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JAPANESE CHESS

(SHO-NGI)

THE SCIENCE AND ART

OF

WAR OR STRUGGLE

PHILOSOPHICALLY TREATED

CHINESE CHESS

(CHONG-KIE)

AND

I-GO

BY

CHO-YO

EURASIAMERICA

NEW YORK:

THE PRESS CLUB OF CHICAGO

U. S. A.

COPYRIGHT. IQ05. BY CHO YO

All Rights Reserved.

M. A. DONOHUE &c COMPANY

PRINTERS AND BINDERS

4-07-429 DEARBORN STREET

CH ICAGO

TO MY ESTEEMED FRIEND

EDWIN F. BROWN,

ONE OF THE GENIUSES IN THE

GAME OF HUMAN AFFAIRS,

THIS WORK IS INSCRIBED BY

THE AUTHOR.

OP THIS EDITION

NINE HUNDRED NINETY AND NINE COPIES

HAVE BEEN PRIVATELY PRINTED,

AND THE TYPE DISTRIBUTED.

EACH COPY IS NUMBERED AND SIGNED,

AND THIS COPY IS

DATE

NUMBER

190

1.

PREFACE

Inspired by the grand economy of the nature which

reveals itself into the causes and effects governing all things

from the universe down to molecular existences, admiring

the almost incomprehensible foresight, clear plans and diplo-

matic movements of Thomas Paine, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas

Jefferson and that sort of personages, and the tactics and

strategy of George Washington those who won the victory

in a colossal chess game of humanity in which they stood for the side of pure democracy; thus inspired, while the little

Japanese of the small little island Empire are contesting with the gigantic and most puisant Russian Autocrat, the writer

dares say that it is not merely a great number of population,

nor enormous amount of pecuniary wealth, nor an immensely

extensive territory, nor a considerable superiority of naval and military materiels, nor all these conditions put together that

one belligerent power compels another to do what the former

wants.

2. It is a union of minds and hearts, others being equal,

on the part of the people whose each protects the other, and

who support one another according to causes and effects of

predestination that one group of men wins over the other.

How the thirteen young colonies did cause the powerful father-

land to succum at the mercy of their will?

perfectly well.

7

We know it

g

PREFACE.

3. Many say that the Japanese are of small bodily constitu-

tions and their works are consequently small, but they forget

that whatever small things they do are worked most carefully

and perfectly, and that the personages that can perfectly finish

the small objects can easily produce ponderous works according

to conditions and circumstances, as the small works are apt to be taken as valuable models for magnificently massive ones.

They, in fact, produced many wonderful works at home many

centuries ago to the latest hour. For these little ones it would

not be difficult to make battleships, even however big, because their minds and hearts have been practically drilled and ex-

perienced.

4. Who remarked that the Japanese do not have a mathe-

matical head? There should be a limit to hypercriticality !

The Far East has produced thinkers, scientific men, diplomats,

practical business men and so on.

There has been a great

secrecy the writer says secrecy, for the public does not know

somehow,though openly practiced to have pleasingly developed

the faculties or their healthy brains, which have been and are

naturally a priori flexible and adaptable to the fullest extent.

This great secrecy has been the playing of the Science and

Philosophy and Art of War, a national game of Chess, of which

the true orientals are the greatest players in the world. The

game or rather the science which they play, nay! practice

from the oldest to the youngest who are to think sanely, from

the wealthiest to the poorest, from the highest down to the

lowest, from the most learned to the ignorant, from the highest

priest to the misosuribozu (valet priest, or page).

5 . The chess play with an exhaustive attention and constant practice in the land of the rising sun is without exaggeration

equal to that of billiard, bowling alley, cards and the last of all

chess, and something else more, put together in this country.

They play it in summer evenings on verandas, along the streets, at the shop entrances, where passers-by would look at the

PREFACE.

g

beautiful operations of technique of struggles on a small war

field of chessboard.

6. They would not suffer summer heat whenever the

weather is too hot to do anything, they gather their heads to

ponder over critical movements of fleet, navies, and battalions, divisions and armies they do not seem to sleep ever.

7. In winter they play it within houses, while enjoying

true native original tea, and deliberately thinking and planning

with utmost considerations.

Before entertainments, either at

public places or at private houses, begin, the guests or members

are hospitably accommodated with chessboards and pieces,

and fine tea in small cups, accompanied by sweet things to

heighten the taste and flavor of the beverage they are playing

here and there, smiling and laughing their beautiful and

skilful hands full of strategy and tactics, watched by their

friends and acquaintances and admirers.

8. The jinrikisha-men are, at street corners, and in summer

in shady nooks, playing Chess, while they are waiting for patrons.

Aye! the little Japanese have drilled their minds with their

chess playing and made the brains comparatively larger with

regard to bodily constitution after a fashion of ceasely working

ants and bees. They understand the importance of union

of which protection and supports of each and every other are

to be paramount.

9. What will be the difficulties, as far as human mind con-

cerns, as regard to mathematics or anything else, for the people

that can not have ennui at all, and who can see many hands

at once some of them able to discern fifty or a hundred differ-

ent hands ahead or blindfold play a game simultaneously with 3 or 10, even fifteen games, or more, the most complicated con-

tests founded upon scientific combinations of movements of

navies, armies, etc., on diminutive war-fields of a board?

i. The Japanese were playing Chess whenever they had

time, in time of peace, also of war, before the European intru-

10

PREFACE

ders went there, so that it is natural that, having trained their

minds, they could see the advantage of modern diplomacy, warships, and ponderous weapons.

2. The little people with a comparatively large quantity

of gray-matter in their intellectual case have improved Chess

according to their peculiar ingenuity of inventions, discoveries

and the assimilating power of adaptability, as they did so in

the lines of the Chinese works of art and many others, and have so come out as to surpass their masters, and, as at the

latest times, they have improved the most modern warfare

weapons implements and other things, such as for example,

the Shimose gunpowder, the Japanese rifles, wireless telegraphy, medicinal discoveries, and therapeutic advancement.

3. This Japanese Chess, thus improved, is the most highly

developed, most interesting and most scientific and philosophical

of all the games ever invented and known.

It plainly illustrates

the secret intricacies and combinations and permutations of

causes and effects of every human affair as a factor of nature.

Playing this game cultivates business tact, keeps up strategy and

tactics, improves diplomacy and strengthens the mental faculties.

4.

That little Japan has come out to surprise the world

through the realm of beautiful works, diplomacy and warfares:

there might be few who do not at all play this game in her army,

from the highest officers, Field- Marshals, down to privates, soldiers and the carriers of supplies and provisions ; in her navy

from admirals down to mere sailors; in diplomatic department,

from the minister to the telephone or gate-keepers; from the

premier

cabinet officials

to footmen; the rich and poor.

5. For ages ago, many of the best known generals and great

personages played chess, even of very primitive state: Gotama

Buddha, Julius Caesar, Charlemagn, William the Conqueror

and others it is said, and it is very well known that Napoleon played well, and that celebrated historian Henry Thomas Buckle, Charles Dickens, and Thomas Henry Huxley. And

PREFACE.

j

j.

all the great Japanese personages of yore played, of course, to the deepest and highest degree, the most highly contrived

game.

6. Some of the richest Japanese have presented many hundred chessboards and as many sets of pieces to the hospi-

tals, for the soldiers, in this present war, and there is no exag-

geration to say that every one of these sets are incessantly

patronized by the wounded, who would enjoy to bring up the

past and speculate for the future in association with the games.

7. Certain the writer dares say it is that almost all the

Dai Nipponese concerned in the present Manchurian War are

dexterious players of a game of the true Oriental Science and

Art of War or Struggle.

8. The writer is wholly convinced that if any one would a little

study the easy movements of the pieces of this fascinating chess

war, he will, without doubt, understand how the brain is easily

improved and his nerves will be tempered and hardened; and

the author fully hopes that his mental faculty, brightened,

sharpened and advanced by manoeuvres, tactics, diplomacy,

strategy of wise men and generals on minimized battlefields

on a small board upon a table

would surely contribute one of the greatest

the maps of real warfares

or struggles

shares for the everlasting promotion of the GREATEST RE-

PUBLIC, THE UNITED

STATES OF AMERICA, the

FIRST in peace and FIRST in the hearts of all nations, and

for its supremacy to oversee and direct the whole world for the

sake of SUBLIME HUMANITY.

C.Y.

Chicago, 0:10 A. M. Fourth of July, 1904.

CONTENTS

Frontispiece

Preface

PAGB

7-11

The Tree of Chessologics compared with that of Math-

ematics CHESS EVOLUTION (a plate) between

Chess, Chessology, or Chessologics, its definition, its legitimate position, functions, etc

The importance of knowledge of the use of Figures.

Chessonym Chessonymy

Japanese Chess its legitimate position, offices, etc.

as the Calculus in CHESSOLOGY

Diagrams Tengoma, or Mochingoma, the VITALITIES of the cap-

tured Chess pieces

1415

i$~37

38-49

47-81

50-214

60-65

86-186

Actual Warfare ELEMENTS as examples for the above 116-186

Alexander's siege and destruction of Tyre of the

Phoenicians

1 1 7-129

The Siege of Port Arthur, a factor of the Man-

churian campaign of Japan-Russian war. 129-186

Naru Promotion Method

Chinese Chess

I-go (Wei-ki) [Japanese and Chinese]

Problems (Mondai)

Index

187-190

207-210

210-214

215-229

230-242

A View of Comparatively Assumed Probabilities of Relation of Branches of Chess

86-116; ss. 2a-6a, pp. 211-3.)

Each of the divisions, or branches of the two Trees is divided, as in the mi

nitude or quantity or quality abstractly, with relatoin to matter; and

bodies, and is consequently interwoven with physical considerations.

7

stocks, into PURE or ABSTRACT, which, respectively, considers element or xnag-

CED or APPLIED, which treats of magnitude or element as subsisting in material

JAPANESE CHESS

THE SCIENCE AND ART OF WAR OR STRUGGLE

CHESSOLOGY

DEFINITION, ITS POSITION AND FUNCTIONS.

1.

Japanese Chess, or what we may vaguely call so here

at present, is of a very great antiquity, and it is a descendant

of the family of that which originated or was invented in time

immemorial, or at least 5,000 years ago.

The game has ac-

quired a great and unique importance throughout the empire;

mainly, no doubt, in consequence of its peculiarly and sooth- ingly extreme, yet inviting, difficulty. It is the subject of

a most extensive literature which would fill up quite a large library, and its study has become more that of a science and

a philosophy than a mere recreation.

2.

Chess, or rather, Chessology, in its simple definition, is

the most abstract of all the sciences, and is played, or rather

practiced, as an intellectual pastime, the most purely intel-

lectual of all the games of skill.

It is founded upon a self-

evident truth working irresistibly and uniformly in all spaces

Chessology, in its largest sense, treats of the

principles of the science of human struggles conceivable and

symbolized in the shortest, smallest and least possible time,

space and force and played as the highest and most intellectual

game to develop and train the Mind, by virtue of amusement

accompanied with competition; the term Chess is mainly to

mean the art of skill and practice of Chessological game; and

the latter is sometimes for convenience sake to be used to

at all times.

15

1 6

JAPANESE CHESS

mean either of both terms.

Artistic, as well as the beautiful, combinations symbolizing

every known element of nature essential for struggles.

is the stronghold of abstract science and philosophy.

and digest Mochingoma, pp. 86-116.)

the domain of all games.

3. Chess, a clear well and factory of patience, a regulator or governor of the Mind, has an extraordinarily flexible nature,

comparable to the attributes of water, in a visible and tangible

domain, electricity in the physical world and ether in space.

Again, Chess is the conception and action out of enlivened

imaginations, formed most commonly in regular numbers as to space, time and force, and it contains the impassioned ex-

pression which is in the countenances of all sciences and phi-

losophies, and more concise in work than in actual warfares

and struggles.

4. It is simple, sensuous and impassioned; that is, simple

in conception, abounding in sensible images, and in forming

It is the Sovereign in

(See

Chess

It reveals

the

Idealistic and

them all with the spirit of the Mind.

Brevity, the soul of wit,

consisting in the compactness and exactness of the thought,

not in the curtailed expression of it, is the only fundamental

principle of Chessology.

5. In Chess, beauty of thought and that of style should be

reverenced to the fullest extent, for Chess is to elevate the

altitude of Mind.

There is embodied in Chess the repetition

in a most condensed and most economized form of ideas, based

upon experiences and observations and synthetic speculations,

thus producing the effect of conciseness.

conciseness is

energy

permeates Chess.

The reason that

The

different

players can develop the mission of Chess in their minds as large

as their respective storage of knowledge expands.

6. Chessology, or Chess viewed from a wide standpoint of

our present knowledge, in its entirety with especial reference

to the part played by man, is to aim at reaching the highest

training of Mind for the settlement of struggles, whatsoever

conceivable by man, making them welcome and pleasure to

himself.

7. It is, thus in brief, an abstraction of the highest kind

of knowledge and of the universe of struggles and specula-

tions conceivable by the human mind.

CHESSOLOGICS

1 7

7 a. Chess, in a general sense, has appeared in some or other

form in times immemorial, though the term chess itself and

all its cognate words were derived from the Persian tongue,

(s

3 , p. 36.)

It -has come out at the same time with the forma-

tion of human mind, at the same time when the fingers begun

to be used for counting numbers for human intellectual need.

It has been improved, revolutionized and specialized in one

way or another; and there are at present many kinds of Chess, but really branches, or divisions according to the law of Evolu-

tion (the last part, s. 8a, p. 103; s. 4C, p. 115).

The game is now

played in all civilized countries and some others, and it is the

only universal game that there is.

ancient Rome (s. 3, p. 36), and previously in early Greece; in

The game was played in

Egypt antedating the period of the Pharaohs; in India long

before the birth of history, and in China thousands of years

ago.

As according to the true and highest sense of the term,

there is the only one History, and such a history as that of the United States, or English history or any other national history, is a mere story for contribution to the Unity of Stories the

, so the time has arrived to have pro-

History of Civilization

duced what is called Chessology (s. 8, p. 17; s. 3-40, p. 115;

s. 4, p. 109). But for grasping this high conception or abstrac-

tion of Chess, chessplayers are very far from perfectly under-

standing Chess in both general and pure, or abstract sense of

the term, and especially the grand beauty of Japanese Chess

the Calculus of Chessology.

Chessologics bet. pp. 14-15.)

(Study and digest the

Tree

of

8.

CHESSOLOGY, or CHESSQLOGICS is in the highest and

rigidest sense the

Ultra- Philosophic- Science both the Phi-

losophy and Science of treating with training the Mind in the

fewest vivid symbolization by minimum abstract condensation

and maximum application for the MAXIMUM harvestage in

struggles of all known principles of knowledge, the sum of

human wisdom, for the most highly organized co-operation:

Chessological

CHESS

Applied Chessology

the

Art

of

the

treatment of all kinds of spheres of knowledge, or the Art of

an actual duel of wits and knowledge.

It profits the players

MAXIMA by virtue of Minima. It may be popularly defined as "a nutshell in which the Infinitude lies." Kazan (s. 2a, p.

1 8

JAPANESE CHESS

8a. Just as there is no such a science as Mathematics or Chem-

istry or Astronomy of this or that country, so there is no other

Chessology but the purest one only(s. 4, p. 109 ;s. 8, p. in). As game or an Art practicable and productive, Chess in the purest

and highest significance is an abstraction, pure intellect and

knowledge rendered into visible symbols of all human struggle-

It shows the student at first only the seemingly

elements.

most important points, and then the others gradually to be

discovered when further and deeper studied, as in the case of

This abstraction

embodied in Chess of all struggle-elements is in its manifesta-

tions like sunlight viewed through stained glass by ordinary

as well as special persons, whereas profound Chessologists take or generalize them as an entity. Chess in general is, therefore, a method or formula for abstraction of all struggles of which

heavenly bodies,

(s. 9, p. 35; s. 8, p. 88.)

there are such grandest incessant struggles at the time of peace as International commerce, International competition for

political supremacy and the like, and what is popularly and

limitedly known as "war," is the most conspicuous at present

as a legacy of savagism.

Hence, the term chess attached

with the local names in adjective such as the European, Oriental,

Chinese or Korean, is a chessological corollary or demonstra-

tion or formula, and what is so-called a war-game is a con-

crete problem of chessological treatment of things pertaining

to only military works; hence, the French, German, American

game of war, or siege-game (s. 2, p. 29; 7, p. in).

They are the

formulas or offsprings evolved out of the principles