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Digital Citizenship Curriculum Training

K-2 Kids and Technology


The steps below require a response. In between the steps on this sheet, navigate back to the course on
the site and continue until the next stopping point.
Step 2: Kids and Technology

After looking at the infographic, what statistic(s) surprised you?


Tech Savvy Toddlers: In 2011, 10 % of kids under 2 had used a mobile device. Now, that’s grown to 38%
of all kids under 2.
How do you think this use of technology might affect kids’ development?
What they are doing on mobile devices are shocking. With increased screen time and activities being
played include games. This increase can affect kids’ development in a negative way.

As you watch the video that illustrates some key issues kids face as they participate in the digital world,
identify one challenge and one opportunity that relate to your future students, given today’s landscape:
Challenge: Knowing when too much technology is too much. Making sure my students know the rules
about being safe and effective on the internet.
Opportunity: Utilizing the new technologies to focus on developing their problem-solving skills and
being a safe user.

Think about the challenge and opportunity stated above. How could you help students take advantage
of the opportunity? How can you help them with the challenge?
Challenge: Knowing when too much technology is too much. Making sure my students know the rules
about being safe and effective on the internet.
Opportunity: Utilizing the new technologies to focus on developing their problem-solving skills and
being a safe user.
Step 3: Introduction to Digital Citizenship

What does “digital citizenship” mean to you? Brainstorm words or phrases that come to mind. Once
you have a definition, share it below:
Digital citizenship is ….. the norms and rules we follow to act appropriately when using technology.

What comments in the video resonate with you?


We want them to internalize the thought process. You know, I’m going down the road and I probably
shouldn’t be, what do I need to think about? What are the consequences that could come out just from
what I know? Rather than waiting for an adult to say, “That’s bad, I’m taking your device.”

Based on your role, in what ways might you engage different stakeholders in digital citizenship?
Have them participate in digital citizenship as a larger community, friends and family, and self.

Based on all of the resources you saw, what are you most excited about? What would you like to
explore more?
The alignement to the ISTE Standards that Common Sense Education provides in their curriculum
lessons. I would like to use this program more hands on and explore it myself.
Step 7: Connecting Families
Complete the scavenger hunt:

1. Where did you find the “Field Tested Questions” document?


Click Host (step 1) – Next scroll down to #3 (Teen Panel) – Finally click on “Teen Panel Handbook”
link and scroll down to page 5 where you will find the “Field Tested Questions”.

Take a screen shot of the top of the document and paste it here:

2. Here is the Ellen video referred to in the exercise:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SCaKuAdKumA

What were you feeling while you watched the segment?


I found it so interesting how easily photos and information can be found by a quick search on
Google.
What do you think of Ellen’s decision to do this segment on her show? Is it okay? Why or why not?
It is definitely okay because the people posted the pictures themselves without thinking who would
see it. They never expected Ellen to see them so I think she wanted to open their eyes to their
internet use.

Ellen asks “Do you know which picture I am going to show of yours?” Think about your photos on
social media. Is there an obvious picture Ellen would pick to embarrass you? (you don’t have to
describe it) What about a more benign photo that might just be embarrassing if taken out of
context?
I am very careful about the photos I post. I know there is a couple of photos that have been added
by friends that I have had to ask them to remove these photos.
At the end of the clip. Ellen shows embarrassing pictures of Megan. Megan is in the audience with her
mom, who doesn’t follow Megan on Facebook. How would you feel if you saw something about your
child/someone close to you on Facebook that you didn’t know or learned something because of what
someone else saw on Facebook.
I would be horrified. I already saw this video from Ellen and it definitely opened my eyes and I will
make sure that my children and students know how to practice safe ways to prevent this.

Megan’s friend who is also in the picture did not choose to share it and did not even go to the show,
yet her embarrassing photo was also shared publicly. How can we manage what pictures others
share of us?
Report the picture or don’t be in a situation where that photo could be taken of you that is
embarrassing.

How can we support kids in a world with new and shifting privacy norms? What role can parents
play? What role can teachers play?
We can all make sure they know how to be respectful on the internet and I believe that it all begins
with parents and teachers. We need to set up expectations for the children to make sure they know
what is acceptable and what is wrong.