Kevin Laudner, Interim Dean, College of special regard for children and
Education, 506 DeGarmo Hall, Campus Box adolescents.
5300; (309) 438-5415 The intellectual commitments are:
Website: education.illinoisstate.edu/  Wide general knowledge and deep
teacher knowledge of the content to be taught
 Knowledge and appreciation of the
REALIZING THE DEMOCRATIC
diversity among learners
IDEAL: TEACHER EDUCATION AT
ILLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY  Understanding of the factors that affect
learning and appropriate teaching
Illinois State University has a historic and strategies
enduring commitment to prepare teachers  Interest in and ability to seek out
and other school personnel who will be informational, technological, and
responsive to the ethical and intellectual collegial resources
demands of a democratic society. To teach
in a democracy is self-consciously to take up  Contagious intellectual enthusiasm and
the challenge of improving the ethical and courage enough to be creative.
intellectual quality of our societal dialogue
by including in it as many educated voices PERFORMANCE-BASED
as possible. ASSESSMENT SYSTEM

The democratic ideal unites caring and Effective Fall 2002, the Council for Teacher
knowing: the more voices we call into Education implemented the Teacher Education
thoughtful dialogue, and the less fettered the Performance-Based Assessment System (PBA).
mutual exchange among those voices This system meets accreditation standards, as
becomes, the truer our convictions and stipulated by the Illinois State Educator
conclusions will be. This is the foundation
Preparation and Licensure Board (ISEPLB)
of a democratic society, and it is why
Illinois State graduates aspire to teach and the National Council for the Accreditation
everyone, especially those on the margins, of Teacher Education (NCATE).
those who have been or are in danger of
The performance-based assessment system is
being excluded.
reviewed by the University Teacher Education
This democratic conception of education Assessment Committee, which reports to the
informs all aspects of teacher education at Council for Teacher Education. The Council
Illinois State University. Graduates who are for Teacher Education approves changes to the
ready to meet the challenges and rewards of system.
serving students in a democratic society
embody the ethical and intellectual The Performance Based Assessment system
commitments of teaching and learning in (PBA) establishes critical points at which
order to realize the democratic ideal. candidates for teacher licensure will be
assessed through three gateways:
The ethical commitments are:
 Sensitivity toward the varieties of Gateway 1: Admission to Professional
individual and cultural diversity Studies

 Disposition and ability to collaborate  Teacher Education Orientation Workshop


effectively with others (PBA)

 High regard for learning and seriousness  ePortfolio Fundamentals Workshop


of personal, professional, and public (LiveText)
purpose  Criminal Background Check(s) - All teacher
candidates will be required to complete an

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


University-Wide Teacher Education 87

annual Illinois State Police Fingerprint Gateway 3: Exit from Student Teaching
Criminal Background Check for Illinois
State University. Results of this Criminal  All education majors must meet the listed
Background Check (CBC) must be sub- requirements in order to graduate and be
mitted and on file in the Cecilia J. Lauby recommended for licensure
Education Center (DeGarmo Hall 56).  Student Teaching (with a grade of C or
Additionally, the schools in which the better)
teacher candidate will complete their
clinical experiences and student teaching  50 clinical hours in diverse setting
assignment(s) will require their own  Disposition Concerns Assessments
criminal background check be completed.  Communication Concerns Assessments
 Criminal History Check (Assessment of  Successful completion of the edTPA
Legal and Ethical Conduct form)
 Test of Academic Proficiency or SAT/
The PBA system ensures that candidates
possess the knowledge, skills, performances,
ACT
and dispositions requisite for successful
 Major and cumulative GPA of 2.5 or teaching careers. When Illinois State
higher University recommends a candidate for
 Communication 110 with a grade of C or teacher licensure, the entire university has
better participated in the preparation of that teacher.
 English 101 with a grade of C or better
 30 hours of coursework Teacher candidates will be required to attend a
workshop on this performance-based
 Safety Education Assessment
assessment early in their education program. At
 Mandatory Reporter of Child Abuse this workshop students will be provided with
Training the information necessary to understand the
 Disposition Concerns Assessment requirements and how to monitor their
 Communication Concerns Assessment progress. Failure to complete certain indicators
 Department approval—given by advisors at required times could delay progress in the
intended major. Details regarding the
 Early Childhood Education Majors only - performance-based system can be found at:
TB Test
education.illinoisstate.edu/teacher/gateways/
orientation, the Teacher Education (PBA)
Gateway 2: Admission to Student Orientation Workshop website.
Teaching
The Council for Teacher Education reserves
 Meet Gateway 1 requirements prior to
beginning Gateway 2 the right to modify performance assessment
indicators in response to state and national
 Major and cumulative GPA of 2.5 or accreditation mandates to reflect current
higher
practice in the teaching profession. Teacher
 ISBE State Content Test candidates should consult with their program
 TB Test advisors for specific requirements for their
 Clinical Experience Hours major on a regular basis.
 Disposition Concerns Assessments
TEACHER EDUCATION
 Communication Concerns Assessments
PROGRAMS APPROVED BY THE
 Department approval ILLINOIS STATE EDUCATOR
 Verified by the Teacher Education Center PREPARATION AND LICENSURE
the semester prior to student teaching: BOARD (ISEPLB)
 The Illinois Sexual Offender Registry
 Clear Violence Against Youth Registry The following is a list of education programs
offered by Illinois State University which
 Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI—for
Foreign Language Students only. may lead to licensure.
For specific courses and program details,
please consult the following website:

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


88 University-Wide Teacher Education

education.illinoisstate.edu/academics/ Each student who completes a bachelor’s


majors/ degree program in an approved Teacher
Education program, and who is recommended
 Agriculture for licensure by the licensure officer at Illinois
 Art State University as having completed all
 Business Education requirements (General Education, Professional
Education, field of study or area of
 Dance Education
specialization, and general teacher education
 Early Childhood Education requirements, and all other applicable degree
 Elementary Education requirements), is recommended for a teaching
 English Language Arts license in the State of Illinois. The Evaluations
Office at Illinois State University will notify
 French students as to the correct procedures for
 Family and Consumer Science applying for the appropriate Illinois teaching
 German license. In order to satisfy Illinois licensure
requirements and Illinois State University’s
 School Health Education
Gateway System requirements, all candidates
 Mathematics must pass a test of basic skills (reading,
 Middle Level Education writing, language arts, and mathematics), a
 Music subject matter knowledge test, and the edTPA,
which are administered by the Illinois State
 Physical Education
Educator Preparation and Licensure Board.
 Science: Biology Effective September 1, 2015, students will be
 Science: Chemistry assessed using the edTPA on teacher effect-
 Science: Earth and Space iveness and each candidate must complete and
pass the edTPA as required by Illinois law
 Science: Physics (105ILCS5/21B-30(f)). Additional tests may
 Social Science: Geography be required for select licensure programs and
 Social Science: History additional endorsements.
 Spanish
Students who have already completed one or
 Special Education: Specialist in Learning more non-teaching degrees and now seek ad-
Behavior, Specialist in Low Vision and mission to a teacher education program are
Blindness, Specialist in Deaf and Hard of advised to seek admission to the University as
Hearing a candidate for a second bachelor’s degree.
 Technology and Engineering Education Subsequent transcript analysis may determine
 Theatre that a second degree is not required. In this
instance, the student will be allowed to com-
The Illinois State Board of Education plete the requirements for licensure with-out
(ISBE) grants teacher/school licenses in completing the requirements of the second
the State of Illinois. All teacher candidates bachelor’s degree.
who successfully complete an approved
teacher education program at Illinois State Students who complete a bachelor’s degree
University, pass appropriate licensure program in Teacher Education at Illinois
exams, and meet ISBE requirements will State University have their transcripts
be recommended for licensure. This does stamped “Student has completed a state
not lead to licensure in other states. and NCATE approved program in Teacher
Teacher candidates are responsible for Education.” (NCATE is the National Council
checking the requirements of the state in
for Accreditation of Teacher Education.)
question.
This statement indicates that the program
has received state approval and national
NOTE: Endor sements ar e available at the
graduate level for Chief School Business accreditation. This status usually makes it
Official, Learning Behavior Specialist II, easier to obtain a teaching license in
Library Information Specialist, Principal, another state.
Reading Specialist, School Psychologist,
School Social Worker, Speech and Language
Pathologist, and Superintendent.

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University-Wide Teacher Education 89

General Education: As par t of the CLINICAL EXPERIENCES IN


entitlement program, the Illinois State TEACHER EDUCATION
Educator Preparation and Licensure Board
will accept the same general education A variety of clinical (pre-student teaching)
requirements for licensure as are accepted for experiences, as well as student teaching,
graduation from that university. are included in the teacher candidates
professional preparation. Observations,
Endorsements: The minimum r equir e- small and large group instruction, tutoring,
ments for all teaching fields and all field experiences, and student teaching are
endorsements are defined by the State of included in the Clinical Experiences Pro-
Illinois. One or more endorsements may be gram. The experiences offered prior to
earned along with the completion of the student teaching are integral parts of
teaching major by taking additional courses specific college courses. Clinical exper-
and a possible state test. Students should iences are provided in off-campus pro-
contact an advisor for information on fessional development schools, local
requirements for endorsements. schools, campus laboratory schools, agen-
cies and other approved non-school
Council for Teacher Education: The Council settings. The Cecilia J. Lauby Teacher
for Teacher Education is responsible for Education Center monitors and documents
developing requirements for Teacher all clinical experiences. Teacher candidates
Education and for providing avenues of will show verification of having completed
communication among all of the areas of the clinical experiences commensurate with
University concerned with teacher education. attaining local, state, and national stand-
ards. Teacher candidates must provide their
Time Limit on Teacher Education Courses: own transportation to clinical experiences
In order to provide teacher candidates with sites.
current information and meet required
standards, all undergraduate teacher edu- Candidates are required to provide docu-
cation courses have a longevity of seven (7) mentation of meeting all State of Illinois,
years. Any teacher education program district, and university requirements in
reserves the right not to accept any course regard to criminal background checks
older than seven years to fulfill the BEFORE beginning any clinical experiences.
requirements of their program. If a course Criminal background checks must remain
has been taken beyond a seven year period, current as of the last day of the clinical
the course may not count towards the experience. Candidates should consult with
education degree. clinical course faculty and the Cecilia J.
Lauby Teacher Education Center well in
Dismissal from Programs: Teacher advance of clinical experiences to determine
candidates who fail to comply with teacher specific requirements needed each semester.
education requirements may be dismissed. At
The approximate number of clinical hours
the option of the department or school,
may be found with the appropriate course
teacher candidates dropped from the program
description in this Undergraduate Catalog.
may pursue a degree in their non-teaching
The following legend relates to the type and
major or be classified “undeclared.”
kind of activity related to a specific course.
If a student is dismissed from a teacher
education program they have a right to appeal
Clinical Experiences Legend
this decision to the Council for Teacher
Education. The appeal process is outlined under
 Observation (including field trips)
the heading “Rights and Responsibilities” on
the website: education.illinois.state.edu/teacher/  Tutoring one-on-one contact
clinical/appeals.php.  Non-instructional assisting
 Small group instruction
NOTE: Teacher candidates convicted of  Whole class instruction
certain types of crimes may not be approved
 Work with clinic client(s)
for licensure by the Illinois State Educator
Preparation and Licensure Board.  Graduate practicum
 Professional meeting

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


90 University-Wide Teacher Education

Every program has a required set of clinical b. An application for student teaching
hours which will be completed in filed in The Cecilia J. Lauby
conjunction with specific courses. Of these Teacher Education Center at least 6
pre-student teaching clinical hours, 50 hours months prior to the planned student
must be in a diverse setting. Prior to teaching semester;
beginning any clinical experience and c. Satisfactory completion of
student teaching, every teacher candidate prerequisite courses to STT 399.
must complete an annual Illinois State (See University-wide courses);
Police Fingerprint Criminal Background
Check for Illinois State University. Results d. Meeting all requirements for
of this Criminal Background Check (CBC) Admission to Professional Studies
must be submitted and on file in the Cecilia (Gateway 1) and Admission to
J. Lauby Teacher Education Center (56 Student Teaching (Gateway 2) as
DeGarmo Hall). Additionally, the schools in stated in the Performance-based
which the teacher candidate will complete Assessment System. All require-
their clinical experiences and student ments for Admission to Student
teaching assignment(s) may require their Teaching must be met by December
own criminal background check be 15 for student teaching during the
completed. spring semester and by July 15 for
student teaching during the fall
Refer to the following website for details semester.
concerning diverse hours:
2. Approval for student teaching by the
education.illinoisstate.edu/teacher/clinical candidate’s major department chair-
person or school director or designee.
STUDENT TEACHING This approval may be based on the
REQUIREMENTS following criteria that the teacher
candidate:
During the student teaching semester the
teacher candidate will be involved with a. has demonstrated content knowledge
directing the learning of pupils, participating in the student’s major area of study;
in school and community activities, and b. has a grade of C or better in all
assuming full responsibility for a group of major coursework and all
learners supervised by a cooperating teacher.
professional education coursework;
Student teaching assignments are made on
the basis of the teacher candidate’s area of c. has completed a minimum of 15
specialization. semester hours at Illinois State
University;
The number of semester hours required for d. possesses professional knowledge
student teaching varies with the teacher necessary for performing teaching
candidate’s program of study. The student responsibilities;
teaching assignment is completed in the
candidate’s major field of study and is the e. has performed at an acceptable level
culminating experience in the teacher during the pre-student teaching
education program. clinical experiences;

The following requirements must be met f. shows evidence of professional


characteristics and interpersonal
prior to participation in student teaching.
skills necessary for working with
children and youth; and
 Approval for student teaching by the
Director of The Cecilia J. Lauby Teacher g. has completed all other departmental
Education Center. This approval will or school requirements, including a
include verification of all of the minimum major GPA (see major
following: department or school for additional
requirements).
a. Completion of pre-student teaching
clinical experiences commensurate
with the local, state, and national
standards;

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University-Wide Teacher Education 91

Student Teaching Assignments: Student teaching assignments begin and end


on the dates indicated on the student
The University will assign student teachers to teacher’s official notice of assignment. The
selected schools or professional development student teacher is expected to follow the
schools (PDS) in Illinois during regular calendar of the school in which they are
semesters. Personnel of The Cecilia J. Lauby completing their student teaching assignment
Teacher Education Center, in cooperation with including vacations and school holidays.
the major department or school, secure the Changes in dates involved in an assignment
student teaching placement(s). Teacher must receive prior permission of the Director
candidates may not self-place and are of The Cecilia J. Lauby Teacher Education
responsible for their own living arrangements Center.
and transportation to and from the student
teaching location. Student teachers are To be recommended for licensure, a teacher
assigned only to classrooms that have regularly education candidate must earn a grade of C
employed full time and fully qualified or better in student teaching in order to meet
teachers. Assignments are not made to a school all requirements for Gateway III: Exit from
in which the teacher candidate or a family Student Teaching.
member is currently or has been employed. A
student teacher may not receive a salary or an Graduation Requirement for All
income for student teaching. Teacher Education Majors:
During the student teaching semester, the All teacher candidates must graduate with a
teacher candidate works with one or more minimum cumulative and major GPA of
cooperating teachers who are responsible for 2.50.
teaching a specific group or groups of pupils.
These cooperating teachers, along with the Licensure for Persons Who Have Been
University supervisors, have responsibility
Convicted of a Crime:
for guiding and evaluating the work of the
student teachers. During this experience, the
Entitlement for licensure is not an automatic
student teacher becomes a member of the
procedure. The Undergraduate Evaluation
school staff and the community in which he
Office will notify the Illinois State Board of
or she is working. Any student teacher who
Education when an Illinois State University
is unable to continue their student teaching
candidate has completed all major degree
assignment should consult with the Director
requirements and all requirements identified in
of the Cecilia J. Lauby Teacher Education
the Performance-Based Assessment System
Center immediately. Any student with a
for all teacher education candidates. The
disability who needs a reasonable accom-
Illinois State Board of Education makes the
modation to complete their student teaching
final decision in awarding of a teaching
assignment should contact the Office of
license. Additional considerations may
Student Access and Accommodation Services
preclude Illinois licensure.
as soon as possible at 350 Fell Hall, (309) 438-
5853, or visit the website at
If the answer to any of the statements below
studentaccess.illinoisstate.edu. is “yes,” the teacher candidate may not be
eligible for licensure in the State of Illinois.
The Director of The Cecilia J. Lauby All statements refer to offenses in Illinois or
Teacher Education Center, upon the recom-
any other state.
mendation of the college supervisor, chair-
person or director of the student’s major  Have you ever had a teaching license or
department or school administrator, may certificate denied, suspended or revoked
remove a student from the assignment. A in any state or country?
student teacher may be required to do  Have you failed to file a tax return with
additional coursework, engage in remedial the Illinois Department of Revenue, or
activities, and/or complete an extended or failed to pay any tax, penalty, or interest
additional student teaching experience until owed or any final assessment of same for
the candidate is sufficiently competent to be any tax as required by law administered by
recommended for licensure. that Department that was not subsequently
resolved to the Department’s satisfaction?

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


92 University-Wide Teacher Education

 Have you ever been indicted as a COMPLAINTS REGARDING


perpetrator of child abuse or neglect by a TEACHER EDUCATION
state agency responsible for child welfare? MATTERS
 Are you in default on an Illinois student
loan for which you have failed to establish For information on how to appeal depart-
a satisfactory repayment plan with the ment, college or university decisions
Illinois Student Assistance Commission? regarding admission, retention, evaluation,
and licensure relative to Teacher
 Do you have a child support order and/or Education, please review the procedures
are more than 30 days delinquent in found on the following website and contact
complying with a child support order? the Director of the Cecilia J. Lauby
 Have you ever been convicted of any of Teacher Education Center, 56 DeGarmo
the following: Hall:
a. Felony education.illinoisstate.edu/teacher/clinical/
b. Sex Offense appeals
c. Drug or narcotic offense
All teacher education appeals will be
d. Any other criminal offense in any reviewed by the Teacher Education Review
state or federal court (other than Board/Council for Teacher Education.
minor traffic violations)

If the teacher candidate answered “yes” to


any of the above, he or she must contact the
Director of The Cecilia J. Lauby Teacher
Education Center, 56 DeGarmo Hall, prior to
application for Admission to Professional
Studies.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


93
INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES
PROGRAMS AND COURSES
Illinois State University offers major and degree preparation will enable them to
minor programs that allow students to succeed in a particular job or educational
synthesize knowledge that spans two or more endeavor.
academic disciplines. Each interdisciplinary
program is directed by a faculty member. MAJOR IN EUROPEAN STUDIES
Faculty from across the University deliver
courses within these programs. In addition, Program Co-Directors: Anthony
the University offers interdisciplinary (IDS) Crubaugh and J.M. van der Laan
courses that transcend the boundaries of a
single discipline. Advisor: Ronald Gifford, Department of
History, 321 Schroeder Hall,
The following courses, majors, minors, and Campus Box 4420
requirements may apply and be available to Phone: (309) 438-8298
students from a wide variety of majors and
disciplines. These include: Email: rmgiffo@IllinoisState.edu

Majors Degree Offered: B.A.


 European Studies, B.A.
 Interdisciplinary Studies: B.A., B.S. A minimum of 38 and a maximum of 46
 University Studies: B.A., B.S. total hours are required to complete this
major. The number of hours depends on the
Minors language level at which the student enters the
 African-American Studies program. Students with no previous language
 African Studies study begin with a 111 LAN course and must
complete 46 hours. Students with two years
 Children’s Studies
of high-school foreign language (or
 Civic Engagement and Responsibility equivalent) usually begin with LAN 112 and
 Cognitive Science must complete 42 hours beyond LAN 111.
 Ethnic Studies Students with three years of high-school
 European Studies foreign language normally begin with LAN
 Interdisciplinary Studies 115 and must complete 38 hours beyond 111
and 112.
 International Studies
 Latin American and Latino/a Studies —Required courses (28 hours): IDS 112, or
 Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies HIS 101, 102, or 107; IDS 212, and 312.
 Native American Studies
—Proficiency equivalent to LAN 111-116,
 Peace and Conflict Resolution Studies plus one 200-level LAN course required in
 Urban Studies a European language other than English.
 Women’s and Gender Studies —Elective courses (18 hours) from the
Courses following list: ART 155, 156, 240, 241,
242, 263, 265, 280, 281, 304, 304, 306;
 Honors Courses DAN 372; ECO 245, 245, 246; ENG 110,
 Interdisciplinary Courses 213, 214, 216, 218, 219, 222, 241, 310,
311, 320, 324, 327, 329, 378, 386, 387,
University-Wide Majors 388; FRE 209, 213, 214, 220, 223, 235,
305, 327, 328, 340, 341, 385; GER 211,
NOTE: Major s in Inter disciplinar y 213, 285, 310, 317, 385; HIS 101, 102,
Studies and University Studies are not as 107, 220, 221, 222, 223, 224, 225, 226,
clearly understood outside the university as 228, 229, 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 237,
traditional baccalaureate majors. These 279, 284, 308, 335, 336, 337, 345, 350,
majors do not prepare a student for a specific 355, 356, 366, 367, 368; ITA 221, 222;
professional career or graduate field, nor do MUS 127, 176, 253, 254, 391, 392, 394,
they satisfy the requirements for teacher 395; PHI 222, 232, 233, 250, 254, 255,
licensure. Because of their general nature, 350; POL 141, 241, 252, 255, 344, 351;
graduates may need to convince prospective SPA 213, 214, 215, 223, 233, 240, 243,
employers or graduate schools that the 305, 323, 324, 337, 360; THE 300, 370,

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


94 Interdisciplinary Studies Programs

371, 376, 377. cannot be accommodated within existing


—Two of these elective courses (6 hours) programs. Some topics recently chosen by
must be History courses or POL 241, two students include East Asian Studies,
courses (6 hours) must be in the arts and Classical Civilization, Three-Dimensional
humanities (ART History, Dance, Design, International Public Adminis-
Literature, Music, Philosophy, Theatre), tration, and Theatre Management. The
and two courses (6 hours) must be in an Individualized Sequence is often a second
area of concentration approved by the or auxiliary major but may be proposed as
academic advisor. a primary major. Students who complete
—Study abroad in a European country for the Individualized Sequence will earn a
one semester is required. Study abroad Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science
during the summer session requires degree and have their transcripts noted:
program approval. Under exceptional “Plan: Interdisciplinary Studies; Sub-plan:
circumstances, a student may petition for Individualized Sequence; Theme: __” (the
exemption from this requirement. theme specified on the plan of study).
—A 2.0 major GPA is required to graduate
with this major. All required and elective II. The Multidisciplinary Studies Sequence
courses must be completed with grades of of the Major in Inter-disciplinary Studies
C or better. This major does NOT require is built around the offerings of two or
a second major in another department. more departments or schools. It is
intended for the student who is seeking a
baccalaureate degree without the
MAJOR IN
specialization of a traditional major. The
INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES
student chooses the focus of the
Program Coordinator: Amelia Noël- program, with the help of a faculty
Elkins advisor, by determining the departments
University College, Campus Box 4060 or schools in which he or she wishes to
Phone: (309) 438-3217 pursue advanced work. Students who
complete the Multidisciplinary Studies
Advisors: Marty Greenberg
Sequence will earn a Bachelor of Arts or
University College, Campus Box 4060
Bachelor of Science degree and have
Phone: (309) 438-7604
Email: ids-programs@ilstu.edu their transcripts noted: “Plan: Inter-
Website: IDS.IllinoisState.edu disciplinary Studies; Sub-plan: Multi-
disciplinary Studies Sequence.”
Degrees Offered: B.A., B.S.
III. The Human and Educational Services
General Information Sequence r ecognizes wor k that
students have completed in working
Under the Major in Interdisciplinary Studies, toward a degree in Special Education
a student may construct one of three (SED) or Teaching and Learning (TCH).
individualized programs of study that differ Completion of this degree program does
from the University’s regular major not allow for recommendation for teacher
programs. These options use existing licensure. Students in this program will
University courses and lead to the Bachelor earn a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of
of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree in Science Degree and have their transcripts
Interdisciplinary Studies. Each sequence noted: “Plan: Interdisciplinary Studies; Sub
addresses a different set of educational -plan: Human and Educational Services
objectives. Sequence.”
I. The Individualized Sequence of the
Major in Interdisciplinary Studies allows Admission Requirements for Individualized
a student to design, with the help of a and Multidisciplinary Sequences
faculty sponsor, a specialized program of  Admission may be requested after the
study that is not offered by the completion of 15 semester hours of
University. This program is intended for coursework.
the student whose specific interests

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Interdisciplinary Studies Programs 95

 Applicants should select an appropriate Major Interdisciplinary Studies;


faculty advisor. The proposed plan of Human and Educational Services
study must be approved by the faculty Sequence Requirements:
advisor, the Interdisciplinary Studies
Major Committee, and the Office of the — An approved plan of study which
includes a minimum of 36 semester
Provost.
hours, of which at least 24 hours are at
Admission to Human and Educational the 200 - 300 level. For students
Services Sequence: previously declared a Special Education
 Only those students who leave a teacher and/or Teaching and Learning majors,
education major during their senior year these courses must include a minimum of
will be eligible for admission into the 27 hours from Special Education and/or
Major in Interdisciplinary Studies; Human Teaching and Learning, as well as 9
and Educational Services Sequence. hours of advisor-approved electives from
departments outside of Special Education
 Applicants to this program must be referred
and Teaching and Learning. For students
by their department or school advisor.
previously declared in other teacher
education programs, an individual plan
General Degree Requirements
of study will be designed, consisting of a
 120 semester hours. minimum of 27 hours required in an
 Completion of General Education require- existing major as well as 9 hours of
ments. advisor approved electives.
 42 senior-college (200 - 300 level) hours,
9 hours of which must be at the 300 level. MAJOR IN UNIVERSITY
 A 3.00 cumulative GPA at the time of STUDIES
application for Individualized and Multi-
disciplinary sequences; a 2.75 at the time Program Coordinator: Amelia Noël-Elkins
of application for Human Educational 324 Fell Hall, Campus Box 4060
Services Sequence. Phone: (309) 438-3217
Website:
Major in Interdisciplinary Studies; UniversityCollege.IllinoisState.edu/
UniversityStudies
Individualized Sequence Requirements
Advisor: Janet Claus
— An approved plan of study from at least
two academic departments or schools Degrees Offered: B.A., B.S.
containing 36-55 hours.
Admission Requirements: 
— Submission of a portfolio of relevant
coursework documenting the accomplish-
ment of learning objectives identified in This degree program is intended for students
the rationale submitted in support of the who are admitted and enrolled at Illinois
major proposal. State University and who either are unable to
meet the admission/retention requirements
Major Interdisciplinary Studies; for majors with requirements above the
Multidisciplinary Studies Sequence University minimums, or who while
Requirements performing successfully in their major,
discover late in their program of study that
— An approved plan of study with a they do not wish to purse the career path that
minimum of 36 hours from at least two follows from their initial major and degree
departments or schools, including 12 choice. In order to be admitted to the major,
senior-college hours (200 - 300 level) applicants must:
from each of 2 departments or schools
and a maximum of 25 hours from any —have completed a minimum of sixty (60)
hours and be in good academic standing
one of the departments or schools.
with a GPA of 2.00 or higher, and
— Submission of a portfolio of relevant —complete an approved Plan of Study in
coursework documenting the accom- collaboration with a program advisor.
plishment of learning objectives identi-
fied in the rationale submitted in support This degree is not available to second
of the major proposal. bachelor degree candidates.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


96 Interdisciplinary Studies Programs

Degree Requirements: a core of two courses on African-American


history and literature, as well as elective
—Completion of all graduation require- courses in the social sciences (History,
ments for the B.A. or the B.S. degree as Sociology, and Politics and Government)
listed in this Undergraduate Catalog. and in the humanities and fine arts (English,
—Completion of all course requirements as Music, and Theatre and Dance), and in
listed on the student’s approved Plan of interdisciplinary programs (including
Study (All changes to the initial Plan relevant course offerings in Interdisciplinary
must be approved by the program Studies and Women’s and Gender Studies).
advisor.) — 18 hours required.
—A minimum of 9 credit hours in the major — Required core (6 hours): ENG 165 or
taken at the 300 level. 265; HIS 257 or 258.
—General Studies Option: — Choose 4 courses (12 hours) from the
—A concentration of a minimum of 18 electives below:
hours in each of two different disciplines ENG 165, 265 (not including the
as approved in the Plan of Study, or required courses above), ENG 365; HIS
—Specialized Studies Option: 111 or SOC 111; HIS 257 or 258 (not
—A concentration of a minimum of 30 including the required courses above);
hours in one department or school as HIS 284, 315, 328; IDS 121A17,
approved in the Plan of Study, or 121A37; MUS 153, 154, 157; POL 334;
PSY 327A02; SOC 264; SWK 310;
—Liberal Studies Option: THE 154.
—A concentration of a minimum of 36
NOTE: Other cour ses appr oved by the
hours bridging academic disciplines as
minor advisor may be counted toward the
approved in the Plan of Study.
minor. Topics courses (e.g., HIS 309, SWK
330, WGS 391) are commonly used as
University-Wide Minors electives for the minor but must be
preapproved by the minor director and
MINOR IN AFRICAN-AMERICAN advisor. Please refer to specific departments
STUDIES or schools for further course information
including prerequisites.
Co-director: Touré Reed,
Department of History MINOR IN AFRICAN STUDIES
328 Schroeder Hall
Campus Box 4420 Director: Agbenyega Adedze,
Phone: (309) 438-8120 Department of History
315 Schroeder Hall
Co-director: Doris Houston, Campus Box 4420
School of Social Work Phone: (309) 438-8367,
Campus Box 4650 Email: adedze@IllinoisState.edu
Phone: (309) 438-8075
Advisor: Ronald Gifford,
Advisor: Ronald Gifford, Department of History
Department of History 321 Schroeder Hall
321 Schroeder Hall Campus Box 4420
Campus Box 4420 Phone: (309) 438-8298
Phone: (309) 438-8298 Email: rmgiffo@IllinoisState.edu
Email: rmgiffo@IllinoisState.edu
A Minor in African Studies will
The Minor in African-American Studies complement a major in several disciplines.
provides an interdisciplinary approach to the It is therefore designed as a multi-
examination of black politics and life in the disciplinary program where the student will
United States. This program is designed to take courses in the social sciences, arts, and
be of interest to students who want to humanities (English; Geography; History;
explore the many contributions African- Languages, Literatures, and Cultures;
Americans have made to the political, Music; Politics and Government; Sociology/
historical, social, and artistic fabric of the Anthropology; and Theatre and Dance). The
United States. Students are required to take Minor will provide students with a broad

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Interdisciplinary Studies Programs 97

background in African history, societies, knowledge of children and child culture


culture, and politics. The program is directed
through interdisciplinary exploration of child
towards students with a view of visiting or -related issues. This program is designed to
working in Africa or those who are be of interest to students who wish to pursue
interested in government or public service child-related emphases in their major
careers. disciplines, such as education, children's
literature, child psychology, children's
Requirements for the Minor in African history and culture, pediatrics, juvenile
Studies: justice, or social work with children, or for
those who wish to learn more about the
—21 hours required. subject of childhood from multidisciplinary
—9 hours required (3 courses) from the frames of reference.
following: GEO 235A01, 250; HIS
104A01, 265, 266; POL 246. (At least The minor will also provide a foundation for
two disciplines must be represented from those students who intend to go to
this list.) professional or graduate school to pursue
—Choose 4 courses (12 hours) from the child-centered research interests.
following electives: ENG 206; GEO  —A minimum of 24 hours, including FCS
235A01, 250; HIS 104A01, 265, 266; 112 or HIS 112 or SOC 112 and one of
POL 246 (any of these six courses may the following: FCS 101; PSY 301; TCH
count if not taken as part of required 210.
core); ANT 185; LAN 206; MUS
139A21, 153, 154, 239A21; THE 271, —The remaining 18 hours must include a
275. minimum of 2 courses from Group A and
a minimum of 2 courses from Group B.
—No more than 9 hours may be selected
from the student’s first or second major —Group A-Humanities and Fine Arts:
department or school. ART 204, 208; ENG 170, 271, 272, 370,
372, 373, 374, 375; MUS 277, 278, 371;
NOTE: Other cour ses appr oved by the DAN 229, 283; THE 281, 282.
minor advisor may be counted toward the —Group B-Social Sciences: CJ S 215;
minor. Please refer to specific departments CSD 115, 175; FCS 231, 233, 250; HIS
or schools for further course information 261, 262, 330; POL 339; PSY 213, 215,
including prerequisites. 302, 346; SOC 262, 318; TCH 233,
233A01.
African Studies minors are encouraged to —With permission of the minor advisor the
study abroad in Africa. There are a number following categories of courses may be
of study abroad programs in which students counted toward the minor; if arranged or
can participate that range in length from a offered through a department or school:
summer to a semester, or an entire academic - 3 hours of an internship with a child-
year. Interested students should contact the related agency.
Office of International Studies and - 3 hours of an independent study on a
Programs. child-related topic.
- 3 hours of a special topics course on a
MINOR IN CHILDREN’S STUDIES child-related topic.

Coordinator: Gregory Braswell


Department of Psychology NOTE: Students may count no more
Email: gsbrasw@ilstu.edu than 9 hours from their major’s department
towards the completion of this minor.
Advisor: Allison Anson, University
College
340 Fell Hall, Campus Box 4060 Phone:
(309) 438-7604
Email: alanson@IllinoisState.edu

The Minor in Children's Studies provides an


opportunity for students to enhance their

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


98 Interdisciplinary Studies Programs

MINOR IN CIVIC ENGAGEMENT Minor requirements:


AND RESPONSIBILITY
— 21 hours required.
Minor Coordinator: Dr. Cynthia — Required core (9 hours): IDS 125,
Edmonds-Cady 398A02, POL 101.
School of Social Work — Choose 4 courses (12 hours) from the
303 Rachel Cooper following (only one course at the 100
Campus Box 4650 level can be taken): CJS 102; COM 201,
Phone: (309) 438-5949 270, 272, 274, 303, 304, 371, 375; EAF
Email: cemond@IllinoisState.edu 228, 231, 235; FCS 328, 333; HIS 253,
272; PHI 104, 150, 234, 236, 240; POL 
106, 214, 220, 221, 222, 225, 312; PSY
Minor Advisor: Wendi Whitman,
213, 302; SOC 241, 333; TEC 275; THE
University College
154, 344.
340 Fell Hall, Campus Box 4060
Phone: (309) 438-7604 NOTE: Other cour ses appr oved by the
Email:wjwhitm@IllinoisState.edu minor coordinator may be counted toward
the minor.
Communityengagement.illinoisstate.edu
NOTE: No mor e than two elective
In teaching civic engagement at Illinois State courses (6 hours) can be taken in any
University, we strive to develop civically single department or school.
responsible individuals who embrace their
membership in communities and society by Concentration for Teacher Education
owning social issues and working to be a part Majors Interested in Urban Education
of the solution, which requires ethical and
civic judgments and interventions when The Minor in Civic Engagement and
appropriate. Illinois State University’s values Responsibility offers a special concentration
(Educating Illinois) are at the core of this for teacher education majors who have an
minor as students will prepare to participate interest in urban education and pursuing
in social change as well as develop an careers in high-need schools. This entails a
awareness of personal social responsibility. dedicated strand of courses that have a strong
This minor is intended to prepare students to focus on diversity, multiculturalism, and the
actively engage in their citizenship. The importance of creating community engaged
interdisciplinary minor is open to all students classrooms. Many of these courses also offer
of any ideological viewpoint and can be activities and assignments that immerse the
positively matched with any major as a way student into the urban context such as field
to broaden the student’s learning experience trips and service-learning projects in urban
and career perspectives. A civically educated schools and communities.
individual (1) gains a sense of self-awareness
as a citizen, (2) actively participates in In consultation with their advisor, teacher
community service, (3) develops an education majors interested in urban teacher
appreciation of diversity, (4) comprehends preparation are recommended to choose four
the interdependence within communities, courses (12 hours) from the following
societies, and the world, (5) grows an courses that have an urban education focus
understanding of the democratic process, (6) (only one course at the 100 level can be
displays critical thinking within the arena of taken): BSC 307; CHE 161; CJS 102; EAF
democratic conversations and social issues, 228, 231, 235; GEO 307; HIS 290, 390; HSC
(7) becomes effective at problem-solving and 387; LAN 319; MAT 201, 223; PHY 353;
change, and (8) is able to personally integrate PSY 213, 215, 302; SOC 109, 240; SPA 223,
reflection on service, social issues, and 244; TCH 110, 111, 204, 208, 212, 232,
course content. This minor will provide 233A01, 319.
students with opportunities to sharpen critical
analysis, skill development, and personal Teacher education majors interested in urban
reflection as well as substantive opportunities teacher preparation courses with designated
to study and perform civic engagement in sections can refer to UTP Passport
their communities. (TeacherPipeline.IllinoisState.edu) for updated
course information.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Interdisciplinary Studies Programs 99

MINOR IN COGNITIVE SCIENCE Course Groups: 


Group A (Quantitative Skills): MAT 120,
Director: Lana Kühle 145, 146, 175, 260, 350; PHI 112 or 210
Department of Philosophy (MAT 210); PSY 138 (recommended) or
323H Stevenson Hall ECO 138.
Campus Box 4540
Phone: (309) 438-7094 Group B (Computer Science): IT 168, 179,
Email: lkuhle@IllinoisState.edu 226, 261, 279, 327, 340, 367, 388.
Advisor: Patrick McNulty Group C (Linguistics): ANT 143 or ENG
University College 143 or LAN 143; ANT 342 or ENG 342;
340 Fell Hall Campus Box 4060 ANT 277; COM 370, 372; CSD 175; ENG
Phone: (309) 438-7604 241, 243, 245, 310, 341, 344; FRE 209, 335,
Email: pamcnul@IllinoisState.edu 340; GER 310; SPA 215, 310, 311, 360;
Website: Philosophy.IllinoisState.edu/ SOC 338.
academics/minor/cogsciminor Group D (Philosophy): PHI 250, 251, 253,
255, 315; PHI *305, *310, *363. NOTE:
—A minimum of 24 hours required for the Courses with * may be used only when the
minor, depending on the emphasis chosen topic is approved by a Cognitive Science
and the level of preparation of student. advisor.
Programs must be planned in consultation
Group E (Psychology): PSY 231, 253, 263,
with the director. Students are required to
331A04, 331A07, 360, 361, 367, 368, 369.
seek an advisor through the Director of
Cognitive Science Studies. Group F (Related Courses): ANT 350, 378,
393; BSC 286, 305, 343; CSD 210.
—Required courses: One course is required
of all students, IDS 265: Introduction to NOTE: Refer to specific depar tments for
Cognitive Science: Computers, Minds, further course information.
Brains, and Robots. Other requirements
will be met by developing a planned Cognitive Science Course
course of study approved by the Cognitive
Science Studies director. In consultation IDS
with the director, the student will choose
an emphasis that is outside the student’s 265 INTRODUCTION TO COGNITIVE
major and will fulfill the requirements of SCIENCE: COMPUTERS, MINDS,
that emphasis. BRAINS, AND ROBOTS SMT
3 sem. hrs.
Emphases: Explores fundamental principles from
Psychology, Computer Science, Philosophy,
Computer Science: IT 168, 179; 2 cour ses Linguistics, and Biology that contribute to
(6 hours) from Groups A and/or B; 1 course the scientific study of intelligent systems
(3 hours) from Group B; and 2 elective (minds). Prerequisites: MAT 113, 120, 130,
courses (6 hours) from Groups C, D, E, or F. or 145 or one semester of Foreign
Language.
Linguistics: PHI 112 or 210; ENG 341; 2
courses (6 hours) from Groups A and/or B; 1
course (3 hours) from Group C; and 2 MINOR IN ETHNIC STUDIES
elective courses (6 hours) from Groups B, D,
E, or F. Director: Susan Kalter,
Department of English
Philosophy: PHI 112 or 210; PHI 251 or 424J Stevenson, Campus Box 4240
253 or  315; 2 courses (6 hours) from Groups Phone: (309) 438-8660
A and/or B; 1 course (3 hours) from Group Email: susankalter@IllinoisState.edu
D; and 2 elective courses (6 hours) from Website: EthnicStudies.IllinoisState.edu
Groups B,C, E, or F.
Psychology: PSY 138 (r ecommended) or Ethnic Studies is the study of race and
ECO 138 (acceptable); PSY 231; 2 courses ethnicity in U.S. and transnational contexts.
(6 hours) from Groups A and/or B; 1 course Students and faculty in this area examine
(3 hours) from Group E; 2 elective courses (6 how social categories like race, indigeneity,
hours) from Groups B, C, D, or F. culture, ethnicity, and nation are concep-

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


100 Interdisciplinary Studies Programs

tualized. They also familiarize themselves cultures, if appropriate to the minor and
with the specific and comparative the student’s focus as determined by the
experiences both historical and contemporary faculty director, will be approved.
of the major population groups that make up
the United States. The program at Illinois Group III – Global Contexts (Students
State allows participants to examine regional, must complete at least 2 courses.)
national, and global dimensions of these —AGR 201; ANT 185, 283, 294, 307, 308,
experiences. 373; ART 275; ENG or LAN 206; GEO
235, 250, 255; *HIS 104A01, *104A02,
Students in the minor must complete a *104A03, *104A04, *104A05, 263, 265,
minimum of 22 hours representing 8 courses 266, 267, 269, 270, 271, 272, 275, 276,
as indicated from Groups I, II, and III; at 282, 283, 307, 335, 373, 375; *IDS
least 4 courses must be above the 100-level. 121A31, *121A42, 133A02, 133A03,
With consent of the director, students may 133A04, 203; CHI 115; FRE 314, 325;
use departmental or IDS 287, 298, or 398 JPN 115, 116; POR 115; SPA 116, 244,
courses for one course in Group II and/or one 326, 327, 336; MQM 349; MUS 216, 275;
course in Group III. NUR 313; PHI 207, 208; POL 140, 240,
245, 246, 247, 340, 345, 349; SOC 220,
Students interested in pursuing a major in 318; THE 271, 275A01, 275A02, 374.
this area may arrange their program of study
through either the Interdisciplinary Studies NOTE: Other cour ses with appr opr iate
Major program or the University Studies content for Group III may be approved by the
program. faculty director. Courses in second-year
language (and beyond) and courses in global
Minors are also available in three specific English-language or non-English-language
areas: African-American Studies; Latin literatures and cultures, if appropriate to the
American and Latino/a Studies; and Native minor and the student’s focus as determined
American Studies. by the faculty director, will be approved.
A list of affiliated faculty and more Group IV - Floating Elective. Students
information is available on the Ethnic Studies must complete at least one (1) additional
website. course from either Group I, Group II, or
Group III.
Group I - Ethnicity (Students must
complete at least 1 course) *NOTE: Var iants of HIS 104 and IDS 121
—ANT 281, 302; COM 272, 372; POL 334; may be taken only once each for credit.
SOC 264, 366.
NOTE: Other cour ses with appr opr iate MINOR IN EUROPEAN STUDIES
content for Group I may be approved by
the faculty director. Program Director: 
Anthony Crubaugh Department of History
Group II - Race and Ethnicity in the Phone: (309) 438-5641
United States. (Students must complete at
least 4 courses chosen from at least 2 Advisor: Ron Gifford, Department of
departments or schools.) History
Phone: (309) 438-8298
—ANT 272, 278, 280, 384; CJS 308; CSD
301 Schroeder Hall
375; ECO 230; ENG 165, 265, 266, 267,
365; *HIS 104A06, 257, 258, 264, 284,
310, 315; HIS/SOC 111; *IDS 121A29, The Minor in European Studies is
*121A37, *121A52; MUS 153, 154; NUR interdisciplinary and international in scope.
312; PSY 327; SOC 109; SWK 310; TCH This minor will help prepare students for
110, 111, 232, 319, 320, 321, 322; THE careers in multiple fields by providing a
154. cohesive program of study in the arts,
history, languages, and society of one or
NOTE: Other cour ses with appr opr iate more European nations, or by providing a
content for Group II may be approved by foundation for advanced study in one of
the faculty director. Courses in non- several disciplines such as European Union
English-language U.S. literatures and

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Interdisciplinary Studies Programs 101

Studies, Fine Arts, European Language and GER 211, 213, 285, 310, 317, 385; HIS
Literatures, European History, International 220, 221, 222, 223, 224, 225, 226, 228,
Business, International Law, International 229, 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 237, 279,
Relations, or Journalism. 284, 308, 335, 336, 337, 345, 350, 355,
356, 366, 367, 368; ITA 221, 222; MUS
In this minor, students will complete six 253, 254; PHI 222, 232, 233, 250, 254,
hours of core courses: IDS 112 (or HIS 101, 255, 350; POL 141, 241, 252, 255, 344,
102, or 107) and IDS 212. Students are 351; SPA 213, 214, 215, 223, 233, 240,
required to achieve proficiency in a 243, 305, 323, 324, 337, 360; THE 300,
European language other than English, 370, 376, 377.
equivalent to three semesters of university-
level coursework. Students complete the
minor requirements by selecting a minimum MINOR IN INTERDISCIPLINARY
of six hours of electives from a list of STUDIES
approved university-wide courses. Study
abroad in a European country is strongly Program Coordinator: Amelia Noël-
recommended. The minor is versatile and can Elkins
be customized to complement an individual University College, Campus Box 4060
student’s interests in various fields of study. Phone: (309) 438-3217
At least four of the courses in the minor Advisors: Marty Greenberg
curriculum qualify for general education University College, Campus Box 4060
credit. This program will be supervised by Phone: (309) 438-7604
the departments of History, Languages, Email: ids-programs@IllinoisState.edu
Literatures, and Cultures, and the School of Website: IDS.IllinoisState.edu
Art.
Illinois State University offers students the
—24 hours are required, including 6 hours at opportunity, under the Minor in
the 200- or 300-level. Interdisciplinary Studies, to construct a
program of study that differs from the
—Required courses (6 hours): IDS 112 or
University’s regular minor programs. The
HIS 101, 102, or 107; IDS 212.
Individualized Requirements provide an
—Proficiency equivalent to LAN 111-115 interdisciplinary program that may be used to
required in a European language other attain specific educational goals that cannot
than English (12 hours). A student who be accommodated by existing minors at
took foreign language courses in high Illinois State.
school may be able to meet the
requirement of completing one or more of
the LAN 111-115 courses through Minor in Interdisciplinary Studies; 
proficiency credit awarded upon Individualized Sequence Requirements
completion of high level LAN courses. Students who complete the Individualized
—2 additional courses (6 hours) in an area of Sequence will have their transcripts noted:
concentration required from the list of  “Plan: Interdisciplinary Studies
electives, at least 3 hours at the 200- or Individualized; Theme: ______” (the theme
300-level. specified on the plan of study).
—Study abroad in Europe is strongly
recommended. —A 3.00 cumulative GPA at the time of
—A 2.0 major GPA is required to graduate application.
with this minor. All required and elective —Approved plan of study from at least 2
courses must be completed with grades of academic departments/schools containing
C or better. 18-24 hours.
Elective courses in groups: —Submission of a portfolio of relevant
ART 155, 156, 240, 241, 242, 263, 265, coursework documenting the accomp-
280, 281, 304, 305, 306; DAN 372; ECO lishment of learning objectives identified
245, 345, 346; ENG 110, 213, 214, 216, in the rationale submitted in support of the
218, 219, 222, 241, 310, 311, 320, 324, minor proposal.
327, 329, 378; FRE 209, 213, 214, 220,
223, 235, 305, 327, 328, 340, 341, 385;

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


102 Interdisciplinary Studies Programs

Procedure: the minor. Contact the International


 Admission to the Minor in Studies Advisor for information on which
Interdisciplinary Studies may be requested courses offered in each program may be
after the completion of 15 semester hours counted toward the minor.
of coursework and before the completion —Up to 9 hours (excluding courses in
of 75 semester hours. Category A) taken in the minor may also
be applied toward the student’s major. At
 Applicants should select an appropriate
faculty advisor. The proposed plan of least 9 hours of the minor must be at the
study must be approved by the faculty 200-level or above.
advisor, the Interdisciplinary Studies —Additional foreign language study is
Minor Committee, and the Office of the strongly encouraged. Special emphasis
Provost. should be placed on developing oral
communication skills.
MINOR IN INTERNATIONAL
STUDIES CATEGORY A—International Issues:
—6-12 hours required. Courses in the
International Studies student’s first major may not count toward
308 Fell Hall, Campus Box 6120 category A requirements. A maximum of
(309) 438-5365 2 courses from any 1 department or school
Director: Shari Zeck may be taken. Choose from the following:
Email: sszeck@IllinoisState.edu AGR 201; ANT 176, 185; ART 275; CJS
369; COM 355, 369, 372; ECO 210, 245,
Advisor: Priyanka Aich 345; ENG 206, 255, 261; GEO 135; HIS
University College 104, 230, 270; IDS 203; INB 225; LAN
340 Fell Hall 206; MUS 275; POL 140, 150, 151, 251,
Phone: (309) 438-7604 252, 254, 255, 344, 351, 358, 363; SOC
Email: paich@IllinoisState.edu 108, 366; THE 271, 275A01, 275A02;
WGS 120, or other courses approved by
The Minor in International Studies is an the International Studies Advisor.
interdisciplinary program that is designed to
offer students an opportunity to enrich their CATEGORY B—Regional Studies:
thinking and experience as global citizens. It —9-15 hours required. Only courses taken in
is a minor that can be tailored to enhance any 1 region listed below may be counted
major with international experience and toward the minor. Many Illinois State
study. University Study Abroad program courses
count.
The minor includes foreign language study,
courses focused on international and regional —In addition to the courses listed below, any
issues, and participation in a formal study pertinent course on the history, literature,
abroad experience. Academic advisement is economic, social, or political structures of
essential to this highly individualized a foreign county, culture, or region may be
program in order for students to make the counted toward the minor, provided it
best use of these opportunities. receives approval in advance from the
International Studies advisor. The
—24 hours required, including LAN 115 or International Studies advisor will help
equivalent; 6-12 hours in Category A; 9- students choose courses appropriate to
15 hours in Category B; and participation their regional studies concentration and
in a study abroad or alternative career objectives.
international experience. —Latin America: GEO 235A02; HIS 263;
—Participation is required in a 6-credit hour SPA 116, 244, 305; POL 240, 340.
(or greater) study abroad experience —Europe: ART 372, 379, HIS 102, 229,
sponsored by Illinois State University or 234, 237, 366; FRE 305; (FRE, GER,
alternative international experience ITA, SPA) 116, GER 217; SPA 243, 305;
approved prior to participation by the POL 241, 242, 341.
minor advisor. Courses taken while
studying abroad may be counted toward —Africa: GEO 250, HIS 266; POL 246.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Interdisciplinary Studies Programs 103

—South and Southwest Asia (Middle —Elective courses (15 hours) from: ANT
East, India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka): HIS 303, 383; ENG 267; FRE 112, 115, 116;
272; PHI 207, 208; POL 245, 247, 349. GEO 235A02; HIS 104A03, 263, 282,
—East Asia: HIS 373, 375; J PN 116; PHI 283; IDS 203A15; LAL 287, 291,
208; POL 245, 345. 398A01, 398A02; POL 240, 340; POR
111, 112, 115; PSY 327A01; SPA 112,
NOTE: Refer to specific depar tments or 115, 116, 120, 233, 240, 244, 326, 327,
schools for further course information. 336; THE 375. Other courses with
appropriate Latin American or Latino/a
Studies content may be approved by the
MINOR IN LATIN AMERICAN AND advisor: ANT 273, SPA 305, 360, 385;
LATINO/A STUDIES (LAL) 467 TCH 319, 320, 321, 322, WGS 391.

Director: Dr. Maura Toro-Morn Students are strongly encouraged to study


Latin American and Latino/a Studies abroad in programs in Latin America and the
Program Caribbean. See the Office of International
328 Williams Hall, Campus Box 4670 Studies and Programs for information.
Phone: (309) 438-0097,
NOTE: Many cour ses ar e offer ed
Email: mitmorn@ilstu.edu regularly. Please note that some courses are
not available every semester.
Advisor: Janet Claus
University College
Latin American and Latino/a Studies
340 Fell Hall, Campus Box 4060
Phone: (309) 438-7604 Courses
Email: jlclaus@IllinoisState.edu
Website: 109 INTRODUCTION TO U.S.
LatinoStudies.IllinoisState.edu LATINO/A STUDIES UST
3 sem. hrs.
The goals of the Minor in Latin American and An interdisciplinary introduction to the
Latino/a Studies are (a) to provide students migration, work, and community
with key concepts, information, and a experiences of U.S. Latino/Latina im-
foundation of knowledge rooted in several migrants and their descendants. May not
academic disciplines; (b) to examine the social, be taken under the P/NP option. Also
political, and cultural challenges of Latin offered as SOC 109.
America and the Latino/a populations in the 398A01 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE:
global community; and (c) to foster a INTERNSHIP/COOP IN LATIN
multicultural, pluralistic, and multi-lingual AMERICAN AND LATINO/A STUDIES
environment by focusing on the interrelations 1-6 sem. hrs.
between the United States, Latin America, and Independent experience in a supervised
its descendant populations. community work setting with oppor-
tunities for civic engagement. Academic
This program is student centered and requirements include a final paper. A
flexible. Students are expected to complete maximum of 6 hours may count toward
coursework in a variety of disciplines and the LAL minor. Prerequisite: Consent of
departments. All individual programs of the director and supervisor.
study must be planned in consultation with
the Latin American and Latino/a Studies 398A02 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE:
advisor. To ensure the integrity of the RESEARCH EXPERIENCE IN LATIN
interdisciplinarity of the minor, students AMERICAN AND LATINO/A STUDIES
must complete coursework from a minimum 1-6 sem. hrs.
of three departments. Practical experience in the design,
implementation, and reporting of research
—21 hours required. through methods appropriate to the fields
—Required courses (6 hours): LAL/SOC of interest. A maximum of 6 hours may
109 and one of: HIS 104A03 or GEO  count toward the LAL minor; a maximum
235A02 or SPA/POR/FRE 112. If a of 16 hours of all 398 courses may count
student can show he or she has earned toward graduation. Prerequisite: SOC 109
language credit in an indigenous and consent of the program director.
language, those credits will be accepted as
well.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


104 Interdisciplinary Studies Programs

MINOR IN MIDDLE EASTERN AND selected from the student’s first or second
SOUTH ASIAN STUDIES major department.
*Discuss with the advisor before taking these
Director: Yusuf Sarfati topics courses; only topics relevant to
Department of Politics and Middle Eastern or South Asian studies may
Government count towards this minor.
403D Schroeder Hall
Campus Box 4600 Participation in Middle Eastern or South
Phone: (309) 438-5785 Asian universities through Illinois State
University or alternative study abroad
Email: ysarfat@IllinoisState.edu
programs, while not required, is strongly
encouraged. Students can accumulate up to 6
Advisor: Erik Rankin credit hours of electives.
Department of Politics and
Government NOTE: Other cour ses appr oved by the
401 Schroeder Hall director may be counted toward the minor.
Campus Box 4600 Refer to specific departments or schools for
Phone: (309) 438-3709, further course information including
Email: etranki@IllinoisState.edu prerequisites.
POL.IllinoisState.edu/academics/
undergraduate/minors/eastminor.php MINOR IN NATIVE AMERICAN
STUDIES
The Minor in Middle Eastern and South
Asian Studies provides an interdisciplinary Director: Susan Kalter, Department of
approach to exploring the politics, society, English
cultures and economics of the countries in 424J Stevenson, Campus Box 4240
the Middle East and South Asia. This Phone: (309) 438-8660
program is designed to be of interest to Email: susankalter@IllinoisState.edu
students who want to explore the socio-
Website: NativeStudies.IllinoisState.edu
political-economic dynamics of the countries
located in the region and their roles in the
The minor in Native American Studies is
world. It also examines the impacts of the
designed to familiarize students with the
global politics, especially the US foreign
histories, literatures, cultures, and futures of
policies, on the socio-political environment
the indigenous citizens of North America. It
of this region. will be of interest to students who wish to
Students are required to take a core of three explore the unique political and social
courses in history, politics, and geography, relationship that the First Nations and their
as well as four elective courses. Elective members hold with the United States. It
courses can be chosen from the social provides students with key concepts,
sciences (Criminal Justice Sciences, Eco- information, and a foundation of knowledge
nomics, Geography, History, Politics and rooted in several academic disciplines.
Government and Sociology), and/or from the Faculty from the departments of English,
humanities (English, Languages, Literatures, History, Sociology and Anthropology, and
and Cultures, and Philosophy). the School of Theatre participate in this
—21 hours required. minor. Students are required to take an
interdisciplinary core of four courses from
—Required core courses (9 hours): GEO three different departments and Inter-
235A04; HIS 104A04 or 104A05, or 272; disciplinary Studies. Two electives from
POL 245, 247 or 345.* approved offerings by faculty in the field of
—Choose 4 courses (12 hours) from the Native American Studies may be selected as
following (if not already taken for credit): alternatives to the list of electives below.
CJS 369; ECO 205, 245; ENG 255, 261, — 18 hours required.
352; ENG 206 or LAN 206; HIS 267, 270, — Required courses: IDS 121A29; ANT
271, 272, 307*; IDS 203A05, 203A20, 272 or 384; ENG 266; HIS 104A06 or
203A25; PHI 207, 208; POL 225, 254, HIS 310.
345*, 349; SOC 268. — 6 hours of additional courses from the
following: ANT 272 (if not previously
NOTE: No mor e than 9 hour s may be

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Interdisciplinary Studies Programs 105

taken), 280, 384 (if not previously taken); minor's capstone experience is a professional
HIS 104A06 (if not previously taken), 310 practice.
(if not previously taken); 287 Independent
Study; and 298/398 Professional Practice The Minor allows students to examine the
(may be on- or off-campus; may apply 3 causes and prevention of war, as well as the
hours towards the minor). nature of violence, including social oppression,
discrimination and marginalization. They also
NOTE: This pr ogr am must be planned in
learn peace strategies to overcome persecution
consultation with the Native American
and transform society to attain a more just and
Studies faculty director. With director
approval, courses other than those listed equitable international community. The inquiry
above−including courses in Native languages encompasses micro to macro perspectives. At
and other Native American Studies courses the micro end of the spectrum, students
approved for transfer in from other investigate non-violent ethics and conflict
accredited universities−may be counted management; interpersonal communication and
toward the minor. relations; intergroup relations; and diversity and
gender issues. At the macro level, students
A list of affiliated faculty and more explore the dynamics of international conflict,
information is available on the Native as well as approaches to peace and world order;
American Studies website. Departments ethnic and socioeconomic justice;
participating in the minor are English, multiculturism; renewable economics; and
History, Sociology/Anthropology, and biodiversity.
Theatre and Dance.
—21 hours required.
MINOR IN PEACE AND CONFLICT —Required core (3 hours): IDS 111, includes
RESOLUTION STUDIES 12-15 hours of practicum.
—Electives (18 hours): Choose three courses
Co-Director: Noha Shawki, Politics and from one group listed below and one
Government course from each remaining group.
403B Schroeder Hall
 Group A - Social Justice: CJ S 102;
Campus Box 4600
COM 272, 372; PHI 238; SOC 106,
Phone (309) 438-3861
108, 264, 366; WGS 120.
Email: nsshawk@IllinoisState.edu
 Group B - Violence Prevention and
Co-Director: Dawn Beichner, Criminal Conflict Resolution: CJ S 307, 369;
Justice Sciences FCS 310; HIS 111, 112; IDS 254; POL
439 Schroeder Hall 252, 255, 352; SOC 365.
Campus Box 5250  Group C - Environmental Justice:
Phone: (309) 438-7626 AGR 201; BSC 202; GEO 135, 205,
Email: dmbeich@IllinoisState.edu 235; HSC 156, 355; HIS 329; PHI 236;
PHY 207.
Advisor: Janet Claus, University College
 Group D - Globalization: ANT 176;
340 Fell Hall, Campus Box 4060 ECO 105; GEO 142; IDS 203; INB
Phone: (309) 438-7604; Email: 225; MQM 349; POL 151, 254; SOC
jlclaus@IllinoisState.edu 241.
POL.IllinoisState.edu/academics/
NOTE: Students ar e encour aged to
undergraduate/minors/peace_conflict.php
consult with the program co-directors and/or
The Minor in Peace and Conflict Resolution advisor regarding course selection.
Studies is an interdisciplinary program that
includes courses from eighteen departments. Peace and Conflict Resolution Courses
The Minor provides a comprehensive and in-
depth approach to peace and conflict resolution IDS
theories and methods. Students are required to
take an introductory course, as well as one 111 PEACE STUDIES SS
course from each of four areas of inquiry 3 sem. hrs.
(social justice, violence prevention and conflict A general, interdisciplinary introduction to
resolution, environmental justice, and global- Peace Studies, including social justice,
conflict resolution, global ecology, and
ization), while also specializing in one of
education for an interdependent world.
these areas with two additional courses. The
Includes arranged service learning hours.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


106 Interdisciplinary Studies Programs

398A01 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE of internship, professional practice, or


INTERNSHIP/COOPERATIVE independent study contributing to the
EDUCATION IN PEACE AND minor and approved in advance by the
CONFLICT RESOLUTION STUDIES urban studies advisor.
3-6 sem. hrs.  Students may use up to 6 hours of courses
Practical experience, preferably in an from their major program to fulfill minor
international, national or local organization requirements.
where peacemaking, conflict resolution and  Students in majors outside the College of
skills are required and learned. Pre- Arts and Sciences may, with approval
requisites: IDS 111 and Minor in Peace and from the urban studies advisor, apply up
Conflict Resolution Studies. to 6 hours of courses from their college--
including from their major program--in
MINOR IN URBAN STUDIES lieu of courses in the above list of
electives.
Advisor: Alan Lessoff
Department of History MINOR IN WOMEN’S AND
327 Schroeder Hall GENDER STUDIES (WGS) 426
Campus Box 4420
Phone: (309) 438-8083 Director: Alison Bailey
Email: ahlesso@ilstu.edu 237 Rachel Cooper
Campus Box 4260
The Minor in Urban Studies is an Phone: (309) 438-2947
interdisciplinary minor sponsored by the Advisor Phone: (309) 438-2947
Departments of Geography, Geology, and Advisor Email:
the Environment, History, Politics and WGSAdvisor@IllinoisState.edu
Government, and Sociology/Anthropology
in the College of Arts and Sciences. The minor in Women’s and Gender Studies
enhances any undergraduate major by
The program is designed for students who wish
offering students an interdisciplinary curric-
to learn about urban places from a social
ulum that focuses on diverse experiences of
sciences perspective, although the minor will
women in both national and international
also benefit those with majors in the arts and
contexts. The program provides a wide
humanities, business, education, social services,
range of electives that offer students the
technology, design, and other fields. This
conceptual tools to critically examine the
program will provide a foundation, especially to
meanings of gender and its intersections
those who wish to pursue careers in urban-
with race, sexuality, class/caste, coloniality
related areas such as public administration,
and ability as they shape our ways of
planning, design, preservation, public history,
knowing, behaviors, and political identities.
the environment, community development, and
Curricular areas of emphasis include the
social services, or to those who wish to pursue
study of feminist theories and method-
graduate study in these areas. The program’s
ologies, social justice and activism, LGBTQ
features include required coursework in urban
studies, women’s histories, literatures, visual
geography, history, political science, and
sociology or anthropology. Students may cultures, and politics.
choose from a range of elective courses,
independent study with urban studies faculty, Women’s and Gender Studies is an inter-
and an optional internship. disciplinary minor that analyzes structures of
power and systemic inequalities–grounded in
 21 hours required. gender and its intersections with other identity
 Required core (12 hours): GEO 336; HIS categories–as they are ex-pressed in historical
and contemporary struggles for social
322; POL 221 or 222; SOC 240 or 361.
change. Women’s and Gender Studies is not
 Choose 9 elective hours from the only about learning facts and theories, but also
following: Any core course not used to about using our collective knowledge to
fulfill requirements or ANT 374, 375, become scholars, practitioners, leaders, and
392; ECO 350; GEO 303, 304, 306A22, agents of social change. Courses encourage
331, 370; HIS 242, 258; POL 231, 232,
students to analyze the world in which they
334; SOC 109, 260, 264, 333, 350, 362,
366; TCH 232; TEC 329; or up to 3 hours live, in order that they might act transform it.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Interdisciplinary Studies Programs 107

 21 hours required. Women’s and Gender Studies Courses

 Required courses: WGS 120; ENG 160 or 120 GENDER, SEX, AND POWER SS
260 or 261 or 360; HIS 261 or HIS 262; 3 sem. hrs.
PHI 246 or POL 338. An interdisciplinary introduction to how
gendered and other structures of
 9 hours of additional courses from: ANT domination shape societies; how
270, 376; CJS 307, 339, 342; COM 128 or individual and collective actions engage
ENG 128 or LAN 128; ENG 206 or LAN and transform these structures. May not be
206; ENG 260, 261, 360 (if not already taken under the P/NP option. Formerly
chosen to fulfill a requirement); FCS 112 WOMEN, GENDER AND SOCIETY.
or HIS 112 or SOC 112; HIS 261 or 262 Prerequisite: ENG 101 or COM 110 or
(if not chosen to fulfill requirement); HIS concurrent registration.
264, 330, 350; IDS 121A39; PHI 202;
POL 225, 337, 338, 363; PSY 123 or SOC 292 INTRODUCTION TO LGBTQ
123; PSY 305; SOC 264, 265, 311, 341, STUDIES
342, 366; WGS 292, 390, 391, 392, 398. 3 sem. hrs.
Interdisciplinary introduction to lesbian,
Queer Studies Concentration: The gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer
Women’s and Gender Studies Program also studies. Topics include LGBTQ histories,
offers a Queer Studies Concentration. The social movements, politics, and cultures.
Queer Studies Concentration is an option for 390 INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH
students wanting to enhance their IN WOMEN’S AND GENDER
understanding of lesbian, gay, bisexual, STUDIES
transgender, queer, and intersex (LGBTQI+) 1-6 sem. hrs.
issues or whose undergraduate curriculum or
professional goals would be enriched by Students will research and write on an
additional coursework in this emerging interdisciplinary topic of their choice
vibrant field. The concentration focuses on relevant to Women’s and Gender Studies.
LGBTQI+ histories, political movements, Prerequisite: A detailed proposal approved
aesthetics, arts, cultures, literatures, by the Director or Assistant Director of
scholarship, contemporary experiences, and Women’s and Gender Studies.
social formations. The Queer Studies 391WOMEN’S AND GENDER STUDIES
Concentration is separate from the Women’s SEMINAR
and Gender Studies minor and is not 1-3 sem. hrs.
recognized on university transcripts. Intensive and critical examination of
selected topics in women’s and gender
 12 hours required. studies. Multiple enrollments are allowed;
 Required courses: WGS 120, 292, 392. maximum 6 hours.

 3 hours of additional courses from: ANT 392 QUEER AND TRANSGENDER


THEORY
270; PHI 202; POL 337; PSY 123 or SOC 3 sem. hrs.
123.
Research in the interdisciplinary field of
LGBTQ Studies emphasizing how queer and
NOTE: Both the minor and concentr ation transgender theory inform a variety of
must be planned in consultation with the academic disciplines and discourses.
Women’s and Gender Studies director or Formerly LESBIAN, GAY , BISEXUAL,
advisor. TRANSGENDER/QUEER STUDIES AND
THEORY. Prerequisite: WGS 120 or consent
of the instructor; or graduate standing.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


108 Interdisciplinary Studies Courses

398 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 198, 298, 398 PROFESSIONAL


INTERNSHIP IN WOMEN’S AND PRACTICE
GENDER STUDIES 1-6 sem. hrs.
1-6 sem. hrs. Supervised work experiences in local, state,
Supervised work experience in local, state, national, and international businesses,
national, or international businesses, agencies, institutions, and organizations
agencies, institutions, or organizations which are planned, administered, and super-
focusing on gender issues and their vised at the departmental level. University-
intersections with race, class, sexuality, and wide coordination is provided through
ability. Multiple enrollments may be Professional Practice in Student and Alumni
allowed; maximum 6 hours. Prerequis-ites: Placement Services or through the Office of
6 hours of Women’s and Gender Studies Clinical Experiences if the experience is in an
and consent of the Director of Women’s and educational agency or institution. Multiple
Gender Studies. enrollments are allowed. Maximum of 16
hours may be applied toward graduation.
Prerequisite: Consent of the department chair
Interdisciplinary Studies (IDS) 604 or school director.
287 INDEPENDENT STUDY
Director: Jonathan Rosenthal
1-6 sem. hrs.
Associate Provost for Undergraduate
Education Intensive work in a special area of the
401 Hovey Hall, Campus Box 4000 student’s interest. Each individual project is
Phone: (309) 438-7018 to culminate in a comprehensive written
report or examination. Open only to students
University-Wide Courses who are not on academic probation and who
have demonstrated an ability to profit from
These courses may be offered by any depart- independent study. Multiple enrollments
ment or school of the University. For specific allowed; maximum of 6 hours may be
departmental offerings contact the applied toward graduation. Prerequisite: 
department or school advisor or visit the Consent of the department chair or school
University website at IllinoisState.edu. director and supervisor.
291 SEMINAR: UNDERGRADUATE
189, 289, 389 SELECTED STUDIES TEACHING ASSISTANTS
1-6 sem. hrs. 1-3 sem. hrs.
Experimental and interdepartmental courses Supervised examination of issues related to
providing content not offered within the the Undergraduate Teaching Experience.
framework of courses approved for in- Seminar requires time beyond the UTA
clusion in the Undergraduate Catalog. For work experience. Multiple enrollments
descriptions of the courses (and decimal- allowed; maximum of 3 hours may be
ized course number) offered each semester applied toward graduation. Prerequisites:
contact the department or school advisor or Official designation as an Undergraduate
visit the University website at Teaching Assistant (UTA). Consent of the
IllinoisState.edu. department chair or school director.
193, 293, 393 WORKSHOP 299 HONORS INDEPENDENT STUDY
1-6 sem. hrs. 1-6 sem. hrs.
An Honors student investigates a topic of
Workshop opportunities are provided for interest within their discipline under the
the purpose of permitting students to work guidance of a faculty member. Multiple
on special topics not covered in any one enrollments are allowed; maximum of 6
course offered by the University. Topics hours may be applied toward graduation.
for investigation by workshop participants Limit of 9 hours HON 299 and 395 may
are limited to areas in which the Topics be combined to count toward graduation.
course numbers are decimalized. Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor,
University is able to provide adequate department chair or school director, and
workshop staff. Maximum of 6 hours may Honors Program.
be applied toward graduation.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Interdisciplinary Studies Courses 109

397 INSTITUTE Effective September 1, 2015 student


1-9 sem. hrs. teachers are assessed using the edTPA
on teacher effectiveness and each
Federal- and state-sponsored institutes or candidate must complete and pass the
similar short-term programs requiring edTPA as required by Illinois law
treatment of subject matter of a special (105ILCS5/21B-30(f)). Additional tests
nature or for special groups. may be required for select licensure
programs and additional endorsements.
Student Teaching Courses (STT) The following are Student Teaching Courses
offered by departments/schools:
399 STUDENT TEACHING
1-16 sem. hrs.
399A01 STUDENT TEACHING:
Directing the learning of pupils; AGRICULTURE
participating in school and community 1-16 sem. hrs.
activities; assuming full responsibility for Multiple enrollments are allowed. See
a group of learners supervised by a Agriculture section for total required
cooperating teacher. Student teaching hours. Prerequisites: AGR 190, 191, 295,
assignments are made on the basis of the 394. (Other requirements as stated in the
teacher candidate’s area of specialization. University-Wide Teacher Education sec-
The teacher candidate’s transcript tion of this catalog.)
indicates the area in which student
399A02 STUDENT TEACHING: ART
teaching was completed. Multiple
1-16 sem. hrs.
enrollments are allowed.
Multiple enrollments are allowed. See
Prerequisites for Student Teaching include: a School of Art section for total hours
minimum cumulative and major GPA which required. Prerequisites: Requirements as
is established by each department or school, stated in the Art Teacher Education
approval of department chair or school Sequence. (Other requirements as stated in
director, approval of the Director of The the University-Wide Teacher Education
Cecilia J. Lauby Teacher Education Center, section of this catalog.)
fifteen hours of coursework or equivalent at 399A03 STUDENT TEACHING:
Illinois State, a grade of C or better in all BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
major coursework, a grade of C or better in 1-16 sem. hrs.
all professional coursework, completion of Multiple enrollments are allowed. See
the second gateway Admission to Student Biological Sciences section for total hours
Teaching which is part of the performance- required. Prerequisites: BSC 307. (Other
based assessment system. All requirements requirements as stated in the University-
for “Admission to Student Teaching” must Wide Teacher Education section of this
be met by December 15th for student catalog.)
teaching during the spring semester and by
July 15th for student teaching during the fall 399A05 STUDENT TEACHING:
semester. BUSINESS EDUCATION
1-16 sem. hrs.
Other requirements as listed in the Multiple enrollments are allowed. See
University-Wide Teacher Education section Business Education section for total
of this Undergraduate Catalog, including but required hours. Prerequisites: BE 362,
not limited to: Gateway 3-Exit from Student 363, 364. (Other requirements as stated in
Teaching: the University-Wide Teacher Education
 All education majors must meet the listed section of this catalog).
requirements in order to graduate and be 399A09 STUDENT TEACHING:
recommended for licensure ENGLISH
 Student Teaching (grade of C or better) 1-16 sem. hrs.
 50 Clinical Hours in a diverse setting Multiple enrollments are allowed. See
English section for total required hours.
 Disposition/Communication Concerns
Prerequisites: ENG 296, 297. (Other
Assessments requirements as stated in the University-
 Successful completion of the edTPA Wide Teacher Education section of this
catalog.)

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


110 Interdisciplinary Studies Courses
399A12 STUDENT TEACHING: FRENCH 399A24 STUDENT TEACHING:
1-16 sem. hrs. FAMILY AND CONSUMER
Multiple enrollments are allowed. See SCIENCES
Languages, Literatures, and Cultures section 1-16 sem. hrs.
for total required hours. Prerequisites: LAN Multiple enrollments are allowed. See
319, 320, or concurrent registration. (Other Family and Consumer Sciences section for
requirements as stated in the University total required hours. Prerequisites: FCS 111
Wide Teacher Education section of this or 203 or concurrent registration. (Other
catalog.) requirements as stated in the University-
399A13 STUDENT TEACHING: Wide Teacher Education section of this
GERMAN catalog.)
1-16 sem. hrs. 399A27 STUDENT TEACHING:
Multiple enrollments are allowed. See MATHEMATICS
Languages, Literatures, and Cultures section 1-16 sem. hrs.
for total required hours. Prerequisites: LAN Multiple enrollments are allowed. See
319, 320, or concurrent registration. (Other Mathematics section for total required
requirements as stated in the University- hours. Prerequisites: Requirements as
Wide Teacher Education section of this stated in the University-Wide Teacher
catalog.) Education section of this catalog.
399A15 STUDENT TEACHING: 399A28 STUDENT TEACHING: MUSIC
SPANISH 1-16 sem. hrs.
1-16 sem. hrs.
Multiple enrollments are allowed. See
Multiple enrollments are allowed. See Music section for total required hours.
Languages, Literatures, and Cultures section Prerequisites: MUS 262; MUS 217 or 274.
for total required hours. Prerequisites: LAN (Other requirements as stated in the
319, 320, or concurrent registration. (Other University-Wide Teacher Education section
requirements as stated in the University- of this catalog.)
Wide Teacher Education section of this 399A33 STUDENT TEACHING:
catalog.) TECHNOLOGY AND
399A18 STUDENT TEACHING: ENGINEERING EDUCATION
GEOGRAPHY 1-16 sem. hrs.
1-16 sem. hrs. Multiple enrollments are allowed. See
Multiple enrollments are allowed. See Technology section for total required hours.
Geography section of this catalog for total Prerequisites: TEC 307 or concurrent
required hours. Prerequisites: GEO 261, registration. (Other requirements as stated in
307. (Other requirements in the University the University-Wide Teacher Education
-Wide Teacher Education section of this section of this catalog.)
catalog.) 399A35 STUDENT TEACHING:
399A19 STUDENT TEACHING: HEALTH EDUCATION
EARTH AND SPACE SCIENCE 1-16 sem. hrs.
1-12 sem. hrs. Multiple enrollments are allowed. See
Multiple enrollments are allowed. See Health Sciences section for total required
Geology section for total required hours. hours. Prerequisites: HSC 391 or con-
Prerequisites: GEO 307 or concurrent current registration. (Other requirements
registration; BSC 307 or PHY 310. (Other as stated in the University-Wide Teacher
requirements as stated in the University-Wide Education section of this catalog.)
Teacher Education section of this catalog.) 399A43 STUDENT TEACHING:
399A20 STUDENT TEACHING: DANCE HISTORY SOCIAL SCIENCE
EDUCATION EDUCATION
1-16 sem. hrs. 1-16 sem. hrs.
Multiple enrollments are allowed. See
Multiple enrollments are allowed. See History section for total required hours.
Theatre and Dance section for total required
Prerequisites: HIS 290 and 390 or
hours. Prerequisites: DAN 327 and
concurrent registration. (Other requirements
concurrent registration with DAN 383. as stated in the University-Wide Teacher
(Other requirements as stated in the
Education section of this catalog.)
University-Wide Teacher Education section
of this catalog.)

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Interdisciplinary Studies Courses 111

399A50 STUDENT TEACHING: 399A64 STUDENT TEACHING:


ELEMENTARY EDUCATION SPECIALIST IN LOW VISION AND
1-16 sem. hrs. BLINDNESS
Multiple enrollments are allowed. See 1-12 sem. hrs.
Teaching and Learning section for total
required hours. Prerequisites: TCH 257, Multiple enrollments are allowed. See
258, 260 and 264. (Other requirements as Special Education section for total
stated in the University-Wide Teacher required hours. Prerequisites: SED
Education section of this catalog.) 253A01, 253A02, 350, 351, 352, 363 or
399A54 STUDENT TEACHING: 364, 357, 358. (Other requirements as
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION stated in the University-Wide Teacher
1-16 sem. hrs. Education section of this catalog.)
Multiple enrollments are allowed. See 399A70 STUDENT TEACHING:
Teaching and Learning section for total THEATRE
required hours. Prerequisites: TCH 274, 1-16 sem. hrs.
275, 277, 294. (Other requirements as
stated in the University-Wide Teacher Multiple enrollments are allowed. See
Education section of this catalog.) Theatre and Dance section for total
required hours. Prerequisites: THE 385 or
399A55 STUDENT TEACHING:
MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION concurrent registration. (Other require-
1-16 sem. hrs. ments as stated in the University-Wide
Teacher Education section of this catalog.)
Multiple enrollments are allowed. See
Teaching and Learning section for total 399A72 STUDENT TEACHING:
required hours. Prerequisites: TCH 306, PHYSICS
333, 395, 396. (Other requirements as 1-16 sem. hrs.
stated in the University-Wide Teacher
Education section of this catalog.) Multiple enrollments are allowed. See
Physics section for total required hours.
399A58 STUDENT TEACHING:
Prerequisites: PHY 209, 302, 310, 311; and
SPECIALIST IN DEAF AND HARD
OF HEARING PHY 312 or concurrent registration. (Other
1-12 sem. hrs. requirements as stated in the University-
Wide Teacher Education section of this
Multiple enrollments are allowed. See
catalog.)
Special Education section for total required
hours. Prerequisites: SED 330, 353; SED 399A73 STUDENT TEACHING:
355, 359, and 375, or concurrent CHEMISTRY
registration. (Other requirements as stated 1-16 sem. hrs.
in the University-Wide Teacher Education Multiple enrollments are allowed. See
section of this catalog.) Chemistry section for total required hours.
399A59 STUDENT TEACHING: Prerequisites: CHE 301 or concurrent
SPECIALIST IN LEARNING AND registration. (Other requirements as stated
BEHAVIOR in the University-Wide Teacher Education
1-12 sem. hrs. section of this catalog.)
Multiple enrollments are allowed. See 399A74 STUDENT TEACHING:
Special Education section for total required SECONDARY PHYSICAL
hours. Prerequisites: SED 252A01, EDUCATION
252A02. (See other requirements in the 1-16 sem. hrs.
University-Wide Teacher Education
section of this catalog.) Multiple enrollments are allowed. See the
Kinesiology and Recreation section for
399A62 STUDENT TEACHING:
COMMUNICATION SCIENCES AND total required hours. Prerequisites: KNR
DISORDERS 242 or concurrent registration; KNR 341
1-16 sem. hrs. or concurrent registration or KNR 365.
(Other requirements as stated in the
Multiple enrollments are allowed. See
Communication Sciences and Disorders University-Wide Teacher Education
section for total hours required. Pre- section of this catalog.)
requisites: Requirements as stated in the
University-Wide Teacher Education sec-
tion of this catalog.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


112 Interdisciplinary Studies Courses
399A75 STUDENT TEACHING: 113 THE ENTREPRENEURIAL
ELEMENTARY PHYSICAL MINDSET SS
EDUCATION 3 sem. hrs.
1-16 sem. hrs. The course explores concepts of
entrepreneurship from an interdisciplinary
Multiple enrollments are allowed. See perspective and a diverse range of
Kinesiology and Recreation section of this disciplines through experiential learning.
catalog for total required hours.
121 TEXTS AND CONTEXTS LH
Prerequisites: KNR 221 or concurrent 3 sem. hrs.
registration. (Other requirements as stated Interdisciplinary writing-intensive course
in the University-Wide Teacher Education focusing on significant humanities texts in
section of this catalog.) relationship to their historical and cultural
contexts. May not be taken under the P/NP
option. See topics that may be offered
Honors Courses (HON) below. Prerequisites: COM 110 and ENG
Honors courses that were formerly under 101 or concurrent registration.
IDS are in the Academic Opportunities- 121A03 MUSIC LH
Honors Section of this catalog. 3 sem. hrs.
Interdisciplinary writing-intensive course
Interdisciplinary Studies Courses (IDS) focusing on significant musical styles,
terminology, genres, composers and
106 CAREER CHOICE performers related to Western art music
1 sem. hr. culture since the Middle Ages. May not be
Introduction to theory of career decision taken under the P/NP option.
making. Laboratory in the application of Prerequisites: COM 110 and ENG 101 or
skills and strategies to individual career concurrent registration.
choices. Materials charge optional. 121A11 GERMANY BEFORE
108 UNIVERSITY SUCCESS SKILLS HITLER LH
2 sem. hrs. 3 sem. hrs.
Intensive academic skills for first-year This writing intensive course on
college students, with a focus on making a Germany’s Weimar Republic focuses on
successful transition to the college humanities texts (broadly defined) chosen
classroom and expectations. Formerly IDS from literature, philosophy, history and the
189A12. fine arts and examines them in an
109 TRANSFER STUDENT SEMINAR interdisciplinary fashion. May not be
1 sem. hr. taken under the P/NP option.
Prerequisites: COM 110 and ENG 101 or
A course assisting transfer students concurrent registration.
transition to the University, including
exploration of involvement opportunities 121A17 THE 1960’S LH
and social and academic adjustment issues. 3 sem. hrs.
Formerly IDS 189A14. Pre-requisite: First This course examines the history of the
semester transfer student status. 1960s through the lens of the cold war,
111 PEACE STUDIES SS civil rights, and popular music. May not
3 sem. hrs. be taken under the P/NP option.
Prerequisites: COM 110 and ENG 101 or
A general, interdisciplinary introduction to
concurrent registration.
Peace Studies, including social justice,
conflict resolution, global ecology, and 121A19 LITERARY STUDIES LH
education for an interdependent world. 3 sem. hrs.
Includes arranged service learning hours. Interdisciplinary writing-intensive course
112 EUROPEAN STUDIES: focusing on significant humanities texts in
INTRODUCTION TO EUROPE H relationship to their historical and cultural
3 sem. hrs. contexts. May not be taken under the P/NP
A general survey of Europe, including its option. Prerequisites: COM 110 and ENG
geography, climate, languages, cultures, 101 or concurrent registration.
religions, and politics.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Interdisciplinary Studies Courses 113

121A21 READING VERBAL 121A39 WOMEN X WOMEN


AND VISUAL TEXT LH CONTEMPORARY
3 sem. hrs. PLAYWRIGHTS LH
Interdisciplinary writing-intensive course 3 sem. hrs.
focusing on significant humanities texts in Interdisciplinary writing intensive course
relationship to their historical and cultural that examines plays by contemporary
contexts. May not be taken under the P/ women playwrights that explore female-to-
NP option. Prerequisites: COM 110 and female relationships: mothers and
ENG 101 or concurrent registration. daughters, sisters, lovers, strangers, and
121A24 COMPARATIVE friends. May not be taken under the P/NP
FRONTIERS LH option. Prerequisites: COM 110 and ENG
3 sem. hrs. 101 or concurrent registration.
Interdisciplinary writing-intensive course 121A47 ART, THE ARTIST:
focusing on significant humanities texts in LITERATURE AND FILM LH
relationship to their historical and cultural 3 sem. hrs.
contexts. May not be taken under the P/
NP option. Prerequisites: COM 110 and An interdisciplinary, writing intensive
ENG 101 or concurrent registration. course that takes as its text art in its
various forms, and examines it through
121A27 PIRATES, CORSAIRS the context of how art and the idea of the
AND SWASHBUCKLERS artist are most commonly received:
THRU THE AGES LH through mass culture, namely literature,
3 sem. hrs. film, the museum, and public space. May
This course examines the history of piracy not be taken under the P/NP option.
throughout the world from ancient to Prerequisites: COM 110 and ENG 101 or
modern times and the pirate as cultural concurrent registration.
hero today. May not be taken under the P/ 121A50 CITY AS TEXT: BERLIN AND
NP option. Prerequisites: COM 110 and MUNICH, GERMANY LH
ENG 101 or concurrent registration. 3 sem. hrs.
121A29 NATIVE WRITERS The study of the cities of Berlin and
ON NATIVE ISSUES LH Munich, Germany, including their history,
3 sem. hrs. culture, commerce, traditions, and place in
Interdisciplinary writing-intensive course the global community. May not be taken
examines historical and contemporary under the P/NP option. Prerequisites:
literature by Native writers to introduce COM 110 or concurrent registration; ENG
key issues in Native American Studies. 101; Admission to the Honors Program.
May not be taken under the P/NP option. 121A51 FILM AND HISTORY:
Prerequisites: COM 110 and ENG 101 or HOLLYWOOD-AMERICA
concurrent registration. IN THE MID 20TH CENTURY LH
121A32 ART LH 3 sem. hrs.
3 sem. hrs. Study of historical films, i.e., films that
Interdisciplinary writing-intensive course depict historical events to determine if
focusing on significant humanities texts in Hollywood has distorted history; study of
relationship to their historical and cultural films in order to learn about the historical
contexts. May not be taken under the P/ period in which films were produced. May
NP option. Prerequisites: COM 110 and not be taken under the P/NP option.
ENG 101 or concurrent registration. Prerequisites: COM 110 and ENG 101 or
121A37 THEATRE AND FILM: concurrent registration.
EXPLORATION OF BLACK 121A52 ETHNIC STUDIES:
IDENTITY IN AMERICA LH ETHNIC LITERATURES LH
3 sem. hrs. 3 sem. hrs.
Through theatre and film, this course will This course will examine works by
explore the formation and evolution of the nineteenth- and twentieth-century writers
black identity in America. May not be who discuss the experiences of racialized
taken under the P/NP option. Pre- persons in the United States. May not be
requisites: COM 110 and ENG 101 or taken under the P/NP option.
concurrent registration. Prerequisites: COM 110 and ENG 101 or
concurrent registration.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


114 Interdisciplinary Studies Courses
121A53 CITY AS TEXT: LIMA 121A60 INTRODUCTION TO
AND CUSCO, PERU LH EUROPE LH
3 sem. hrs. 3 sem. hrs.
The study of the cities of Lima and Cusco, This is a general survey of topics about
Peru, including their history, culture, Europe including its geography, climate,
commerce, traditions, and place in the languages, cultures, religions, and politics.
global community. May not be taken Students will form a better understanding
under the P/NP option. Prerequisites: of a part of the world which seems well-
COM 110 or concurrent registration; ENG known, but remains mostly foreign and
101; Admission to the Honors Program. unfamiliar. May not be taken under the P/
121A55 SEEN AND NOT HEARD: NP option. Prerequisites: COM 110 and
CHILDREN AND THE ENG 101 or concurrent registration.
THEATRE LH 121A61 WOMEN IN CHINESE
3 sem. hrs. HISTORY AND LITERATURE LH
This course will explore the place of 3 sem. hrs.
children as consumers of theatre. Students An interdisciplinary study of Chinese
will read and analyze numerous plays for women from the Shang dynasty through
young audiences and place them within the twentieth century. May not be taken
historical, political and social framework. under the P/NP option. Prerequisites: 
May not be taken under the P/NP option.
Prerequisites: COM 110 and ENG 101 or COM 110 and ENG 101 or concurrent
concurrent registration. registration.
121A56 AMERICAN IMMIGRATION 121A63 THE COLD WAR IN
HISTORY LH EUROPE LH
3 sem. hrs. 3 sem. hrs.
Survey of the immigration experience of This course introduces students to the
women, men, and children who came to political changes in Cold War Europe
the U.S. from colonial era through the from 1945 to the collapse of the Soviet
20th century; will focus on migration and Union in 1991. May not be taken under
on the ways race, ethnicity, gender, class the P/NP option. Prerequisites: COM 110
and national ideas shaped the lives of and ENG 101 or concurrent registration.
immigrants. May not be taken under the P/ 121A64 CITY AS TEXT: MÉRIDA LH
NP option. Prerequisites: COM 110 and 3 sem. hrs.
ENG 101 or concurrent registration. Interdisciplinary writing intensive course
121A57 JESUS IN AMERICAN focusing on significant humanities texts in
CULTURE LH relationship to their historical and cultural
3 sem. hrs. contexts. May not be taken under the P/NP
The readings of this course delineate the option. Prerequisites: COM 110 and ENG
history of how Jesus has been portrayed in 101 or concurrent registration.
American sermons, poetry, fiction, film, 121A65 CITY AS TEXT: HAVANA
and art. May not be taken under the P/NP
CUBA LH
option. Prerequisites: COM 110 and ENG
101 or concurrent registration. 3 sem. hrs.
Interdisciplinary writing intensive course
121A58 CITY AS TEXT:
focusing on significant humanities texts in
FLORENCE, ITALY LH
relationship to their historical and cultural
3 sem. hrs. contexts. The purpose of this course is to
The study of the city of Florence, its history, study Cuba, with an emphasis on the
culture, commerce, traditions, and place in society, people, history, culture, economy,
the global community. May not be taken religion, traditions, education, and politics
under the P/NP option. Prerequisites: COM of the region. May not be taken under the
110 or concurrent registration; ENG 101; P/NP option. Prerequisites: COM 110 and
Admission to the Honors Program and ENG 101 or concurrent registration.
completion of HON 102A87. 121A66 CITY AS TEXT:PANAMA LH
121A59 CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY LH 3 sem. hrs.
3 sem. hrs.
This course will explore the origins and Interdisciplinary writing intensive course
development of Classical (Greek and focusing on significant humanities texts in
Roman) Mythology. May not be taken relationship to their historical and cultural
under the P/NP option. Prerequisites: contexts. May not be taken under the P/NP
COM 110 and ENG 101 or concurrent option. Prerequisites: ENG 101; COM
registration. 110 or concurrent registration.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Interdisciplinary Studies Courses 115
122 FIRST YEAR LEARNING IN 133A05 FRENCH HISTORY,
COMMUNITIES SEMINAR CIVILIZATION AND CULTURE
1 sem. hr. 3 sem. hrs.
A seminar to assist first-year freshmen Study Abroad - French history,
students in their transition to the civilization and culture.
University, including exploration of 133A08 ITALIAN LANGUAGE AND
majors, minors, and careers, campus CULTURE—ORVIETO, ITALY
resources, and opportunities for engage- 3 sem. hrs.
ment in university and civic life. Formerly Students will experience this formative
IDS 189A95. region of the world and its rich cultural
122A02 LEARNING IN THE heritage from the perspective of multiple
COMMUNITIES (LINC): and interactive disciplines.
VETERAN’S SEMINAR 133A09 STUDY ABROAD:
1 sem. hr. ARGENTINA HISTORY, CULTURE
The intent of the Veterans Seminar is to AND SOCIETY H
assist student veterans in their transition to 3 sem. hrs.
the University community, Bloomington- Study the history, culture and society of
Normal area, and civilian life. Student Argentina within the broader context of
veterans will also gain an understanding of South America through visits and research
how to maximize the resources provided at while interning in the Argentinean
Illinois State University as well as those workplace.
offered by the surrounding community. The 133A12 MOROCCAN LANGUAGE
seminar helps students develop the academic AND CULTURE, MEKNES,
skills necessary for success in college in a MOROCCO
small seminar-style environment. 3 sem. hrs.
125 FOUNDATIONS OF CITIZENSHIP: Summer study abroad in Meknes,
AN INTRODUCTION TO CIVIC Morocco. Includes beginning Moroccan
RESPONSIBILITY Colloquial Arabic and cultural excursions.
3 sem. hrs. Multiple enrollments are allowed if
Designed to enhance students’ basic content is different.
knowledge, understanding, and skills in 133A21 NETHERLANDS
active citizenship and civic responsibility 3 sem. hrs.
through introductory concepts and applied Students study the history, culture and
elements of civic engagement. Pre- society of the Netherlands within the
requisites: COM 110 and ENG 101. broader context of the European Union;
133 INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDY explore the business in the European Union
ABROAD within an awareness of history and culture,
1-6 sem. hrs. as they develop skills to critically analyze
Study abroad. Specific topics and regions primary and secondary evidence, develop
as approved and indicated by decimal and market plans, and communicate their own
extended title. See topics below. Multiple ideas and group viewpoints clearly and
enrollments are allowed if content differs. effectively both orally and in writing.
133A02 JAPANESE HISTORY, 133A22 STUDY ABROAD: GREAT
CIVILIZATION AND CULTURE BRITAIN H
3 sem. hrs. 3 sem. hrs.
Study abroad - Japanese history, Study of the culture and society of Great
civilization and culture. Britain, both historical and contemporary,
133A04 INTRODUCTION TO particularly in placing music within the
MEXICAN CULTURE broader social context.
3 sem. hrs.
133A25 NOVANCIA SCHOOL OF
Experiential learning, language develop- BUSINESS, PARIS FRANCE
ment, and community engagement in 1 sem. hr.
Mexico. Students will acquire under-
standing of Mexican culture, history, and Explores intercultural competence and
politics. communication; Paris rhetoric, international
and global marketing practices. Pre-
requisites: Completion of 39 hours; 2.80
GPA.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


116 Interdisciplinary Studies Courses

133A26 HANZE SCHOOL OF 212 EUROPEAN STUDIES:


COMMUNICATION MEDIA AND IT, EUROPE TODAY LH
GRONINGEN 3 sem. hrs.
1 sem. hr.
An integrated survey of the major cultural,
Explores intercultural competence and
communication; Eurozone laws, economics, demographical, geographical, political, and
and politics; and the diverse European social transformations of Europe east and
cultures from a business perspective. west since 1945.
Prerequisites: COM 178, 272 or equivalent. 254 RELIGIONS AND CULTURES LH
194 CAREERS FOR HEALTH 3 sem. hrs.
PROFESSIONALS
1 sem. hr. A critical examination of diverse religious
discourses and literacies and how they
Information and experience on careers in
medicine, dentistry, osteopathy, podiatry, construct and reflect identity based on
optometry, pharmacy, veterinary medicine, cultural differences. May not be taken
occupational therapy and physical therapy. under the P/NP option. Prerequisites:
Not for credit if had BSC 298A01. CR/NC COM 110 and ENG 101 or concurrent
only. Prerequisite: Consent of the pre- registration.
professional advisor. 265 INTRODUCTION TO COGNITIVE
203 NATIONS AND NARRATIONS H SCIENCE: COMPUTERS, MINDS,
3 sem. hrs. BRAINS, AND ROBOTS SMT
Construction of national identities from 3 sem. hrs.
cultural, philosophical, religious, and
Explores fundamental principles from
political empires using narrative discourse Psychology, Computer Science,
as a lens. Topics vary and are designated
Philosophy, Linguistics, and Biology that
by different decimals. See topics below. contribute to the scientific study of
Prerequisites: COM 110 and ENG 101. intelligent systems (minds). Prerequisites:
203A05 NATIONS AND MAT 113, 120, 130, 145 or one semester
NARRATIONS: AFRICA H of Foreign Language.
3 sem. hrs.
Construction of national identities from 274 PREPARING FOR THE EDTPA
cultural, philosophical, religious, and 1 sem. hr.
political empires using narrative discourse This course explores aspects of the edTPA,
as a lens. including planning, instruction, assessment,
203A10 NATIONS AND identifying evidence of practice, analytical
NARRATIONS: EAST ASIA H writing, and supporting edTPA resources.
3 sem. hrs. Prerequisites: Completion of 60 hours.
Construction of national identities from Education major.
cultural, philosophical, religious, and 275 TOPICS IN EUROPEAN STUDIES
political empires using narrative discourse 3 sem. hrs.
as a lens. Intermediate course in European Studies
203A15 NATIONS AND focusing on different themes, periods, or
NARRATIONS: LATIN AMERICA H issues each semester. Multiple enrollments
3 sem. hrs. are allowed if content is different;
Construction of national identities from maximum of 12 hours.
cultural, philosophical, religious, and 298 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 
political empires using narrative discourse INTERNSHIP/COOPERATIVE
as a lens. EDUCATION
204 SERVICE LEARNING: MEKNES 1-6 sem. hrs.
MOROCCO Interdisciplinary directed project or on-the-
2 sem. hrs. job experience related to student’s career
Students will work three hours per week at a interests under the supervision of internship
host organization to increase language coordinator or faculty of one or more
proficiency and gain valuable international departments or schools. Prerequisite:
experience. Multiple enrollments are Junior standing.
allowed; maximum of 4 hours. Prerequisites:
 IDS 133A12 or concurrent registration.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Interdisciplinary Studies Courses 117

298A02 PROFESSIONAL 398A01 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE


PRACTICE: MENTORSHIP IN INTERNSHIP/COOPERATIVE
HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONS EDUCATION OR CO-OP IN PEACE
1 sem. hr. STUDIES AND CONFLICT
Work in a mentorship environment with RESOLUTION
practicing professionals in specific areas 3-6 sem. hrs.
of healthcare, including medicine, Practical experience, preferably in an
dentistry, and optometry. Not for credit if international, national, or local organ-
had BSC 298A02. CR/NC only. Pre- ization where peacemaking conflict res-
requisites: IDS 194; a minimum 3.50 GPA
olution skills are required and learned.
and consent of the pre-professional
Prerequisites: IDS 111 and Minor in Peace
advisor.
and Conflict Resolution Studies.
302SEMINAR ON SUCCESS
398A02 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE:
1 sem. hr. SERVICE LEARNING EXPERIENCE
A synthesis of learning outcomes from IN CIVIC ENGAGEMENT
across CAST majors with a focus on the 3 sem. hrs.
successful transition to the professional This capstone course provides the
career. Prerequisites: Junior or senior
opportunity to integrate academic study
standing; admission to any major in the
College of Applied Science and with service learning by having super-
Technology. vised, practical experience in a profess-
sional environment that focuses on civic
312 EUROPEAN STUDIES SENIOR responsibility. Prerequisite: Minor in Civic
SEMINAR Engagement and Responsibility.
3 sem. hrs.
398A03 PROFESSIONAL
A capstone research project in European PRACTICE: FOR
Studies. This project will be both INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES
interdisciplinary (typically involving MAJOR OR MINOR
humanities and social sciences) and inter- 1-16 sem. hrs.
European (involving more than one nation
or national culture). Prerequisites: IDS Supervised work experience in local, state,
112 or HIS 101, 102, or 107 and IDS 212. national, and international businesses,
agencies, institutions, and organizations
375 RESEARCH IN EUROPEAN which are planned, administered, and
STUDIES supervised at the department level.
3 sem. hrs. Maximum of 16 hours may be applied
Research in selected topics in European toward graduation. Prerequisites: Major or
Studies. Topics will vary each semester. Minor in Interdisciplinary Studies only.
Multiple enrollments are allowed if Consent of the instructor.
content is different; maximum of 12 hours.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


118

COLLEGE OF APPLIED SCIENCE


AND TECHNOLOGY
Dean: Todd McLoda,
103 Turner Hall.
Associate Dean: Kevin Laudner .
Assistant Dean: Kar a Snyder .
Website: CAST.IllinoisState.edu

The College of Applied Science and


Technology offers programs to prepare
students for professional and technical
positions in education, government,
business, and industry. Five departments/
schools in the College also offer teacher
preparation programs. Faculty in the College
are dedicated to the personal and academic
development of their students as well as the
discovery and application of theoretical
knowledge and the advancement of
professional practice in their respective
areas. This is accomplished through a
dynamic partnership of interdisciplinary
learning, scholarship, and service that is
built on a collaboration among students,
faculty, and members of the professional
community.

The College is comprised of six


departments: Agriculture; Criminal
Justice Sciences; Family and Consumer
Sciences; Health Sciences; Military
Science; and Technology and two
schools: Information Technology and
Kinesiology and Recreation.

The College offers graduate programs in


Agriculture; Criminal Justice Sciences;
Family and Consumer Sciences; Information
Technology; Kinesiology and Recreation;
and Technology. Descriptions and
requirements of these programs may be
found in the Graduate Catalog.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Agriculture 119

AGRICULTURE ment of Economics.


(AGR) 502 —Required courses (21-22 hours): ACC
131; AGR 109, 110; CHE 110 and 112,
125 Ropp Agriculture Building or 140; ECO 105; MAT 120.
Phone: (309) 438-5654 —Choose four courses (12-14 hours) from:
Fax: (309) 438-5653 AGR 120, 130, 150, 157, 170, 205.
Web address: Agriculture.IllinoisState.edu —The student must complete a minimum of
Email address: isuagr@IllinoisState.edu 12 semester hours (within the 36 required
Chairperson: Robert Rhykerd. in Agriculture) in Agribusiness courses
selected from AGR 213, 214, 215, 216,
General Department Information 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 317, 318,
319, 320, 324.
HONORS IN AGRICULTURE —AGR 295, 394, and 395 do not count
Departmental Honors in Agriculture is toward this major.
available to qualified juniors and seniors. —Non-business majors who desire to elect
The student completing the Honors Program more than 30 hours of their coursework
graduation requirements will graduate “with in business must meet all College of
Honors in Agriculture,” which will be indi- Business requirements for graduation.
cated on the student’s official transcript and These students should register for addi-
diploma. Admission to the Honors Program tional courses only in person and with the
in Agriculture requires a minimum of sixty written permission of the College of
(60) semester hours of post-secondary Business advisor.
courses with a cumulative grade point aver-
age of 3.50 or higher on a 4.00 scale. In Agriculture Communication and
order to graduate as an Honors Graduate in Leadership Sequence
Agriculture, a student must fulfill the gen-
eral requirements for participation in the —37 hours in Agriculture and 18 hours in
University Honors Program. Students must Communication required.
also have a cumulative grade point average
—Required Agriculture courses (25 hours):
of 3.50 or higher; a cumulative grade point
AGR 109, 110, 120, 130, 150, 170, 190,
of 3.70 or higher for all courses taken in the
Department of Agriculture; successfully 192, 205.
completed two in-course honors in 200- —3 hours from AGR 295 or 398.
level or higher courses in the student’s tech- —3 hours from: AGR 319; EAF 228, 231,
nical area; successfully completed one in- 235; or TCH 212.
course honors course in a 200-level or high-
er course offered outside the Department of —Additional required courses (6 hours):
Agriculture; and successfully completed a COM 111 and 297.
minimum of three credit hours of AGR 299,
Independent Study. The Department of Agronomy Management Sequence
Agriculture offers in-course honors work in —55 hours in Agriculture required.
all its courses for students enrolled in the—Required Agriculture courses (34 hours):
University Honors Program or in any de- AGR 109, 110, 120, 150, 157, 203, 234,
partmental honors program. In-course work
272, 305, 357.
is offered at the discretion of the instructor.
—6 hours of Agronomy electives.
Further details about the University Honors —12 hours of senior level Agribusiness
program are available at courses.
Honors.IllinoisState.edu. —3 hours of a senior level Horticulture
course.
Agriculture Program
Animal Industry Management
Degree Offered: B.S. Sequence
MAJOR IN AGRICULTURE —55 hours in Agriculture required.
—Required Agriculture courses (32-33
Agribusiness Sequence
hours): AGR 109, 170, 173, 272, 275,
—36 hours in Agriculture and 19 hours in 282, 283, 286; combination of AGR 380
the College of Business and/or Depart-

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


120 Agriculture
and one from 381A01 or 381A02 or Horticulture and Landscape
381A03 or 398 (2 hours); and choose one Management Sequence
from AGR 110, 120, 130, 150 or 157.
—36 hours in Agriculture and 19 hours in the
—8 hours of Animal Science electives. College of Business and/or Department of
—15 hours of Agribusiness electives. Economics.
—Additional required courses (6-12 hours): —Required courses (38-39 hours): ACC 131;
BSC 101 or 196 or 197; CHE 102, or 110 AGR 109, 110, 120, 130, 157; AGR 150 or
and 112, or 140 and 141. BSC 196 or 197 (AGR 150 preferred);
CHE 110 and 112, or 140; ECO 105; FIL
Animal Science Sequence 185; MAT 120.
—36 hours in Agriculture required. —12 hours from AGR 252, 253, 254, 255,
—Required Agriculture courses (32-33 256, 257, 260, 262, 352, 353, 355, 356.
hours): AGR 109, 170, 173A01 or —AGR 295, 394, and 395 do not count to-
173A02, 272, 275, 282, 283, 286; combi- ward this sequence.
nation of AGR 380 and one from 381A01
or 381A02 or 381A03 or 398 (2 hours); Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sequence
and choose one from AGR 110, 120, 130,
150, or 157. —36 hours in Agriculture required.
—4 hours of Animal Science electives. —Required Agriculture courses (32-33
hours): AGR 109, 170, 173, 272, 275, 282,
—Additional required courses (20-24 hours): 283, 286; combination of AGR 380 and
BSC 196 or 197; CHE 110 and 112, or 140
one from 381A01 or 381A02 or 381A03 or
and 141; CHE 220 or 230 and 231; and
398 (2 hours); and choose one from AGR
CHE 242 or 342; MAT 120 or 144 or 145.
110, 120, 130, 150, 157.
Crop and Soil Science Sequence — 4 hours of Animal Science electives.
— Additional required courses (35-37 hours):
— A minimum of 61 hour s r equir ed. BSC 196 and 197; CHE 140, 141, 230,
— 37 hours in Agriculture required. 231, and 242 or 342; MAT 144 or 145;
— Required Agriculture courses (34 hours): PHY 108 and 109, or 110 and 111.
AGR 109, 110, 120, 150, 157, 203, 234, — A minimum of 3.00 GPA in chemistry
272, 305, 357. courses must be achieved by 60 hours to
— 3 hours of senior level Agronomy elec- remain in the Pre-Veterinarian Sequence.
tives. — Must maintain a minimum 3.20 cumulative
— Required courses outside of Agriculture GPA to remain in the Pre-Veterinary Med-
(24-27 hours): CHE 110 and 112, or 140 icine Sequence.
and 141; CHE 220 and 242; GEO 102;
MAT 120 or 144 or 145; PHY 105. Agriculture Teacher Education
Sequence
Food Industry Management Sequence All Agriculture Teacher Education students
—36 hours in Agriculture and/or Family and planning to become licensed teachers must
Consumer Sciences and 19 hours in the apply for and be admitted to the University
College of Business and/or Department of Professional Studies program (see the Uni-
Economics. versity-Wide Teacher Education section of
—Required courses (42-43 hours): ACC 131; this Undergraduate Catalog). A cumulative
AGR 109, 110, 271, 315, 317; AGR 205 or 2.50 GPA and 2.50 GPA in the major are
IT 150; CHE 110 and 112, or 140; ECO required for admission and retention in the
105; ECO 138 or MQM 100; FIL 185; sequence. Students are encouraged to consid-
MKT 230; MAT 120. er a second licensure in an academic area
such as Biological Sciences, Chemistry or
—Choose one course (3-4 hours) from: AGR
Mathematics.
120, 130, 150, 170.
—74-75 total hours required.
—15 hours from AGR 214, 215, 257, 285,
314, 319, 324, 340; FCS 102, 113, 213, —42 hours in Agriculture required.
316, 319, 332. —Required Agriculture courses (42 hours):
—AGR 295, 394, and 395 do not count to- AGR 109, 110, 120, 130, 150, 157, 170,
ward this sequence. 173, 190, 191, 205, 231, 295, 394, 395.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


121
Agriculture
— Additional required courses (8-9 hours): legend relates to the type and kind of activity
BSC 196 or 197 (196 preferred); CHE 110 related to a specific course.
and 112, or 140.
— Professional Education requirements (14 Clinical Experiences Legend
hours): EAF 228 or 231 or 235; PSY 215;  Observation (including field trips)
TCH 212, 216, and 219.  Tutoring one-on-one contact
— A minimum of 100 clock hours of ap-  Non-instructional assisting
proved pre-student teaching clinical expe-  Small group instruction
riences; and Student Teaching 399A01 (10  Whole class instruction
hours). All professional education and  Work with clinic client(s)
content-area coursework required for the  Graduate practicum
program must be passed with a grade of C  Professional meeting
or better. Program leads to licensure: sec-
ondary 6-12. MINOR IN AGRICULTURE
CLINICAL EXPERIENCES IN — 24 hours in Agriculture required.
TEACHER EDUCATION — Required courses: AGR 109, two 100-
A variety of clinical (pre-student teaching) level Agriculture courses.
experiences, as well as student teaching, are
included in the teacher candidates profession- Agriculture Courses
al preparation. Observations, small and large In meeting program requirements in the De-
group instruction, tutoring, field experiences, partment of Agriculture, the student should
and student teaching are included in the Clin- note that the courses are considered in areas,
ical Experiences Program. The experiences as follows:
offered prior to student teaching are integral
parts of specific college courses. Clinical General courses: AGR 109, 198, 201,
experiences are provided in off-campus pro- 203, 205, 302, 303, 398.
fessional development schools, local schools, Agribusiness: AGR 110, 213, 214, 215,
campus laboratory schools, agencies and 216, 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 317,
other approved non-school settings. The 318, 319, 320, 324.
Cecilia J. Lauby Teacher Education Center Agricultural Education: AGR 190, 295,
monitors and documents all clinical experi- 394, 395.
ences. Teacher candidates will show verifica-
Agricultural Engineering Technology:
tion of having completed clinical experiences
AGR 130, 225, 231, 232, 234, 235, 304,
commensurate with attaining local, state, and
340, 383.
national standards. Teacher candidates must
provide their own transportation to clinical Agronomy: AGR 150, 157, 272, 304,
experiences sites. 305, 306, 352, 355, 357, 363.
Animal Science: AGR 170, 173, 271,
Candidates are required to provide documen- 272, 275, 280, 282, 283, 285, 286, 288,
tation of meeting all State of Illinois, district, 363, 372, 375, 380, 381A01, 381A03, 386.
and university requirements in regard to
Horticulture and Landscape Manage-
criminal background checks BEFORE begin-
ment: AGR 120, 150, 157, 252, 253, 254,
ning any clinical experiences. Criminal back- 255, 256, 257, 260, 262, 352, 353, 355,
ground checks must remain current as of the
356.
last day of the clinical experience. Candi-
dates should consult with clinical course
109 INTRODUCTION TO THE
faculty and the Cecilia J. Lauby Teacher
Education Center well in advance of clinical AGRICULTURAL INDUSTRY
experiences to determine specific require- 3 sem. hrs.
ments needed each semester. Study of the agriculture programs within the
The approximate number of clinical hours department and career opportunities in agri-
associated with each course offering can be culture.
found with the appropriate course description
in this Undergraduate Catalog. The following

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


122 Agriculture

110 INTRODUCTORY AGRICULTURAL 190 INTRODUCTION TO


ECONOMICS AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION
3 sem. hrs. 2 sem. hrs.
Fundamental principles of economics ap- Introduction to formal and informal educa-
plied to agriculture, agriculture finance, tion in Agriculture. The philosophical ba-
prices, taxation, marketing, and land use. sis, history, audiences, and methods in edu-
cational settings in agriculture. Prerequi-
120 INTRODUCTORY HORTICULTURE site: Concurrent registration in AGR 191 or
3 sem. hrs. 192.
Introduction to principles and practices in 191 INTRODUCTION TO
development, production, and use of horti- AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION
cultural crops (fruits, vegetables, green- TEACHER LICENSURE
house, floral, turf, nursery, and landscape). 1 sem. hr.
Materials charge optional. Introduction to the agricultural teaching
130 INTRODUCTION TO profession, licensure process, endorse-
ENGINEERING ments, preparation process at Illinois State
TECHNOLOGY University, teaching methods, classroom
3 sem. hrs. management and inclusion. Includes Clini-
Place of mechanics in agriculture. Exam- cal Experience: 10 hours. Prerequisite:
ples, problems, discussions, and laboratory AGR 190 or concurrent registration.
exercises in present and future mechanics 192 INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURAL
applications. Lecture and lab. Materials COMMUNICATION AND
charge optional. LEADERSHIP
150 PRINCIPLES OF AGRONOMY 1 sem. hr.
4 sem. hrs. This course is an introduction to Agricul-
Fundamentals of plant science; importance, tural Communication and Leadership; in-
classification, distribution, and production formal agricultural education settings and
practices of the major crops of the world. the communication field, media and cam-
Lecture and lab. paign development. Prerequisite: AGR
190 or concurrent registration.
157 SOIL SCIENCE
198 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE:
4 sem. hrs. FARM INTERNSHIP
Origin and formation, physical and chemi- 1-6 sem. hrs.
cal properties, moisture relationships, lim- Experience in basic agricultural operations.
ing and fertilizing soils. Chemical and CR/NC only. Prerequisites: Major only.
physical tests of soils. Lecture and lab. Approved application required. Minimum
Materials charge optional. Prerequisite: 45 experience/hours credit.
CHE 102 or 110 or 140 or equivalent. 201 RESOURCES, FOOD, AND
170 INTRODUCTION TO ANIMAL  SOCIETY: A GLOBAL
SCIENCE PERSPECTIVE SS
3 sem. hrs. 3 sem. hrs.
Breeding, selection, genetics, nutrition, Food and fiber production and distribution
physiology, and production of farm and problems, policies, and processes analyzed
companion animals. Fundamentals of ani- within social, economic, political, and cul-
mal science. Lecture. tural contexts of societies. May not be tak-
en under the P/NP option. Prerequisite:
173 WORKING WITH DOMESTIC
COM 110 or ENG 101 or concurrent regis-
ANIMALS
tration.
2 sem. hrs.
Introduction to key techniques, procedures, 203 AGRICULTURE AND THE
and equipment associated with care and ENVIRONMENT SMT
3 sem. hrs.
management of domestic animals. Lab.
Materials charge optional. Formerly AGR Examination of contemporary environmen-
173A01 INTRODUCTION TO A NIMA L tal issues that are strongly linked to current
and past agricultural practices. Prerequi-
SCIENCE LABORATORY: FARM ANI-
sites: COM 110 and ENG 101; and MAT
MALS and 173A02 INTRODUCTION TO
113, 120, 130, or 145.
ANIMAL SCIENCE LABORATORY: COM-
PANION ANIMALS. Prerequisite: AGR
170 or concurrent registration.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Agriculture 123

205 MICROCOMPUTER 232 AGRICULTURAL AND


APPLICATIONS IN AGRICULTURE HORTICULTURAL MACHINERY
3 sem. hrs. SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT
3 sem. hrs.
Introduction to microcomputer applica-
Principles of power and machinery opera-
tions specific to agriculture. Prerequisite:
tion. Calibration, management and use of
AGR 110 recommended. common agricultural and horticultural ma-
213 FARM MANAGEMENT chine systems. Lecture and lab. Materials
3 sem. hrs. charge optional.
Factors of production, such as equipment, 234 SOIL AND WATER
labor distribution, cropping systems, and CONSERVATION
soils; organization and operation; types of 3 sem. hrs.
farming. Drainage, soil erosion control, water con-
214 AGRICULTURE MARKETING servation on farms; planning, materials,
3 sem. hrs. construction, repair, and adaptation of
structures to farm needs. Lecture, lab, and
Markets, price-making forces, reasons for field trips.
existing practices, marketing services, and 235 AGRICULTURAL AND
cooperative marketing. Prerequisite: AGR HORTICULTURAL STRUCTURES
110 or ECO 105 or equivalent introducto- AND ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS
ry microeconomics course. 3 sem. hrs.
215 FARM SUPPLY AND FOOD Principles of design, selection, and man-
INDUSTRY MANAGEMENT agement of structural, utility, and HVAC
3 sem. hrs. systems used in agricultural and horticul-
tural production and processing. Lecture
Tools for profitable management of corpo- and lab. Materials charge optional.
rate and proprietary farm supply and food
252 URBAN LANDSCAPE
industry agribusinesses. Prerequisite:  MANAGEMENT
ACC 131 or AGR 216 or consent of the 3 sem. hrs.
instructor. Cultural practices and principles in the se-
216 FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING FOR lection and care of ornamental plants for
AGRICULTURAL PRODUCERS landscape and garden use. Introduction to
3 sem. hrs. landscape design and maintenance. Lec-
Standard farm business accounting meth- ture and lab. Offered even-numbered
years. Prerequisites: AGR 150 and 157 or
ods and procedures, financial measures of
consent of the instructor.
success, inventories, depreciation, net
254 HERBACEOUS PLANT MATERIAL
worth, income tax, budgeting and cash
3 sem. hrs.
flow, and business analysis. Formerly
Identification, selection, use, and manage-
FARM ACCOUNTING.
ment of annuals, perennials, and ornamen-
225 RENEWABLE ENERGY AND tal grasses in the landscape. Lecture and
AGRICULTURE lab. Field trip. Offered even-numbered
3 sem. hrs. years in the spring. Materials charge op-
Explores the relationships between renew- tional. Prerequisite: AGR 120.
able energy and agriculture with emphasis 255 LANDSCAPE PLANTS
on biofuels, wind energy, and hydropow- 3 sem. hrs.
er. Prerequisite: AGR 110 or ECO 105. Identification and landscape value of orna-
mental trees, shrubs, vines, and ground
231 MANAGING AND TEACHING IN cover. Intensive field study supplemented
AGRICULTURAL AND by lectures.
TECHNOLOGY LABORATORIES 256 LANDSCAPE PLANTS II
3 sem. hrs. 3 sem. hrs.
Principles, methods and skills involved in Continuation of AGR 255. Identification
managing and teaching in agricultural and and landscape value of additional species
technology laboratories. Lecture and lab. of ornamental trees, shrubs, vines, and
Materials charge optional. Prerequisite:  groundcovers. Intensive field study; lec-
AGR 130 or consent of the instructor. ture. Prerequisite: AGR 255.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


124 Agriculture
257 FRUIT AND VEGETABLE 282 ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF
PRODUCTION LIVESTOCK AND COMPANION
3 sem. hrs. ANIMALS I
Horticultural food crop identification, pro- 3 sem. hrs.
duction and cultural requirements. Intro- Anatomy and physiology of livestock and
duction to quality determinations, pest companion animals including the integu-
control, and marketing. Lecture and lab. mentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, and
Field trip. Materials charge optional. Pre- cardiovascular systems. Materials charge
requisite: AGR 120. optional. Formerly PHY SIOLOGY OF
262 ORNAMENTAL PLANT FARM ANIMALS. Prerequisites: AGR
PRODUCTION 170; BSC 196 or 197.
3 sem. hrs. 283 REPRODUCTIVE PHYSIOLOGY
Commercial ornamental plant production OF LIVESTOCK
and management including: nursery site se- 3 sem. hrs.
lection; plant propagation techniques; green- Comparative anatomy, physiology, and
house, container and field stock; growing endocrinology of reproduction of live-
facilities and equipment requirements. Lec- stock. Lecture and lab. Materials charge
ture and lab. Field trip required. Offered optional.
even-numbered years in the spring. Materi- 285 MEAT SCIENCE
als charge optional. Formerly NURSERY 3 sem. hrs.
MANAGEMENT. Prerequisite: AGR 120 Comprehensive treatment of the meat indus-
or 150. try and presentation of basic facts about one
271 FOODS OF ANIMAL ORIGIN of our most important food products. Lec-
3 sem. hrs. ture and lab. Materials charge optional.
Concepts of food-animal products (meat, 286 BEHAVIOR OF DOMESTIC
dairy, eggs) including their nutritive val- ANIMALS
ue, packaging, marketing chain, and value 3 sem. hrs.
-added technology. Lecture and lab. Mate- Behavioral patterns and systems, group
rials charge optional. Prerequisites: CHE formations, socialization, physical envi-
110 and 112, or 140 and 141. ronment, genetic and physiological factors
272 AGRICULTURAL GENETICS as they relate to domestic animals. Prereq-
3 sem. hrs. uisite: AGR 170 recommended.
Heredity, variation, and development of 288 ADVANCED LIVESTOCK AND
domesticated plants and animals. Mende- DAIRY CATTLE SELECTION
lian genetics, mutations, linkage, quantita- 3 sem. hrs.
tive inheritance, and population genetics. Judging various species of livestock in re-
275 INTRODUCTION TO ANIMAL lation to their functions in the show ring
NUTRITION and market and the presentation of oral
4 sem. hrs. reasons.
Study of nutrients, their metabolism and 292 ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF
utilization; digestive physiology in rumi- LIVESTOCK AND
nants, non-ruminants and avians; diet for- COMPANION ANIMALS II
mulation and ration balancing. Materials 3 sem. hrs.
charge optional. Prerequisite: AGR 170. Anatomy and physiology of livestock and
280 LIVESTOCK AND DAIRY companion animals including the respira-
CATTLE SELECTION tory, lymphatic, digestive, endocrine, uri-
3 sem. hrs. nary, and reproductive systems. Lecture
and lab. Materials charge optional. Pre-
Fundamentals of livestock and dairy se-
requisites: AGR 170; BSC 196 or 197.
lection; relation to production, marketing,
and showing. Lab and field trips.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Agriculture 125

295 SUMMER INTERNSHIP IN 312 MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING


AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION FOR AGRICULTURAL
3 sem. hrs. PRODUCERS
Experience in the profession of agricultur- 3 sem. hrs.
al education in high school. Includes pro- Advanced farm business records and anal-
gram planning and working with special- ysis with emphasis on computer applica-
needs students. Includes Clinical Experi- tions. Formerly A DV A NCED FA RM A C-
ence: 100 hours. Prerequisite: Admission COUNTING. Prerequisites: AGR 213 and
to Professional Studies. 216, or graduate standing.
302 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN 313 ADVANCED FARM
AGRICULTURE MANAGEMENT
1-3 sem. hrs. 3 sem. hrs.
Special work in research interests of stu- Farm business decisions and their interre-
dent and staff. Projects must be approved lationships. Examination of statics, dy-
by the staff member and the Chairperson namics, and uncertainty in agricultural de-
of the Department. Multiple enrollments cision-making. Prerequisites: AGR 213
are allowed; maximum 6 hours. Prerequi- and 216, or graduate standing.
sites: Major or minor in Agriculture or 314 MARKETING GRAIN AND
Agriculture Business, or graduate stand- LIVESTOCK
ing; 2.50 GPA required. 3 sem. hrs.
303 SEMINAR IN AGRICULTURE Economic principles applied to marketing
1 sem. hr. grain and livestock. Consideration given
Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing to producers and distributors of grain.
required. Prerequisite: AGR 214 or consent of the
304 GEOSPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES instructor, or graduate standing.
IN AGRICULTURE 315 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
3 sem. hrs.
AND ANALYSIS OF THE
To understand the acquisition and analysis AGRIBUSINESS FIRM
of geographically referenced data for the 3 sem. hrs.
management of crop production systems.
Application of quantitative concepts and
305 CROP GROWTH AND
methods to the analysis and financial man-
DEVELOPMENT
agement of proprietary and cooperative
4 sem. hrs.
agribusiness firms. Prerequisites: AGR
Crop management and plant growth as in- 215; MAT 120; and AGR 216 or ACC
fluenced by the environment, plant spe-
131 or consent of the instructor, or gradu-
cies, cropping systems, and principles of
ate standing.
integrated crop management (ICM). Lec-
ture and lab. 317 FOOD INDUSTRY MARKETING
306 WEED SCIENCE AND STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT
3 sem. hrs. 3 sem. hrs.
Principles and practices of weed manage- Marketing management and decision-
ment systems, including chemical and non making as they relate to corporate and co-
-chemical controls. Identification and biol- operative marketing and strategic problem
ogy of common weed species. Lecture and solving in the food industry. Prerequisite:
lab. AGR 215 or consent of the instructor, or
311 STRATEGIC AGRIBUSINESS graduate standing.
SALES 318 AGRICULTURAL FINANCE
3 sem. hrs. 3 sem. hrs.
Skills, ethics and behavior theories and Principles of agricultural finance including
concepts for the professional, business-to- the capital requirements, the sources of
business, agribusiness salesperson. Pre- credit, and the optimum uses of capital.
requisites: A minimum of 45 hours com- Prerequisite: AGR 216 or ACC 131, or
pleted or in progress; AGR 215 or consent graduate standing.
of the instructor.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


126 Agriculture

319 AGRICULTURAL POLICIES AND 363 AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS


PROGRAMS 3 sem. hrs.
3 sem. hrs. Principles of agricultural research for
History and impact of governmental inter- plant and animal sciences; includes de-
vention in agriculture. Examination of ma- sign, data collection, interpretation, and
jor agricultural programs, past and pre- presentation of results. Prerequisite: MAT
sent. Prerequisite: AGR 110, or graduate 120 or 144, or graduate standing.
standing.
372 LIVESTOCK BREEDING
320 FARM COMMODITY PRICING
3 sem. hrs.
3 sem. hrs.
Reproduction and principles of heredity
Theory and mechanics of price determina-
and their application to livestock breed-
tion for agriculture commodities. Prereq-
ing; population genetics, inbreeding, rela-
uisite: AGR 214, or graduate standing.
tionship, outbreeding, and selection. Pre-
324 COMMODITY FUTURES AND
requisite: AGR 272 or BSC 219, or gradu-
OPTIONS
3 sem. hrs. ate standing.
Examines the evolution of futures markets 375 ANIMAL NUTRITION
and the use of futures and options con- 3 sem. hrs.
tracts as price risk management tools. Pre- Science of animal nutrition; special atten-
requisite: AGR 214 or consent of the in- tion to recent discoveries pertaining to the
structor, or graduate standing. protein, mineral, and vitamin requirements
352 RESIDENTIAL AND SPORTS TURF of livestock. Field trips. Offered odd-
MANAGEMENT numbered years. Prerequisites: AGR 170
3 sem. hrs. and 171, or graduate standing.
Principles and practices used in the man-
agement of residential and recreational 380 CURRENT ISSUES IN THE
turfgrasses. Lecture, lab and field trips. LIVESTOCK INDUSTRY
Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: 3 sem. hrs.
AGR 120 and 150 or consent of the in- A study of the history and evolution of the
structor, or graduate standing. livestock industry as impacted by internal
353 LANDSCAPE DESIGN and external factors. Lecture. Prerequi-
3 sem. hrs. sites: AGR 170, 173, 272, 275, 282, 283,
Problem solving approach to landscape de- 286, or consent of the instructor. A mini-
sign. Topics include design principles, site mum of 75 hours completed or in progress
measurement and base map preparation, is recommended, or graduate standing.
functional diagrams, form composition,
plant selection and preparation of prelimi- 381A01 LIVESTOCK INDUSTRY: BEEF
nary and master plans. Lectures and drafting CATTLE
laboratories. Materials charge optional. For- 2 sem. hrs.
merly LANDSCAPE DESIGN AND CON- Basic principles and commercial practices
STRUCTION. Prerequisites: AGR 252 and involved in feedlot and cow-calf manage-
255, or graduate standing. ment. Lecture and lab. Prerequisites:
355 PLANT BIOTECHNOLOGY AND AGR 170, 173, 272, 275, 282, 283, 286,
BREEDING 380 or concurrent registration, or consent
3 sem. hrs. of the instructor, or graduate standing.
Breeding procedures and techniques used
in developing new varieties of field crops. 381A03 LIVESTOCK INDUSTRY:
SWINE
357 SOIL FERTILITY AND
FERTILIZERS 2 sem. hrs.
4 sem. hrs. Basic principles and commercial practices
Fundamental concepts of soil fertility and involved in swine management. Lecture
fertilizer manufacturing. Plant nutrition, fac- and lab. Prerequisites: AGR 170, 173,
tors affecting plant growth, soil-plant rela- 272, 275, 282, 283, 286, 380 or concurrent
tionships, and macro- and micro-nutrients. registration, or consent of the instructor,
Lecture, lab, and field trips. Materials or graduate standing.
charge optional. Prerequisite: AGR 157, or
graduate standing.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Agriculture 127

383 AGRICULTURAL SAFETY AND


HEALTH
3 sem. hrs.
Major problems of accident causation and
prevention applicable to agriculture and
the need for farm safety education, engi-
neering, and enforcement countermeas-
ures. Half-day Saturday field trip at end
of semester required. Also offered as HSC
383.
386 ANIMAL WELFARE
2 sem. hrs.
Examination of the multidisciplinary tools
used to study and assess animal welfare.
Prerequisites: AGR 170 and 286 or consent
of the instructor, or graduate standing.
392 PRINCIPLES OF AGRICULTURAL
LEADERSHIP
3 sem. hrs.
This course is a critical exploration of the
theory, research and best practices of
leadership applied in the agricultural
field. Prerequisite: A minimum of 45
hours completed or in progress, or con-
sent of the instructor.
394 METHODS AND PROCEDURES IN
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION
3 sem. hrs.
Procedures in planning, conducting, and
evaluating an agricultural education pro-
gram; pragmatic interfacing of learning
theories, philosophy and guidance with
instructional programs in agriculture. In-
cludes Clinical Experience: 10 hours.
Prerequisite: Admission to Professional
Studies, or graduate standing.
395 PROFESSIONAL SEMINAR IN
AGRICULTURE EDUCATION
2 sem. hrs.
In-depth analysis of selected trends, is-
sues, and problems confronting the agri-
cultural educator. Prerequisites: STT
399A01 concurrent registration, Admis-
sion to Professional Studies.
398 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE:
INTERNSHIP IN AGRICULTURE
1-6 sem. hrs.
Supervised on-the-job experience in an
agriculture setting. Minimum 45 hours
experience/credit. Multiple enrollments
are allowed; maximum 6 hours. Prerequi-
sites: Major in any Agriculture program;
2.50 GPA; 8 hours of course work in in-
tern area; approved application required.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


128 Criminal Justice Sciences

CRIMINAL JUSTICE Retention Requirements:


SCIENCES (CJS) 525 Criminal Justice Sciences majors must main-
441 Schroeder Hall, (309) 438-7626 tain a cumulative GPA of at least 2.40 every
Web address: CriminalJus- semester. If, at any given time, a student’s
tice.IllinoisState.edu GPA falls below a 2.40 that student may be
Chairperson: Br ent Teasdale. removed from the major and reclassified as
Undeclared. After a student is reclassified as
Undeclared, all rights as a major are forfeit-
General Department Information
ed, including the right to be eligible to do
The purpose of the Criminal Justice Sciences the Criminal Justice Sciences internship.
program is to provide the student with a sys- Students who have been reclassified must
tem orientation to the field of Criminal Justice. meet regular admission requirements to be
Study in Criminal Justice involves the applica- eligible for readmission to the major.
tion of the principles of Criminal Justice and
the related behavioral and social sciences to HONORS IN CRIMINAL
problems and issues in the field of Criminal JUSTICE SCIENCES
Justice. The program focuses on the building
of knowledge in the areas of policing, courts, The Department offers honors study in
and corrections from a social science perspec- Criminal Justice Sciences to highly qualified
tive. Students develop a knowledge base for an students who will pursue an individualized
in-depth understanding of human behavior and program of study. The Honors Program ena-
the kinds of problems and circumstances that bles the student to focus on topics of the stu-
often result in criminality. Finally, the program dent’s own choosing in close consultation
provides students with the opportunity to gain with a Criminal Justice Sciences Department
necessary skills in the area of interviewing, pro- faculty member.
gram development, community organization,
Students must also fulfill the general educa-
planning and research to function in a profes-
tion requirements for participation in the
sional position in the field of Criminal Justice.
University’s Honors Program. Successful
Program Admission Requirements for completion of the Honors Program will pro-
New and Continuing Students: vide the designation of Honors in Criminal
Justice Sciences upon graduation. The Uni-
Admission to this academic program is lim- versity will note the Honors designation on
ited and is based on space availability and official transcripts and the diploma. Require-
the competitiveness of the applicant pool. ments include being in good standing with
Factors that may be considered include, but the Honors Program and are reviewed at the
are not limited to: courses completed, cumu- end of the final semester. These require-
lative GPA, hours completed, personal inter- ments include:
view or written statement, and samples of
work completed. For additional information 1) 3.30 cumulative GPA;
on minimum requirements for admission and 2) 3.50 major GPA;
the application and selection process, visit 3) Fulfill Honors Program participation
IllinoisState.edu/Majors or contact the un- requirements: One (1) Honors Learn-
dergraduate advisor for the intended major. ing Experience per semester in the
program, including the final semester.
The Department of Criminal Justice Scienc- Please note: students are not required
es reserves the right to maintain a balanced to complete an Honors Learning Ex-
enrollment. perience when they are off-campus.
a. This may restrict the numbers of fresh- 4) Complete three (3) Honors Learning
men, transfer students, and continuing Experiences in CJS courses, which
students who wish to be Criminal Jus- may include:
tice Sciences majors.
—Honors Section
b. Most Criminal Justice Sciences courses
—Honors Contracts for in-class honors
are restricted to Criminal Justice Sci-
ence majors. —Honors Research
—Honors Explorations (a maximum
of 2)

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Criminal Justice Sciences 129

5) Complete an Honors Capstone Experi- course offerings.


ence, which may include: — NOTE: Space in Cr iminal J ustice Sci-
—Honors Independent Study (299) ences courses is limited for non-majors.
— Honors Thesis (HON 395) Please see the department website for spe-
cific criteria for admission and retention to
Students interested in participating in the the minor.
Honors Program should inquire about admis-
sion in the Office of the Department of Criminal Justice Sciences Courses
Criminal Justice Sciences. Further details
about the University Honors program are 101 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL
available at Honors.IllinoisState.edu. JUSTICE SCIENCES SS
3 sem. hrs.
Criminal Justice Sciences Programs An analysis of the criminal justice system
Degrees Offered: B.A., B.S. focusing on the police, courts, and correc-
tions.
MAJOR IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE 102 INDIVIDUALS, SOCIETY,
SCIENCES AND JUSTICE ICL
3 sem. hrs.
—51 hours required.
Explores justice, law, and civic life from
—Required courses (30 hours): CJS 101, historical, comparative, social science, and
200, 201, 207, 208, 300, 398A01* (6 contemporary cultural perspectives. May
hours); PSY 110 or 111; SOC 106. not be taken under the P/NP option.
—21 hours of electives selected from the fol- 200 CONTEMPORARY CORRECTIONS
lowing CJS courses: CJS 102, 206, 210, 3 sem. hrs.
212, 215, 216, 217, 240, 241, 287, 291,
299, 305, 306, 307, 308, 310, 311, 312, Familiarizes students with correctional alter-
322, 337, 338, 339, 342, 360, 369, 395, natives as they currently exist. Controversies
398A02* (3-6 hours). and emerging trends in corrections will be
*Students seeking enrollment in CJS 398A01 considered. Prerequisite: Major or minor
and 398A02 must complete necessary paper- only or consent of the department advisor.
work for application to the internship which 201 CRIME AND BEHAVIOR
will be received during mandatory meetings 3 sem. hrs.
set by the Internship Coordinator. To be eli- Theoretical and conceptual explanations
gible, the student must have: (1) completed of criminal behavior. Prerequisite: Major
60 semester hours, (2) an overall and major or minor only or consent of the depart-
GPA of 2.00 at the time referrals are made. ment advisor.
Students who have significant professional 206 FUNDAMENTALS OF CRIMINAL
experience in the criminal justice system or INVESTIGATION
related field, may apply for an exemption to 3 sem. hrs.
the internship requirement. If approved, stu-
dents must take 6 hours of coursework ap- An intensive analysis of the criminal in-
proved by the academic advisor. Students el- vestigation process including information
igible for an internship will, with the assis- gathering and analysis, preservation of ev-
tance of the internship coordinator, choose idence, legal issues, and investigative
an agency from a list of approved agencies. strategies. Prerequisite:  Major or minor
Students may also participate in out-of-state only or consent of the department advisor.
internships. 207 CONTEMPORARY POLICING IN
AMERICA
MINOR IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE 3 sem. hrs.
SCIENCES
Survey of law enforcement, its history,
— 21 hours required. police practices, functions, and related is-
— Required courses: CJS 101, 200, 201, 207, sues and concepts of contemporary police.
208. Prerequisite: Major or minor only or con-
— 6 hours of electives selected, with the ap- sent of the department advisor.
proval of an academic advisor, from the
Department of Criminal Justice Sciences

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


130 Criminal Justice Sciences

208 CRIMINAL LAW 241 INTERNSHIPS AND CAREERS IN


3 sem. hrs. CRIMINAL JUSTICE
Survey of criminal law, including devel- 1 sem. hr.
opment of substantive criminal law. Ex- Provides an overview of career opportuni-
amination of judicial opinions related to
ties in criminal justice, and prepares stu-
the criminal justice process. Prerequisite:
dents for the required internship experi-
Major or minor only or consent of the de-
ence. Prerequisites: Completion of 30
partment advisor.
hours or consent of the department advi-
210 CRIMINAL COURT SYSTEMS sor. Majors only.
3 sem. hrs.
298A50 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE:
Survey of the role of criminal courts in the
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION IN
criminal justice system, including plea
bargaining, trials, juries, and appellate CRIMINAL JUSTICE
courts. Prerequisite: Major or minor only, 1 sem. hr.
or consent of the department advisor. Supervised experiences in local, state, and
212 COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS federal criminal justice agencies. Enroll-
3 sem. hrs. ment limited, based on availability of
Theoretical basis, current methodology, sites. Multiple enrollment allowed once.
and operations: court counselors, citizen Prerequisites: Sophomore or junior stand-
action, half-way houses, work-release, ing. Major or minor only or consent of the
drug abuse treatment, detention, reception department internship coordinator.
and diagnostic centers, and probation and 300 RESEARCH METHODS
parole. Prerequisites: CJS 200. Major or 3 sem. hrs.
minor only or consent of the department Assesses basic components of how re-
advisor. search is conducted in criminal justice in-
215 JUVENILE JUSTICE quiries. Examines the criteria for social
3 sem. hrs. scientific research in the criminal justice
The processing and treatment of juvenile field. Prerequisites: CJS 101; 45 hours
offenders. Examines the organization, op- completed. Major or minor only or con-
eration, and goals of the individuals, agen- sent of the department advisor, or gradu-
cies, and institutions that work with ate standing.
youthful offenders. Prerequisite: Major or
305 CRIMINAL PROCEDURE AND
minor only or consent of the department
EVIDENCE
advisor.
3 sem. hrs.
216 CRIMINAL JUSTICE ETHICS
3 sem. hrs. Law of criminal procedure, types of evi-
dence, and legal requirements relating to the
Examines ethical issues in the administra-
tion of criminal justice, including those admissibility of evidence in court. Formerly
faced by police, courts, and corrections. RULES OF EVIDENCE FOR THE AD-
Prerequisite: Major or minor only or con- MINISTRATION OF JUSTICE. Prerequi-
sent of the department advisor. sites:  45 hours completed. Major or minor
only or consent of the department advisor,
217 CRIMINAL JUSTICE POLICY or graduate standing.
3 sem. hrs. 306 EXPERIENCES IN
Explores how criminal justice policy is INTERNATIONAL JUSTICE
made and investigates many prominent 3 or 6 sem. hrs.
policies in the contemporary criminal jus-
tice system. Prerequisite: Major or minor The course involves an exploration of a
only or consent of the department advisor. foreign country. Students will have expo-
sure to cultural, political, social and crimi-
240 HISTORY OF CRIMINAL
nal justice issues. Multiple enrollments
JUSTICE
are allowed if content is different; maxi-
3 sem. hrs.
mum of 12 hours. Travel fees apply. Pre-
Crime and the American criminal justice
requisite: Freshman standing (12 hours
system from the colonial period until the
completed), or graduate standing.
mid-20th century.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Criminal Justice Sciences 131

307 FAMILY VIOLENCE: CROSS- 337 SEX OFFENDERS AND THE


CULTURAL PERSPECTIVES CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM
3 sem. hrs. 3 sem. hrs.
Analysis of family violence in the United Analysis of sex offender prevalence and
typologies. Emphasis on assessment, treat-
States and other countries. Emphasis on
ment, and management within the commu-
police and judiciary response, solutions nity. Prerequisites: 45 hours completed.
and treatments. Prerequisites: 45 hours Major or minor only or consent of the de-
completed. Major or minor only or con- partment advisor, or graduate standing.
sent of the department advisor, or graduate 338 ALCOHOL, DRUGS, AND CRIME
standing. 3 sem. hrs.
308 RACE, ETHNICITY, AND Analysis of the impact of alcohol and
CRIMINAL JUSTICE drugs on crime and the criminal justice
3 sem. hrs. system. Prerequisites: CJS 101; 45 hours
Historical and contemporary perspectives completed. Major or minor only or con-
of race, ethnicity, crime, and justice rela- sent of the department advisor, or graduate
tions in the United States. Prerequisite: standing.
Major or minor only or consent of the de-
partment advisor, or graduate standing. 339 WOMEN IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE
3 sem. hrs.
310 CORRECTIONAL INSTITUTIONS
Historical and theoretical perspectives and
3 sem. hrs.
contemporary trends concerning women
An intensive analysis of correctional institu- and crime and processing of women by the
tions and jails focusing on management is- criminal justice system. Prerequisites: 45
sues, inmate subcultures, and prisonization. hours completed. Major or minor only or
Prerequisites: CJS 200; 45 hours completed. consent of the department advisor, or
Major or minor only or consent of the de- graduate standing.
partment advisor, or graduate standing.
342 VICTIMOLOGY
311 CRIMINALIZING MENTAL 3 sem. hrs.
ILLNESS
An examination of the victim’s role in the
3 sem. hrs.
criminal event, the process of victimiza-
Historical precedents and new innovations tion, patterns, trends, theories, and victim
to deal with the rising number of mentally offender relationships. Prerequisites: 45
ill in the criminal justice system. Former- hours completed. Major or minor only or
ly CJS 389A22. Prerequisite: Major or consent of the department advisor, or
minor only or consent of the department graduate standing.
advisor, or graduate standing.
360 ISSUES IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE
312 CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR 1-4 sem. hrs.
ANALYSIS
A critical and analytical study of a contem-
3 sem. hrs.
porary issue or controversy in the field of
A broad study of criminal behavior analy- criminal justice. Multiple enrollments are
sis and investigative techniques as they ap- allowed if content is different; maximum 6
ply to predatory and frequently violent of- hours. Prerequisites: 45 hours completed.
fenders. Formerly CJS 389A21. Prerequi- Major or minor only or consent of the de-
sites: Completion of 45 hours. Major or partment advisor, or graduate standing.
minor only or consent of the department
advisor, or graduate standing. 360A18 TERROR AND
COUNTERTERRORISM
322 CONFLICT RESOLUTION, 3 sem. hrs.
COMMUNICATION, AND
MEDIATION IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE The purpose of this course is to familiarize
students with the ideology, motivation,
3 sem. hrs.
and methods of the numerous terrorist
Conflict resolution, communication, and groups in existence over the last two cen-
mediation skills are applied to different turies in order to provide a basis for an un-
areas of professional practice and restora- derstanding of contemporary terrorist or-
tive justice throughout communities. For- ganizations and their impact on the nation-
merly COMMUNICA TION SKILLS IN al security of the United States. Prerequi-
CRIMINAL JUSTICE. Prerequisites: 45 sites: 45 hours completed. Major/minor
hours completed. Major or minor only or only or consent of department advisor, or
consent of the department advisor, or graduate standing.
graduate standing.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


132 Criminal Justice Sciences

369 WORLD CRIMINAL JUSTICE


SYSTEMS
3 sem. hrs.
Explores the nature of crime and justice
around the world. Provides a comparison
of varying systems of justice in selected
countries. Prerequisite: 45 hours complet-
ed or consent of the department advisor,
or graduate standing.
395 CRIMINAL JUSTICE
ADMINISTRATION
3 sem. hrs.
Aspects of organizational behavior in
criminal justice agencies, including man-
agement, leadership, and professionalism.
Prerequisites: CJS 101; 45 hours complet-
ed. Major on minor only or consent of the
department advisor.
398A01 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE:
CRIMINAL JUSTICE INTERNSHIP I
6 sem. hrs.
Field placement in a criminal justice relat-
ed agency. Interns work with designated
agency personnel and receive an overview
of agency functions. CR/NC only. Pre-
requisites: Consent of the department in-
ternship coordinator. Criminal Justice Sci-
ences major only. See Criminal Justice
Sciences major requirements for enroll-
ment limitations.
398A02 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE:
CRIMINAL JUSTICE
INTERNSHIP II
3-6 sem. hrs.
Intensive experience in a single criminal
justice agency setting. CR/NC only. Pre-
requisites: CJS 398A01 and consent of the
department internship coordinator. Crimi-
nal Justice Sciences major only. See
Criminal Justice Sciences major require-
ments for enrollment limitations.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Family and Consumer Sciences 133

FAMILY AND CONSUMER Family and Consumer Sciences


SCIENCES (FCS) 506 Programs
Degrees Offered: B.A., B.S.
110 Turner Hall, (309) 438-2517
Fax: (309) 438-5659 Admission Requirements for Family and
Web address: FCS.IllinoisState.edu Consumer Sciences Majors (Non-Teacher
Email: FCS@IllinoisState.edu Education Options):
Chairperson: Ani Yazedjian.
A student may enter a major or minor in the
General Department Information Department of Family and Consumer Sci-
ences as a freshman, transfer student, or as a
Family and Consumer Sciences is a profes- change of major at Illinois State University.
sion committed to improving the quality of Students should contact the Family and Con-
life for individuals and families. The mission sumer Sciences undergraduate advisor for
of the department is to provide integrative minimum GPA requirements and/or other
study of the human environment and systems admission requirements. Options in the De-
that impact and strengthen individuals, fami- partment of Family and Consumer Sciences
ly units, agencies, businesses, and the com- are in high demand and admissions are based
munity at large. on a combination of student qualifications
and course capacities.
The Department serves undergraduate and
graduate majors specializing in fields such as MAJOR IN FAMILY AND
interior design, human development, family CONSUMER SCIENCES
life education, nutrition and dietetics, fashion
design and merchandising, and family and Degrees Offered: B.A., B.S.
consumer sciences teacher education. The
General Sequence
undergraduate programs of the department
are accredited by the American Association Students in the General Sequence in the Fami-
of Family and Consumer Sciences. ly and Consumer Sciences major receive a
broad education which prepares them for gen-
HONORS IN FAMILY AND eral careers in a variety of settings that enhance
CONSUMER SCIENCES the lives of individuals, their families, commu-
nities and organizations. Those who study fam-
The Department offers honors work in each ily and consumer sciences at a professional
Family and Consumer Sciences program to level acquire the knowledge and skills to help
highly qualified students. Candidates must people make informed decisions to safeguard
be full-time students, declared Family and their health and optimize their quality of life.
Consumer Sciences majors, and have an Students are provided opportunities to develop
overall 3.30 GPA. Honors requirements in- the knowledge, skills, attributes, and behaviors
clude completion of at least 3 in-course hon- needed in a diverse and global society. Stu-
ors at the 200-level or above. Honors stu- dents will find this degree beneficial to devel-
dents may also pursue Honors in the Major. oping their own unique professional career
This would involve at least 2 Honors pro- path. Students are encouraged to consider com-
jects taken in the Department and the com- pleting a minor.
pletion of FCS 299, culminating in a sub-
stantial research project. The Department al- Option 1:
so offers in-course honors work in all cours- —54 hours required.
es for students enrolled in the University —9 hours in FCS core: FCS 100, 200, 300,
Honors Program or in any departmental hon- 398.
ors program. In-course honors work is of- —27 hours in General FCS core: FCS 101,
fered at the discretion of the instructor. For
102, 104, 113, 222, 226, 231, 232, 242.
further information, contact the departmental
advisor. All Family and Consumer Sciences —18 hours of electives (9 hours of which
honors students must fulfill the general re- must be at the 300-level) from the follow-
quirements for participation in the University ing: FCS 111, 122, 203, 212, 213, 214,
Honors Program. Further details about the 217, 218, 224, 225, 228, 250, 251, 254,
University Honors program are available at 304, 305, 311, 333, 334, 338, 347, 348,
361, 362, 363.
Honors.IllinoisState.edu.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


134 Family and Consumer Sciences
Option 2: Family and Consumer Sciences Teacher
—55 hours required. Education Sequence
—9 hours in FCS core: FCS 100, 200, 300, Part of the endorsement program leading to
398. licensure by the State of Illinois for teaching
—18 hours from one of the FCS discipline Family and Consumer Sciences courses
areas: Fashion Design and Merchandising; grades 9-12. “Nutrition, Wellness, and Hos-
Food, Nutrition and Dietetics; Human De- pitality” designation.
velopment and Family Science; or Interior —65 hours required.
Design.
—41 hours of Family and Consumer Scienc-
—28 hours of electives (9 hours of which es requirements.
must be at the 300-level) from the follow-
ing: FCS 101, 111, 122, 203, 212, 213, —8 hours in FCS core: FCS 100, 200, 300.
214, 217, 218, 224, 225, 226, 228, 231, — 24 hours of sequence courses: FCS 101,
232, 246, 250, 254, 304, 305, 309, 311, 102, 111, 113, 203, 231, 250, 390, and
318, 319, 333, 334, 338, 347, 348, 352, 3 hours required from: FCS 104, 242, or
361, 362, 363. 338;
3 hours required from: FCS 122, 222, 225,
Family and Consumer Sciences Teacher or 226;
Education Sequence 3 hours required from: FCS 232, 330, or
333.
Selective Admission-Retention —24 hours in Professional Education re-
Requirements for the Teacher Education quirements: EAF 228 or 231 or 235; PSY
Sequence 215; TCH 212, 216 and 219; STT 399A24
Selective Admission: (10 hours).

All Family and Consumer Sciences Educa- See the Family and Consumer Sciences advi-
tion students planning to become licensed sor for information about courses that count
teachers must apply for and be admitted to towards additional Family and Consumer
the University’s Professional Studies pro- Sciences designations. See the Professional
gram. (See the University-Wide Teacher Ed- Studies Admission-Retention program found
ucation Program section of this Undergradu- in the University-Wide Professional Studies
ate Catalog.) Upon applying for admission Program Requirements for admission and re-
each Family and Consumer Sciences student tention standards. Also see the Family and
must have verified the following: Consumer Sciences Selective Admission-
Retention Requirements section of this Un-
1. A minimum GPA of 2.50 overall and in all
dergraduate Catalog.
Family and Consumer Sciences courses
including Professional Education courses. CLINICAL EXPERIENCES IN
2. A positive recommendation for Admission TEACHER EDUCATION
to Professional Studies by all Family and
Consumer Sciences faculty. See the de- A variety of clinical (pre-student teaching)
partmental advisor for procedure. experiences, as well as student teaching, are
3. An interview with the Family and Con- included in the teacher candidates profes-
sumer Sciences Education Coordinator. sional preparation. Observations, small and
large group instruction, tutoring, field experi-
Selective Retention: ences, and student teaching are included in
the Clinical Experiences Program. The expe-
In order to receive departmental approval for riences offered prior to student teaching are
a student teaching assignment the student integral parts of specific college courses.
must verify the following: Clinical experiences are provided in off-
1. Maintain a minimum GPA of 2.50 in all campus professional development schools,
courses and in all Family and Consumer local schools, campus laboratory schools,
Sciences courses including Professional agencies and other approved non-school set-
Education courses. tings. The Cecilia J. Lauby Teacher Educa-
2. Completion of FCS 200, or the equivalent tion Center monitors and documents all clini-
for transfer students. cal experiences. Teacher candidates will
show verification of having completed clini-
cal experiences commensurate with attaining

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Family and Consumer Sciences 135

local, state, and national standards. Teacher ulation, textile quality testing, and sustaina-
candidates must provide their own transpor- bility are incorporated into classes.
tation to clinical experiences sites.
The FDM program offers courses in textiles,
Candidates are required to provide docu- fashion trend and industry analysis, social
mentation of meeting all State of Illinois, and psychological aspects of clothing and
district, and university requirements in re- behavior, fashion history, economics of
gard to criminal background checks BE- fashion, fashion merchandising, fashion de-
FORE beginning any clinical experiences. sign, apparel production, fashion-related
Criminal background checks must remain marketing and management and sustainabil-
current as of the last day of the clinical ex- ity. Within the FDM program, students can
perience. Candidates should consult with select either the Fashion Merchandising op-
clinical course faculty and the Cecilia J. tion or the Fashion Design and Product De-
Lauby Teacher Education Center well in ad- velopment option. FDM students have the
vance of clinical experiences to determine opportunity to participate in study tours in-
specific requirements needed each semester. side and outside of the United States to loca-
tions such as New York and California, as
The approximate number of clinical hours
well as various locations in Europe. The
associated with each course offering can be
tours provide students the opportunity to
found with the appropriate course descrip-
learn about various firms within the textiles
tion in this Undergraduate Catalog. The fol-
and apparel industry.
lowing legend relates to the type and kind of
activity related to a specific course. —A minimum of 58 hours required.
—9 hours in FCS core: FCS 100, 200, 300,
Clinical Experiences Legend
398 (For students pursuing Option B,
 Observation (including field trips) FCS 365 may be taken in addition to or
 Tutoring one-on-one contact instead of FCS 398 with consent of the
 Non-instructional assisting instructor and departmental approval).
 Small group instruction —49 hours of required courses: ECO 105;
 Whole class instruction FCS 122, 225, 226, 323, 327, 328, 329,
362; MKT 230; PSY 110 or PSY 223 or
 Work with clinic client(s)
SOC 223; and option A or B that follows:
 Graduate practicum
 Professional meeting A. Fashion Merchandising: FCS 368,
369, 371; MQM 220; MKT 335.
Recommended electives: FCS 222,
MAJOR IN FASHION DESIGN AND 228, 321, 324, 334, 361, 366; MQM 
MERCHANDISING 328.
Degrees Offered: B.A., B.S. B. Fashion Design/Product Develop-
The Fashion Design and Merchandising pro- ment: FCS 228, 321, 324, 361, 366.
gram at Illinois State University offers two Recommended electives: FCS 222,
sequences: Fashion Design and Merchandis- 334, 365, 368, 369, 371; MQM 328.
ing Sequence, and Fashion Design and Mer- —For students interested in Fashion Mer-
chandising Accelerated Sequence. chandising, a Business Administration or
Communication minor is recommended;
Fashion Design and Merchandising for students interested in Fashion Design/
Sequence Product Development, an Art History,
Theatre, or Business Administration mi-
The Fashion Design and Merchandising nor is recommended; for students inter-
(FDM) program prepares students for ca- ested in Fashion Journalism, a Communi-
reers in the global apparel and textile indus- cation minor is recommended; for stu-
try including apparel design and production, dents interested in Museum Curator/
merchandising, textile product quality con- Conservator, a minor in History or Art
trol, and historic costume and textile preser- History is recommended.
vation. Computer-aided design (CAD) pro-
grams, pattern making and design, visual re-
tailing software, merchandising process sim-

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


136 Family and Consumer Sciences

Fashion Design and Merchandising must take at least one of these courses for
Accelerated Sequence graduate credit during the senior year. The
student must consult with an advisor and the
Program Admission Requirements for instructor prior to the start of each new
New and Continuing Students: High course to ensure approval and correct regis-
achieving students with a cumulative GPA tration for graduate credit.
of 3.20 or higher may request the accelerat-
ed sequence in the spring semester of their
MAJOR IN FOOD, NUTRITION AND
junior year. This sequence allows students DIETETICS
to take up to 12 hours of approved graduate Degrees Offered: B.A., B.S.
courses that will count for both the under-
The Food, Nutrition and Dietetics (FND)
graduate and graduate program in Fashion
program at Illinois State University offers
Design and Merchandising/Family and Con-
four sequences: Dietetics Sequence, Dietet-
sumer Sciences. Students can then apply to
ics Accelerated Sequence, Food and Nutri-
the Family and Consumer Sciences graduate
tion Management Sequence, and Food Nu-
program in the spring of their senior year.
Enrollment in the Accelerated Sequence trition Management Accelerated Sequence.
does not guarantee final admission into the Dietetics Sequence
Family and Consumer Sciences graduate
program. For additional information on min- The Dietetics sequence is a Didactic Pro-
imum requirements for admission and the gram in Dietetics (DPD) which is accredited
application and selection process, visit Illi- by the Accreditation Council for Education
noisState.edu/Majors. in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) of the
Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The
— A minimum of 58 hours required. program prepares students for dietetic in-
— 9 hours in FCS core: FCS 100, 200, 300, ternships and careers in promoting optimal
398 (For students pursuing Option B, health by incorporating positive food choic-
FCS 365 may be taken in addition to or es and nutrition strategies which influence
instead of FCS 398 with consent of the the overall well-being of individuals and
instructor and departmental approval). communities. This sequence provides the
— 49 hours of required courses: ECO 105; first step for students wanting to become a
FCS 122, 225, 226, 323, 328, 329, 362, registered dietitian (R.D.). To become an
427; MKT 230; PSY 110 or PSY 223 or R.D., students must apply for an ACEND-
SOC 223; and option A or B that follows: accredited dietetic internship after gradua-
A. Fashion Merchandising: FCS 368, tion, and, upon completion, are eligible to
369, 371*; MQM 220; MKT 335. take the registration examination. An
Recommended electives: FCS 222, ACEND Verification Statement of DPD
228, 321*, 324, 334, 366, 461; MQM  Completion will be given to students com-
328. pleting this sequence This official statement
is required for graduates to begin an
B. Fashion Design/Product Develop-
ACEND-accredited dietetic internship after
ment: FCS 228, 321, 324, 361, 366.
acceptance, and for other professional appli-
Recommended electives: FCS 222,
cations requiring verification of DPD com-
334, 365*, 368, 369*, 371*; MQM
pletion. The Didactic Program in Dietetics
328.
(DPD) at Illinois State University is current-
— For students interested in Fashion Mer- ly accredited by the Accreditation Council
chandising, a Business Administration or for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics
Communication minor is recommended; (ACEND) of the Academy of Nutrition and
for students interested in Fashion Design/ Dietetics. ACEND is recognized by the
Product Development, an Art History, United States Department of Education and
Theatre, or Business Administration mi- can be contacted at 120 South Riverside Pla-
nor is recommended; for students interest- za, Suite 2190, Chicago, IL 60606-6995,
ed in Fashion Journalism, a Communica- (312) 899-0040, Ext 5400.
tion minor is recommended; for students
interested in Museum Curator/ —71-72 hours required.
Conservator, a minor in History or Art —9 hours in FCS core: FCS 100, 200, 300,
History is recommended. 398.
*To graduate in this sequence, a student

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Family and Consumer Sciences 137

—31 hours in FND core: BSC 160; CHE requires fewer science courses (no organic
110, 112; FCS 102, 113, 217, 316, 318, and biochemistry) and more business and
319; MQM 220. food-related courses than the dietetics se-
—31-32 hours: CHE 220, 242; ECO 103 or quence. Consumers spend about 50 percent
105; FCS 219, 311, 312, 317; KNR 182; of their food dollars in restaurants, cafeterias,
PSY 110 or 111. fast-food franchises, at work, or at school.
Food systems managers organize these oper-
Dietetics Accelerated Sequence ations and make sure the foods are attractive,
nutritious, and safely prepared. Popular ca-
Program Admission Requirements for reer options include restaurant manager, caf-
New and Continuing Students: eteria manager, caterer, and corporate, hospi-
High achieving students with a cumulative tal, long-term care, or school food service
GPA of 3.20 or higher may request the accel- manager. Employment opportunities also ex-
erated sequence in the spring semester of ist with companies that produce food, food
their junior year. This sequence allows stu- ingredients, or processing equipment, and
dents to take up to 12 hours of approved food safety inspection, food sales, marketing,
graduate courses that will count for both the and business management.
undergraduate and graduate program in Die-
tetics/Family and Consumer Sciences. Stu- —62 hours required.
dents can then apply to the Family and Con- —9 hours in FCS core: FCS 100, 200, 300,
sumer Sciences graduate program in the 398.
spring of their senior year. Enrollment in the —31 hours in FND core: BSC 160; CHE
Accelerated Sequence does not guarantee fi- 110, 112; FCS 102, 113, 217, 316, 318,
nal admission into the Family and Consumer 319; MQM 220.
Sciences graduate program. For additional —22 hours: ACC 131; ECO 105; FCS 213,
information on minimum requirements for 214, 320; HSC 350; MQM 100.
admission and the application and selection
process, visit IllinoisState.edu/Majors. All —Multiple enrollments of FCS 320 are al-
accreditation information for the Dietetics lowed twice up to a total of 9 semester
Sequence applies to the Dietetics Accelerated hours.
Sequence. —Recommended electives: AGR 271, 285;
FIL 185; MKT 230, 231.
—71-72 hours required.
—9 hours in FCS core: FCS 100, 200, 300, Food and Nutrition Management
398. Accelerated Sequence
—31 hours in FND core: BSC 160; CHE
110, 112; FCS 102, 113, 217, 316*, 318*, Program Admission Requirements for
319; MQM 220. New and Continuing Students:
—31-32 hours: CHE 220, 242; ECO 103 or
105; FCS 219, 311, 312, 317; KNR 182; High achieving students with a cumulative
PSY 110 or 111. GPA of 3.20 or higher may request the accel-
—Recommended electives in consultation erated sequence in the spring semester of
with the advisor: FCS 320, 415, 433. their junior year. This sequence allows stu-
dents to take up to 12 hours of approved
*To graduate in this sequence, a student must graduate courses that will count for both the
take at least one of these courses for graduate undergraduate and graduate program in Food
credit during the senior year. The student and Nutrition/Family and Consumer Scienc-
must consult with an advisor and the instruc- es. Students can then apply to the Family and
tor prior to the start of each new course to en- Consumer Sciences graduate program in the
sure approval and correct registration for spring of their senior year. Enrollment in the
graduate credit. Accelerated Sequence does not guarantee fi-
nal admission into the Family and Consumer
Food and Nutrition Management Sciences graduate program. For additional
Sequence information on minimum requirements for
admission and the application and selection
The Food and Nutrition Management se-
process, visit IllinoisState.edu/Majors.
quence prepares graduates for careers in the
growing food industry by combining busi- —62 hours required.
ness and management principles with food —9 hours in FCS core: FCS 100, 200, 300,
service and hospitality skills. This sequence 398.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


138 Family and Consumer Sciences

—31 hours in FND core: BSC 160; CHE —Choose 6 hours from the following: FCS
110, 112; FCS 102, 113, 217, 316*, 318*, 306, 309, 363, 364, 395.
319; MQM 220. —Choose 6 additional hours of elective
—22 hours: ACC 131; ECO 105; FCS 213, courses in FCS or related areas.
214, 320*; HSC 350; MQM 100.
—Multiple enrollments of FCS 320 are al- MAJOR IN INTERIOR DESIGN
lowed twice up to a total of 9 semester Degrees Offered: B.A., B.S.
hours.
—Recommended electives: AGR 271, 285; The Interior Design (ID) program at Illinois
FIL 185; MKT 230, 231. State University offers two sequences: Inte-
rior Design Sequence, and Interior Design
*To graduate in this sequence, a student Accelerated Sequence, which is a pathway
must take at least one of these courses for to the Family and Consumer Sciences grad-
graduate credit during the senior year. The uate program.
student must consult with an advisor and the
instructor prior to the start of each new Interior Design Sequence
course to ensure approval and correct regis-
tration for graduate credit. The Interior Design program prepares stu-
dents to design innovative, functional, sup-
MAJOR IN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT portive, and responsible interior environ-
AND FAMILY SCIENCE ments that positively impact the quality of
life within a global market. The curriculum
Degrees Offered: B.A., B.S.
develops students’ skills and knowledge in
Students majoring in Human Development design, sketching and technical drawing,
and Family Science will find rewarding ca- space planning, interior construction and
reers working to improve the lives of indi- building systems, materials specifications,
historical interiors, building codes and ac-
viduals, families and communities.
cessibility guidelines. Sustainability issues
Human Development and Family Science and universal design are emphasized. The
graduates are prepared to enter a variety of program is accredited by the Council for In-
service-oriented fields. Graduates may work terior Design Accreditation (CIDA) and fo-
in a variety of settings including non-profit cuses on the broad range of specialties with-
organizations, child care centers, preschools, in commercial interior design. Course con-
private educational settings, parent/family tent is based on the knowledge and skills
life education, residential facilities, camp needed to pass the National Council for Inte-
settings, colleges and universities (non- rior Design Qualification certification exam.
teaching positions), state, local, and federal To be licensed in the State of Illinois, gradu-
government agencies, and hospitals and oth- ates of a 4-year CIDA-accredited program
er organizations/businesses serving the must have a minimum of two years profes-
needs of children and families. sional work experience and pass the Nation-
al Council for Interior Design Qualification
The Human Development and Family Sci- (NCIDQ) Examination. Passage of this ex-
ence undergraduate program provides a am also qualifies the individual for profes-
foundation for advanced graduate study in sional membership in interior design organi-
child life, family science, child/human de- zations such as International Interior Design
velopment, social work, marriage and family Association (IIDA) and American Society of
therapy, psychology, counseling, gerontolo- Interior Designers (ASID).
gy, early intervention, occupational therapy
and religious studies. —62 hours required.
—9 hours in FCS core: FCS 100, 200, 300,
—A minimum of 51 hours required. 398.
—9 hours in FCS core: FCS 100, 200, 300, —53 hours required: FCS 104, 218, 225,
398. 242, 246, 338, 340, 345, 346, 347, 348,
—24 hours in HDFS core: FCS 101, 224, 352, 370, 375, 376; TEC 117, 217; one of
231, 232, 252, 310, 333; FCS 308 or 335. the following: ART 155, 156, 265, or
—Choose 6-8 hours from the following:  275.
FCS 250, 251, 254, 304, 305, 307. —Possible minors based on individual inter-

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Family and Consumer Sciences 139

ests: Technology, Art, or Business. Sciences.


—Recommended electives: FCS 334, 377; —FCS core (6 hours): FCS 100, 200.
TEC 317, 322. —15 additional hours in Family and Con-
sumer Sciences.
Interior Design Accelerated Sequence
Program Admission Requirements for Family and Consumer Sciences Courses
New and Continuing Students:
100 INTRODUCTION TO FAMILY AND
High achieving students with a cumulative CONSUMER SCIENCES
GPA of 3.20 or higher may request the accel- 3 sem. hrs.
erated sequence in the spring semester of Family and consumer sciences professions,
their junior year. This sequence allows stu-
history, philosophy, and foundations. Pre-
dents to take up to 12 hours of approved
requisite: FCS major or consent of the in-
graduate courses that will count for both the
undergraduate and graduate program in Inte- structor.
rior Design/Family and Consumer Sciences. 101 HUMAN AND FAMILY
Students can then apply to the Family and DEVELOPMENT
Consumer Sciences graduate program in the 3 sem. hrs.
spring of their senior year. Enrollment in the Human development throughout the life-
Accelerated Sequence does not guarantee fi- span within the context of the developing
nal admission into the Family and Consumer family unit.
Sciences graduate program. For additional
102 FUNDAMENTALS OF HUMAN
information on minimum requirements for
admission and the application and selection NUTRITION
process, visit IllinoisState.edu/Majors. 3 sem. hrs.
Nutrients needed by humans. Food choic-
—62 hours required. es to meet nutrition needs of individuals
—9 hours in FCS core: FCS 100, 200, 300, and families throughout the life cycle. For-
398. merly NUTRITION IN LIFE SPA N.
—53 hours required: FCS 104, 218, 225,
242, 246, 338, 340, 345*, 346, 347, 348, 103 MANAGEMENT FOR
352, 370, 375 or 475, 376 or 476; TEC CONSUMERS
117, 217; one of the following: ART 155, 3 sem. hrs.
156, 265, or 275. Management for individual and family
—Possible minors based on individual inter- problems in the home and marketplace.
ests: Technology, Art, or Business. 104 ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN
—Recommended electives: FCS 334, 377, ELEMENTS: STUDIO
400; TEC 317, 322. 3 sem. hrs.
*To graduate in this sequence, a student must Introduction to design fundamentals and
take at least one of these courses for graduate development of perceptual skills, creative
credit during the senior year. The student awareness, and the technical ability to
must consult with an advisor and the instruc- handle a variety of design media. Lecture
tor prior to the start of each new course to and lab. Prerequisite: Major or minor only
ensure approval and correct registration for or consent of the instructor.
graduate credit.
111 INTRODUCTION TO TEACHING
FAMILY AND CONSUMER
MINOR IN FAMILY AND
SCIENCES
CONSUMER SCIENCES 3 sem. hrs.
A minor in Family and Consumer Sciences Introduction to family and consumer sci-
complements many majors from business to ences teaching profession; emphasis on
humanities. Students may take courses from planning curriculum, observing programs,
a number of different Family and Consumer professionalism, diversity, and history of
Sciences disciplines or focus on one particu- the field.  Includes Clinical Experience: 20
hours. Formerly INTRODUCTION TO
lar area of interest.
THE FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCI-
—21 hours required in Family and Consumer ENCES EDUCATOR ROLE. Prerequi-
site: FCS 101.

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140 Family and Consumer Sciences

112 AMERICAN FAMILY: CHANGE 208 DYNAMICS OF UNITED STATES


AND DIVERSITY UST CONTEMPORARY HEALTH
3 sem. hrs. ISSUES SMT
Historical and comparative exploration of 3 sem. hrs.
activities of family formation, mainte- Exploration and analysis of current health
nance, and reconfiguration in America. and lifestyle issues. Emphasis on how in-
Emphasis on issues of diversity. May not dividuals, communities and society make
be taken under the P/NP option. Also of- health decisions. Also offered as HSC/
KNR 208. Prerequisites: COM 110 and
fered as HIS/SOC 112.
ENG 101.
113 PRINCIPLES OF FOOD
212 FAMILY HEALTH AND WELL
PREPARATION BEING
3 sem. hrs. 3 sem. hrs.
Scientific principles involved in the prepa- Relationship of personal decision making,
ration of food. Materials charge optional. self-assessment and behavioral change to
Prerequisite: Major or minor only or con- optimal wellness for individuals and fami-
sent of the instructor. lies. Practicum rotations included. Prereq-
122 APPAREL PRODUCT uisites: FCS 101. Major or minor only or
DEVELOPMENT I consent of the instructor.
3 sem. hrs. 213 FOOD PLANNING, MARKETING,
Basic apparel production techniques. Ma- AND COST CONTROLS
terials charge optional. Prerequisite: Ma- 3 sem. hrs.
jor or minor only or consent of the instruc- Meal planning based on criteria of nutri-
tor. tive requirements, marketing challenges,
and utilization of resources. Materials
198 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE
charge optional. Prerequisites: FCS 113.
1-6 sem. hrs. Major or minor only or consent of the in-
Exploration of entry-level career opportu- structor.
nities. Observation of professional skills 214 THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY
and competencies of practicing home 3 sem. hrs.
economists. CR/NC only. Multiple enroll-
A broad and comprehensive examination
ments allowed; maximum 6 hours. Pre- of the hospitality industry. Prerequisite:
requisites: Major only. 2.00 GPA; 27 Major or minor only or consent of the in-
hours; Approved application required. structor.
200 PROBLEM SOLVING AND 217 NUTRITION THROUGH THE
RESEARCH METHODS IN FAMILY LIFE CYCLE
AND CONSUMER SCIENCES 3 sem. hrs.
3 sem. hrs. Examination of physiological, sociologi-
Problem solving and research methodolo- cal, and developmental factors that affect
gy exploring issues and trends in the vari- nutritional requirements and recommenda-
ous disciplines of family and consumer tions at various stages of the life cycle.
sciences. Writing-intensive course. Pre- Prerequisite: FCS 102.
requisites: FCS 100. Major or minor only 218 INTERIOR CONSTRUCTION AND
or consent of the instructor. BUILDING SYSTEMS
203 COMPETENCIES FOR 3 sem. hrs.
TEACHING FAMILY AND Evaluation of building infrastructure, in-
CONSUMER SCIENCES cluding heating/cooling systems, electrical
3 sem. hrs. and plumbing conventions, and interior
construction, as related to the design pro-
Curriculum development, assessment,
cess. Field trips. Materials charge option-
teaching strategies, and professionalism
al. Prerequisite: FCS 242.
for family and consumer sciences teach-
ers. Formerly COMPETENCIES FOR 219 NUTRITION COUNSELING AND
TEACHING. Prerequisites: Admission to ASSESSMENT
3 sem. hrs.
Professional Studies; FCS 111; TCH 212
or concurrent registration. Major or minor Application of nutrition assessment, coun-
only or consent of the instructor. seling and communication techniques with
individuals and groups in community and
clinical settings. Prerequisite: FCS 217.

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Family and Consumer Sciences 141
222 CULTURAL DIVERSITY 233 FAMILY ECONOMIC RESOURCES
IN DRESS SS 3 sem. hrs.
3 sem. hrs. Economic description of the family em-
Interdisciplinary, comparative exploration phasizing the family’s financial, physical,
of diverse cultures through dress and and human capital investments over the
adornment. Prerequisites: COM 110 and life cycle. Prerequisites: FCS 103. Major
ENG 101. or minor only or consent of the instructor.
224 ENDURING ISSUES FOR COUPLES 242 DRAFTING FOR INTERIOR
AND FAMILIES SS DESIGN
3 sem. hrs. 3 sem. hrs.
Analysis of persistent and newly emerging Introduces students to equipment, media,
issues for couples and families living in and techniques for graphic presentation of
the 21st century. Prerequisites: COM 110 architectural design. Materials charge op-
and ENG 101. tional. Prerequisite: Major or minor only
225 TEXTILES or consent of the instructor.
3 sem. hrs. 246 VISUAL COMMUNICATION FOR
Fundamentals of textile science: fibers, INTERIOR DESIGN
yarns, fabrications, finishes, and dyeing. 2 sem. hrs.
Selection and care of apparel/home fur- Presentation techniques using various ma-
nishings fabrics. Textile legislation. Lec- terials/methods for communication of inte-
ture and lab. Materials charge optional. rior design solutions. Emphasis on volu-
Prerequisite: Major or minor only or con- metric space and building enclosure. Lec-
sent of the instructor. ture and lab. Prerequisites: Grade of C or
226 FASHION TREND AND INDUSTRY better in FCS 104 and 242. Major or minor
ANALYSIS only or consent of the instructor.
3 sem. hrs. 250 DEVELOPMENT AND GUIDANCE
Fundamentals of the fashion industry, em- OF PRESCHOOL CHILDREN
phasis on analysis and forecasting of 4 sem. hrs.
trends and sectors of apparel and merchan- Examination of development and guidance
dising industries. Prerequisite: Major or of preschool children. Emphasis on observa-
minor only or consent of the instructor. tion, assessment and developmentally ap-
228 APPAREL DESIGN propriate practices. Includes Clinical Experi-
3 sem. hrs. ence. Prerequisites: FCS 101. Major or mi-
Application of art principles to apparel nor only or consent of the instructor.
creation through computers and hand tech- 251 DEVELOPMENT AND GUIDANCE
niques. Idea development from conception OF INFANTS AND TODDLERS
through production to retailing. Style no- 4 sem. hrs.
menclature emphasized. Materials charge Exanimation of development and guidance
optional. Prerequisites: FCS 122 and 226 of infants and toddlers. Emphasis on obser-
or concurrent registration. vation, assessment and developmentally ap-
231 PARENTING propriate practices. Includes Clinical Expe-
3 sem. hrs. rience. Prerequisites: FCS 101. Major or
Functions of productive family units to minor only or consent of the instructor.
fulfill individual and group needs. Empha- 252 MULTICULTURAL FAMILY
sis on the skills needed by the parent. For- STUDIES
merly FA MILY RELA TIONSHIPS. Pre- 3 sem. hrs.
requisites: FCS 101. Major or minor only An examination of family life, values, and
or consent of the instructor. norms of culturally diverse individuals and
232 RESOURCE MANAGEMENT FOR families. Emphasis on working with di-
INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES verse populations. Prerequisite: FCS 101.
3 sem. hrs. 254 ISSUES AND DEVELOPMENT IN
MIDDLE CHILDHOOD
Problem solving approach to the use of 3 sem. hrs.
managerial components and their func-
A survey of middle childhood, focusing on
tional relationships to the complexities of physical, cognitive, moral, social and
today’s living. Prerequisites: FCS 101. emotional development, contemporary is-
Major or minor only or consent of the in- sues, and family relationships. Prerequi-
structor. site: FCS 101.

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142 Family and Consumer Sciences

300 PROFESSIONAL LEADERSHIP IN 308 ORGANIZATION AND


FAMILY AND CONSUMER ADMINISTRATION OF EARLY
SCIENCES CHILDHOOD PROGRAMS
2 sem. hrs. 3 sem. hrs.
A study of the leadership skills necessary Administration of early childhood pro-
for successful entry into a professional ca- grams and community services responsi-
reer in family and consumer sciences. For- ble for guidance of young children. In-
merly LEA DERSHIP DEV ELOPMENT cludes Clinical Experience: 20 hours.
Prerequisite: FCS 250 or consent of the
FOR FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCI-
instructor, or graduate standing.
ENCES PROFESSIONALS. Prerequi-
sites: FCS 200; and concurrent registra- 309 COUPLE RELATIONSHIPS
tion with first FCS 398 registration, ex- 3 sem. hrs.
cept for FCS Teacher Education majors. An interactional approach to the study of
intimate pairings: establishing couple rela-
304 ADOLESCENCE AND EMERGING
tionships and developing effective inti-
ADULTHOOD IN THE CULTURAL mate pairing communication; an overview
CONTEXT of marriage enrichment history, programs,
3 sem. hrs. practice, theory, and research. Prerequi-
Theories, historical background, and re- site: FCS 200, or graduate standing.
search regarding adolescent development 310 FAMILY CRISES
and emerging adulthood as they relate to 3 sem. hrs.
contemporary society and across culture. Cognitive and affective exploration of
Formerly FCS 389A37 A DOLESCENCE family crisis: definition, management pro-
AND EMERGING ADULTHOOD IN SO- cesses, and professional helping re-
CIO-CULTURAL CONTEXT. Prerequi- sources. Field trips required. Prerequisite:
sites: FCS 101 and 200. A minimum of 45  A minimum of 45 hours completed.
hours completed; majors or minors only, 311 COMMUNITY NUTRITION
or consent of the instructor. 3 sem. hrs.
305 FAMILIES IN LATER LIFE Nutritional needs of selected populations
3 sem. hrs. vulnerable to inadequate diet; emphasis on
Exploration of family dynamics in later U.S. programs designed for groups at nu-
life. Emphasis on developmental tasks, tritional risk. Prerequisite: FCS 102 or
needs and decision-making issues of aging graduate standing.
family members. Prerequisite: A mini- 312 MEDICAL NUTRITION THERAPY
mum of 45 hours completed. 4 sem. hrs.
306 PSYCHOSOCIAL CARE OF Planning modified diets and studying un-
CHILDREN AND FAMILIES IN derlying diseases. Nutritional counseling
HEALTHCARE ENVIRONMENTS of individuals and groups. Prerequisite:
3 sem. hrs. FCS 219 or graduate standing.
Application of human development theo- 314 EARLY CHILDHOOD
ries and developmentally appropriate NUTRITION EDUCATION
practices to the psychosocial care of chil- 3 sem. hrs.
dren and families in healthcare environ- Principles of nutrition and current re-
ments. Includes Clinical Experience. For- search. Emphasis on the needs of young
merly SEMINA R IN CHILD LIFE children. Guidance in implementing a
STUDIES. Prerequisite: FCS 231 or 250 sound nutritional education program. In-
or 251 or 254 or consent of the instructor. cludes Clinical Experience.
315 NUTRITION FOR HEALTH AND
307 ADVANCED CHILD
PHYSICAL FITNESS
DEVELOPMENT APPLICATIONS
3 sem. hrs.
3 sem. hrs.
An advanced course focusing on the phys-
Application of research in the develop- iological and biochemical importance of
ment and guidance of infants, toddlers and nutrition to health, physical fitness, and
preschool age children as related to family sports. Prerequisites: FCS 102 or consent
and society. Includes Clinical Experience. of the instructor; KNR 182 or BSC 181
Prerequisite: FCS 250 or 251 or 254, or and 182.
graduate standing.

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Family and Consumer Sciences 143

316 FOOD SCIENCE 323 ADVANCED TEXTILES


3 sem. hrs. 3 sem. hrs.
Experimental approach to principles un- Exploration of established practices and
derlying food preparation. Materials new developments in the textile and appar-
el industry. Research and problem-solving
charge optional. Prerequisites: FCS 113;
emphasis. Lecture and lab. Materials
CHE 110 and 112 or graduate standing. charge optional. Prerequisites: FCS 225
317 NUTRITION AND METABOLISM and 226, or graduate standing.
4 sem. hrs. 324 DRAPING AND DESIGN
Physiological and biochemical basis for 3 sem. hrs.
human nutritional requirements and Interpretation of garment designs in fabric
health. Prerequisites: BSC 160; FCS 102; by means of the draping procedure. Mate-
KNR 182, or graduate standing. rials charge optional. Prerequisite: FCS
122, or graduate standing.
318 FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT
3 sem. hrs. 327 CLOTHING AND BEHAVIOR
3 sem. hrs.
Management of commercial foodservice Factors that influence clothing and behav-
systems: planning, control systems, deci- ior across the life stages of human devel-
sion making, human considerations. Pre- opment. Emphasis on research. Prerequi-
requisite: FCS 113, or graduate standing. sites: A minimum of 45 hours completed.
319 QUANTITY FOODS Major or minor only, or graduate standing.
4 sem. hrs. 328 ECONOMICS OF FASHION
Principles, techniques, and standards for 3 sem. hrs.
procuring, storing, and producing food in Fashion as an economic force in the inter-
batch/quantity for group, institutional and national economy. Fashion’s influence on
production, distribution and consumption
commercial feeding. Field trips. Materials
of textiles and apparel. Prerequisites: FCS
charge optional. Prerequisite: FCS 113, or 225, 226 and ECO 105.
graduate standing.
329 APPAREL PRODUCT ANALYSIS
320 SPECIAL TOPICS IN FOOD AND 3 sem. hrs.
HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT Overview of apparel manufacturing and
3 sem. hrs. analysis of ready-to-wear apparel product
New concepts and recent developments in quality. Prerequisites: FCS 122, 225 and
the food and hospitality industry. Multiple 226.
enrollments are allowed for credit if con- 330 DECISION-MAKING FOR
tent differs for a maximum of 9 semester CONSUMERS
hours. See the following topic. Prerequi- 3 sem. hrs.
site: FCS 214, or graduate standing. Survey of consumer problems, trends, and
information. Topics include: insurance,
320A01 SPECIAL TOPICS IN FOOD housing, credit, life style, consumer pro-
AND HOSPITALITY MANAGE- tection, leisure, and achieving financial se-
MENT: FOOD AND LAW curity. Also offered as BE 330.
REGULATION 331 CONSUMER MATERIALS
3 sem. hrs. 3 sem. hrs.
An overview of the laws, policies, and Application and evaluation of consumer
standards that govern food regulation in information sources. Prerequisite: FCS
the United States. The history of food and 103, or graduate standing. FCS 233 is rec-
beverage policy will also be covered. Pre- ommended.
requisite: FCS 214. 333 FAMILY AND CONSUMER
321 FLAT PATTERN DESIGN PUBLIC POLICY
3 sem. hrs. 3 sem. hrs.
Public and private sector programs serving
Computer and hand techniques in making human needs; role of family and consumer
garment patterns by the flat pattern meth- science professional in the public policy
od. Materials charge optional. Prerequi- arena. Prerequisites: A minimum of 45
sites: FCS 122 or equivalent. Major or mi- hours completed. Major or minor only or
nor only or consent of the instructor., or consent of the instructor.
graduate standing.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


144 Family and Consumer Sciences

334 PERSPECTIVES ON SUSTAIN 346 ENVIRONMENTAL LIGHTING


ABILITY IN APPAREL AND DESIGN
INTERIOR DESIGN 2 sem. hrs.
3 sem. hrs. Design of the luminous environment. Em-
Understanding the environmental impact phasis on lighting sources, fixture sched-
of apparel and interior product design and ules, switching patterns, and the required
production processes; alternative solutions drawings used in residential and commer-
for sustainable design and merchandising cial applications. Prerequisite: FCS 340.
decisions. Prerequisite: FCS 225 or con- 347 HUMAN FACTORS IN
sent of the instructor. INTERIOR ENVIRONMENTS
335 FAMILY LIFE EDUCATION 2 sem. hrs.
METHODS This course focuses on the functionality
3 sem. hrs. and aesthetics of interior environments
Introduction to the profession of family with an emphasis on the interface between
life education and the development, im- man-made environments and humans. The
plementation and evaluation of family life needs of special populations are ad-
education programming. Prerequisites: dressed. Lecture and lab. Prerequisites:
FCS 231 and A minimum of 45 hours FCS 200 and 242, or graduate standing.
completed, or graduate standing. 348 HISTORY OF INTERIOR AND
336 VALUE OF PLAY IN HUMAN ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN II
DEVELOPMENT 2 sem. hrs.
3 sem. hrs. Major movements in architecture and in-
Study of the value of play to development; terior design from the late 19th century to
theories in historical and contemporary per- the present. Prerequisite: Major or minor
spectives; explanations in behavior, rela- only or consent of the instructor. FCS 338
tionships, and culture. Not for credit if had recommended.
FCS 392. Prerequisites: FCS 250, 251, 254, 352 RENDERING FOR INTERIOR
or 304 or consent of the instructor. DESIGNERS
338 HISTORY OF INTERIOR AND 3 sem. hrs.
ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN I Perspective sketching and delineations of
3 sem. hrs. architectural interiors. Various media and
Major stylistic time periods in architecture application techniques will be stressed for
and interior design from antiquity to late professional results in presentations. Ma-
19th century. Prerequisites: A minimum terials charge optional. Also offered as
of 45 hours completed. Major or minor ART 352. Prerequisites: FCS 242, 246,
only or consent of the instructor, or gradu- 340, or consent of the instructor, or gradu-
ate standing. ate standing.
340 INTERIOR DESIGN I: STUDIO 361 FASHION HISTORY I
4 sem. hrs. 3 sem. hrs.
Design principles applied to residential Analysis of fashion from antiquity to
space. Students examine the ways in 1899, in relation to social and cultural en-
which rooms are affected by various de- vironments. Emphasis on western world.
sign elements. Lecture and lab. Materials Prerequisite: A minimum of 45 hours
charge optional. Prerequisites: A mini- completed.
mum of 45 hours completed. Grade of C 362 FASHION HISTORY II
or better in FCS 104, 242 and 246; FCS 3 sem. hrs.
218 and TEC 117 concurrent registration Analysis of fashion from 1900 to today in
is recommended. Major or minor only or relation to social and cultural environ-
consent of the instructor, or graduate ments. Emphasis on designers and inno-
standing. vators. Prerequisite: A minimum of 45
345 INTERIOR DESIGN BUSINESS hours completed.
PRACTICES 363 BEREAVEMENT, GRIEF AND
2 sem. hrs. LOSS
Practices and procedures of professional 3 sem. hrs.
design firms. Emphasis on business own- Examination of concepts and relevant is-
ership, programming, purchasing proce- sues of bereavement, grief and loss. Pre-
dures, billing hours, contracts and busi- requisites: FCS 231, 310 or 364, and jun-
ness forms. Prerequisite: FCS 340, or ior standing or consent of the instructor,
graduate standing. or graduate standing.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


145
Family and Consumer Sciences
364 HELPING AND COMMUNICATION 371 ADVANCED MERCHANDISING
SKILLS FOR FCS PROFESSIONS 3 sem. hrs.
3 sem. hrs. Merchandising practices as related to cur-
An introduction to the helping and com- rent issues in management, as well as
munication skills and theories used by planning, developing, and presenting soft
FCS professionals in their work with indi- good lines. Prerequisite: FCS 369, or
viduals and families. Formerly BA SIC graduate standing.
SKILLS IN COUNSELING. Prerequisite: 373 FASHION PORTFOLIO
FCS 101, or graduate standing. DEVELOPMENT
365 APPAREL COLLECTION 3 sem. hrs.
DEVELOPMENT Career development in the fashion indus-
3 sem. hrs. try with emphasis on advancing presenta-
Advanced problem solving in apparel col- tion skills, networking, and achieving per-
lection design with emphasis on integra- sonal professional goals. Prerequisite:
tion of various tools of design. Lecture Completion of 45 hours.
and lab. Prerequisites: FCS 122, 228, 321 375 INTERIOR DESIGN III: STUDIO
or consent of the instructor, or graduate 4 sem. hrs.
standing. Study of design theory/analysis in relation
366 CAD FOR APPAREL DESIGN to large-scale, comprehensive commercial
3 sem. hrs. interiors. Emphasis on codes regulating
Application of art principles to apparel de- ergonomic and life safety issues. Materi-
sign using CAD. Apparel idea develop- als charge optional. Prerequisite: FCS
ment from concept through application to 370.
production. Portfolio development. Lec- 376 INTERIOR DESIGN IV: STUDIO
ture and lab. Prerequisites: FCS 122, 226, 4 sem. hrs.
228, or graduate standing.
Culmination of design process in a self-
368 FASHION PROMOTION guided interior design project in student’s
3 sem. hrs. area of concentration. Materials charge
Apparel merchandising techniques with optional. Prerequisites: FCS 375. Major
emphasis on visual merchandising, adver- or minor only or consent of the instructor.
tising, fashion shows, and related promo- 377 FAMILY AND CONSUMER
tional activities. Prerequisite: FCS 226. SCIENCES TRAVEL STUDY
369 MERCHANDISE PLANNING AND 1-6 sem. hrs.
CONTROL Encompasses any studies related to Fami-
3 sem. hrs. ly and Consumer Sciences Study Travel
The financial management of merchandis- Program: Domestic or Abroad. Multiple
ing fashion goods, with emphasis on enrollments are allowed; maximum of 6
stock, sales, assortment planning and con- hours may be applied toward graduation.
trol. Prerequisites: FCS 226; MKT 230 or Prerequisite: Major or minor only or con-
concurrent registration; MQM 220 or con- sent of the department chairperson.
current registration, or graduate standing. 380 ORGANIZATION AND
370 INTERIOR DESIGN II: STUDIO ADMINISTRATION OF CAREER
4 sem. hrs. AND TECHNICAL COOPERATIVE
The process of linking spaces using archi- EDUCATION PROGRAMS
tectural elements. Emphasizing the design 3 sem. hrs.
process as it affects private and public Planning and organizing a cooperative
spaces. Field trips required. Materials program; emphasis on recruitment, selec-
charge optional. Prerequisites: FCS 218, tion of training stations, student place-
340, TEC 217, or graduate standing. ment, and operation of cooperative plan.
ART/FCS 352 concurrent registration Also offered as BE 380. Includes Clinical
with FCS 370 recommended. Experience: 5 hours.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


146 Family and Consumer Sciences
382 COORDINATION TECHNIQUES 398A01 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE:
OF CAREER AND TECHNICAL HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION FAMILY SCIENCE
PROGRAMS 1 sem. hr.
3 sem. hrs. Planned and supervised culminating pro-
Coordination techniques needed for high fessional experience in business, industry,
school and post-secondary teacher coordi- community, government, or healthcare
nation in integrating classroom activities setting. Multiple enrollments are allowed
with daily employment. Also offered as for a maximum of two hours. Prerequi-
BE 382 and TEC 306. Includes Clinical sites: A minimum of 75 hours completed;
Experience: 5 hours. FCS 200; 2.00 overall GPA on date of ap-
390 STUDENT TEACHING SEMINAR plication. Concurrent registration with
IN FAMILY AND CONSUMER FCS 300 the first time 398A01 is taken.
SCIENCES See advisor for additional requirements.
2 sem. hrs. Placement is not guaranteed.
Reflection and discussion of issues and chal- 398A03 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE:
lenges encountered during the student teach- FOOD, NUTRITION AND
ing experience. Includes Clinical Experi- DIETETICS
ence: 15 hours. Prerequisites: STT 399A24 1 sem. hr.
concurrent registration. Admission to Profes- Planned and supervised culminating pro-
sional Studies. fessional experience in business, industry,
392 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMAN community, government, or healthcare
DEVELOPMENT AND FAMILY setting. Multiple enrollments are allowed
SCIENCE for a maximum of two hours. Prerequi-
3 sem. hrs. sites: A minimum of 75 hours completed;
Recent developments, new concepts, and FCS 200; 2.00 overall GPA on date of ap-
special topics in the field of human develop- plication. Concurrent registration with
ment and family sciences. Multiple enroll- FCS 300 the first time 398A03 is taken.
ments are allowed with department approv- See advisor for additional requirements.
al; maximum of 9 hours. Prerequisites: Placement is not guaranteed.
FCS 101 and 224, or graduate standing. 398A04 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE:
394 HEALTH ASPECTS OF AGING INTERIOR DESIGN
3 sem. hrs. 1 sem. hr.
Characteristics of the aging process and Planned and supervised culminating pro-
factors influencing adaptations and the fessional experience in business, industry,
quality of living. Also offered as HSC/ community, government, or healthcare
setting. Multiple enrollments are allowed
KNR 394.
for a maximum of two hours. Prerequi-
395 SEXUALITY AND FAMILY LIFE sites: A minimum of 75 hours completed;
3 sem. hrs. FCS 200; 2.00 overall GPA on date of ap-
Study of sexuality across the life course plication. Concurrent registration with
emphasizing the role of sexuality on fami- FCS 300 the first time 398A04 is taken.
ly relations and implications for family See advisor for additional requirements.
life. Prerequisites: FCS 101 and 224, or Placement is not guaranteed.
graduate standing. 398A05 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE:
398 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: FASHION DESIGN AND
FAMILY AND CONSUMER MERCHANDISING
SCIENCES 1 sem. hr.
1 sem. hr. Planned and supervised culminating pro-
Planned and supervised culminating pro- fessional experience in business, industry,
fessional experience in business, industry, community, government, or healthcare
community, government, or healthcare setting. Multiple enrollments are allowed
setting. Multiple enrollments are allowed for a maximum of two hours. Prerequi-
for a maximum of two hours. Prerequi- sites: A minimum of 75 hours completed;
sites: A minimum of 75 hours completed; FCS 200; 2.00 overall GPA on date of ap-
FCS 200; 2.00 overall GPA on date of ap- plication. Concurrent registration with
plication. Concurrent registration with FCS 300 the first time 398A05 is taken.
FCS 300 the first time 398 is taken. See See advisor for additional requirements.
advisor for additional requirements. Placement is not guaranteed.
Placement is not guaranteed.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Health Sciences 147

HEALTH SCIENCES Standards for Progress in the Minor:


(HSC) 522 Students must maintain a minimum cumula-
305 Felmley Hall tive GPA of 2.50 to progress in the minor.
Phone: (309) 438-8329 —A grade of C or better must be achieved in
Fax: (309) 438-2450 all courses in the minor
Web address: HealthScienc- —21 hours required.
es.IlllinoisState.edu
—Required courses: FCS 102; HSC 207,
Email: HSCInfo@IllinoisState.edu
296, 298A04, 377; KNR 113, 303.
Chairperson: J effr ey Clar k. —No more than 9 hours taken in the minor
General Department Information may count toward a major plan of study.
NOTE: Other courses appr oved by the mi-
HONORS IN HEALTH SCIENCES nor director may be counted toward the minor.

The Department offers honors study to qual- MINOR IN PUBLIC HEALTH


ified students who will pursue an individual-
ized course of study. To qualify, students The Minor in Public Health is designed to
must be declared majors in the Department, prepare students in core competencies need-
have completed 30 hours of credit, have and ed by professionals working on population-
maintain a minimum cumulative 3.50 GPA; based health issues. Public health profes-
and have and maintain a 3.50 GPA in the sionals work to improve the quality and
major. To graduate with Departmental Hon- length of life in diverse communities by pre-
ors, students must be a member of the Uni- venting health problems before they occur.
versity Honors Program and complete 12 They do this through supporting healthy en-
credit hours of honors work in Health Sci- vironments, promoting the adoption of
ences courses selected from at least two of healthy lifestyles, preventing injuries, and
the following options: Honors Undergradu- preserving and protecting important re-
ate Research, Honors Independent Study, in- sources that support human health. Public
course Honors, or Honors Undergraduate health is an interdisciplinary field built upon
Teaching Assistant. Students interested in knowledge in environmental health, health
the Honors Program must contact the depart- behavior/promotion, epidemiology, medi-
mental advisor to complete an orientation cine and other areas of study. This minor
and planning meeting. Further details about provides students with a foundation in key
the University Honors program are available public health courses and, in combination
at: Honors.IllinoisState.edu. with various majors, can create opportunities
for employment in public health settings and
graduate study in a Master of Public Health
MINOR IN HEALTH AND program or other health disciplines.
WELLNESS COACHING
New and Internal Transfer Requirements:
Director: Dr. Jim Broadbear, Department
of Health Sciences Admission to this academic program is limited
226B Felmley Science Annex, Campus and is based on space availability and the com-
Box 5220; Phone: (309) 438-8807; petitiveness of the applicant pool. Factors that
Email: jtbroad@ilstu.edu may be considered include, but are not limited
to: courses completed, cumulative GPA, hours
completed, personal interview or written state-
The Minor in Health and Wellness Coaching
ment, and samples of work completed. For ad-
provides students with a foundation in
ditional information on minimum require-
coaching knowledge and skills and will
ments for admission and the application and
complement studies in various majors. Stu-
selection process, visit IllinoisState.edu/Majors
dents who aspire to work with people one-on
or contact the undergraduate advisor for the
-one and to help them reach their health
intended program.
goals may be particularly interested in this
minor. Completion of the minor will prepare Standards for Progress in the Minor:
students for health and wellness coaching
certifications and advanced study. Students must maintain a minimum cumula-
tive GPA of 2.50 to progress in the minor.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Health Sciences
148

—21 hours required. Standards for Progress in the Major:


—Required core courses (15 hours): HSC Students must maintain a cumulative GPA of
156, 170, 204A01 or 204A02, 258A01 or
2.00 or higher and earn grades of C or better
258A02, 296. in all Health Sciences courses to be retained
—Choose 2 courses (6 hours) from the fol- in the major.
lowing: HSC 208, 248, 378, 390, 394.
—Required and elective courses must be Accreditation:
completed with a grade of C or better. The Environmental Health program is ac-
—No more than 9 hours taken in the minor credited by the National Environmental
may count toward a major program of Health Science and Protection Accreditation
study within the Department of Health Council, www.ehacoffice.org.
Sciences.
MAJOR IN ENVIRONMENTAL
NOTE: Other cour ses appr oved by the di-
HEALTH
rector of the minor may be counted toward
the minor. —81 total hours required.
—42 hours in Health Sciences required
Environmental Health Programs —Required courses (18 hours): HSC 145,
Website: HealthSciences.IllinoisState.edu/ 156, 204*, 249, 258, 355.
environmental —Professional Practice (9 hours): HSC
Degree Offered: B.S. 398A01.
Environmental Health specialists identify —Group 1 elective courses (15 hours): HSC
and resolve problems that occur when hu- 248, 252, 254, 257, 271, 322, 350, 359,
mans interact with their environment. Some 362, 378. NOTE: No more than two of the
of these environmental problems include in- following courses can be counted towards
door and outdoor air pollution, water pollu- the Environmental Health major: HSC
tion, food contamination, hazardous wastes, 271, 362, 378.
insect-borne diseases, occupational hazards, —Group 2 (additional) elective courses (3
and chemical or biological terrorism. Envi- hours): CHE 215, 242, 280; ECO 255;
ronmental Health specialists identify, imple- GEO 102, 276, 336; HIS 240; HSC 381,
ment, and evaluate the best methods of con- 383.
trolling or preventing these problems. Em- —Required courses outside of Health Sci-
ployment opportunities include private con- ences (16 hours, excluding required Gen-
sulting firms; industry; non-profit organiza- eral Education courses): CHE 141, 220;
tions; and local, state, or federal agencies. KNR 182, 184; MAT 119.
—Required General Education courses (20
New Freshmen, New and Internal Trans- hours): BSC 160; CHE 140; HSC 156;
fer Admission Requirements: MAT 118 or 145; PHY 105 or 108.
*NOTE: Gener al Education cour ses
Admission to this academic program is lim- MQM 100, ECO 138, GEO 138, POL
ited and is based on space availability and 138, or PSY 138 may be substituted for
the competitiveness of the applicant pool. HSC 204.
Factors that may be considered include, but
are not limited to: courses completed, cumu- MINOR IN ENVIRONMENTAL
lative GPA, hours completed, personal inter- HEALTH
view or written statement, and samples of
work completed. For additional information —30 total hours required.
on minimum requirements for admission and —15 hours in Health Sciences required.
the application and selection process, visit —Required courses (9 hours): HSC 145,
IllinoisState.edu/Majors or contact the under-156, 249 or 258A01.
graduate advisor for the intended major. —Elective courses (6 hours): HSC 248, 249
Internal transfer students must have a mini- (if not used to satisfy other requirements),
mum cumulative GPA of 2.00 and should 252, 254, 257, 258A01 (if not used to sat-
schedule an appointment with the depart- isfy other requirements), 322, 350.
mental academic advisor for information. —Required courses outside of Health Sci-

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Health Sciences 149

ences: (a minimum of 15 hours): CHE 140, lative and major GPA of 2.50 is required for
141; MAT 118 or 145. admission to Student Teaching as well as for
NOTE: The pr er equisites for HSC 249 retention in the HPE major. Admission to
are CHE 220 and KNR 182; the prerequi- Professional Studies is contingent upon meet-
sites for HSC 258A01 are BSC 160 or 260. ing admission requirements to University-
NOTE: CHE 140, MAT 118, 145; and wide Teacher Education and recommendation
of the HPE faculty and the School Health Ed-
HSC 156 are General Education courses.
ucation Coordinator.

Health Promotion and Education Community Health Promotion Sequence:


Program All students should have a projected program
plan completed in consultation with the de-
Website: HealthSciences.IllinoisState.edu/
partmental academic advisor. A minimum cu-
education mulative and major GPA of 2.50 and grades
Degrees Offered: B.S., B.S. in Ed. of C or better in all 60 credit hours required
Health Promotion Specialists and Health Ed- by the major are required for retention in the
ucators work with people in schools and com- Community Health Promotion program as
munity settings. They promote positive health well as for enrollment in Professional Prac-
behaviors by giving presentations, planning tice, HSC 398A02.
and implementing programs, preparing in-
structional materials, assessing community CLINICAL EXPERIENCES IN
and individual health needs, teaching and TEACHER EDUCATION
training, coordinating community/school ef-
forts, health coaching, advocating for healthy A variety of clinical (pre-student teaching)
policies, leading coalitions, and acting as a experiences, as well as student teaching, are
resource person. Every Health Promotion and included in the teacher candidates profession-
Education major completes a core of 12 hours al preparation. Observations, small and large
and either a sequence in School Health Edu- group instruction, tutoring, field experiences,
cation or Community Health Promotion. and student teaching are included in the Clin-
ical Experiences Program. The experiences
offered prior to student teaching are integral
New Freshmen, New and Internal Transfer parts of specific college courses. Clinical ex-
Admission Requirements: periences are provided in off-campus profes-
New freshmen and transfer students desiring sional development schools, local schools,
admission to the Health Promotion and Edu- campus laboratory schools, agencies and oth-
cation (HPE) program must meet the admis- er approved non-school settings. The Cecilia
sion requirements established by the Univer- J. Lauby Teacher Education Center monitors
sity. Those students wishing to be admitted and documents all clinical experiences.
into the School Health Education sequence of Teacher candidates will show verification of
HPE must apply for and be admitted into the having completed clinical experiences com-
University Professional Studies program. mensurate with attaining local, state, and na-
(See the University-Wide Teacher Education tional standards. Teacher candidates must
section in this Undergraduate Catalog.). Stu- provide their own transportation to clinical
dents currently enrolled at the University who experience sites.
wish to change their major to HPE must haveCandidates are required to provide documen-
a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.50, though tation of meeting all State of Illinois, district,
this minimum GPA does not guarantee ad- and university requirements in regard to crim-
mission. Transfer students and internal trans-
inal background checks BEFORE beginning
fer students should schedule an appointmentany clinical experiences. Criminal back-
with the departmental academic advisor for ground checks must remain current as of the
information. last day of the clinical experience. Candidates
should consult with clinical course faculty
Standards for Progress in the Major:
and the Cecilia J. Lauby Teacher Education
School Health Education Sequence: All stu- Center well in advance of clinical experiences
dents should have a projected program plan to determine specific requirements needed
completed in consultation with the depart- each semester.
mental academic advisor. A minimum cumu-
The approximate number of clinical hours as-

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


150 Health Sciences
sociated with each course offering can be Community Health Promotion
found with the appropriate course description Sequence
in this Undergraduate Catalog. The following
legend relates to the type and kind of activity —Required courses (27 hours): BSC 145*;
related to a specific course. HSC 204A01, 207, 258A02, 286, 290A01,
305, 395, 396.
Clinical Experiences Legend —Electives (12 hours) chosen in consultation
 Observation (including field trips) with an advisor from the following: FCS
 Tutoring one-on-one contact 102; HSC 105, 156**, 170**, 377, 387,
 Non-instructional assisting 390, 394; SOC 123.
 Small group instruction —Professional Practice 398A02 (9 hours re-
quired), determined in consultation with
 Whole class instruction
the advisor and Community Health Pro-
 Work with clinic client(s) motion Coordinator.
 Graduate practicum —2.50 cumulative and major GPA prior to
 Professional meeting the semester of enrollment in HSC
398A02.
Accreditation
*BSC 145 meets General Education require-
The School Health and Promotion Education ment for SMT.
curriculum is accredited by the National **Course is General Education option.
Council for Accreditation of Teacher Educa-
tion (NCATE). The Community Health Pro- Health Information Management
motion curriculum has been approved Program
through combined review of two professional Website: HealthScience.IllinoisState.edu/
organizations. info-management
MAJOR IN HEALTH Degree Offered: B.S.
PROMOTION AND EDUCATION
Health information managers are profession-
—59 total hours (School Health Education) als responsible for the management of health
or 60 total hours (Community Health Pro- data and health information systems in health
motion) required. care organizations and organizations that use
—Required core courses (12 hours) includ- health data. They ensure data quality; code
ing: HSC 292, 293, 294, 296. and classify data; maintain data security and
privacy; design, implement and manage
—HPE majors must also complete either the
health information systems (both manual and
School Health Education Sequence or the
electronic); evaluate medical care data to
Community Health Promotion Sequence.
monitor quality and risk; and manage support
School Health Education Sequence personnel.

This sequence is part of the program leading MAJOR IN HEALTH


to a 9-12 secondary endorsement. INFORMATION MANAGEMENT
—Required courses (18 hours): HSC 190, The Health Information Management (HIM)
290A02, 387, 390, 391; SOC 123. major program offers two sequences to stu-
—Elective (3 hours): 1 course selected from: dents who are seeking to earn a Bachelor of
FCS 102; HSC 105, 156*, 170*, 207. Science degree in Health Information Man-
—Students must complete all Illinois State agement. The sequences are the HIM On-
Board of Education (ISBE) requirements Campus Sequence and the RHIT-HIM 
for certification and the Professional Edu- Online Sequence.
cation requirements (26 hours): EAF 228
HIM On-Campus Sequence: This sequence is
or 231 or 235; PSY 215; TCH 212, 216,
designed for and restricted to students who
219, and 12 hours of student teaching STT
are taking HIM courses on campus.
399A35; and the General Education re-
quirements. A 2.50 cumulative and major New Freshmen, New and Internal
GPA is required for admission to Profes- Transfer Admission Requirements
sional Studies and for student teaching.
Admission to this academic program is lim-
*Course is a General Education option. ited and is based on space availability and

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Health Sciences 151

the competitiveness of the applicant pool. Admission and Retention in the RHIT-
Factors that may be considered for admission HIM Online Sequence
include, but are not limited to: courses com-
pleted, cumulative GPA, and hours complet- To be admitted and retained in the RHIT-
ed. For additional information on minimum HIM Online Sequence, a student must:
requirements for admission and applications —Be admitted to Illinois State University;
selection process, visit IllinoisState.edu/ —Be a graduate of an associate degree pro-
Majors or contact the undergraduate advisor gram in health information technology ac-
for the intended major. credited by the Commission on the Ac-
creditation of Health Informatics and In-
Retention in the HIM On-Campus formation Management Education
Sequence (CAHIIM);
To be retained in the HIM major a student —Be currently certified as a Registered
must: Health Information Technician;
—Be in good academic standing in the Uni- —Complete the Associate Degree in Arts
versity with a minimum cumulative 2.25 (A.A.) or an Associate Degree in Science
GPA; (A.S.) or the Illinois Transferable General
Education Core Curriculum;
—Have a grade of C or better in the follow-
ing courses, or their equivalents, to enroll —Maintain a minimum cumulative 2.25
in the HIM professional courses: HSC 105 GPA for retention in the HIM major;
and KNR 181 and 182; —Earn grades of C or better in all HIM ma-
—Earn grades of C or better in all major jor courses.
courses.
Course Requirements in the RHIT-HIM
Course Requirements for the HIM On- Online Sequence
Campus Sequence —Major courses (66 hours): HSC 326, 327,
328, 329, 330, and 398A05 (3 hours); and
—Prerequisite courses (22 hours): HSC 105;
33 semester hours earned as Proficiency
IT 168, 178, 254, 261; KNR 181 and 182.
Credit;
—Major courses (49 hours): HSC 201, 202, —A grade of C or better is required in all
204*, 210, 212, 213, 230, 298A03, 300, HIM courses for retention in the major.
310, 320, 341, 345, 346, 398A03; IT 250
and 262. Health information technology courses are held
as Proficiency Credit for the student until suc-
—Recommended courses: IT 164 and MAT cessful completion of three consecutive semes-
119 are highly recommended. ters of Health Information Management upper-
division courses from: HSC 326, 327, 328,
*NOTE: Gener al Education cour ses 329, or 330. Once these courses have been suc-
MQM 100 or ECO 138 or PSY 138 may be cessfully completed with a grade of C or better
substituted for HSC 204. through enrollment, thirty-three (33) credit
hours are placed on the student’s transcript as
RHIT-HIM Online Sequence Proficiency Credit for the following Health In-
formation Management courses: HSC 105,
This sequence is designed for and restricted 201, 202, 204, 210, 212, 213, 230, and
to students who have completed an associate 298A03; KNR 181 and KNR 182.
degree program in health information tech-
nology (HIT) and are currently certified as Accreditation and Credentialing
Registered Health Information Technicians The HIM Program is accredited by the Com-
(RHIT). The Sequence is designed to give mission on Accreditation of Health Informat-
these students an opportunity to earn a Bach- ics and Information Management
elor of Science Degree in Health Information (www.cahiim.org). Graduates of the program
Management in six semesters. All HIM  are eligible and expected to write the national
courses will be delivered online via distance registry examination. Successful completion
of the registry examination leads to the Reg-
learning. Students will be expected to com- istered Health Information Administrator
plete one course each semester. (RHIA) professional designation.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


152 Health Sciences

Criminal Background Check: ceptance into the clinical experience during


the spring of the junior year. Students must
All Health Information Management students have maintained a cumulative 2.50 GPA and
enrolling in HSC 298A03 and HSC 398A03 have received a grade of C or better in all re-
are required to pass a criminal background quired courses to be eligible for professional
check. The complete policy is outlined in the practice.
Health Information Management Student
Handbook. See the Medical Laboratory Science Student
Handbook for more information and a current
list of professional practice locations.
Medical Laboratory Science Program
Website: HealthSciences.IllinoisState.edu/ Criminal Background Check:
lab-science
All Medical Laboratory Science students en-
Degree Offered: B.S. tering Professional Practice are required to
Medical laboratory scientists work as a part pass a criminal background check. The com-
of the medical team. They analyze body flu- plete policy is outlined in the Medical Labor-
ids and perform tests using highly specialized atory Science Student Handbook.
equipment to diagnose diseases and monitor
treatment. They are largely employed in hos- Immunizations:
pitals and private clinical laboratories and in- Evidence of immunity and/or proof of im-
dustry. Graduates of the program are eligible munization against several viral agents is re-
for national certification. quired for students entering professional
practice. See the policy outlined in the Medi-
New Freshmen and New and Internal
cal Laboratory Science Handbook for details.
Transfer Admission Requirements:
Admission to this academic program is lim- MAJOR IN MEDICAL
ited and is based on space availability and the LABORATORY SCIENCE
competitiveness of the applicant pool. Fac-
— 82 hours minimum as specified below.
tors that may be considered include, but are
not limited to: courses completed, cumulative — Required Health Sciences courses (50
GPA, hours completed, personal interview or hours): HSC 260, 261, 262, 263, 301, 302,
written statement, and samples of work com- 308, 312, 315, 316, 317, 318, 319, 325,
pleted. For additional information on mini- 398A22, 398A23, 398A24, 398A27,
mum requirements for admission and the ap- 398A28 or 398A25, 398A29.
plication and selection process, visit Illinois- — Required courses outside Health Sciences
State.edu/Majors or contact the undergradu- (24-25 hours): BSC 197 and either 160 or
ate advisor for the intended program. 260; CHE 140, 141, and either 220 or
CHE 230/231 (220 is preferred); MAT
Standards for Progress in the Major: 120, 144 or 145.
MLS majors must earn grades of C or better — Elective courses (8 hours): BSC 170, BSC
in all courses required by the major, includ- 181 or KNR 181, BSC 182 or KNR 182,
ing prerequisites, and maintain a minimum BSC 196, 203, 219, 220, 283; CHE 215,
cumulative GPA of 2.50 or better to be re- 242; PHY 105, 108.
tained in the program. — Strongly recommended courses: HSC 105
and 204A02.
PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE IN —NOTE: This major may r equir e mor e
MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE hours than indicated due to prerequisites or
Professional Practice is provided off-campus lack of prior skill.
in clinical facilities affiliated with the Uni- A.A.S. to B.S. Degree:
versity. The experience involves technical
instruction in clinical hematology, chemistry, Persons possessing an Applied Associate of
blood banking, microbiology and other as- Science degree in clinical (medical) laborato-
pects of laboratory medicine. Students are ry technology from an Illinois community
responsible to provide their own transporta- college may complete a B.S. through the Illi-
tion and housing during the Professional nois Articulation Initiative. To qualify, stu-
Practice experience. Students apply for ac- dents must be certified as a medical laborato-
ry technician by the American Society for

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Health Sciences 153

Clinical Pathology or by American Medical Standards for Progress in the Major:


Technologists. Qualified students are award- Students must earn grades of C or better in
ed proficiency credit for some of the A.A.S. Health Sciences courses required by the ma-
courses. Interested students should contact jor and maintain a minimum cumulative
the Medical Laboratory Science program di- GPA of 2.00 for retention in the program. All
rector for details. students should have a projected plan of
study completed in consultation with the de-
Accreditation:
partmental academic advisor.
The Medical Laboratory Science program is ac-
credited by the National Accrediting Agency for Professional Affiliation:
Clinical Laboratory Sciences, www.naacls.org, Professional affiliation is with the American
5600 N. River Road, Ste. 720, Rosemont, IL Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE), Central
60018, phone (773) 714-8880. Illinois Chapter, Illinois State University stu-
dent section, at: asse.org.
Safety Program
Website: HealthSciences.IllinoisState.edu/ MAJOR IN SAFETY
safety — A minimum of 77 total hours required.
Degree Offered: B.S. — 52 hours in Health Sciences required.
Safety professionals apply principles drawn —Required courses (37 hours): HSC 170,
from such disciplines as technology, the sci- 248, 271, 359, 362, 370, 372, 378, 380,
ences, management, communication, health, 381, 382, 385.
and education to reduce the risk of harm to —Professional Practice (9 hours): HSC
people, property and the environment. Safety 398A04.
professionals have the knowledge and skills —Two elective courses selected from the fol-
to identify, evaluate, and cost-effectively lowing (6 hours): HSC 272, 383, 384.
control or prevent the hazards that can pro- —Required courses outside of Health Sci-
duce harm to people, property and the envi- ences (10 hours): CHE 141; KNR 182;
ronment. Successful safety professionals are
TEC 130.
effective communicators with strong “people
skills.” Safety professionals are employed in —Required General Education courses: CHE
a variety of public and private sector assign- 140; MAT 120; PHY 105 or 108; and one
ments, including manufacturing, insurance, of the following: MQM 100; ECO 138;
construction, government, and consulting. GEO 138; POL 138; or PSY 138*.
—Recommended electives based on career
goals (variable): BSC 160; CHE 220;
New Freshmen, New and Internal Trans- ENG 145A13 or 249; FIL 250; HSC 145,
fer Admission Requirements: 156; KNR 181, 282, 342**.
Admission to this academic program is lim- NOTE: *HSC 204A02 may be substitut-
ited and is based on space availability and the ed, but is not a General Education course.
competitiveness of the applicant pool. Fac- **KNR 181, 182, and 282 are prerequi-
tors that may be considered include, but are sites for KNR 342.
not limited to: courses completed, cumulative
GPA, hours completed, personal interview or MINOR IN SAFETY
written statement, and samples of work com-
pleted. For additional information on mini- —22 hours in Health Sciences required.
mum requirements for admission and the ap- —Required courses (10 hours): HSC 170,
271, 381.
plication and selection process, visit Illinois-
State.edu/Majors or contact the undergradu- —Elective courses selected from the follow-
ate advisor for the intended program. ing (12 hours): HSC 248, 272, 359, 362,
370, 372, 378, 380, 382, 383, 384, 385.
Students currently enrolled at Illinois State —Required courses outside of Health Sci-
who wish to change their major to Safety ences (12-14 hours): CHE 110, 112 or
must have a minimum GPA of 2.00. Students CHE 140; MAT 120; PHY 105 or 108.
should see the department academic advisor
for information.

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154 Health Sciences

Health Sciences Courses 201 PATHOPHYSIOLOGY I


3 sem. hrs.
105 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY Study of human disease processes, includ-
3 sem. hrs. ing the diagnosis, treatment and manage-
Study of basic language related to medical ment of patients. Prerequisites: GPA 2.25.
science and allied health specialties with HSC 105; KNR 181 and 182. Health Sci-
emphasis on word analysis, construction, ences major only.
definitions, pronunciation, spelling, and 202 PATHOPHYSIOLOGY II
standard abbreviations. 3 sem. hrs.
Continuation of HSC 201. Prerequisite:
145 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
HSC 201.
PRACTICE
3 sem. hrs. 204 HEALTH DATA ANALYSIS
3 sem. hrs.
Introduction to problem-solving tools and
Theory and practice of analysis and
skills used in the practice of environmental
presentation of data for management and
health from the perspective of waste in so-
research in the Health Sciences. Prerequi-
ciety. Prerequisite: Major or minor or con- site: Health Sciences major only.
sent of the instructor.
204A01 HEALTH DATA ANALYSIS:
156 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH IN HEALTH EDUCATION
THE 21ST CENTURY: MEETING 3 sem. hrs.
THE GLOBAL CHALLENGE SMT Theory and use of research, data analysis,
3 sem. hrs. and data display in decision-making, and
Application of scientific methods of in- basic interpretation of univariate empirical
quiry to understand environmental prob- findings in Health Promotion and Educa-
lems as they affect public health and per- tion. Prerequisite: Health Sciences major
sonal well-being. Not for credit if had HSC only.
155. 204A02 HEALTH DATA ANALYSIS:
170 SAFETY AND SOCIETY SS ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND
3 sem. hrs. HEALTH INFORMATION
Examines the impact of the social sciences MANAGEMENT
3 sem. hrs.
upon safety and accident prevention. Fo-
cuses on cultural influences from a global Theory and use of research, data analysis,
perspective. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or and data display in decision-making, and
basic interpretation of univariate empirical
COM 110 or concurrent registration.
findings in Environmental Health and
173 ASPECTS OF PROFESSIONAL Health Information Management. Prereq-
SAFETY uisite: Health Sciences major only.
3 sem. hrs. 207 MIND/BODY HEALTH
Philosophical perspectives of effective and 3 sem. hrs.
ethical safety practices. Comparison of Exploration of social, emotional, spiritual
major concepts related to professional and intellectual health relationships to
communication, leadership, and ethics. physical well-being. Active participation in
190 FOUNDATIONS OF HEALTH mind/body practices is included.
EDUCATION 208 DYNAMICS OF UNITED STATES
3 sem. hrs. CONTEMPORARY HEALTH
The historical and philosophical perspec- ISSUES SMT
tives of the development of Health Educa- 3 sem. hrs.
tion. A comparison of the major concepts Exploration and analysis of current health
and theories of health and characteristics and lifestyle issues. Emphasis on how indi-
of health education programs in schools viduals, communities and society make
and communities. Prerequisite: Health health decisions. Also offered as FCS/
Promotion and Education major only. KNR 208. Prerequisite: COM 110 or ENG
101.

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Health Sciences 155

210 INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH 252 WATER AND WASTEWATER


INFORMATION MANAGEMENT CONTROL
3 sem. hrs. 4 sem. hrs.
Introduction of health information man- Protection of water quality for human and
agement principles, policies and proce- ecosystem needs, and the control of
dures including health data content, col- wastewater. Lecture and lab. Materials
lection, quality, registries, access, and re- charge optional. Formerly W A TER
tention. Lecture and lab. Prerequisites: QUALITY AND TREATMENT. Prerequi-
HSC 105; KNR 181 and 182. sites: CHE 140 and 141; MAT 118 or 145,
or consent of the advisor; HSC 145; BSC
212 INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL
160 or concurrent registration.
CODING FOR REIMBURSEMENT
AND UTILIZATION MANAGEMENT 254 CONTROL OF INSTITUTIONAL
3 sem. hrs. ENVIRONMENTS
3 sem. hrs.
Introduction to the application of diagno-
sis and procedure coding applied in the Environmental health aspects of hospitals,
ambulatory healthcare setting for reim- nursing homes, penal institutions, schools,
bursement and utilization management. colleges and universities. Control of physi-
Formerly INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH cal, chemical and microbiological hazards.
DATA CLASSIFICATION SYSTEMS. Pre- Lecture and lab. Prerequisites: CHE 140;
requisites: HSC 201 and 210. CHE 141 or concurrent registration; HSC
145; BSC 160 or concurrent registration.
213 HOSPITAL INPATIENT
CLASSIFICATION AND 257 AIR QUALITY AND POLLUTION
REIMBURSEMENT PROCESSES CONTROL
3 sem. hrs. 3 sem. hrs.
Application of inpatient diagnoses and pro- Air contaminants found in the ambient air,
cedure classification and healthcare reim- workplace, and home, including health ef-
bursement processes, including quality and fects, measurement, and control. Lecture
performance monitoring. Formerly AD- and lab. Materials charge optional. Pre-
VANCED APPLICATIONS OF HEALTH requisites: CHE 140, 141 or concurrent
DATA CLASSIFICATIONS. Prerequisites: registration; HSC 145; MAT 118 or 145,
HSC 202, 212, and 298A03. or consent of the advisor; KNR 182 or
.
concurrent registration.
230 LEGAL ASPECTS OF HEALTH 258A01 EPIDEMIOLOGY FOR
INFORMATION AND RISK ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
MANAGEMENT 3 sem. hrs.
3 sem. hrs.
Principles and methods governing the sur-
Review and application of laws, policies, veillance and investigation of disease and
procedures and practices applying to the injury in human populations. Prerequi-
legal aspects of health information and sites: HSC 145 and 204A02; MAT 119;
risk management. Prerequisites: HSC 105 BSC 160 or 260 or concurrent registration.
and 210 or consent of the instructor. Ma-
jor only. 258A02 EPIDEMIOLOGY FOR
PUBLIC HEALTH
248 OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH 3 sem. hrs.
3 sem. hrs. Principles and methods governing the sur-
Adverse environmental conditions en- veillance and investigation of disease and
countered in the workplace affecting the injury in human populations. Prerequisite:
efficiency, health, and well-being of em- HSC 204A01 or 204A02.
ployees.
260 INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL
249 ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY IMMUNOHEMATOLOGY
3 sem. hrs. 3 sem. hrs.
Toxicants such as heavy metals, gases, va- Basic principles and procedures of im-
pors, dusts, pesticides, food additives, and
munohematology (blood banking). Lec-
their effects on health and the environ-
ture and lab. Materials charge optional.
ment. Prerequisites: CHE 140, 141; MAT
118 or 145 or consent of the advisor; CHE Prerequisites: HSC 261, 262, 263. Major
220 or concurrent registration; KNR 182 only; a minimum of 45 hours completed.
and HSC 145. CHE 220 is recommended.

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156 Health Sciences

261 INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL 286 NEEDS ASSESSMENT IN HEALTH


HEMATOLOGY EDUCATION
4 sem. hrs. 3 sem. hrs.
Basic principles of hematology and body Emphasis on procedures which identify
fluid analysis. Lecture and lab. Materials health education priorities of populations in
charge optional. Prerequisites: BSC 197; various settings. Examination of health needs
CHE 140 and 141; concurrent registration of select populations. Prerequisites: Health
in HSC 262, 263. Major only; a minimum Promotion and Education major only.
of 45 hours completed. CHE 220 is rec- 290 STRATEGIES IN HEALTH
ommended. EDUCATION
262 INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL 3 sem. hrs.
CHEMISTRY Examination of the educational process,
4 sem. hrs. methods, strategies, and techniques in
Basic principles and procedures of clinical health education, communication tech-
chemistry and urinalysis. Lecture and lab. niques and current resources. See topics
Materials charge optional. Prerequisites: below. Includes Clinical Experience: 5
BSC 197; CHE 140 and 141; concurrent hours. Prerequisites: Major only. HSC
registration in HSC 261, 263. Major only; 190.
a minimum of 45 hours completed. CHE 290A01 STRATEGIES IN HEALTH
220 is recommended. EDUCATION: COMMUNITY
263 INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL HEALTH
IMMUNOLOGY 3 sem. hrs.
3 sem. hrs. The purpose of this course is to improve
Basic principles and procedures of immu- Community Health Promotion student’s
nology and serology. Lecture and lab. Ma- ability to select, design, and implement
terials charge optional. Prerequisites: evidence-based health education. Prereq-
BSC 197; CHE 140 and 141; concurrent uisites: Major only.
registration in HSC 261, 262. Major only; 290A02 STRATEGIES IN HEALTH
a minimum of 45 hours completed. CHE EDUCATION: SCHOOL HEALTH
220 is recommended. 3 sem. hrs.
270 GLOBAL CONTEXTS The purpose of this course is to improve
3 sem. hrs. School Health Education student’s ability
Philosophical perspectives on professional to select, design, and implement evidence-
practice in a new cultural context. Short- based health education. Prerequisites:
term study abroad. Topics and regions as Major only. HSC 190.
approved. Multiple enrollments are allowed 291 UNDERGRADUATE TEACHING
if content is different; maximum of 6 hours. EXPERIENCE IN HEALTH
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. SCIENCES
271 SAFETY TECHNOLOGY 1-3 sem. hrs.
3 sem. hrs. Supervised examination of issues related
Controlling production costs due to acci- to the Undergraduate Teaching Experi-
dents. Addresses legislation, worker’s ence. Requires time beyond the UTA work
compensation, hazard recognition, and experience. A maximum of 3 hours may
safety planning. Includes basic engineer- be applied toward graduation. Prerequi-
ing solutions. sites: Official designation as an Under-
graduate Teaching Assistant (UTA). Con-
272 CONSTRUCTION SAFETY sent of the department chair.
3 sem. hrs.
292 COMMUNITY PUBLIC HEALTH
Addresses employee safety training re- 3 sem. hrs.
quirements, recordkeeping, hazard recog-
Introduction to community public health at
nition, safety inspections, and program
local, state, and national levels. Includes
planning in the construction industry. Pre-
emphasis on community health problems,
requisite: MAT 120.
institutions and resources. Prerequisite:
Major only.

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Health Sciences 157

293 PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN 301 INTRODUCTION TO


DISEASE COAGULATION AND HEMOSTASIS
3 sem. hrs. 2 sem. hrs.
Emphasis on human disease processes with Principles and test procedures related to
special focus on cardiovascular and respir- blood coagulation and hemostasis. Correla-
atory systems and the implications for tion of test results in disease states. Materi-
health education. Prerequisite: Health Pro- als charge optional. Prerequisite: Grade of
motion and Education major only. C or better in HSC 261.
294 DISEASES OF THE HUMAN BODY 302 INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL
3 sem. hrs. BIOCHEMISTRY
The course explores human diseases affect- 3 sem. hrs.
ing various body systems including the Theory and principles of advanced instru-
nervous, digestive, reproductive, skeletal mentation and techniques used in refer-
and integumentary. Prerequisites: HSC ence, pharmaceutical, and biotechnology
293. Health Promotion and Education ma- laboratories as related to disease diagnosis.
jor only. Prerequisite: HSC 262 or consent of the
instructor.
296 HEALTH BEHAVIOR AND
305 PUBLIC HEALTH LEADERSHIP
THEORY
3 sem. hrs.
3 sem. hrs.
Examination of theoretical foundations,
An examination of health determinants, concepts, styles and practice of leadership
major theories, and models of health be- in public health.
havior. Application to Health Promotion
308 INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL
and Education programming will be em-
MICROBIOLOGY
phasized. Formerly CONCEPTS IN
4 sem. hrs.
HEALTH EDUCATION. Prerequisites: 45
Survey of medical microbiology with em-
hours completed.
phasis on common pathogens. Included are
298A03 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE:  taxonomy, identification, culture methods,
HEALTH INFORMATION MANAGE- procedures and antibiotic susceptibility
MENT: CLINICAL INTERNSHIP testing. Lecture and lab. Materials charge
3 sem. hrs. optional. Prerequisites: BSC 160 or 260;
Rotation and project assignments in hospi- and HSC 263.
tal medical records departments. Prerequi- 310 HEALTH INFORMATION
sites: Grade of C or better in HSC 202, MANAGEMENT SEMINAR
212, 230. Major only and consent of the 1 sem. hr.
program director. Synthesis of program content in prepara-
298A04 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: tion for initial employment and the RHIA
PRACTICUM IN HEALTH examination. Prerequisites: HSC 213,
PROMOTION AND EDUCATION 298A03, and 345. Major only.
1-3 sem. hrs. 312 CLINICAL CHEMISTRY II
3 sem. hrs.
Application of knowledge and skills in pro-
fessional settings for Health Promotion and Concentrated laboratory instruction and theo-
retical applications of clinical biochemistry.
Education. Prerequisites: Major or minor
Current testing procedures, method compari-
only. A minimum of 60 hours completed.
son, and quality assurance are studied. Pre-
300 HEALTH INFORMATION DATA requisites: HSC 262; MAT 120, 144 or 145
ANALYSIS or consent of the instructor.
3 sem. hrs. 315 CLINICAL PARASITOLOGY AND
Management and analysis of health data MYCOLOGY
using data analysis and presentation appli- 2 sem. hrs.
cations. Introduction to data mining and General techniques for identification of
other health data analysis tools. Formerly clinically significant parasites and fungi.
HEALTH INFORMATION SYSTEMS. Morphology, symptomology, and epidemi-
Prerequisites: HSC 298A03. Major only. ology are stressed. Prerequisite: HSC 308.

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158 Health Sciences

316 CLINICAL LABORATORY 326 HEALTHCARE FINANCIAL


SCIENCE: RESEARCH DESIGN MANAGEMENT AND
1 sem. hr. REIMBURSEMENT SYSTEMS
Research design in clinical laboratory sci- 6 sem. hrs.
ence. Prerequisites: HSC 260, 261 and 262 Analysis and application of principles and
or consent of the instructor. theories of financial management and re-
317 CLINICAL HEMATOLOGY II imbursement systems utilized in the Unit-
2 sem. hrs. ed States healthcare system. Prerequisite:
Advanced concepts in Hematology. Clini- RHIT-HIM Online Sequence only.
cal correlation of test results and disease 327 HEALTHCARE QUALITY
are emphasized. Prerequisites: HSC 261 MANAGEMENT, LAW, AND RISK
and 301. MANAGEMENT
6 sem. hrs.
318 CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY II
Analysis and application of principles and
2 sem. hrs.
theories concerning United States health-
Comprehensive medical microbiology care quality management, law, and risk
with emphasis on characterization of less management. Prerequisite: RHIT-HIM
common pathogens, interpretation of clini- Online Sequence only.
cal data and etiology. Prerequisites: BSC 328 PLANNING, IMPLEMENTATION
260 and HSC 308. AND MANAGEMENT OF HEALTH
319 CLINICAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS
IMMUNOHEMATOLOGY II 6 sem. hrs.
3 sem. hrs. Addresses the Health Information man-
Advanced concepts in Immunohematolo- ager’s role and responsibilities in planning,
gy. Donor criteria, component therapy, implementing and managing health infor-
transfusion and problem solving are em- mation systems to manage health data. Pre-
phasized. Prerequisite: HSC 260. requisite: RHIT-HIM Online Sequence only.
320 ORGANIZATION AND 329 MANAGEMENT FOR THE
MANAGEMENT OF HEALTH HEALTH INFORMATION
INFORMATION SERVICES ADMINISTRATOR
3 sem. hrs. 6 sem. hrs.
Organization and management of person-
Managerial decision making for planning,
nel and processes by health information
organizing, staffing, directing and control-
administrators. Prerequisite: RHIT-HIM
ling the functions, operations and re-
Online Sequence only.
sources of a health information depart-
330 HEALTH DATA ANALYSIS FOR
ment. Prerequisites: HSC 230, 298A03,
DECISION MAKING
345 and 346. Major only.
6 sem. hrs.
322 POLLUTION PREVENTION Collect, analyze, and report clinical data to
4 sem. hrs. address administrative problems and is-
Basic methods in solid and hazardous sues. Prerequisite: RHIT-HIM Online Se-
waste management with an emphasis in quence only.
waste minimization/pollution prevention.
331 APPLIED CLINICAL
Prerequisites: HSC 145; MAT 118 or 145,
LABORATORY MANAGEMENT
or consent of the advisor, or graduate
1-3 sem. hrs.
standing.
Concentrated instruction in the funda-
325 LABORATORY EDUCATION AND
mentals of laboratory management in-
MANAGEMENT
cluding regulatory, budgetary, per-
2 sem. hrs.
sonnel and educational issues. Lec-
Foundational concepts of education and
ture in a clinical setting. Multiple en-
management, with emphasis on philoso-
rollments are allowed; maximum 3
phies, methods and techniques for profes-
sional application with practicum. Prereq- hours. Prerequisites: HSC 260, 261
uisites: HSC 260, 261 and 262 or consent and 262 or consent of the instructor.
of the instructor.

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Health Sciences 159

332 APPLIED CLINICAL 346 HEALTHCARE FINANCE


BIOCHEMISTRY 3 sem. hrs.
1-7 sem. hrs. Systematic study of hospital financial
Concentrated laboratory instruction in clin- planning; coordination of financial re-
ical biochemistry. Current testing proce- sources and expenditures; reimbursement
dures, instrumentation and quality assur- methods. Formerly HOSPITA L BUDGET-
ance are studied. Lecture and lab in a clini- ING PROCEDURES. Prerequisites: HSC
cal setting. Prerequisite: HSC 302. 212, and 298A03 or consent of the instruc-
334 APPLIED CLINICAL URINALYSIS tor. Major only.
1-3 sem. hrs.
350 FOOD PROTECTION
Concentrated laboratory instruction in rou- 3 sem. hrs.
tine and special urinalysis procedures.
Clinical lab only. Prerequisite: HSC 262. An intensive study of the laws, principles,
and techniques applied in the protection of
335 APPLIED SPECIAL
food and milk for human consumption.
MICROBIOLOGY
Lecture and lab. Materials charge optional.
1-6 sem. hrs.
Prerequisites: HSC 145; BSC 160 or con-
Concentrated laboratory instruction in the
current registration, or graduate standing.
identification of significant pathogens re-
quiring unique identification methods. 355 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
May include virology, parasitology or my- DECISION PROCESSES
cology. Lecture and lab in a clinical set- 3 sem. hrs.
ting. Prerequisite: HSC 308. Intensive study of the decision making
338 APPLIED CLINICAL techniques, organizational structure, inter-
MICROBIOLOGY agency relationships, program methodolo-
1-6 sem. hrs. gies, and legal aspects of environmental
Concentrated laboratory instruction in clin- health practice. Prerequisites: HSC 145
ical microbiology, including identification and 156. Senior standing, major in Envi-
of pathogens, culture methods, procedures, ronmental Health Program, or consent of
antibiotic testing and interpretation of clin- the instructor.
ical data. Lecture and lab in a clinical set- 359 INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE
ting. Prerequisite: HSC 308. 3 sem. hrs.
339 APPLIED CLINICAL Techniques for measurement, evaluation, and
IMMUNOHEMATOLOGY control of chemical and physical hazards in
1-5 sem. hrs. occupational environments. Lecture and lab.
Concentrated laboratory instruction in Materials charge optional. Prerequisites:
blood bank. Current testing procedures, CHE 140; HSC 248; MAT 118 or 120 or
donor collection, preparation of blood 145, or consent of the advisor.
components and quality assurance are
362 ERGONOMICS
studied. Lecture and lab in a clinical set-
ting. Prerequisite: HSC 260. 3 sem. hrs.
341 HEALTH DATA GOVERNANCE Overview of physical and psychological
aspects of ergonomics, including work-
3 sem. hrs.
station design, its role in accident causa-
The systemic study and practice of manag- tion, and ergonomic-related injuries and
ing health information as an asset through illnesses. Lecture. Prerequisites: MAT
strategic planning, enterprise solutions and 120 or 145; PHY 105 or 108; HSC 204 or
quality control. Prerequisites: HSC 202, MQM 100 or ECO 138 or GEO 138 or
204, 210, 212, 230, 298A03. POL 138 or PSY 138, or graduate stand-
345 QUALITY MANAGEMENT IN ing.
HEALTH CARE 370 SAFETY TRAINING DEVELOMENT
3 sem. hrs. 3 sem. hrs.
Review and application of strategies to in- Principles, responsibilities, and techniques
vestigate, identify, assess, resolve and for developing, and administering an in-
monitor performance using health data. dustrial safety training program, including
Prerequisites: HSC 204, 210, 212, and principles of adult learning. Formerly IN-
298A03 or consent of the instructor. Major DUSTRIAL SAFETY. Prerequisite: HSC
only. 381, or graduate standing.

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160 Health Sciences

372 ACCIDENT/INCIDENT 383 AGRICULTURAL SAFETY AND


INVESTIGATION, RECORDS, AND HEALTH
EVALUATION 3 sem. hrs.
3 sem. hrs. Major problems of accident causation and
Theory, function and application of acci- prevention applicable to agriculture and
dent/incident investigation, reporting, and the need for farm safety education, engi-
analysis systems. Form design, utilization neering, and enforcement of countermeas-
and record keeping procedures. Prerequi- ures. Half-day field trip required. Also of-
sites: HSC 381; MAT 120 or 145; PHY fered as AGR 383.
105 or 108, or graduate standing. 384 HAZARDOUS MATERIALS
377 HEALTH AND WELLNESS REGULATION
COACHING 3 sem. hrs.
3 sem. hrs. Overview of federal and state safety and
An overview of health and wellness environmental regulations dealing with
coaching with emphasis on models, ap- hazardous materials in the workplace and
proaches, and evidence-based skills. community. Prerequisite: CHE 140, or
Prerequisite: HSC 296. graduate standing.
385 SYSTEM SAFETY
378 DISASTER PREPAREDNESS 3 sem. hrs.
3 sem. hrs. Risk and life cycle concept. Application of
Organizing, directing, coordinating disas- inductive and deductive analytical tech-
ter services in schools, industry, and local niques for hazard identification and risk as-
government. Includes a hands-on disaster sessment. Prerequisite: HSC 204 or MQM
exercise. Prerequisites: CHE 110 and 112 100 or ECO 138 or GEO 138 or POL 138 or
or CHE 140 or BSC 145; or consent of the PSY 138, or graduate standing.
instructor, or graduate standing. 387 PROGRAMS IN SCHOOL HEALTH
380 FIRE PROTECTION AND  3 sem. hrs.
PREVENTION Comprehensive school health education
3 sem. hrs. with major topics of health education,
Measures related to safeguarding human school health programs, and school com-
life and preservation of property in preven- munity collaboration. Prerequisites: HSC
tion, detection, and suppression of fire. 290A02 and 292.
Prerequisites: HSC 381; PHY 105 or 108, 390 DRUGS IN SOCIETY
or graduate standing. 3 sem. hrs.
381 OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND  Psychological, social, medical, legal, and
HEALTH ACT (OSHA) economic aspects of use, misuse, and
4 sem. hrs. abuse of substances will be explored along
Interpretation of the provisions of the Oc- with the implications for education and
cupational Safety and Health Act; the reg- prevention. Prerequisites: Health Promo-
ulations, standards, and reporting require- tion and Education major only. A mini-
ments pursuant to it. Prerequisites: HSC mum of 45 hours completed, or graduate
170, 271; CHE 140 or concurrent registra- standing.
tion, or graduate standing. 391 CURRICULUM AND EVALUATION
382 IMPROVING SAFETY IN SCHOOL HEALTH
PERFORMANCE 3 sem. hrs.
3 sem. hrs. School health education standards, curricu-
Development of specialized knowledge lum development and evaluation, student
and skills in problem-solving; evaluation assessment and accommodations for stu-
and implementation of occupational safety dents with special needs. Includes Clinical
programs. Prerequisites: HSC 370; HSC Experience: 10 hours. Prerequisites: HSC
204A02 or MQM 100 or ECO 138 or GEO 290A02; Admission to Professional Stud-
138 or POL 138 or PSY 138, or graduate ies, or graduate standing.
standing.

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Health Sciences 161

394 HEALTH ASPECTS OF AGING 398A04 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE:


3 sem. hrs. SAFETY
Characteristics of the aging process and 6-12 sem. hrs.
factors influencing adaptation and the Structured safety work experience under
quality of living. Also offered as FCS/ the supervision of an experienced safety
KNR 394. professional in a business, industry, or
395 HEALTH COMMUNICATION AND government setting, with oversight by a
SOCIAL MARKETING Safety faculty member. Provides a cap-
3 sem. hrs. stone experience for Safety majors. Prereq-
Analysis and development of print and non uisites: HSC 359, 381 and 6 hours from
-print materials and their use by health HSC 272, 362, 370, 372, 378, 380, 382,
promotion professionals. Formerly ME- 383, 384, 385. A 2.00 major and cumula-
DIA AND MATERIALS IN HEALTH EDU- tive GPA is required. Safety majors only.
CATION. Prerequisites: Grade of C or
398A05 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE:
better in HSC 286 and HSC 290A01 or
290A02. Health Sciences major only, or HEALTH INFORMATION
graduate standing. MANAGEMENT – RHIT
1-3 sem. hrs.
396 HEALTH EDUCATION PROGRAM
PLANNING AND EVALUATION Application of HIM knowledge and skills
3 sem. hrs. in a healthcare professional setting. Multi-
Theory and application of Health Promo- ple enrollments are allowed for a maxi-
tion planning and promotion. Grantsman- mum of 3 hours. This is a capstone course
ship and evaluation will be emphasized. and the students are required to have a pro-
Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in HSC fessional skills base. Prerequisites: Grade
286 and HSC 290A01 or 290A02. Health of C or better in HSC 326, 327 and 328.
Sciences major only, or graduate standing. RHIT-HIM Online Sequence major only
398A01 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: and consent of program director. Evidence
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH of health insurance and professional liabil-
INTERNSHIP ity may be required.
3-12 sem. hrs. 398A21 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE:
Internship in a governmental, industrial, or MEDICAL LABORATORY
institutional organization, providing on-the SCIENCE: SPECIAL STUDIES
-job training and introduction to a career in 1-8 sem. hrs.
environmental health. Multiple enroll- Structured, off-campus clinical laboratory
ments are allowed; maximum 2 hours. experience under the guidance of qualified
Prerequisite: Consent of the program di- medical laboratory professionals. Students
rector. receive individualized training and practi-
398A02 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: cum to develop professional attitudes,
INTERNSHIP IN HEALTH competencies and analytical skills. Prereq-
EDUCATION uisites: Grade of C or better in HSC 260,
1-16 sem. hrs. 261, 262, 263, 301, 302, 308 taken within
Extended in-service experience under the the last 7 years.
guidance of qualified personnel in Health
Promotion. Prerequisites: 2.50 major and 398A22 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE:
cumulative GPA; HSC 395 and 396. MEDICAL LABORATORY
SCIENCE: BIOCHEMISTRY
398A03 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE:
2 sem. hrs.
HEALTH INFORMATION
MANAGEMENT: MANAGEMENT Structured, off-campus clinical laboratory
INTERNSHIP experience under the guidance of qualified
3 sem. hrs. medical laboratory professionals. Students
Application of advanced Health Infor- receive individualized training and practi-
mation Management skills in a health re- cum to develop professional attitudes,
lated setting geared towards the career in- competencies and analytical skills. Prereq-
terests of the students. Prerequisites: uisites: Grade of C or better in HSC 260,
Grade of C or better in all major courses. 261, 262, 263, 301, 302, 308 taken within
Major only and consent of program direc- the last 7 years.
tor. Evidence of health insurance and pro-
fessional liability insurance required.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


162 Health Sciences

398A23 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 398A28 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE:


MEDICAL LABORATORY MEDICAL LABORATORY
SCIENCE: SEROLOGY SCIENCE: MICROBIOLOGY
1 sem. hr. 3 sem. hrs.
Structured, off-campus clinical laboratory Structured, off-campus clinical laboratory
experience under the guidance of qualified experience under the guidance of qualified
medical laboratory professionals. Students medical laboratory professionals. Stu-
receive individualized training and practi- dents receive individualized training and
cum to develop professional attitudes, practicum to develop professional atti-
competencies and analytical skills. Pre- tudes, competencies and analytical skills.
requisites: Grade of C or better in HSC Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in HSC
260, 261, 262, 263, 301, 302, 308 taken 260, 261, 262, 263, 301, 302, 308 taken
within the last 7 years. within the last 7 years.
398A24 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 398A29 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE:
MEDICAL LABORATORY MEDICAL LABORATORY
SCIENCE: URINALYSIS AND BODY SCIENCE: IMMUNOHEMATOLOGY
FLUIDS 2.5 sem. hrs.
1 sem. hr. Structured, off-campus clinical laboratory
Structured, off-campus clinical laboratory experience under the guidance of qualified
experience under the guidance of qualified medical laboratory professionals. Students
medical laboratory professionals. Students receive individualized training and practi-
receive individualized training and practi- cum to develop professional attitudes,
cum to develop professional attitudes, competencies and analytical skills. Pre-
competencies and analytical skills. Pre- requisites: Grade of C or better in HSC
requisites: Grade of C or better in HSC 260, 261, 262, 263, 301, 302, 308 taken
260, 261, 262, 263, 301, 302, 308 taken within the last 7 years.
within the last 7 years.
398A25 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE:
MEDICAL LABORATORY
SCIENCE: MICROBIOLOGY
SIMULATION
3 sem. hrs.
Structured, on-campus laboratory experi-
ence under the guidance of qualified medi-
cal laboratory professionals. Students re-
ceive individualized training and practi-
cum to develop professional attitudes,
competencies and analytical skills. Pre-
requisites: Grade of C or better in HSC
260, 261, 262, 263, 301, 302, 308 taken
within the last 7 years.
398A27 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE:
MEDICAL LABORATORY
SCIENCE: HEMATOLOGY
2.5 sem. hrs.
Structured, off-campus clinical laboratory
experience under the guidance of qualified
medical laboratory professionals. Students
receive individualized training and practi-
cum to develop professional attitudes,
competencies and analytical skills. Pre-
requisites: Grade of C or better in HSC
260, 261, 262, 263, 301, 302, 308 taken
within the last 7 years.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Information Technology 163

INFORMATION C or better is required in all prerequisite cours-


es. For majors, only courses in which the stu-
TECHNOLOGY (IT) 515 dent has received a grade of C or better may be
202 Old Union counted toward the hours required in the major,
Phone: (309) 438-8338 including supporting requirements.
Web address: IT.IllinoisState.edu
Director: Mar y Elaine Califf. A student cannot pursue a double major in
any two programs in the School of Infor-
General School Information mation Technology. Also, a student cannot
pursue both a major and a minor in Infor-
The School of Information Technology (IT) mation Technology.
offers four degree programs: Computer Sci-
ence, Cybersecurity, Information Systems, Admission Requirements:
and Network and Telecommunications Man- A student may enter a major or minor in the
agement. All IT majors require substantial School of Information Technology as a new
interpersonal written and verbal communica- freshman, a transfer student, or as a change
tion skills as well as technical computing of major at Illinois State University. Students
skills. The curricula have a strong practical should contact the Information Technology
emphasis on the application of computing so- undergraduate advisor or University Admis-
lutions to real world problems. Practical sions for minimum admission requirements.
skills and applications are balanced with ex-
posure to the theoretical knowledge base that Transfer Students:
underlies the field of computing. Proficiency with the Java programming lan-
All programs prepare a student for a compu- guage is expected in 200-and 300-level Infor-
ting career, but there are important differ- mation Technology courses and is usually
ences in the context of the work to be per- obtained by completing IT 168 and one of IT
formed, the types of problems to be solved, 178, 179 or 275.
and the types of systems to be designed and
built. Computer Science focuses on algo- HONORS IN INFORMATION
rithm development and writing programs that TECHNOLOGY
others will use. Cybersecurity focuses on all The School offers honors work in all pro-
aspects of information assurance, including grams to highly qualified juniors and seniors.
protecting networks, servers, databases, and Candidates must have a 3.30 overall GPA
private information. Information Systems and a 3.50 GPA in Information Technology.
focuses on integrating hardware and software Honors requirements involve honors course
authored by others into a coherent system to work and the preparation of a substantial re-
fulfill a business purpose. Network and Tel- search paper or the completion of a signifi-
ecommunications Management prepares stu- cant project prepared under the guidance of a
dents to build and optimize networks for best faculty advisor. Further details about the
performance. University Honors program are available at
Starting positions for Computer Science and Honors.IllinoisState.edu.
Information Systems include such job titles
as programmer or programmer/analyst. Cy- PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE
bersecurity graduates will take jobs as securi- Each degree program requires a practical ex-
ty analysts, while Network and Telecommu- perience that may be satisfied by a directed
nications titles include network administrator project or an internship. An internship expe-
and network technician. rience is the usual way for students to satisfy
Department minors are intended to help majors this requirement. IT 191 (1 hour) is required
in other departments focus on specific skills and prepares students for fulfilling this re-
and electives which are relevant for their career quirement. It is recommended that IT 191 be
needs. Minors are available in Information Sys- taken no later than the sophomore year.
tems and in Computer Science. The six (6) hours of Professional Practice credit
Academic Requirements: counted toward the major will be graded. Any
additional Professional Practice credit will be
For any student who enrolls in a course in the earned on a CR/NC basis. A maximum of 16
School of Information Technology, a grade of hours of Professional Practice credit (IT 391,

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


164 Information Technology

398) may be applied toward graduation. Stu- —Communication (6 hours): COM 223,
dents may not register for IT 398 during the ENG 249.
last semester of their studies. —Lab Science (8 hours): 2 courses from:
BSC 196, 197, CHE 140, 141, PHY
MINOR IN COGNITIVE SCIENCE 110, 111.
—Science and Math electives (7-8 hours):
The School of Information Technology par- 2 additional courses from: BSC 196,
ticipates in the Minor in Cognitive Science 197, CHE 140, 141, MAT 175, PHY
program. Several courses offered by the 110, 111, 112, 375, PSY 110.
School contribute to the minor. For further
information, please consult the School un- Allowable Substitutions for Required
dergraduate advisor as well as the section en- Courses:
titled “Interdisciplinary Studies Programs” in —Acceptable substitution for 3 hours of IT
this Undergraduate Catalog. 398 is 3 hours of IT 391.
—Acceptable substitution for 6 hours of IT
Computer Science Programs 398 is 3 hours of IT 391 and 3 additional
Degree Offered: B.S. hours from IT 244, 276, 326, 330, 340,
345, 351, 353, 355, 356, 367, 382, 384,
MAJOR IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 385, 388 (if not used to satisfy other re-
This degree is designed for students who quirements).
wish to pursue a comprehensive study of
Web Computing Sequence
computer science that blends theory, abstrac-
tion, and design in a variety of traditional
The Web Computing sequence is designed
and current areas. The Computer Science for students who wish to study computer sci-
major prepares students to solve modern ence with special emphasis on Web, mobile,
computing problems by providing a strong and cloud computing. A minor is not re-
background in theory, design, hardware, andquired.
systems along with significant software de-—86-88 hours required.
velopment experience in multiple languages
—50 hours in Information Technology
on multiple operating systems. It would also
required.
prepare students to pursue graduate studies
in Computer Science. The Computer Science —Required courses (44 hours): IT 168, 179,
major is accredited by the Computing Ac- 191, 214, 225, 226, 261, 279, 327, 328,
creditation Commission of ABET, at 353, 354, 358, 378, 383.
www.abet.org. —6 hours of IT 398.
—Supporting requirements (36-38 hours):
General Computer Science Sequence
—Mathematics and Statistics (15-16
The General Computer Science sequence is hours): MAT 145, 146, 260; 1 course
designed for students who wish to pursue a from: MQM 100, MAT 350.
broad education in computer science. A mi- —Communication (6 hours): COM 223,
nor is not required. ENG 249.
—86-88 hours required. —Lab Science (8 hours): 2 courses from:
—50 hours in Information Technology re- BSC 196, 197, CHE 140, 141, PHY
quired. 110, 111.
—Required courses (35 hours): IT 168, 179, —Science and Math electives (7-8 hours):
191, 214, 225, 226, 261, 279, 327, 328, 2 additional courses from: BSC 196,
378, 383. 197, CHE 140, 141, MAT 175, PHY
—6 hours of IT 398. 110, 111, 112, 375, PSY 110.
—9 hours from: IT 244, 276, 326, 330, 340,
345, 351, 353, 355, 356, 367, 382, 384, Allowable Substitutions for Required
385, 388 (6 of the 9 hours must be from: Courses:
IT 326, 340, 355, 356, 382, 384, 388). —Acceptable substitution for 3 hours of IT
—Supporting requirements (36-38 hours): 398 is 3 hours of IT 391.
—Mathematics and Statistics (15-16 —Acceptable substitution for 6 hours of IT
hours): MAT 145, 146, 260; 1 course 398 is 3 hours of IT 391 and 3 additional
from: MQM 100, MAT 350. hours from IT 244, 276, 326, 330, 340,

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Information Technology 165

345, 351, 356, 367, 382, 384, 385, 388 (if hours): COM 223; ECO 105; ENG
not used to satisfy other requirements). 249; MQM 220.

Preparation for Graduate Study: Allowable Substitutions for Required


Courses:
The General Computer Science sequence of
—Acceptable substitution for 3 hours of IT
the Computer Science major should be select-
398 is 3 hours of IT 391.
ed by those students interested in traditional
Computer Science graduate programs. Any —Acceptable substitution for 6 hours of IT
student interested in graduate school should 398 is 3 hours of IT 391 and 3 hours from
discuss options with faculty and an academic IT 330, 353, 355, 363, 369, 370, 376, 381
advisor during the junior year. (if not used to satisfy other requirements).

MINOR IN COMPUTER SCIENCE Information Systems Programs


Degree Offered: B.S.
This minor provides a solid foundation for us-
ing the computer as a tool in any discipline and MAJOR IN INFORMATION
may be of particular interest to majors in mathe-
SYSTEMS
matics or the natural sciences. It provides an op-
portunity for students to gain knowledge in a The Information Systems (IS) Major is de-
specialized area such as graphics, parallel pro- signed to prepare professionals in Information
cessing, or artificial intelligence. Systems including such areas as systems anal-
ysis and design. This degree focuses on the
—22 hours required. use of computer technology and information
—IT 168, 179, 225, 226, 261, 279. management methods to solve business prob-
—1 course from: IT 326, 327, 328, 340, 356, lems. This requires an understanding of both
384, 388. the organizational context of the problem and
the technologies, methodologies, and tools
Cybersecurity Program typically utilized. There are three sequences
within this program: the Integration of Enter-
Degree Offered: B.S.
prise Systems Sequence, the Systems Devel-
opment/Analyst Sequence, and the Web Ap-
MAJOR IN CYBERSECURITY plication Development Sequence.
The Cybersecurity Major is designed to give The Integration of Enterprise Systems Se-
students the knowledge and tools necessary quence is designed for students who wish to
for protecting information and information pursue both technical and practical skills in
systems. The major provides education for large-scale, multi-platform enterprise compu-
protecting the confidentiality, availability, and
ting systems. The Systems Development/
integrity of information using technology, Analyst Sequence provides breadth and depth
people, and policy. A minor is not required. in analysis and design techniques preparing
Any student interested in graduate school students to work in a variety of information
should discuss options with faculty and an ac-
technology environments, while the Web Ap-
ademic advisor during their junior year. plication Development Sequence emphasizes
—80 total hours required. the development of Web/Internet-based busi-
—56 hours in Information Technology re- ness information systems. The Information
quired. Systems program is accredited by the Compu-
ting Accreditation Commission of ABET, at
—Required courses (44 hours): IT 168, 170 www.abet.org.
or 178 or 179, 191, 214, 225 or 254, 250,
261, 262, 276, 351, 357, 359, 360, 377, Preparation for Graduate Study:
378.
—Professional Practice (6 hours): IT 398. The Information Systems major offers excel-
—2 courses from: IT 330, 353, 355, 369, 370, lent preparation for a number of computer and
376, 381. management information systems master's
programs. Students interested in an MBA pro-
—Supporting requirements (24 hours):
gram may want to combine this major with a
— Mathematics and Statistics (11 hours): Business Administration minor. Any student
MAT 120 or 145; MAT 160; 1 course interested in graduate school should discuss
from: ECO 138; PSY 138; MQM 100. options with faculty and an academic advisor
— Communication and Organization (13 during their junior year.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


166 Information Technology

Integration of Enterprise Systems —Required courses (37 hours): IT 168, 178,


Sequence 191, 214, 254, 261, 262, 272, 276, 363,
372, 378.
The Integration of Enterprise Systems Se-
—Professional Practice (6 hours): IT 398.
quence is designed for students who are in-
terested in the areas of software develop- —2 courses from: IT 244, 250, 330, 341,
ment, project management, and application 344, 345, 353, 367, 368.
integration using large enterprise computing —Supporting requirements (33 hours):
systems. This sequence provides in-depth —Mathematics and Statistics (11 hours):
knowledge regarding the integration of busi- MAT 120 or 145; MAT 160; 1 course
ness applications on a large enterprise com- from ECO 138; PSY 138; MQM 100.
puting system. A minor is not required. —Communication and Organization (22
—81-82 total hours required. hours): ACC 131; COM 223, ECO 105
(4 hours), MQM 220; 1 course from
—44-49 hours in Information Technology COM 227, ENG 249; 2 courses from
required. ACC 132, ECO 225 or 239 or 245, FIL
—Required courses (39 hours): IT 168, 178, 240, MKT 230.
191, 214, 225 or 254; 261, 262, 272, 276,
330, 372, 378, 392. Allowable Substitutions for Required
—Professional Practice (6 hours): IT 398. Courses:
—1 course from: IT 244, 250, 344, 345, 363, —Acceptable substitution for 3 hours of IT
367, 368. 398 is 3 hours of IT 391.
—Supporting requirements (33 hours): —Acceptable substitution for 6 hours of IT
398 is 3 hours of IT 391 and 3 hours from
—Mathematics and Statistics (11 hours):
IT 244, 250, 330, 341, 344, 345, 353, 367,
MAT 120 or 145; MAT 160; 1 course
368 (if not used to satisfy other require-
from ECO 138, PSY 138, MQM 100.
ments).
—Communication and Organization (22
hours): ACC 131, COM 223, ECO 105 Web Application Development
(4 hours), MQM 220; 1 course from Sequence
COM 227, ENG 249; 2 courses from
ACC 132, ECO 225 or 239 or 245, FIL The Web Application Development Se-
240, MKT 230. quence is designed to give students a back-
Allowable Substitutions for Required ground for developing information systems
Courses: in a Web/Internet-based environment. This
sequence provides in-depth knowledge of
—Acceptable substitution for 3 hours of IT
Web development techniques and supporting
398 is 3 hours of IT 391.
technologies, along with related emerging
—Acceptable substitution for 6 hours of IT technologies. A minor is not required.
398 is 3 hours of IT 391 and 3 hours from
IT 244, 250, 344, 345, 363, 367, 368, (if —80 total hours required.
not used to satisfy other requirements). —47 hours in Information Technology re-
quired.
Systems Development/Analyst
—Required courses (35 hours): IT 168, 178,
Sequence 191, 214, 254, 261, 262, 276, 353, 354,
The Systems Development/Analyst Sequence 358, 378.
is designed for the student who will seek a —Professional Practice (6 hours): IT 398.
position as an Information Systems profes- —2 courses from: IT 244, 330, 341, 344,
sional developing business-oriented infor- 345, 367, 368, 377.
mation systems. This sequence provides in-
—Supporting requirements (33 hours):
depth knowledge of analysis and design tech-
niques along with electives in emerging tech- —Mathematics and Statistics (11 hours):
nologies. A minor is not required. MAT 120 or 145; MAT 160; 1 course
from: ECO 138; PSY 138; MQM 100.
—82 total hours required. —Communication and Organization (22
—49 hours in Information Technology re- hours): ACC 131; COM 223; ECO 105
quired. (4 hours); MQM 220; 1 course from:

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Information Technology 167

COM 227, ENG 249; and 2 courses —Required courses (35 hours): IT 168, 170
from ACC 132, ECO 225 or 239 or 245, or 178, 191, 214, 254, 261, 262, 276, 373,
FIL 240, MKT 230. 377, 379, 381.
Allowable Substitutions for Required —Professional Practice (6 hours): IT 398.
Courses: —Electives: 2 courses from: IT 250, 374,
—Acceptable substitution for 3 hours of IT 376, 378, 380.
398 is 3 hours of IT 391. —Economic, Legal, Public Policy (10
—Acceptable substitution for 6 hours of IT hours): ECO 105 (4 hours), 235; 1 course
398 is 3 hours of IT 391 and 3 hours from from: FIL 311, 312; POL 318.
IT 244, 330, 341, 344, 345, 367, 368, 377 —Supporting requirements (23 hours):
(if not used to satisfy other requirements). —Mathematics and Statistics (11 hours):
MAT 120 or 145; MAT 146 or 160; 1
MINOR IN INFORMATION course from: ECO 138, PSY 138, MQM
SYSTEMS  100.
The Information Systems Minor is designed —Communication and Organization (12
for people who will use computers as tools in hours): ACC 131; COM 223; MQM
their chosen profession or provide limited 220; 1 course from COM 227, ENG
computer support for their work group. 249.

—A minimum of 22 hours required. Allowable Substitutions for Required


—Required courses: IT 168, 178, 254, 261, Courses:
262. —Acceptable substitution for 3 hours of IT
—1 course from: IT 250, 276, 341, 353, 367, 398 is 3 hours of IT 391.
368, 378. —Acceptable substitution for 6 hours of IT
—3-4 hours of an IT 200 or 300-level course. 398 is 3 hours of IT 391 and 3 hours from
IT 374, 376, 378, 380 (if not used to satis-
fy other requirements).
Network and Telecommunications
Management Program Information Technology Courses
Degree Offered: B.S.
Most Information Technology courses are re-
MAJOR IN NETWORK AND stricted to students with majors or minors with-
in the School of Information Technology.
TELECOMMUNICATIONS
Some Information Technology courses may
MANAGEMENT
not be offered every year. Contact the School
Network and Telecommunications Manage- of Information Technology undergraduate ad-
ment is concerned with network technology, visor for the current schedule of offerings.
information systems, computer technology,
business practices, and policy issues involved 115 REASONING ABOUT COMPLEX
in data, image, video and voice transmission. SYSTEMS QR
This program prepares undergraduate stu- 3 sem. hrs.
dents to enter the industry in entry-level posi- Systems theory applied to complex sys-
tions with adequate preparation to assume tems. Design, construction, uses, and anal-
management positions once work experience ysis of simulations for complex systems.
is gained. Graduates will possess an in-depth May not be taken under the P/NP option.
technical understanding of computer net- Prerequisites: MAT 113, 120, 130, or 145.
works and telecommunication systems as 140 INTERACTING IN A DIGITAL
well as an appreciation of the economic and WORLD SMT
public policy issues that are important in the 3 sem. hrs.
design and development of local and wide This course provides foundation concepts
area networks, and national and multinational of computers and information technologies
telecommunication systems. A minor is not and their application in today’s world.
required. Lecture and lab. Not for credit IT Major or
minor. Formerly INTRODUCTION TO
—80 total hours required.
THE COMPUTER WORLD. Prerequi-
—47 hours in Information Technology re- sites: COM 110 and ENG 101.
quired.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


168 Information Technology

150 USING MICROCOMPUTER- 178 COMPUTER APPLICATION


PRODUCTIVITY TOOLS PROGRAMMING
3 sem. hrs. 3 sem. hrs.
Introduction to typical microcomputer- The design, development, and implementa-
based productivity tools such as word pro- tion of computer application systems, in-
cessing, spreadsheets, databases, and cluding files and GUI. Prerequisite: Grade
presentation graphics. Lecture and lab. Not of C or better in IT 168 or consent of the
for credit IT major or minor, or if had BE school advisor.
125. 179 INTRODUCTION TO DATA
STRUCTURES
164 INTRODUCTION TO PROBLEM
3 sem. hrs.
SOLVING USING THE COMPUTER
3 sem. hrs. Intermediate computer programming, in-
cluding elementary data structures such as
Use of pseudocode, charts, and Python to linked lists, stacks, queues, binary trees.
develop the analytical and algorithmic Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in IT 168
thinking necessary to succeeding in pro- or consent of the school advisor.
gramming courses. 191 INTRODUCTION TO IT
165 COMPUTER PROGRAMMING PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE
FOR SCIENTISTS 1 sem. hr.
4 sem. hrs. Researching available positions, interpreting
Introduction to computer programming job descriptions, interview skills, preparing a
emphasizing numerical algorithms for sci- resume, benefits of a Professional Practice
entific applications. Problem analysis and experience. Prerequisites: Grade of C or bet-
operating system concepts included. Not ter in IT 168. Major only.
for credit IT major or minor. Lecture and 214 SOCIAL, LEGAL, AND ETHICAL
lab. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ISSUES IN INFORMATION
MAT 145. TECHNOLOGY SMT
166 PHYTHON PROGRAMMING FOR 3 sem. hrs.
SCIENCE AND DATA ANALYSIS Study of personal, societal, legal, and ethi-
4 sem. hrs. cal issues raised by the effects of infor-
mation technology. Prerequisites: COM
Introduction to computer programming in
110 and ENG 101.
Python emphasizing algorithms for scien-
tific applications and data analysis. Pre- 225 COMPUTER ORGANIZATION
3 sem. hrs.
requisites: Grade of C or better in MAT
121 or 145 or GEO 238 or consent of the Introduction to computer organization, inter-
school advisor. nal representation of instructions and data,
and interaction between software and hard-
168 STRUCTURED PROBLEM- ware components. Prerequisites: Grade of C
SOLVING USING THE COMPUTER or better in IT 178 or 179. Major or minor
4 sem. hrs. only or consent of the school advisor.
Introduction to the development of algo- 226 ADVANCED PRACTICAL
rithms for computer systems processing. APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT
Emphasis on structured problem solving 3 sem. hrs.
and the design of problem solutions. Rec- Practical programming tools and techniques,
ommended as one of the first courses in including event-driven programming, design
the Computer Science major. Lecture and patterns, testing, source-code control, soft-
lab. Prerequisite: MAT 104 or high school ware maintenance. Introduction to C++ and
equivalent. UNIX. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in
IT 179. Major or minor only or consent of
170 SCRIPTING LANGUAGES AND
the school advisor.
AUTOMATION
3 sem. hrs. 244 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS
INTELLIGENCE
Fundamentals of scripting languages for 3 sem. hrs.
automation of tasks and general program-
This course enables students to learn about
ming. Emphasis on portability, text pro- Business Intelligence and explore the rele-
cessing and system administration. Pre- vant technology from a multi-disciplinary
requisite: Grade of C or better in IT 168 or perspective. Prerequisites: IT 150 or equiva-
consent of the school advisor. lent; MQM 100 or consent of the instructor.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Information Technology 169

250 FUNDAMENTALS OF 276 DATA COMMUNICATIONS


INFORMATION ASSURANCE 3 sem. hrs.
AND SECURITY Hardware and software used in data com-
3 sem. hrs. munications and networking. Network
Fundamental concepts in information as- types, architectures, protocols and stand-
surance and security including planning, ards. Local area and packet networks. For-
risk management, cryptography, network merly IT 375. Prerequisites: Grade of C or
security, hardening, people, and physical better in IT 168 and (IT 225 or 254 or con-
security. Formerly IT 350. Prerequisites:
current registration). Major or minor only
Grade of C or better in IT 170 or 178 or
179 and 276 or concurrent registration. or consent of the school advisor.
Major or minor only or consent of the 279 ALGORITHMS AND DATA
school advisor. STRUCTURES
254 HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE 3 sem. hrs.
CONCEPTS Data structures, algorithms, mathematical
3 sem. hrs. foundations of computer science. Topics
Overview of nature and interrelationships include lists, trees, graphs, sorting, search-
of computer architectures, hardware, oper- ing, correctness, computational complexi-
ating systems, data types, microcontrollers, ty, algorithm design. Prerequisites: Grade
virtualization, storage technologies, and of C or better in IT 226; MAT 160 or 260
filesystems. Prerequisites: Grade of C or or concurrent registration in MAT 260.
better in IT 168. Major or minor only or
Major or minor only or consent of the
consent of the school advisor.
school advisor.
261 SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT I
3 sem. hrs. 326 PRINCIPLES OF SOFTWARE
ENGINEERING
Information systems development, develop-
3 sem. hrs.
ment methodologies, analysis and design
techniques and tools, relational database con- Fundamentals of software engineering. Top-
cepts. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in ics include specification models, metrics, de-
IT 170, 178, or 179 and IT 254 or 225 or sign fundamentals, interface design, quality
concurrent registration. Major or minor only assurance, and automated tools. Offered al-
or consent of the school advisor. ternate years. Prerequisites: Grade of C or
better in IT 179 and 261. Major or minor on-
262 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ly or consent of the school advisor, or gradu-
PROJECT MANAGEMENT ate standing.
3 sem. hrs.
327 CONCEPTS OF PROGRAMMING
The processes, methods, techniques, and LANGUAGES
tools in managing information technology 3 sem. hrs.
projects including scope, time, cost, quality,
and risk management. Prerequisites: IT 261 Survey of pragmatic, syntactic and seman-
or concurrent registration. Major or minor tic structure of programming languages.
only or consent of the school advisor. Procedural, logic-oriented, object-oriented
and other contemporary languages includ-
272 COBOL AS A SECOND LANGUAGE ed. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in
4 sem. hrs. IT 179. Major or minor only or consent of
COBOL language for students with substan- the school advisor, or graduate standing.
tial programming experience in another lan- 328 INTRODUCTION TO THE
guage. Emphasizes structured problem- THEORY OF COMPUTATION
solving and programming. Prerequisites: 3 sem. hrs.
Grade of C or better in IT 168. Major or mi-
nor only or consent of the school advisor. Basic concepts in computing theory.
Topics include recursive definitions,
275 JAVA AS A SECOND LANGUAGE regular expressions, transition graphs,
4 sem. hrs. automata, nondeterminism, grammars,
Intensive study of the Java programming lan- parsing, decidability, Turing ma-
guage for students with previous program- chines. Prerequisites: Grade of C or
ming experience. Prerequisites: 2-semester better in IT 279. Major or minor only
sequence in a high-level programming lan- or consent of the school advisor, or
guage required. Major or minor only or con- graduate standing.
sent of the school advisor.

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170 Information Technology
330 INTRODUCTION TO ENTERPRISE 353 WEB DEVELOPMENT
COMPUTING SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGIES
3 sem. hrs. 3 sem. hrs.
Introduction to the mainframe enterprise Web concepts, infrastructure, development
computing systems, organizations, architec- technologies, multi-tiered program design
tures, operating systems, networking, hard- and implementation, and current issues
ware and software utilities, and applications. and trends. Prerequisites: Grade of C or
Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in IT 225 better in 261. Major or minor only or con-
or 254. Major or minor only or consent of
sent of the school advisor, or graduate
the school advisor, or graduate standing.
standing.
340 INTRODUCTION TO ARTIFICIAL
354 ADVANCED WEB APPLICATION
INTELLIGENCE
DEVELOPMENT
3 sem. hrs.
3 sem. hrs.
Foundations of artificial intelligence in-
Theory and practice of state-of-the-art
cluding heuristic search and knowledge
technologies for application development
representation with a survey of several ar-
for the Web including service-oriented and
tificial intelligence research areas. Prereq-
mobile systems. Prerequisites: Grade of C
uisites: Grade of C or better in IT 279.
or better in IT 353. Major or minor only or
Major or minor only or consent of the
consent of the school advisor, or graduate
school advisor, or graduate standing.
standing.
341 OBJECT-ORIENTED SYSTEM
DEVELOPMENT 355 SECURE SOFTWARE
3 sem. hrs. DEVELOPMENT
3 sem. hrs.
Main concepts of object-oriented technol-
ogy and a comprehensive methodology for Ensuring software is secure through archi-
system development. Object-oriented tecture and development techniques. Pre-
analysis, design, and implementation in- requisites: Grade of C or better in IT 178
cluding object-oriented databases. Prereq- or 179 and 261.
uisites: Grade of C or better in IT 261. 356 INTRODUCTION TO
Major or minor only or consent of the COMPUTER GRAPHICS
school advisor, or graduate standing. 3 sem. hrs.
344 APPLIED DATA MINING Graphics software and hardware, pipeline
3 sem. hrs. model of rendering. 2D/3D modeling, trans-
This course enables students to extract formations. Algorithms: polygons, lighting,
knowledge from big datasets by applying textures, visibility. Prerequisites: IT 279.
supervised and unsupervised data mining Major or minor only or consent of the
methods using software tools. Prerequi- school advisor, or graduate standing.
site: IT 244 or equivalent.
357 TOOLS AND TECHNIQUES IN
345 ADVANCED BUSINESS INTELLI- DEFENSIVE SECURITY
GENCE AND DATA WAREHOUSING
3 sem. hrs.
3 sem. hrs.
Topics covered include data warehousing, Application of current tools and tech-
Big Data, data governance, and the future niques in preventative information assur-
of the business intelligence field. Prereq- ance and security including monitoring
uisite: Grade of C or better in IT 378, or and defensive countermeasures. Formerly
graduate standing. TOOLS AND TECHNIQUES IN INFOR-
351 PRACTICAL CRYPTOGRAPHY MATION ASSURANCE AND SECURITY.
AND TRUSTED SYSTEMS Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in IT
3 sem. hrs. 250 and 276, or graduate standing.
Practical cryptography and its applica- 358 MOBILE AND CLOUD COMPUTING
tions, authentication protocols, access con- 3 sem. hrs.
trols and trusted systems. Formerly A D- Develop, deploy, and troubleshoot mobile
VANCED INFORMATION ASSURANCE and cloud computing applications. Pre-
AND APPLIED CRYPTOGRAPHY. Pre- requisite: Grade of C or better in IT 353,
requisites: Grade of C or better in IT 250 or consent of the school advisor, or gradu-
or 226 and 276. Major or minor only or ate standing.
consent of the school advisor, or graduate
standing.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Information Technology 171

359 TOOLS AND TECHNIQUES IN 368A16 MANAGING IT SERVICES


PENETRATION TESTING 3 sem. hrs.
3 sem. hrs. The Information Technology Infrastruc-
Penetration testing and offensive security ture Library (ITIL) service lifecycle, con-
software and methodologies, with empha- sisting of five interrelated phases, is intro-
sis on ethical hacking. Lecture and lab. duced and narrated with real-world scenar-
Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in IT ios and case studies. Prerequisite: Infor-
250 and 276. mation Systems or Computer Science ma-
360 SECURITY INCIDENT AND EVENT jor or minor only or consent of the depart-
MANAGEMENT AND FORENSICS ment advisor, or graduate standing.
3 sem. hrs. 368A17 ENTERPRISE RESOURCE
Detecting, responding to, and investigating PLANNING
information security incidents. Prerequi- 3 sem. hrs.
sites: Grade of C or better in IT 250 and This course provides students with a com-
276. prehensive evaluation of Enterprise Re-
363 SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT II source Planning (ERP) from managerial
4 sem. hrs. and technical aspects. Prerequisites: 
Emphasis on analysis and design tech- Major or minor only or consent of the de-
niques and tools, project communication, partment advisor. A grade of C or better in
systems development methodologies, in- IT 261 and COM 223 or consent of the
terface design. Systems development team graduate advisor, or graduate standing.
project. Prerequisites: Grade of C or bet-
ter in IT 261 and 262. Grade of C or better 369 TOPICS IN CYBERSECURITY
in COM 223. Major or minor only or con- 3 sem. hrs.
sent of the school advisor. Advanced topics in cybersecurity, includ-
367 DESIGNING THE USER INTERFACE ing cryptography, information assurance,
3 sem. hrs. and computer security. Multiple enroll-
ments are allowed if content is different.
Human factors issues in developing infor-
Prerequisites: Major or minor only or con-
mation systems: task analysis, user interface
sent of the school advisor.
design guidelines, psychological principles,
prototyping interfaces, and user evaluation. 370 SERVER MANAGEMENT
Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in IT 261. 3 sem. hrs.
Major or minor only or consent of the school Build, manage and troubleshoot server
advisor, or graduate standing. hardware and software. Prerequisite:
368 TOPICS IN INFORMATION Grade of C or better in IT 377, or consent
SYSTEMS of the school advisor, or graduate stand-
3 sem. hrs. ing.
Advanced topics in information systems, 372 EXTERNAL DATA STRUCTURES
including systems analysis, design, sys- 3 sem. hrs.
tems development and Web development. External file design, VSAM, IBM utilities
Multiple enrollments are allowed if con- and sort/merge, basic concepts of IBM/
tent is different. Prerequisites: Major or MVS operating systems, and extensive
minor only or consent of the school advi- study of JCL. Prerequisites: Grade of C or
sor, or graduate standing. Prerequisites better in IT 254 and 272. Major or minor
vary with topic chosen. only or consent of the school advisor, or
368A10 WEBSITE DEVELOPMENT graduate standing.
USING ASP.NET 373 WIDE AREA NETWORK
3 sem. hrs. INFRASTRUCTURES
Website development using ASP.Net. This 3 sem. hrs.
course will focus on the practical applica- Design, configure, operate, and use Wide
tion of ASP.Net to build comprehensive Area Networks and network applications.
websites. Internet Information Services Emphasizes hands-on use of network de-
(IIS) and Visual Studio.Net will be cov- sign tools. Prerequisites: Grade of C or
ered to facilitate the complete integration better in IT 276. Major or minor only or
of ASP.Net within the web environment. consent of the school advisor.
Prerequisite: IT 261.

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172 Information Technology
374 TOPICS IN 380 WIRELESS COMMUNICATION
TELECOMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS
3 sem. hrs. 3 sem. hrs.
In-depth study of a topic in telecommuni- The theory and practice of wireless tele-
cations such as emerging technologies, communications systems. Emphasis is on
network administration, network manage- application, design, and analysis of wire-
ment architectures, and wireless communi- less systems. Prerequisites: Grade of C or
cations. Multiple enrollments are allowed better in IT 276. Major or minor only or
if content is different. Prerequisites: Major consent of the school advisor, or graduate
or minor only or consent of the school ad- standing.
visor, or graduate standing. Prerequisites 381 NETWORK DESIGN AND
vary with topic chosen. ANALYSIS
376 WIRELESS AND MOBILE 3 sem. hrs.
NETWORK SECURITY Analyze user internetworking require-
3 sem. hrs. ments; design and implement a network
Overview of fundamental principles and infrastructure that can meet the user re-
security algorithms of security in wireless quirements. Prerequisites: Grade of C or
networks. Emphasis is on application, de- better in IT 377 or consent of the school
sign, and analysis. Prerequisites: Grade of advisor, or graduate standing.
C or better in IT 276. Major or minor only 382 DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS
or consent of the school advisor, or gradu- 3 sem. hrs.
ate standing. Overview of distributed systems including
system architectures, models, distributed op-
377 PRACTICAL
erating systems, distributed algorithms, dis-
TELECOMMUNICATIONS
tributed databases, distributed objects, issues
NETWORKING
and trends. Offered alternate years. Prereq-
3 sem. hrs. uisites: Grade of C or better in IT 179, 225
Design, configure, operate and use local and 261. Major or minor only or consent of
area networks, network applications, and the school advisor, or graduate standing.
wide area network concepts. Emphasizes 383 PRINCIPLES OF OPERATING
hands-on use of a network operating sys- SYSTEMS
tem. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in 3 sem. hrs.
IT 276. Major or minor only or consent of Functional criteria for operating system
the school advisor, or graduate standing. design. Job management, task manage-
378 DATABASE PROCESSING ment, data management, resource alloca-
3 sem. hrs. tion and dump and trace facilities. Prereq-
Database concepts, emphasis on relational uisites: Grade of C or better in IT 225 and
databases, SQL, data modeling, database 226. Major or minor only or consent of the
design, DBMS functions, database applica- school advisor, or graduate standing.
tion programming, current trends, design 385 TOPICS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE
project. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better 3 sem. hrs.
in IT 261. Major or minor only or consent In-depth study of a topic such as compiler
of the school advisor, or graduate standing. design, artificial intelligence, program-
379 ADVANCED COMPUTER ming language and digital logic design.
Multiple enrollments are allowed if con-
NETWORKS
tent different. Offered alternate years. Pre-
3 sem. hrs.
requisite: Major or minor only or consent
Explore the latest advances in networking of the school advisor, or graduate standing.
with emphasis on practical hands-on learn- Prerequisites vary with topic chosen.
ing. Formerly TELECOMMUNICATIONS
385A11 LAN SECURITY
NETWORK OPERATIONS AND MANAGE-
3 sem. hrs.
MENT. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better
in IT 377, or consent of the school advisor, This course will teach students practical
aspects of LAN security. Prerequisite: 
or graduate standing.
Consent of school advisor.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Information Technology 173

385A15 MACHINE LEARNING 398A50 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE:


3 sem. hrs. COOP I IN INFORMATION
Survey of machine learning, including sta- TECHNOLOGY
tistical, connectionist, and rule-based ap- 1-6 sem. hrs.
proaches to supervised, unsupervised, and Multiple enrollments are allowed; maxi-
semi-supervised settings. Prerequisite: IT mum 6 hours. Prerequisite: Major only.
279. 398A60 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE:
388 INTRODUCTION TO COOP II IN INFORMATION
PARALLEL PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY
3 sem. hrs. 1-8 sem. hrs.
Study of parallel processors and their soft- CR/NC basis only. Multiple enrollments
ware environments. Students will write are allowed. Prerequisites: Concurrent
programs for several parallel computers. registration in IT 398A50. Major only.
Offered alternate years. Prerequisites:
Grade of C or better in IT 225; concurrent
registration in IT 279. Major or minor only
or consent of the school advisor, or gradu-
ate standing.
391 DIRECTED PROJECT IN
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
3 sem. hrs.
Team design and/or implementation of a
modest-sized computer-based system in a
live environment under faculty supervi-
sion. Prerequisites: A minimum of 90
hours completed and a grade of C or better
in IT 191 and 377 or 378 or 383. Major
only.
392 ENTERPRISE SYSTEMS
INTEGRATION AND APPLICATION
DEVELOPMENT
3 sem. hrs.
Capstone course including business appli-
cations, systems integration, enterprise
business decisions, systems administration,
and the systems deployment life cycle.
Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in IT
272 and 330. Major or minor only or con-
sent of the school advisor, or graduate
standing.
398 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: IN
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
1-6 sem. hrs.
Multiple enrollments are allowed. Maxi-
mum 16 hours credit in Professional Prac-
tice. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in
IT 191. By application and prior approval
of IT Professional Practice Advisor only.
Major only.

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174 Kinesiology and Recreation

KINESIOLOGY AND Honors Program Requirements:


RECREATION (KNR) 512 —Fulfill the general requirements for partici-
250 McCormick, (309) 438-8661 pation in the University Honors Program.
Web address: KinRec.IllinoisState.edu —Successfully complete a minimum of 3
Director: Dan Elkins. hours of School of Kinesiology and Recre-
ation Honors courses.
General School Information —Successfully complete KNR 295: Honors
Seminar.
Admission/Retention Requirements: —Initiate and complete a research project in
KNR 299: Honors Independent Study
A student may be admitted to the Athletic (variable, 3-6 hours) under the direction of
Training Major, Exercise Science Major, a faculty mentor in the student’s major/
Physical Education Teacher Education Major sequence.
or the Recreation and Park Administration
Major as a new freshman, as a transfer stu- —Maintain a minimum 3.30 overall GPA.
dent, or as a change of major at Illinois State Further details about the University Honors
University. New freshmen who meet the
program are available at
University’s admission standards may elect
to become a major in the School of Kinesiol- Honors.IllinoisState.edu.
ogy and Recreation. Retention of students
will be determined by the student’s cumula- PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE/
tive GPA and other specified criteria re- STUDENT TEACHING
quired for the major. All courses required in
each major must be completed with a grade Internship and cooperative education experi-
of C or better. ences are available at all levels in Athletic
Training (298, 398), Exercise Science (298,
HONORS IN KINESIOLOGY AND  398), and in Recreation and Park Administra-
RECREATION tion (298, 398). Students may earn from 1-16
Majors in the School of Kinesiology and hours. No more than 16 hours may be ap-
Recreation with superior academic records plied toward graduation. Professional Prac-
are invited to apply for admission to the tice experiences are supervised work experi-
School Honors Program. The program pro- ences in businesses, agencies, organizations,
vides an opportunity for a scholastically gift- and institutions and are either paid or unpaid.
ed student to pursue personal interests For further information, contact the Profes-
through an independent honors project. Stu- sional Practice coordinator in your major.
dents successfully completing the Honors
Program will receive the designation of Hon- Student Teaching in Physical Education re-
ors in Kinesiology and Recreation upon quires being accepted into the Teacher Edu-
graduation. The student’s official academic cation program at Illinois State University.
transcript and diploma will be so noted. Students are placed in schools with physical
education cooperating teachers at the ele-
Admission Requirements: mentary, middle school, and/or secondary
—Be a declared Athletic Training, Physical school levels as required for teacher licen-
Education Teacher Education, Exercise sure. Student teachers are supervised by
Science, or Recreation and Park Admin- Physical Education faculty supervisors. The
istration major with at least 30 and not Physical Education Student Teaching Coor-
more than 90 hours of coursework com- dinator arranges for all student teaching
pleted, including at least 6 hours of KNR placements.
courses.
—Have a minimum 3.30 overall GPA.
—Submit an application form to the School
of Kinesiology and Recreation Honors ad-
visor.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Kinesiology and Recreation 175

Athletic Training Program Students successful in the four previous cri-


Degree Offered: B.S. teria are then considered for acceptance into
the clinical portion of the program. Place-
MAJOR IN ATHLETIC TRAINING ment is limited by the number of clinical
sites and availability of approved clinical in-
structors. Highest priority will be given to
Program Admission Requirements for
the most qualified applicants based on the
New and Continuing Students:
following criteria:
—overall and major grade point average
Admission to this academic program is
—grades in requisite courses
limited and is based on space availabil-
ity and the competitiveness of the appli- —quality of written essay submitted with ap-
cant pool. Factors that may be consid- plication
ered include, but are not limited to: —performance evaluations of observation
courses completed, cumulative GPA, hours from clinical instructors
hours completed, personal interview and —score on an athletic training general
written statement, and samples of work knowledge examination
completed. For additional information —two written recommendations from quali-
on minimum requirements for admission fied individuals
and the application and selection pro-
—completion of an interview with members
cess, visit IllinoisState.edu/Majors,
of the athletic training faculty
KinRec.IllinoisState.edu/at, or contact
the undergraduate advisor for the in-
tended major. The selection process results in one of the
following student classifications:
Admission to Athletic Training Program: a. full acceptance to the clinical portion of
All students planning to become a certified the program
athletic trainer must apply for and be admit- b. qualified, but placed on a wait list
ted to the Athletic Training Program (AT) c. not qualified, not accepted
Clinical Instruction Practicum. Completed
applications are accepted only during the fall Athletic Training Program Curriculum:
semester and must be received on or before
November 30. Transfer students must also —60 major hours that include:
apply to the AT Clinical Instruction Practi- —54 hours in KNR as follows:
cum and will be evaluated individually based —15 hours in foundation courses: KNR 181,
on previous coursework and stated criteria. 182, 257, 280, 282.
Current application deadlines are posted on —34 hours in athletic training core courses:
the athletic training home page and an- KNR 188, 252, 284, 288, 298A11,
nounced in KNR 188. Eligibility to apply for 298A12, 298A13, 298A14, 298A15, 334,
admission to the AT Clinical Instruction 335, 361, 362, 363, 387, 388.
Practicum will be determined by the Director
—5 hours (minimum) in KNR 398A12.
of the Athletic Training Program. Applicants
compete for available spaces in the program. —6 hours of interdisciplinary courses: FCS
The following qualifications must be met to 102; HSC 105.
be considered for admission into the pro-
gram. Standards for Progress in the Major:

1. Fulfill university requirements up to the Once admitted to the AT Clinical Instruction


time of application to the AT Clinical In- Practicum, the student will begin clinical
struction Practicum. work in athletic training at sites affiliated
2. Completion of prerequisite coursework with Illinois State University, and must
with a grade of C or better in KNR 181, maintain the following requirements:
188. 1. A minimum cumulative and major GPA of
3. Overall GPA of 2.70 or higher and major 2.70.
GPA of 2.70 or higher. 2. A student falling below the required GPA
4. Completed application for admittance to will be placed on probation for one semes-
the AT Clinical Instruction Practicum. ter. If after one semester, the 2.70 GPA
has not been re-established, the student

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


176 Kinesiology and Recreation

will be dropped from the AT Clinical In- Exercise Science Program


struction Practicum and advised to change Degree Offered: B.S.
majors.
3. The student must earn a grade of C or bet- MAJOR IN EXERCISE SCIENCE
ter on each clinical site supervisor evalua-
tion. A student earning less than a grade of Program Admission Requirements for
C will not be permitted to count the hours
New and Continuing Students:
completed during the affected clinical ro-
tation toward AT requirements. Admission to this academic program is lim-
4. The student must adhere to the latest pub- ited and is based on space availability and
lished version of the Athletic Training the competitiveness of the applicant pool.
Program Handbook maintained on the Factors that may be considered include, but
Program website. The student is hereby are not limited to: courses completed, cumu-
informed of reasonable monetary costs as- lative GPA, hours completed, personal inter-
sociated with the AT including the pur- view or written statement, and samples of
work completed. For additional information
chase of uniform clothing to be worn dur-
on minimum requirements for admission and
ing assigned clinical rotations.
the application and selection process, visit
5. In keeping with the University require- IllinoisState.edu/Majors or contact the under-
ments regarding hepatitis-B (HBV) im- graduate advisor for the intended major.
munizations, clinical students in the AT
shall be immunized against this disease. Exercise Science Program of Study:
Additionally students admitted to the Clin-
—55 total hours are required.
ical Instruction Practicum must submit
complete documentation of a current phys- —20 hours in core courses: KNR 181, 182,
ical examination from an approved (MD 240, 254, 257, 280, 282.
or DO) licensed physician. —23 hours in major courses: KNR 164,
298A10, 303, 307, 309, 311, 313, and one
6. The student is responsible for maintaining
of KNR 286, 305, 310, or 353.
standards and expectations of the AT.
Failure to do so will result in written noti- —12 hours from either of the following op-
fication and reprimand including possible tions:
dismissal from the AT. Option 1: KNR 378A10 and 10 hour s in
KNR 398A11.
7. A student who has not been retained in the
AT Clinical Instruction Practicum may re- Option 2 (requires program approval):
12 hours of advanced studies from the fol-
apply for admission during the next avail-
lowing list of courses, or others approved
able application period upon the advise-
by exercise science faculty: KNR 287,
ment of the Director of the Athletic Train-
299, 305, 306, 320, 342, 345, 352, 353,
ing Program. 361, 381, KNR/HSC/FCS 394.

Certification and Licensure: Standards for Progress in the Major:

Completion of the Athletic Training program Once admitted to the Exercise Science major,
of study including 1200 supervised clinical the student must maintain a minimum 2.50
hours and certification in first aid and Emer- cumulative GPA. A student falling below the
gency Cardiac Care is designed to permit the required 2.50 GPA will be placed on proba-
tion for one semester. If after one semester
student to apply to take the Board of Certifi-
the 2.50 GPA has not been re-established, the
cation (BOC) examination and to apply for
student will be dropped from the Exercise
Illinois licensure as an athletic trainer. How-
Science major. A student who has been thus
ever, accreditation and licensure require- dropped from the Exercise Science major
ments are subject to change so the student is may reapply for admission to the major after
strongly advised to obtain notification of the raising his or her GPA to the required stand-
latest requirements for BOC certification and ard. The student who is not readmitted after
Illinois licensure from the respective govern- one semester of probation and has a mini-
ing organizations and from the Director of mum 2.00 GPA will have the option of enter-
the Athletic Training Program. ing the Kinesiology Studies Sequence.

2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog May 21, 2018


Kinesiology and Recreation 177

A student must have a minimum 2.50 cumu- Physical Education Program


lative GPA and have completed all major Degrees Offered: B.S., B.S. in Education
courses with a grade of C or better to partici-
pate in the senior internship (KNR 398A11
Professional Practice: Internship in Exercise MAJOR IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Science). Students seeking to take Option 2
(12 hours of advanced coursework in lieu of The Physical Education program consists of
KNR 378A10 and KNR 398A11) must ap- two sequences. The Physical Education
ply for approval of this option at the start of Teacher Education Sequence requires a min-
the semester in which they are registered to imum cumulative GPA of 2.50 for admis-
take KNR 298A10. The application must in- sion and retention. The Kinesiology Studies
clude a statement as to why the review com- Sequence requires a minimum cumulative
mittee should allow the student entry into GPA of 2.00 for admission and retention.
this option, and it must also speak to what All physical education major courses must
steps the student has taken to prepare for ac- be completed with a grade of C or better.
ademic study beyond the B.S. in Exercise
Science. Examples of such preparation Kinesiology Studies Sequence (B.S.)
might include indications of pre-requisites
completed, observation hours completed, The Kinesiology Studies sequence is not
completion of research statistics or methods available for direct admission. Contact the
courses, applications to graduate or profes- department or undergraduate advisor for
sional schools, etc. Applications for this op- more information. A student has the oppor-
tion will be considered by a committee of tunity to select from a series of Physical Ed-
Exercise Science faculty. ucation courses to develop a plan of study.
Students in the Kinesiology Studies Se-
Credentialing Opportunities:
quence must have earned a minimum cumu-
There is no single professional credential or lative 2.00 GPA.
certification that is necessary to pursue a ca-
reer in Exercise Science. However, there are Kinesiology Studies Sequence Program
a number of optional credentialing opportu- of Study:
nities that students are encouraged to exam-
—40 hours required.
ine. Coursework in this major is focused on
the content areas needed for certification —26 hours in core courses: KNR 160, 181,
preparation by several organizations in this 182, 240, 254, 257, 280, 282. Select 3 ad-
professional field of study. Students graduat- ditional KNR hours.
ing in this major can strengthen their profes- —14 additional hours from within the Physi-
sional credentials by pursuing a variety of cal Education Program are required for
different certifications offered by organiza- majors not selecting a specialized se-
tions such as the American College of Sports quence. A minimum of 8 hours of upper-
Medicine and the National Strength and division courses are required, 6 hours of
Conditioning Association. Students interest- which must be at the 300-level.
ed in learning more about these recommend-
ed certification options should consult the —A second major or minor, or an individu-
Exercise Science Program Director in the alized program by advisement, is recom-
School of Kinesiology and Recreation for mended.
further information. —Graduation requirements: all required
Physical Education courses must be com-
MINOR IN EXERCISE SCIENCE