Sie sind auf Seite 1von 9

 

HAMPTON NETWORK SOLUTIONS 

Tauren Bass 

Tori Epps 

Zaire Elleby 

Report Distributed on April 24, 2019 

Prepared for 

Hampton University 

Board of Directors 

 
TABLE OF CONTENTS 

SUMMARY………………………………………………………………………...4 

INTRODUCTION………………...………………………………………………..5 

SOLUTIONS…………………………………………………………………….....6 

a. REMAP….………………………………………………………….…...….6 
b. UPGRADE………………………………………………………………….7 
c. STABILIZE…………………………………………………………………8 

   
 

Summary 
In this memo we will be discussing a problem that is affecting the Hampton University Campus; 
the situation surrounding the wifi. We will be discussing what the various problem points are, 
and what we believe the solutions to be. We have broken down our solution down into three 
major points as well as providing data points as to why we believe that this is a pressing issue.   
 

Introduction 
As current students at Hampton University, we have noticed a pressing issue that seems to be 
affecting the student body, the poor wifi. Over the years of our matriculation, we have noticed 
that there is a severe lack of appropriate internet connectivity. The current wifi lacks speed, 
security, and manageability. There are many challenges facing the current situation. 

Although there are quite a few problem points we are going to provide the solution steps that 
need to be taken to solve these problems in an manageable way. We have broken down these 
solution steps into the consumable chunks; Remap, Upgrade, Stabilize. In this memo we will be 
going in depth into these steps.   
 

Solution Steps 
Step 1: Remap 

Presently the main issue that hinders the next step forward is a lack of network understanding. In 
networking there is a term known as topology which is described as a map that shows how our 
network is laid out. The reason as to why this is important is that the way that a network is laid 
out defines how slow or fast the internet is in certain places. The way that the network is 
currently laid out we follow a tree structure in 
our topology. Meaning we have one hub or 
router per building and a large amount of 
splitters that split the connection for that 
building into every room. Even though we may 
know the structure we do not know where any 
of these connections are being made. Thus we 
have our first major issue. 

Fig 1. Tree Topology(taken from “Computer Network : Tree Network Topology.”  Computer Network : Tree Network Topology , 
computerlearningcentre.blogspot.com/2014/07/computer­network­tree­network­topology.html. 

Our solution to fix this problem would be to  Remap  the network. This task is not one of 
difficulty but of time. It would take between a couple of weeks to a few months to map out our 
entire campus depending on the complexity of the last design. The cost to do this is one of the 
cheaper tasks. The parts needed: Commotion node (router), Mounting hardware, Ethernet 
cabling, Power supply ­ Included with outdoor router, Indoor router, cost between 250­500 USD 
per unit, which would mean per building in this case (Put Andy Gunn Citation Here). In terms of 
the cost of labor it should be between 100­250 USD per building.  

Commotion  Mounting  Ethernet  Power  Outdoor  Indoor  Labor Cost 


Node  Hardware  Cabling   Supply  Router  Router 

$200  $40  $275  $350  $130  $150  $175 


Fig 2. Shows the average cost of each of the parts that fill the requirements based on common choices. 

The impact of remapping on our campus will be huge. Without the remapping of our network, 
those who use Hampton University’s WIFI will continue to experience the problems that we 
have addressed before. But if Hampton does allow for the remapping of the network, many 
things will change on campus. Those who use the WIFI will notice a faster internet speed. With 
the remap will know how slow or fast the connections are on certain parts of campus. Greater 
internet speeds can ease the frustrations that students have with trying to complete their 
assignments. Another benefit of remapping is that our network will be more secure. The IT 
professionals on this campus will be able to track where each point of connectivity is coming 
from.  

Step 2: Upgrade 

Presently the wifi on campus is not something that follows our standard of excellence at 
Hampton University; According to a study done by SpeedTest, an internet speed archive and test 
site, where they tested the internet speed of many different tests their slowest was the University 
of Alabama at 38.88 Mbps(megabits per second) (McKetta, 2019). Comparing that to Hampton 
which clocks in around 3.5 Mbps. 

The next point is  Upgrade ; now that we 
have a completed map of our network 
we are able to add new routers and 
upgrade our network pipeline to both 
increase internet speed but widen the 
range of our network. 

Since we now have an upgraded 
topology we would be able to upgrade 
the network. To do this we would need 
to replace all of the router points on our 
campus whilst also paying for an 
increase in wifi. To do this it would take 
about ~125 USD per building based on 
the average of upgrading each 
individual build but to upgrade a 
network of this scale for the needs of 
our student body would be ~540,000 
USD to on average with much more 
prominent universities.  

*Fig 03. College Internet Speeds taken from McKetta, I. 
(2019, January 09). Which Campus Has the Fastest Wi­Fi? 
Comparing Football Rivals. Retrieved from https://www.speedtest.net/insights/blog/fastest­campuses­2018/ 
The impact this would have on the Hampton’s students and faculty would be quite large. It will 
allow for students to have an easier time accessing online information as well as faster upload 
and download for assignments. It would help faculty by allowing for more interactive lessons or 
integrating different types of learning such as videos. 

Step 3: Stabilize 

When it comes to stabilization we saw two major problems: 

● The Lack of Security 
● The Lack of Proper Encryption  

The Lack of Security:  

Currently, the network is an open entry point; meaning that anyone is able to get access to the 
network and the various aspects that are connected to it. The things that are linked to this 
network are: our payment information for tuition, personal information, and university 
information like a transcript. These vulnerabilities pose problems for both the student body and 
everyone that works for the university. 

Lack of Encryption: 

Connecting to an unsecured wireless network can leave your computer or mobile device 
susceptible to a plethora of security risks and unwanted activity. Not only that, but unauthorized 
users can slow your connection down to a crawl, access your private data, or even use the 
network to perform shady activities that can be traced back to you. While it may seem incredibly 
complicated, securing our wireless network is rather simple. It just takes a bit of standard 
encryption, limiting access, and password creativity. The first and most simple step is for the 
network to differentiate whether or not a user is a Hampton student, faculty, staff or not to make 
sure no unauthorized users are on the network. We also use outdated types of encryption like 
WPA. 

Solution: 

● Differentiate Hampton users vs non­Hampton users 
● Enable encryption software 
● Prevent unauthorized access. 
● WPA or WPA2 encryption 
Another step is by using encryption. Encryption encodes the data sent wirelessly between your 
device and the router, essentially scrambling the information and restricting open access. Another 
difference between WPA and WPA2 is the length of their passwords. WPA2 requires you to enter 
a longer password than WPA requires. The shared password only has to be entered one time on 
the devices that access the router, but it provides an additional layer of protection from people 
who would crack your network if they could. 

   
 

Conclusion 
This memo went over the proposed solutions for Hampton University’s network as provided by 
TZT Solutions group. We seperated down our solutions into three consumables chunks  Remap, 
Upgrade, Stabilize.  These steps encompassed mapping our network layout and replacing all of 
the hardware, paying to upgrade our newly mapped network, and hiring professionals to upkeep 
and protect the network.