Sie sind auf Seite 1von 20

MAPPING COMMUNITY ASSETS: 

A KEY COMPONENT TO 
STRENTHENING LOCAL GRANT 
PROPOSALS 
_____________________________________ 

Maryland 
Local Government Grants Conference 
January 6, 2006
Session Goals 
l  Better understanding of local 
community perspectives and resources. 

l  Understand the supports and 
connections within a community. 

l  Explore how community asset mapping 
can strengthen local grant proposals.
Who has heard of asset 
mapping? 

What do you know about it? 

What is the difference 
between needs assessment 
and asset mapping?
and asset mapping? 
Needs Assessment  Asset Mapping 

Focuses on deficiencies or problems  Focuses on effectiveness 

Results in fragmentation of response to local needs  Builds interdependencies 

Makes people consumers of services, builds dependence  Identifies ways people can use talents 

Citizens have little voice in addressing local concerns  Seeks to empower people
Shift focus from the 
problem… 
l  Using problems to formulate human service 
interventions targets resources to service 
providers rather than residents. 

l  Fragments efforts to provide solutions. 

l  Places reliance on outside resources and 
outside experts. 

l  Leads to a maintenance and survival 
mentality rather than to community 
development.
…to the community. 
l  Develop policies and activities based on an 
understanding, or ‘map,’ of the community’s 
resources — individual capacities and 
abilities, and organizational resources with 
the potential for promoting personal and 
community development. 

l  Promote connections or relationships 
between individuals, between individuals 
and organizations, and between 
organizations and organizations.
Benefits of Mapping: 
•  Builds interdependencies and collaboration. 

•  Seeks to empower people. 

•  Identifies ways people can use their talents, skills, and abilities. 

•  All local residents play an effective role in addressing local matters. 

•  Local residents are asked to give their time and talents in implementing strategies they 
have a say in devising. 

•  Begins by understanding what is in the community right now – the abilities of local 
residents, associations, and institutions. 

•  Internally focused on the community. 

•  Relationship‑based in that it provides opportunities for local people, organizations, and 
institutions to work together. 

•  Assets within a given community, organization, or institution can be collected/mapped 
through a variety of approaches.
Challenges of Mapping: 
Be cautious of asset mapping when: 

•  There is a crisis or problem needing immediate attention. 

•  There isn’t time to get citizen/community input. 

•  Community input cannot be gathered. 

•  There is a mounting feeling that people want to vent about 
problems. 

•  There is little or no understanding of the local context.
Four Key Arenas Of 
Community Asset Mapping 

l  People 

l  Culture 

l  Formal Institutions 

l  Informal Organizations
People 
l  Everyone has talents skills and gifts relevant to 
community activities 
l  Each time a person uses their talents the 
community is stronger and the person empowered 
l  Strong communities value the skills and talents 
citizens possess 
l  Such an approach contributes to the development 
“of” the community 
l  Four components of a “capacity inventory” of 
individuals: skills information, community skills, 
enterprising interests and experiences, personal 
information
Culture 

l  Documenting cultural resources in the community — 
examining long‑term customs, behaviors, and 
activities that have meaning to individuals and to the 
community. 

l  Information for cultural mapping is gathered by face‑ 
to‑face interviews. Communities can use cultural 
mapping as a tool for self‑awareness to promote 
understanding of the diversity within a community 
and to protect and conserve traditions, customs, and 
resources.
Formal Local Institutions 
l  The mapping of inter‑organizational linkages is a 
form of ecomapping designed to show the 
relationships that one organization has with other 
organizations within the community. 

l  Relationships with other organizations may relate to 
funding, referrals, access to resources, joint service 
planning, collaborative projects with contributed 
staff or funds, etc. 

l  Major institutions include: Kinship, Economic, 
Education, Political, Religious, Associations 
(KEEPRA)
Local Formal Institutions and 
Community Building 
•  Every community has a variety of public, private and non‑profit 
organizations. 

•  Some communities are institution rich, others are not. 

•  Too often, local institutions are not connected to local community 
building efforts. 

•  Inventory local institutions, identify activities; map their assets. 

•  Explore the types of links that can be built between these institutions as 
well as between them, local people and informal organizations. 

•  Seek the assistance of local institutions as conduits to resources outside 
the community.
Schools as an Asset to 
Community Building: 
Examples 
Parent/adult involvement  Facilities 

Materials and equipment  Youth 

Purchasing power  Employment 

Courses  Teachers 

Financial capacity
How Formal Institutions 
Help Build Communities 
l  Purchase locally 
l  Hire locally 
l  Help create new local businesses 
l  Develop human resources 
l  Free­up potentially productive space 
l  Initiate local investment strategies (endowments, 
fundraising, micro­loans) 
l  Mobilize external resources
Informal Organizations 
Often carry‑out three key roles: 
•  Decide to address and issue/concern of 
common interest 
•  Develop a plan to address the issue 
•  Carry out the plan to resolve the issue 

They may be neighborhood, community or 
faith‑based and involve, empower and 
impact local citizens (church groups, 
community groups, sports leagues).
Summary of Community 
Asset Mapping 
•  Map the assets of individuals, institutions and 
informal organizations. 
•  Build relationships among these local assets. 
•  Explore how assets can be mobilized to improve 
local conditions/needs (such as expanding job 
opportunities, improving education, better health 
care services). 
•  Engage the community in visioning and planning. 
•  Tap outside resources that help advance local 
improvement efforts.
Help with Identifying Local 
Match 
l  “Match is the share of a project’s TOTAL COST 
that a grantee must pay for with their own money, 
also called the “non­federal share.” 

l  There are two types of match*: 
­ Cash (donations, non­federal income, state) 
­ In­kind contributions (donated services, goods) 

* Government­wide with few rare exceptions grantees cannot use other federal funds to match, must 
leverage from the community
Creates New Avenues of 
Leadership 
•Move from a centralized mode of decision making to a polycentric 
approach ‑‑ one that involves many centers of leadership. 

•Helps expand the number of people who embrace community goals. 

•The polycentric approach requires access to leadership opportunities. 

•To realize its full potential, decisions and action plans in a 
community must depend less on a pyramidal approach and more on a 
series of inter‑related circles.
Contact Information 
Keith J. Hart, Director 
Governor’s Office on Service and Volunteerism 
301 W. Preston Street, 15 th  Floor 
Baltimore, MD 21201 
Phone: 410.767.4803 
Fax: 410.333.5957 
E­mail: Khart@gosv.state.md.us