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EXTENT OF IMPLEMENTATION OF BRIGADA ESKWELA:

BASIS FOR AN ACTION PLAN

_______________________________________

A Thesis Presented to
The Faculty of the Graduate School
University of Mindanao, Davao City

In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirement


For the Degree Master of Arts in Education
Major in Educational Management

______________________________________

MARICHU M. CELESTIAL
October 2015
ii

APPOVAL SHEET

The thesis entitled “EXTENT OF IMPLEMENTATION OF BRIGADA


ESKWELA: BASIS FOR AN ACTION PLAN”, prepared and submitted by
Marichu M. Celestial in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of
Master of Arts in Education major in Educational Management, has been
examined and is hereby endorsed for approval and acceptance.

EUNICE A. ATIENZAR, Ed. D.


Adviser
_______________________________________________________________

PANEL OF EXAMINERS

APPROVED by the Panel of Examiners on Oral Examination with a grade of


Passed

EUGENIO S. GUHAO JR., D. M


Chairman

GLORIA P. GEMPES, Ed.D., D.M. ALVIN O. CAYOGYOG, Ph. D


Member Member

RINANTE L. GENUBA, Ed. D.


Member
________________________________________________________________

ACCEPTED in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of


Master of Arts in Education major in Educational Management.

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION: PASSED

PEDRO B. SAN JOSE, Ph. D.


EVP-Academic Affairs

October 2015
iii

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

The researcher expresses her deep gratitude and sincere appreciation to

the following persons for their valuable time and guidance in the accomplishment

of this paper, for without them, this academic paper would have not realized.

The panel of examiners and validators chaired by Dr. Eugenio S. Guhao

Jr., and his members, Dr. Gloria P. Gempes, Dr. Alvin O. Cayogyog and Rinante

L. Genuba, for their constructive comments and suggestions in the improvement

of this paper.

Dr. Eunice A. Atienzar, her adviser, for the encouragement, understanding

guidance and for the extended intellectual support and follow up in the

accomplishment.

Dr. Gaudencio G. Abellanosa, her statistician, for his professional ideas

and information on the statistical aspect of this study.f this study.

The Schools Division Superintendent of the Island Garden City of Samal,

Eufemia T. Gamutin, CESO VI, for her kind assistance, prompt attention and for

allowing her to conduct the study that helped much in the realization of this study;

The Principals, School in-charge of the 16 public elementary schools, for

their kind assistance in the conduct of this study; And the teachers, for their

patience in answering the survey questionnaire;

To her family and friends, for the love and spiritual support throughout her

life and of course to her loving and devoted husband, Ronie L. Celestial, who
iv

made this commitment and sacrifice with her and providing balance in her life,

allowing her to be who she is and pursue her personal best.

Most of all, to the Almighty Father, for providing wisdom and needs in the

success of this study.

M.M.C.
v

ABSTRACT

The study aimed to determine the extent of implementation of the

BrigadaEskwela (BE) Program of the DepED among the public elementary

schools in the Island Garden City of Samal. The study used the non-experimental

quantitative research design utilizing descriptive-survey method with statistics

such as mean and T-Test. The data were gathered through a researcher-

constructed questionnaire which was administered to 210 respondents from 16

public elementary schools distributed to 14 small schools and 2 big schools. It

was established that theBrigadaEskwela Program was highly implemented in the

light of the findings of Pre-Implementation Stage, Implementation Stage and

Post-Implementation Stage. Revealed was the null hypothesis of significant

difference in the level of implementation of the BrigadaEskwela Program when

analyzed by school size.

In the light of the findings of the study, It was found out that small schools

need an assistance from the big schools in order for them to implement it the way

the big schools implemented.

An action plan was proposed for the enhancement of the practices to

further strengthen school-community partnership especially in the small

schoolsthrough the BrigadaEskwela Program.

Keywords: BrigadaEskwela, Action Plan, Philippines, Education


vi

TABLE OF CONTENTS

TITLE PAGE I

APPROVAL SHEET ii

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT iii

ABSTRACT v

TABLE OF CONTENTS vi

LIST OF TABLES viii

LIST OF FIGURES ix

DEDICATION x

CHAPTER

1 INTRODUCTION

Rationale 1

Research Objective 3

Hypothesis 3

Review of Related Literature 4

Theoretical Framework 19

Conceptual Framework 20

Significance of the Study 22

Definition of Terms 23

2 METHOD

Research Design 24
vii

Research Locale 25

Population and Sample 28

Research Instrument 29

Data Collection 30

Statistical Tools 31

3 RESULTS 32

4 DISCUSSION 36

Action Plan 40

Conclusion 46

Recommendations 46

REFERENCES 47

APPENDICES 52

A. Survey Questionnaire 53

B. Letter to Validators and Validation Sheets 58

C. Letter to Schools Division Superintendent and Principals 59

D. Certificate of Appearance 60

E. Specific Items per indicator for Table 1 61

F. Test of Reliability 62

G. Other Documents 63

CURRICULUM VITAE 64
viii
ix

LIST OF TABLES

Table Page

1 Level of Implementation of BrigadaEskwela Program 33

2 Significance of the Difference in the Level of


Implementation of BrigadaEskwela Program When 34
Analyzed by School Size
x

LIST OF FIGURES

Figure Pages

1 Conceptual Framework Showing the Variables 21

2 Map of the Island Garden City of Samal 27


xi

DEDICATION

This piece of work is heartily dedicated

to her parents

Mr. Geronimo CuaMacatual Sr. and Mrs. Encarnacion S. Macatual

Her brother, Geronimo S. Macatual Jr.

and her sisters

Marites M. Jimenez Marilou M. Llorando, Marilyn M. Rodaje

andMarivic M. Baltero

her children

Romar Justine M. Celestial and RomarJabez M. Celestial

and to

her dearest husband Ronie L Celestial

who has been a great source of motivation and inspiration.

Finally, this book is dedicated to all those who believe in the richness of

learning.

To God, my all in all honors, glory and adoration belong to you.

M. M. C.
2

Chapter 1

INTRODUCTION

Rationale

Lack of support and cooperation of the parents and other stakeholders are

the common problems face of the public schools every opening of the school

year. Deped Secretary Armin Luistro stresses that in education everything is a

pressing problem. (Docliners, 2015).These include lack of time and/or money,

lack of information or training, differences in discernment and values, and issues

with school space and facilities.

Thus BrigadaEskwela (BE) program or National Maintenance Week was

initiated on May 2003 (BrigadaEskwela Manual, 2009). Recognizing this as best

manifestation of school and community relationship, the problem lies on how the

administrators utilize effective procedures by which to help the public understand

what the schools are trying to do to attract the support of the community in their

efforts to provide a refine education, and on how to make the schools be likewise

concerned with the needs and problems of the community. DO 21, s (2011).

In local research study, Chua (2006), Moreover, according to Seri llano

(2009), the problems in public schools are mainly attributed to the government’s

lack of budgetary allocation for education. Some schools rely on donations from

charitable institutions. In addition, leaking roofs, dilapidated desks and chairs,

unpaved grounds, and vandalized, flaking walls-this is the scenario for many

public schools in the Philippines. This kind of school environment makes it hard
3

for students to concentrate in the class, leading to poor academic performance.

In this regard, BrigadaEskwela can be considered as a temporary solution to the

age-old problem (Dioko, 2008).

It is therefore in this considerable magnitude, that the researcher found

the conception of this study more than timely so as to determine the extent of

implementation of BrigadaEskwela in the elementary public schools and

determine to the extent the school heads’ ability to attract community members to

get involved in the school through the BrigadaEskwela (BE) program of the

Department of Education. And the researcher found out that there is no study

conducted in the division of Island Garden City of Samal. The result of the study

serves as the basis of an action plan to address the problems encountered by

the school heads in the implementation of BrigadaEskwela.

Research Objectives

The study was conducted to determine the extent of implementation of the

BrigadaEskwela Program among the elementary schools of the Division of Island

Garden City of Samal. Specifically, it intends to achieve the following objectives:

1. To determine the level of implementation of BrigadaEskwela program

in the elementary schools in terms of the following:

1.1 Pre-implementation stage

1.2 Implementation stage

1.3 Post-implementation stage.

2. To determine the significant difference in the level of implementation


4

of the BrigadaEskwela Program when analyzed by school size:

2.1 Small Elementary School

2.2 Big Elementary School

3. To propose an action plan that is based on the findings of the study.

Hypothesis

This study tested the following null hypothesis, which was subjected to a

statistical test at α 0.05 level of significance, that there is no significant difference

on the level of implementation of the BrigadaEskwela when analyzed by school

size.

Review of Related Literature Commented [u1]: Provide a storyline

Presented in this section are the review of related ideas andinformation

taken from books, journals, researchers and interviews.The indicators are the

Pre-Implementation, Actual Implementation and the Post

Implementation.(Source)

BrigadaEskwela better known as the Bayanihan Para

saPaaralan (Working Together for Schools), added a new meaning to the Filipino

notion of unity. From the image of barrio men bearing together the weight of

a bahaykubo (nipa hut) on their shoulders to the image of volunteers braving

storms and floods to help calamity-stricken communities, BrigadaEskwela brings

to us a picture of people from different sectors of society repainting walls and

blackboards, cleaning windows and doors, or repairing fences. Carreon(2015).


5

Over the years, the BrigadaEskwela has become the foundation for

community building. Its effort has evolved from a week-long cleaning-up and

beautification exercise to a festive coming together of students, teachers, schools

officials, parents, community members, local government officials, non-

government organizations, church groups and the private sector. It, too, has

become one of the major initiatives of DepEDin enjoining local communities to

respond to the needs of public schools and be part of a nationwide effort towards

improving Philippines basic education (BrigadaEskwela Manual, 2009).

As its name suggests, BrigadaEskwela assembles an army of volunteers

to repair and prepare classrooms in time for the opening of classes. The success

of its implementation lies in the collaborative effort of school heads, private

partners, local government units, and the community members, including parents

and students. Through the initiative of the school heads, private partners are

given the opportunity to contribute resources for the effort. And in honor of their

goodwill, private partners are offered tax incentives of up to 150%.

Local government units and community members mostly provide

manpower and volunteer services during this week-long activity. Partners from

private companies not only donate cash and resources to the cause. Some of

them also send their employees to schools to help. Representatives from

religious groups and members of local government units (LGU) such as

policemen, firefighters, and bantay bayan also take part in putting up new

donated blackboards, painting school fences, and mounting bulletin boards.


6

Parents, teachers, and students from different school organizations also offer

their help.

Usually, everyone works from 8 am to 5 pm with very little supervision Commented [u2]: insert

from the officers of the student government. Throughout the years, the spirit of

volunteerism in BrigadaEskwela has reached more people in the communities.

Carreon (2015).It was with this spirit of volunteerism and public-private

partnership for education that Republic Act 8525, or the “Adopt-A-School Act”

was made in 1998. Through the Adopt-A-School companies and professionals

are given the opportunity to contribute in improving the public education system

of the country

In the effort of Adopt-A-School program to bring the bayanihanspirit to the

community level and maximize civil participation and utilize local resources to

improve the public schools, the Department of Education launched the National

Schools Maintenance Week on May 2003. Dubbed, BrigadaEskwela, the

program brought together teachers, parents and community members every third

week of May to work together in repairing public schools for school opening. In

the spirit of bayanihan, private institutions/individuals and even the local

government units contributed in generating for the effort. During the week-long

event, volunteers take time out in doing minor repairs, painting, and cleaning of

school campuses (BrigadaEskwelaManual, 2009).

Bayanihan as a term is taken from the root word bayani meaning “hero”.

Thus, bayanihan means being a hero to one another. As in the classic tradition of

carrying a house, each man carries a portion of the weight of the house and in
7

effect, becomes a hero for all the others because he lightens the load for the

others. Each man thus becomes a hero to everyone as all the others become a

hero to him (Paredes, 2009).

Since its inception, schools are the natural focus of a neighborhood or Commented [u3]: insert

community. And can serve as the foundation for community partnerships that are

beneficial to students, families, businesses, agencies, and other civic

organizations.Abromitis (2009).By building communication, sharing resources

and developing unique solutions to community problems, these partnerships can

become vital and organic entities that are agents of lasting change in the

community. This relates to the idea of Sanders (2005), that boosting parental and

community participation in public education has the potential to attract a range of

new resources for government schools; to renew community support and

confidence in public education; to foster innovation, creativity, dynamism and

strategic capability in schools; and to enable schools and communities to meet

their own particular needs in a way which enriches both.

It has to be emphasized that good school-community partnerships think Commented [u4]: insert

“outside the box” to generate new relationships across otherwise unconnected

areas of the community. They build on existing structures and networks in the

community to create new shared responses to the needs of the community in

general and its young people in particular ( Towards School Community

Partnership: Education Foundation Research Seminars, 2001).

In 2007 alone, Mendoza (2009) mentioned in his Scribe’s Corner,

BrigadaEskwela hit a record high of 90 percent participation among, school


8

communities, generating more than P2.5 billion worth of support-in-kind and

volunteer man-hours. It has proven to continue to gain more mileage among

communities, corporations and private individuals. In 2008, the “bayanihan spirit”

saved the Department of Education P5.7 billion in repair costs. Lapuz was cited

in his report that it saved all that money because more than five million Filipinos

volunteered to repair and clean up the school in the communities. In addition, the

program achieved results in all 44.619 school communities in 2008, up from only

31 percent in 2003. The savings amounted to P2.9 billion worth of community

maintenance and operating costs; P1.6 billion worth of volunteer time and labor

man-hours; and P1.2 billion worth of donations-in-kind (Tubeza, 2009). Commented [u5]: Where’s the separation of Mendoza and
Tubeza’s ideas?

Indeed, BrigadaEskwelais becoming DepED’s model of genuine public

and private partnership in action. As the Department endeavors to solve the

many challenges facing Philippine education, BrigadaEskwela will serve as one

of its frontline initiatives reminding each and every Filipino that we are all

stakeholders in education (BrigadaEskwela Manual, 2009).

Furthermore, KavithaMediratta, SeemaSha and Sara McAlister (2009),

adverted that there was growing worldwide view that more functional schools

require more than government intervention. New approaches to social needs

bring together the skills, resources and experience of the public, private or

philanthropic sectors. This does not imply abandonment or reduction of

government’s responsibilities. Instead, it has the potential to add creative, flexible

and ground-up responses to the needs of young people and communities.


9

On the other hand, studies suggest that a successful collaboration

requires (Marek, Brock and Saula, 2014). The same concept that the

BrigadaEskwela (BE) was made, it passes through stages in its implementation.

Pre-Implementation Stage.According to Glickman & Gordon (2009), Commented [u6]: Refrain from starting a paragraph with a
source- all throughout RRL

successful school efforts extend beyond school walls. School Improvement

needs to connect to the community members be involved in planning,

implementing and assessing improvement efforts. This idea may associate to

school improvement efforts of the BrigadaEskwela (BE) which call for

involvement of the community even before the implementation. (source)

This stage serves as the preparation for a successful implementation

which should start as early as January. The school heads have to initiate the

organization of BrigadaEskwela committees and orientation on specific roles and

tasks. While the role of a school head is the key to the BrigadaEskwela Program,

the assistance and active participation of the stakeholders ensures its success

(BrigadaEskwela Manual. 2009). Adelman & Taylor (2009),noted that support for Commented [u7]: Same comment,provide transition word

family and community involvement begins with school administrators. Their

willingness to recruit parents and community members for school tasks, to listen

to other people’s viewpoints, and to share decision making provides a necessary

foundation for all school-family-community partnerships.

In this stage, organizing the efforts of the stakeholders is the first step to

take by way of establishing the following various committees which will be

responsible for the different concerns in implementing BrigadaEskwela. After

forming the committees, it is important to orient the members about their roles
10

and tasks (BrigadaEskwela Manual, 2009). According to Cheminais, (2008), the Commented [u8]: Provide transition word

main purpose for building school community partnerships is to share resources

and avoid the duplication of services. Schools can provide easy access to

children and families in need of community services, and by partnering with

agencies in the community, they can ensure that parents and other family

members are aware of all the types of assistance that are available to them and

how to access those services.

The first committee to be organized is the Steering Committee which

spearheads the implementation of the program and oversees the various efforts

to be undertaken. The members of the Steering Committee may be appointed to

chair the various BrigadaEskwela Working Committees such as the Advocacy

and Marketing Committee, which is responsible in the promotion of public

awareness and in the encouragement of the stakeholders to get involve; the Commented [u9]: tense

Resource Mobilization Committee which will generate resources, both materials

and manpower or volunteer services, the Program Implementation committee in

directing and in monitoring the implementation of different activities as specified

in the school work plan and the Administrative and Finance (BrigadaEskwela

Manual , 2009).

Another important working committee according to the same source, is the

Documentation Committee which will prepare the necessary documentation and

reports the prescribed forms, take photos and or video footages of activities,

especially the improvements done on the schools (before, during, and after

photos. It is also responsible in keeping and maintaining records and pertinent


11

papers and documents such as daily report on donations received and daily

attendance of volunteers.

In order to have sufficient time in planning as well as in the Commented [u10]: add

implementation, as early as January, the school head is expected to conduct an

an ocular inspection and assessment of school facilities needing repair. A Commented [u11]: add

designated School Physical Facilities Coordinator and any of the PTA member

may be asked to help assist in determining the repair and maintenance needs of

the school. A need assessment is a vehicle used to determine the needs and

current level of satisfaction of school staff and families regarding the school’s

family-involvement opportunities.As stated by Slavin (2004). After analyzing the Commented [u12]: provide transition word, paraphrase and
put source at the end

results of the needs assessment, the action team can develop goals for the

school’s involvement program. Regular meetings of all stakeholders provide an

opportunity to discuss issues facing the students and families, and to brainstorm

ways in which schools and community organizations may collaborate to solve

them. Creativity is the key. School community partnerships provide the

opportunity to synthesize what is available into unique programs and

opportunities for all (Sheldon & Epstein, 2005). Commented [u13]: where’s the separation of 2 sources?

As Abromitis (2009) had emphasized that each school community has a Commented [u14]: Put transition and paraphrase then source
be at the end

unique set of problems, and those best equipped to solve them are within the

community itself. In BE, the school head is the lead actor who must be best

equipped with strategies to properly implement the program. In line, the school

head may undertake information drive activities such as attending district and

division initiated orientation on BE ; securing pertinent advocacy and marketing


12

materials from the Central, region or division office for information drive activities;

convening target members of the BE Committee of awareness of roles and

functions relative to its conduct.

The related action was studied by Abromitis (2009) that in order for a Commented [u15]: Same comment

school community partnership to work, it is essential to build strong

communication among all the participants and those who will be affected by the

partnership. The levels of communication may vary, depending on the

circumstances and the purpose of the message, and include the following

components awareness, information-gathering, evaluation, and collaboration,

where the schools and organizations are actively involved with each other and

communicate regularly in order to plan for their collaborative efforts

(BrigadaEskwela Manual, 2009).

According to Aguilar, (2011)spreading the word many schools battle with a Commented [u16]: same

level of staff exhaustion or a lack of leadership which means that good ideas

never get off the ground. In other instances, schools have the willingness to build

new beneficial community relationship but lack the knowledge of how this might

be done. In addition, there is a need to widely publicize programs and

partnerships which have already experienced success to support existing

practice and encourage far more schools and community agencies to explore

new collaborative partnerships.

Through the Resource Mobilization Committee, the school can determine

the resources needed, partners to be tapped, and volunteers to participate in the

BrigadaEskwela along with the accomplished BE form 01 Physical Facilities


13

Repair and Maintenance Needs Assessment Form) and the school’s BE Work

Plan as bases, that will firm-up the kind of services and materials to be sourced

for the conduct of BE. With these things in place, a productive and successful

implementation of BE in the school will likely to occur (BrigadaEskwela Manual,

2009).

Moreover, after the marketing, advocacy and resource mobilization take

theie efforts prior to the BE Week, the last pre-implementation activity is to

prepare for the actual event. A meeting must be set with the working committees

to assess the readiness of your school for the actual BE week and finalize

activities to be undertaken. Lastly, by making sure that donations are in-kind, and

that all cash donations are converted into materials before acknowledging receipt

of such assistance. It is the policy of DepEd and the Adopt-A-School program to

refrain from accepting cash donations (BrigadaEskwela Manual, 2009).

Implementation Stage.The actual implementation stage is during the

BrigadaEskwela Week also referred to as the “National School Maintenance

Week” (NSMW). This is usually conducted on the third week of May before the

opening of classes. This is the time when all marketing, advocacy and resource

mobilization efforts during the pre-implementation stage will bear fruit. This is

also the time when plans are executed by the school with the support of

volunteer stakeholders and partners. Since the school takes the center stage

during the BrigadaEskwela Week, the school head becomes the master of the

show. It was stressed that school administrators are instrument in providing


14

teachers with professional development in family and community involvement

(Mueller, 2004).

It is highly suggested to start the week with the simple kick off ceremony

to formally set the mood and stimulate the enthusiasm among the volunteers.

While this program need not be extravagant. It would be useful to make it

inspiring and meaningful. This will also provide the school head an opportunity to Commented [u17]: insert

acknowledge the volunteers and stakeholders who are supporting the program.

The presence of prominent stakeholders in the community, i.e., LGU and

barangay officials, DepED officials, PTCA and School Governing members Commented [u18]: correct way

during the opening program can help boost the morale of the volunteers. A

presentation on the mechanics of BE program and overview of planned activities

would be interesting to highlight. This could include, but not limited to school

work plan on BE, major projects/activities to be done, donations and

commitments received during pre-implementation phase, and support or

assistance needed to accomplish (BrigadaEskwela Manual, 2009).

The next task of the action team is selecting the types of involvement

programs that will help the school reach its goals. Specific programs and

activities should reflect the partnership approach (Slavin, 2004). In this

BrigadaEskela stage, the volunteers of partners may be asked to find out and

choose where they can be of. As soon as they are grouped, team leaders may

be appointed and a briefing on the program of activities according to the school

work plan will be conducted. Working teams maybe organized to nature tasks to

be done (BrigadaEskwela Manual, 2009).


15

It is the responsibility of the school head and his staffs to inspire the Commented [u19]: appropriate transition word

volunteers and make them the seriousness of the school’s endeavor. New

volunteers may come to the school each day to help; they must be welcomed

and are guided on how they can contribute most productively. According to Heid,

(2012), Volunteering can provide a sense of purpose, as found of older adults;

according to this study, formal volunteering moderated the loss of a sense of

purpose among older adults who had experienced the loss of major role

identities, such as wage-earner and parent, other stakeholders, or the barangay

council (BrigadaEskwela Manual, 2009).

Post-Implementation Stage.This is the stage of the BrigadaEskwela that

speaks of the success of the school in the implementation of BE which should

not be left unnoticed. The week that speaks of collaborative efforts, meaningful

relationships, and notable accomplishments. It also sends a strong message of

how much the community puts value in education. Hence, it is only proper that

these be documented and reported. Post BrigadaEskwela is the period after the

last day of the conduct of the week long activities. It is during this period that all

the data be put together reflected in the different forms completed and submitted

to by the different working committees, particularly by the Documentation

Committee, to form part of the school’s accomplishment report (BrigadaEskwela

Manual, 2009).

In addition, the same source stressed that preparation of the final

accomplishment report is the time the school head convenes the members of the

BE Steering Committee and all Working Committees immediately after the BE


16

week. The Documentation Committee members, with the help of the other

committee members, summarize and consolidate all the completed reports or

forms for submission.It is necessary that an overall evaluation be included so that

strengths and areas for improvement has to be noted for more effective

implementation and more productive results be accomplished. Commented [u20]: add, you can revise accordingly

The final reports of the BrigadaEskwela (BE) will go through from the

District Supervisor who consolidates or summarizes the accomplishment reports

submitted by the different schools, then submits it to the Division Office. The

Assistant Schools Division Superintendent designated or the BrigadaEskwela

Coordinator of the division consolidates or summarizes the accomplishment

reports submitted by the District supervisors, then submit it to the Regional Office

thru the regional BrigadaEskwela coordinator. The regional consolidated

accomplishment reports should be submitted to the Adopt-A-School (ASP)

Secretariat (Adopt-a-school Primer, 2007).

Moreover, the school improvement does not end on the last day of

BrigadaEskwela week. It is a year-round undertaking to guarantee the school

children of an environment conducive to learning. As a means of sustaining the

BrigadaEskwela efforts, communication is important to engage all teachers,

pupils, and parents to fulfill their corresponding roles and do their share in the

upkeep of the school, particularly those that were contributed by partners and

volunteers during the BrigadaEskwela Week. According to Aquino (2004) that the Commented [u21]: same

school itself bears the weight of the responsibilities that they cannot relegate to

their teachers alone. Schools with comprehensive program can help parents
17

build home conditions for learning, communicate with them become their

productive volunteers and contribute to decisions that affect the schools and their

children.

Schools, too, have an even greater responsibility in making more linkages

a and creating public relations with other and creating public relations with other

social units in the surrounding environment like the community, Stacho, (2012)

explained that public relations is planned systematic two-way of communication

between an educational organization and its internal and external public

designed to build morale, goodwill, understanding and support for that

organization. Schools need to develop good relationships with the community

especially. As pointed by Aquino (2004), a close cooperation and collaboration Commented [u22]: same

between schools and community is necessary to make the school serviceable

and responsive to the needs of the people, and to draw the people to the school

for whatever they may contribute in the school program effectively. Aquino

concluded that when good relationship exists, the school reflects community life,

and the community reflects the ideas of the school.

The school can make itself accessible to the community by a two-way

involvement where there is mutual respect and trust. Handugan (2006) opined

that the school may initiate the relationship by establishing connections that can

be the foundation of relationship through community education programs, use of

school buildings for community activities, volunteers’ opportunities in the

communities, and reach out programs. Aquino (2004) elaborated that community
18

group also expect participation form the schools cultural, fraternal, civic, and

religious activities.

Handugan (2006) cited by saying that the community may return the Commented [u23]: same

services by patronizing the school, giving protection to it, and cooperating with it

in accomplishing community projects. The second manner of getting involved can

be by way of inviting them also to activities related to decision-making,

volunteerism. Further, citizens can participate in school board meetings by

serving on task forces, and can also speak up about concerns, including budget

issues, remembering that quality education may depend on their understanding

and support (American Association of School Administration).

Epstein, et.al.pushed that research and practice clearly show that Commented [u24]: where’sseaparation?

community involvement in schools can benefit students, families and

communities. The partners or those persons and individuals involved would

acquire collaborative skills and share common goals, structures for decision-

making and a time for reflection and evaluation.BrigadaEskwela is proof that an

effective partnership between the government and citizens is possible according

to Carreon (2015).

In conclusion, Eipstein, et.al. (2002), opined that the community Commented [u25]: same

involvement, however, is not the ultimate and only solution problems. It cannot

replace sound educational policies, adequate funding, excellent teaching, and

effective partnership with parents, but can enhance the effects it brings to the

school. When properly executed, community involvement can be a little extra that

can make a big difference. Commented [u26]: add importance to BE mentioning the
readiness of schools for the opening of the SY- refer to the
objectives
19

The literatures and studies mentioned in this paper serve as guide to

explore and describe this present study. Further, these help the investigation Commented [u27]: tense

become more relevant in terms of their conformity or contradiction with the result

of the study.

Theoretical Framework

This study is anchored on theBrigadaEskwela Manual, 2009 prepared by

the Regional Adopt-a-School Program Coordinators together with the National

Secretariat and consultants of the Department of Education through the series of

consultations and workshops. In the same way, Unified responsibility of Dutta-

Bergman (2009) supported it. The proposition describes volunteerism, as a

formalized, public, and proactive choice to donate one’s time and energy freely to

benefit another person, group or organization.

An existing research brings to surface key demographic variables that are

significant predictors of volunteering.

Conceptual Framework

Shown in Figure 1 is the conceptual framework of the study having

variables of the study. BrigadaEskwela Manual, (2009). The Brigada

Implementation was measured by the indicators: The Pre-implementation stage,

refers to the planning stage of the BrigadaEskwela activities like organizing and

establishing the different commitees and orienting the members of their roles and

tasks; The implementation stage, the actual conduct of the planned actions to

carry all the BrigadaEskwela activities; and the Post-implementation stage, refers
20

to evaluating the extent of success of the school in implementing the

BrigadaEskwela program. The moderator variable was the school size. Small

schools were referred to schools having a pupils population of below 500; and

big schools, 501 to 1, 500.

The result of getting the level of implementation of the three stages

became the basis of developing an action plan in strengthening school-

community partnership. And help make the implementation of BrigadaEskwela Commented [u28]: do not start with this

become successful in pre-Implementage Stage, Implementation Stage and Post

Implementation Stage.
21

Input Output

Extent of Implementation of
BrigadaEskwela

 Pre-implementation
Stage

 Implementation
Stage

 Post Implementation
Stage
Action Plan

School Size

 Small
 Big

Moderator variable

Figure1. The Conceptual Framework Showing the Variables

Significance of the Study


22

The findings of the study could be beneficial and provide information to

clarify the concept and value the outcomes of family and community connections Commented [u29]: insert

with schools. This may also provideinsights and perspective to the following Commented [u30]: insert

groups of people.

This may serve as basis for the DedED officials in improving and revising

formulated policies to help the schools who are in urgent need of assistance and

support for effective and successful implementation of the BrigadaEskwela (BE)

Program. Moreover, the results of the study may help the school heads formulate

some innovative ways in strengthening volunteerism in the school and to further

improve the school-community partnership. By so doing, the findings would be of

great help to other stakeholders to better understand their roles in the education Commented [u31]: what about the attitude and commitment
of teachers?

of the youth in their community.

Thus, they will be intrinsically motivated to intensify their involvement and

volunteering spirit to the school’s activities. Furthermore, this may serve as basis

for the pupils to actively involve with their parents as partners of the school

towards a strong commitment to aid the school in realizing its mission. Lastly, this

study may be used as reference that will help future researchers conduct their

related study. The weakness and other unidentified limitations may challenge

them to either replicate the study using other research methodologies and

substantial sampling population to validate the results.

Definition of Terms
23

The following terms were defined operationally for a clear and better

understanding to the readers.

BrigadaEskwela. It is the schools maintenance program nationwide of

the Department of Education, initiated by the Adopt-a-School program that that

engages all stakeholders to contribute their time, effort and resources in insuring

that all public schools are ready in time for the opening of classes.

Action Plan.A sequence of steps that must be taken, or activities that

must be performed well, for a strategy to succeed.


Chapter 2

METHOD

Presented in this chapter are the research designs, research locale,

Population and sample, research instrument, data collection and statistical

tools.

Research Design

This study employed the non-experimental quantitative research design to

determine the level of implementation of the BrigadaEskwela (BE) Program

among the Public Elementary Schools. Non-experimental quantitative research

design according to Johnson (2001) was a measure that is highly descriptive of

what we do and also allows us to communicate effectively in an interdisciplinary

research environment. It aimed to describe problems descriptively and

numerically and it used mathematical and statistical mean to measure results

and to come up with a decision whether to accept or reject null hypothesis

(Johnson 2007). Downie (2000) attested that this type of research design gives

a scientific picture of the variables under study. In this certain case, according to

Anastasi (2005), the study was conducted to determine the significant difference

in the level of implementation of the BrigadaEskwela Program with their

corresponding indicators.

This research was appropriate when the researcher would like to make

an action plan based on the data generated from the study to improve the quality

and standard of the mentioned indicators in the variables of the study.


25

Research Locale

Selected public elementary schools of Island Garden City of Samal were the

focus of the study. Specifically the 16 public schools of Babak District, Island Garden

city of Samal.The places were orderly conducive to travel and accessible by means

of land transportation.

Figure 2 shows the map of the Philippines with the map of the island at the

upper corner. Island Garden City of Small is an enchanting paradise - an island, a

garden, and a city. Located at the heart of Davao Gulf of Southern Philippines, the

Island Garden City of Samal (IGACOS) teems with rich flora and fauna bedecked in

captivating waterfalls, challenging ridges, fascinating cave systems, and picturesque

underwater gardens. The City is an Island, a cluster of nine islands at the heart of

Davao Gulf with scenic seascapes pristine coastlines, and turquoise marine waters, a

118-kilometer of fine, white, sandy coastlines, home to more than 50 commercial

resorts and hundreds of private getaway.

Improve the Map of IGACOS ( not clear)


26
27

Figure 2. Map of the Philippines

Population and Sample

A total of two hundred ten elementary school teachers of Babak District,

Division of Island Garden City of Samal were the respondents of the study.

Among the sixteen schools, Angel VillaricaCental Elementary School

contributed the highest percentage of teachers with 31, 43 percent. Universal

sampling was the techniques used by the researcher where in all teachers were

utilized in answering the survey questionnaire to collect and gather the data needed

for the study.

Nine teachers from Camudmud Elementary School which has a percentage of

4.29; 14 teachers from Cogon elementary School which has a percentage of 6.67; 13

from San Isidro Elementary School which has a percentage of 6.19; 7 teachers from

Tambo Elementary School which has a percentage of 3.33; 13 teachers from

Mambago B which has a percentage of 6.19; 7 teachers from Kinawitnon

Elementary School which has a percentage of 3.33; 13 teachers from Caliclic

Elementary School which has a percentage of 6.19; 11 teachers from Balet

Elementary Schoolwhich has a percentage of 5.24; 7 teachers from Tagpopongan

Elementary School which has a percentage of 3.33; 2 teacjers from KilaElemetary

School which has a percentage of .95; 9 teachers from Libuak Elementary School

which has a percentage of 4. 29; 8 teachers from San Agustin Elementary School

which has a percentage of 3.81; 11 teachers from San Antonio Elementary School

which has a percentage of 5.24; 7 teachers from Santo Niño which has a percentage

of 3.33 and 13 teachers from Toril Elementary School which has a percentage of

6.19.
28

Research Instrument

The instrument used in the study was a researcher-made questionnaire

formulated based on the BrigadaEskwela (BE) Manual for School Heads. The

indicators used in this study were carefully chosen and improved after several

consultations and discussions with the adviser. Important points were chosen that

could necessarily represent the essence, substance and intention of the study.

The first draft of the questionnaire was submitted to the researcher adviser for

comments, suggestions and recommendation to improve its presentation. Each item

in the questionnaire was carefully checked and the whole content of the instrument

was submitted to the experts to establish its reliability and validity.

It was validated by Eugenio S. Guhao Jr., D.M. , To further ensure the Commented [u32]: Was he the only one?

reliability and validity of the instrument, it was piloted to 30 respondents and run in

the computation program, the Cronbach’s Alpha Based on Standardized item. The

cronbach’s alpha is .987 and the cronbach’s alpha based on standardized items is

.987 and 30 as the N of items, and it was reliable. (Refer to Appendix F). The

research instrument utilized the five-point Likert Scale which intent to determine the

level of implementation of BrigadaEskwela (BE) Program among the public

elementary schools in terms of pre – implementation, implementation and post –

implementation.
29

Descriptive
Range of Mean Level Interpretation

Meets the standard requirements –have


4.20 – 5.00 Very High completed 15-20 items of the established goals

Few improvements needed – have completed


3.40 – 4.19 High 10-15 items of the established goals

Some improvements needed – have completed


2.60– 3.39 Moderate 5 – 10 items of the established goals

Several improvements needed – have


1.80 – 2.59 Low completed 1-5 items of the established goals.

Many improvements needed – have rarely


achieved established goals; requires significant
1.00 – 1.79 Very Low
and immediate improvement.

Data collection

In gathering the data for this study, the researcher observed the following

steps: First was, the researcher asked for an endorsement from the Dean of the

Graduate School, Eugenio S. Guhao, Jr. D.M. then a letter was scribbled by the

researcher to formally asked permission to the Schools Division Superintendent of Commented [u33]: Tense; what was the Adviser’s role here?

the Division of Island Garden City of Samal, Eufemia T. Gamutin, CESO VI to

conduct the study to the sixteen public elementary school of Babak District, Division

of Island Garden City of Samal. The content of the research study was assessed and

evaluated until permission was hereby granted provided that no government funds

shall be used during the conduct of the activity, classes will not be disrupted as

indicated in DepED Order No. 9 s. 2005 re: “Instituting Measures to Increase

Engaged Time-on-Task and Ensuring Compliance Therewith” and proper

coordination with the school administrators shall be arranged prior to the conduct of

the said activity. Rommel R. Jandayan, ED.D, Chief, School Governance and
30

Operation Division Officer-in-charge signed the letter for and in the absence of the

OIC-SDS.

Second was the Administration and retrieval of questionnaire. The researcher

asked permission from the school heads to distribute the questionnaire regarding the

implementation of BrigadaEskwela Program to the sixteen public elementary schools

of Babak District, Division of Island Garden City of Samal. The researcher personally

distributed and administered the questionnaire to the respondents with the

assistance of the school heads. The researcher personally retrieved the survey

questionnaire after the entire questions for each indicator were answered. A

certificate of appearance signed by the school principals was given for

documentation purposes.

Finally was the Collation and Tabulation of Data. The researcher collated,

tallied and tabulated all the information acquired from the respondents utilizing the

five-Likert scale, analyzed and interpreted the statistical results of the data with the

help of the statistician, Dr. GaudencioAbellanosa . Drawn conclusion, and formulated

an action plan based on the result of the study.

Statistical Tools

The following statistical tools were used in the computation of data testing the

hypothesis at α 0.05 level of significance.

Mean. This was used to determine the level of implementation of

BrigadaEskwela Program in the school.


31

T-Test. This was used to determine the significance of differences in the

extent of implementation of BrigadaEskwela when analyzed by school size.


33

CHAPTER 3

RESULTS

Presented in this chapter the results, interpretation, and analysis of

findings. Tables are arranged in the following: Level of implementation of

BrigadaEskwela Program in the Elementary School and the Significance of the

Difference in the Level of Implementation of BrigadaEskwela Program When

Analyzed by School Size with their corresponding indicators.

The standard deviation in the three descriptive tables, Table 1.1, Table 1.2

and Table 1.3, ranged from 0.66 to 0.81 which are less than 1.0 as the typical

standard deviation for a 5-point Likert scale according to Wittink and Bayer

(1994). This means that the ratings in the accomplished questionnaires were

close to the mean, indicating consistency of responses among the respondents.

Level of Implementation of Brigada of Eskwela

The level of implementation of BrigadaEskwela was computed and

interpreted based on the obtained mean rating per indicator: Pre –

Implementation Stage, Implementation Stage, and Post – Implementation Stage.

Table 1 shows the level of Implementation of BrigadaEskwela which

answers the first problem of the study. As shown, the overall standard deviation

was .70 and the overall mean rating is 4.02 which were interpreted as “high”

which means that there are few improvements needed and have completed 10-

15 items of the established goals. Among its three indicators, post-

implementation obtained the highest mean of 4.15 which has a descriptive


34

interpretation of “High”, pre – implementation stage and implementation stage

was all high level as indicated by their respective mean rating of 4.13 and 3.88.

Table I

Level of Implementation of BrigadaEskwela Program in the Elementary


School

Descriptive
Indicators SD Mean Level

Pre-Implementation Stage .79 4.13 High

Implementation .81 3.88 High

Post Implementation .66 4.15 High

Overall .70 4.02 High


35

Significance of the Difference in the Level of Implementation of


BrigadaEskwela Program When Analyzed by School Size

Significance of difference in the level of implementation of BrigadaEskwela

when analyzed size was computed and interpreted based on the p-value shown

by their respective indicators in Table 2 which answer the research objective

number 2.

Table 2

Significance of the Difference in the Level of Implementation of


BrigadaEskwela Program When Analyzed by School Size

Implementation of School Size Decision on


BrigadaEskwela t-value p-value Hₒ
Program
Small Big

Pre-implementation 3.74 4.77 11.710 .000 Reject

Implementation 3.42 4.64 15.497 .000 Reject

Post Implementation 3.67 4.66 15.695 .000 Reject

Overall 3.61 4.69 16.217 .000 Reject


36

The figure presented in Table 2 reveals the significance of the difference

in the Level of Implementation of BrigadaEskwela Program When Analyzed by

School Size. As shown, in the Pre-implementation stage when by analyzed

school size, it has a t-value of 11.710 and a p-value of .000 which means that

there is a significant difference of the Pre-implementation stage in favor of the

big school which lead in rejecting the null hypothesis; In the Implementation

Stage, it has a t-value of 15.497 and has a p-value of .000 which also means that

there is a significant difference in favor of the big school which lead in rejecting

the null hypothesis. And in the Post Implementation stage, it has a t-value of 15.

695 and p-value of .000 which means that there is a significant difference in favor

of the big school which led in rejecting the null hypothesis. Furthermore, the

overall t- value of 16.217 and a p-value of .000 that is lesser than .05 significance

level set in this study signified that there is a significant difference in the level of

implementation of the BrigadaEskwela Program when the schools are grouped

by size which lead in rejecting the null hypothesis.


37

CHAPTER 4

DISCUSSION

Presented in this chapter are the discussions on the data gathered. The

discussion starts on the level of Implementation of BrigadaEskwela followed by the


Significance of the Difference in the Level of Implementation of BrigadaEskwela
Program When Analyzed by School Size.

Level of Implementation of Brigada of Eskwela( point out each finding before the

support. Review if the findings and supports align with each other)

Table 1 illustrates the level of implementation of BrigadaEskwelain the public

elementary schools in terms of pre-implementation stage, Implementation stage and

post-implementation stage. The overall mean is 4.02 which is described as high. The

result means that the BrigadaEskwela program is highly implemented by the

elementary public schools under study.

Further, the table illustrates that the Pre-implementation stage obtained the Commented [u34]: indent

mean of 4.13 with a descriptive level equivalent to high; the implementation stage

obtained the mean of 3.88 which has a high descriptive equivalent and the Post-

implementation obtained the highest mean of 4.15 equivalent to high.

The brigade Eskwelais the department’s frontline initiatives that believes in the Commented [u35]: ?

role of the community in improving public education. The achievement gained by

BrigadaEskwela inspire the schools to utilize existing partnerships with the

communities to get parentsinvolved in ensuring that the schools are conducive for
38

learning, that the children are enrolled and actually learning in school which is the

essence of the BrigadaEskwela Plus. (BrigadaEskwela Manual. 2009)

In the Pre-implementation Stage, it has obtained a mean of 4.13 or high. This

means that the implementation of the program in terms of its implementation is highly

manifested. Consequently, the item with the highest mean of 4.48 or very highly

manifested is the sharing of responsibility with the PTA/SGC in administering and

managing the funds generated for the program. This means that the PTA/SGC took

responsibility in generating funds for the program, in collecting as well as in allocating

the funds to the different tasks. Whereas, DepEDorder no. 20, series of 2006

stressed that teachers are not in any way involved in financial matters.

The second highest bears the mean of 4.45 or very highly manifested is the

documenting of all the activities especially the improvements done through photos

and video footages. This means that now a days photos and video footages are of

high regard to the stakeholders as a sort of motivation in having everything

documented. Goda (2014), he stated that documenting efforts, progress and results

is very important and it brings closure and value to the whole process.

Following is the summarizing and consolidating of the different brigade forms

for submission, it shows that the in charge of this is very much eager to do the tasks.

Next is the acting out of the school head as the chair of the committee. This result

supports the imperative that the school head is the lead actor of the BrigadaEskwela.

Next to it is the Orienting of members of each committee which bears a mean of 4.17

or highly manifested. This means that that the school head took careful planning of

the program by making all the members aware of their functions. Assisting the
39

resource mobilization committee to list potential partners with corresponding skills/

services & resources the school needs bears the mean of 4.00 or highly manifested,

which would indicate that the school tapped stakeholders who are willing to share

their resources to best actualize the program.

While the Philippine Education Act of 1980 embodies a pertinent provision

concerning the new perception. It is a declared policy to foster, at all times, a spirit of

a shared purpose and cooperation among the members and elements of the

educational community, and other sectors of society in the realization that only in

such an atmosphere can the true goals and objectives of education can be fulfilled.

Inviting/involving students, teachers, parents, LGUs, and other stakeholders in the

planning, and the assisting of the resource mobilization committee to list potential

partners with corresponding skills/services & resources the school needs. Contrary to

what has stressed on school community partnership that school have an even

greater responsibility in making more linkages and creating public relations with other

social units in the surrounding environment like the community. Handugan (2006)

explained that public relations is planned systematic two-way process of

communication between an educational organization and its internal and external

public designed to build morale, goodwill, understanding and support for that

organization. Schools need to develop relationships with the community especially.

While the lowest mean of 3.50 is the item conducting the early January

planning of BrigadaEskwela, which would mean that early planning was not at all

prioritized by the school heads. Contradicting the instruction set in the


40

BrigadaEskwela Manual that the planning must be done as early as January to be

fully prepared on the May implementation.

As pointed by Brock, Marek, Saulo (2014), a close cooperation and

collaboration between schools and community is necessary to make the school

serviceable and responsive to the needs of the community whatever they may

contribute in the school program effectively. Brock, et.al concludes that when good

relationship exists, the school reflects community life, and the community reflects the

ideas of the school. The idea of involvement this author emphasizes is that, the

community involvement characterizes a close collaboration for continuous planning,

participation, and evaluation in order to enhance the academic achievements of

students. Education is increasingly viewed as a family, school and community

relationship. Indeed, it takes the whole village to raise a child.

However, five of the items under the pre-implementation stage are analyzed

as very high, which would reveal that the set of activities before the implementation

were undertaken by the school. As stated by Adelman and Taylor(2010), when a

broad range of stakeholders are motivated to work together toward a shared vision,

they come up with more innovative and effective strategies than any guidebook or

toolkit can contain. Preparation varied from the school to the other as every school

has its own prioritized activity to undertake.

Implementation stage. The level of implementation of the BrigadaEskwela

(BE) Program in the Elementary Schools in terms of Implementation Stage obtained

the overall mean score of 3.88 or high.


41

Going to the results of the study, the item updating of BrigadaEskwela forms

are monitored and checked daily has the highest mean of 4.22 or describes very

high. This would indicate that School Heads conform with BrigadaEskwela guideline

that all the forms should be monitored and checked for submission to the Division

office then to the Regional office.

Second highest is the tracking of accomplishments such as the report of

resources generated and its utilization and the number of hours/days rendered with

4.21 mean or very high. In Yaoundė, Cameron in Africa where the school system rely

heavily on volunteers and donations in order to run effectively just like any other

public school around the world, the volunteers whether a parent, grandparent or just

a community member in most schools in that locality are required to complete a form.

This recording and tracking serve the purpose for proper documentation (Jordon,

Orozco and Averett, 2001).

Conducting a regular inventory of all materials bears a mean of 4.09 or high.

Appointing of team leaders and conducting a briefing on the program of activities

bears a mean of 4.07 or described as high.

Two items both have obtained the same mean scores of 3.90 or described as

high; establishing, sustaining and manifesting of the spirit of volunteerism or

bayanihan among the stakeholders throughout the Brigada Week yearly and the

recording and monitoring of daily accomplishments. The initiating of the kick-off

ceremony / opening of the first day of the BrigadaEskwela week has a mean of 3.43

or high.
42

Attention is given to the item with the lowest mean of 3.30 or describe as

moderate; the awarding or acknowledging/ recognizing of the volunteers, donors by

providing certificates during the closing program. As stated by Eipstein (2002), a

school must be receptive and appreciative of community involvement. Community

people and individuals value the expressions of gratitude they receive through formal

acknowledgement, thank you letters or notes, calls citations, and awards, in

newsletter and e-mails, etc. Sustainign peoples commitment is a big responsibility for

any educational institution should it want to.

Post-implementation. The table shows the level of implementation of the

BrigadaEskwela in the Elementary public schools in terms of Post-implementation

stage which has an overall mean of 4.05 or high. This finding reveals that the

activities under the post-implementation are highly implemented.

Welcoming DepEd officials who monitor and evaluate the school

implementation of the BrigadaEskwela got the highest mean of 4. 39 or described

very high. This would mean that the schools paid high respect to authorities. The

implementation of BrigadaEskwela is being monitored and evaluated by the Regional

team of the Adopt-a-school Program using the same measure of evaluation set for all

schools. It is then followed by the submitting of the BrigadaEskwela documentation

and the checking of BrigadaEskwela documentation obtained the same mean scores

of 4.24 or high. As it is so required to submit documents of the implementation for

assessment and evaluation of the whole program which the schedule and flowchart

of submission is as follows: on June 15 from the BrigadaEskwela Documentation

Committee to the school head; June 30 to the District Supervisor; July 31 to the
43

Division BrigadaEskwela Coordinator; and August 31, to the Adopt-a-School Program

(ASP) National Secretariat. (BrigadaEskwela Manual for School Heads, 2009).

Aligning of the school heads of all BrigadaEskwela related activities for the

continuous school improvement in terms of increasing participation rate, reducing

dro-out rate, increase pupi’s competition and achievement rate obtained a mean

score of 4.17. This result aligned the idea that pupils perform and achieve highly in

their endeavors due to the involvement of three social factors namely: the school, the

parents, and the community Epstein et.al (2002).

Identifying other needs not covered during the BrigadaEskwela Week bears a

mean of 4.09 or high while evaluating the school BrigadaEskwela implementation by

the school head bears a mean of 4.06 ot high. The disseminating of

accomplishments to the stakeholders through the school through school publications

and or through letter which has a 3. 85 mean score, and the sending of letters of

gratitude to partners for their contribution in the conduct of the National Schools

Maintenace Week (NSMW) which has 3.52 mean score.

Akin to any organization that wants to attract or to draw peoplein, a school

must exude a positive disposition, a spirit that is welcoming Epstein, et al, (2002)

stated that a school must be receptive and appreciative of community involvement.

Community people and individuals value the expressions of gratitude they receive

through formal acknowledgement, thank you letters or notes, calls, citations, and

awards. Since volunteering, which requires various strategies is defined as

involvement that recruits and organizes help and support to school functions and
44

students’ activities, it is important to remember, however, that in recruiting there must

be a plan to acknowledge, recognize , and/ or celebrate with the volunteers.

The high level of implementation of BrigadaEskwela indicates that the result

become parallel to the statistical report published in DepEd website that since its

inception in 2003 which only obtained 31% rate, BrigadaEskwela moved to 100

percent rate in 2008. More than 7 million volunteers comprising parents, teachers,

employees, local government units, alumni associations and civic organizations have

joined BrigadaEskwela in 2009 alone, as DepEd updates released on May 24, 2010.

Significance of the Difference in the Level of Implementation of


BrigadaEskwela Program When Analyzed by School Size Commented [u36]: What does it implies?

Table 2 presents Significance of the Difference in the Level of Implementation

of BrigadaEskwela Program When Analyzed by School Size.

In the Pre-implementation stage, it has a t-value of 11.710 and p-value of .000

which means that there is a significant difference in favor of the big school. In the

implementation stage it bears a t-value of 15.497 and p-value of .000 which means

that there is a significant difference in favor of the big school and in

the post-implementation it obtained a t-value of 15. 695 and p-value of .000 which

means that there is a significant difference in favor of the big school.

Overall, the obtained P value of .000 is significant. Hence, there is a significant

difference in the level of implementation of the BrigadaEskwela (BE) Program in favor

of the big school when the schools are grouped by size therefore, the null hypothesis

is rejected. This ascribes that the big school perform well when it comes to the

implementation of the BrigadaEskwela Program during Pre – implementation stage,

Implementation stage and Post – Implementation Stage. The result confirmed that
45

the search for the most innovative BrigadaEskwela School implementers is

categorized by school size (DepEd Memo No. 041 S. 2014) Enhanced Selection

Criteria on the Search for BrigadaEskwela Best Implementing School. It was found

out that the big schools are more aggressive and innovative when it comes to

implementation of BrigadaEskwela in Pre-Implementation Stage, Implementation

Stage and Post-Implementation Stage. (Region memorandum No. 105 s. 2014).

This ascribes further that the small and big school showed different

manifestation as to the level of the implementation of the BrigadaEskwela Program is

concerned. According to Gordon, (2010) Small Schools matter. Small schools have

smaller classes, smaller number of pupils, teachers and parents thus manpower is

limited. The School head find it difficult to follow the guidelines in the Pre-

implementation such as recorida and giving of fliers, all because of the budgetary

allocation. Despite the government claims that it has been increasing the budget for

education, still the public school specifically the small schools is hardly coping with

the shortages Umil, (2013). On the other hand, Big Schools bear all the necessary

manpower for the BrigadaEskwela implementation, the school head can easily

attracts donors and volunteers from the wealthy family in the community. According

to (Getangi, Onkeo&Orodho, 2014) activities in the school are provided the

necessary financial support as long as approval of the PTA is granted. Kinyanjui

(2008) and Getangeet.al(2014) attested that the functions of the PTA include;

integrating the school activities into those of the community within which the school is

located, providing the necessary financial support to the school by organizing schools
46

developmental projects. This clearly explains the difference of the implementation of

BrigadaEskwela when group by school size.

ACTION PLAN: EFFECTIVE IMPLEMENTATION OF BRIGADA ESKWELA


47

ACTION PLAN FOR THE EFFECTIVE IMPLEMENTATION OF BRIGADA


ESKWELA

I. Introduction

In the Philippines, the educational system especially in the public schools is in

dire need of support and aid from the other sources to provide the demand for quality

and globally competitive education (Luistro, 2015). Thus, the Brigadaeskwela Commented [EAA37]: review

Program was created for this purpose. Over the years, since its inception in 2003,

BrigadaEskwela has become a venue where the community can get actively involved

in the affairs of basic education, particularly through helping prepare public schools

opening, and he said “Education is everyone’s responsibility” (Luistro, 2015). Thus, Commented [EAA38]: insert

working together in ensuring that everyone can create an environment that is

conducive to learning for the learners and that the school is in good condition so that

the learners can get a better start for the school year. Luistro further stated that the Commented [EAA39]: replacement

spirit of bayanihan has fueled the success of BrigadaEskwela. It is a proof that an

effective partnership between the government and citizens is possible (Carreon,

2015).

II. Rationale

The foregoing study in the implementation of this program showed that among

the stages, the Post – Implementation stage has the highest mean with the Commented [EAA40]: tense

Implementation stage which is really the actual implementation stage. That made the

researcher became inquisitive how it happen when the planning stage took its lowest

sort.
48

This fact may urge the School Heads to find ways and means to address the

problem of effective planning in the implementation of the BrigadaEskwela Program

for the schools to really benefit from its value.

On the other hand, the results and the findings of the study identified the

activities that need improvement for they show lower manifestation compared to

other listed activities.

Designed from the pattern of the School Family Community Partnership Plan

for 2008 – 2009 (Lysons, 2008), this action plan is borne out of the urgent desire to Commented [EAA41]: correction

assist, improve and raise the weaker points in the implementation of the

BrigadaEskwela. It has been designed to hopefully aid the school heads to create

BrigadaEskwela innovations to strengthen school-community partnership gearing

towards the improvement of the academic achievement of the learners. It envisioned

making use of the instrumentality of the study as basis of the above mentioned

intention.

III. General Objective

As proposed in this action plan, the School Heads;

1. Will adopt effective practices to strengthen school-community partnership to

continually develop volunteerism among stakeholders. Commented [EAA42]: insert


43

ACTION PLAN FOR THE EFFECTIVE IMPLEMENTATION OF BRIGADA ESKWELA


SCHOOL YEAR 2015 - 2016

Pre – Implementation Stage

Goal: To increase continuing involvement of stakeholders by encouraging participation in the planning phase of Commented [EAA43]: insert

school activities to meet the needs of the school.


How to Measure
Action /Steps Person(s) Resources
Progress/ Timeline
Responsible Needed
Benchmarks
1. : Conduct an ocular Principal, PTA BrigadaEskwela Result of the January,
inspection. officers, Form 1 assessment during the 2015
Conduct an ocular inspection Faculty and ocular inspection
of the school physical facilities staff

2. Open House Principal Planning Attendance will be kept. January,


An annual family open house that is Faculty and Communication School administration 2015
active, participatory and open to the Staff Refreshments will solicit positive
community. Parents BrigadaEskwela feedback from the
FORM 2 community
3. Family Involvement Survey Parent Action Materials Numbers of surveys Late
a.Parent Action Team will design a Team Connected completed. February,
survey, assessing family needs Parents computer End of the year survey 2015
interests, availability, and preferred Guidance Website to assess family
types of involvement in the school Coordinator BrigadaEskwela satisfaction with quality
community. IT Staff statement of and opportunities for
b. Distribute survey & analyze. interest Form family involvement. Commented [EAA44]: obsolete form, not needed
c. Results will be used to guide Increased attendance at
further involvement in planning. school events.
44

4. Volunteers Sign-up Principal Notices Document the number of March –


Increase the opportunities for a Parents Volunteer Book Parents who pledge to April,
number of parent volunteers. Faculty BrigadaEskwela volunteer during the 2015
PTA Form 6 BrigadaEskwela
BrigadaEskwela
Work Team
45

Implementation Stage

Goal: To create a school wide atmosphere that celebrates with stakeholders for the volunteerism manifested.

How to Measure
Action /Steps Person(s) Resources
Progress/ Timeline
Responsible Needed
Benchmarks
1. Walkthroughs Principal Purchases Labor Parents will respond June
a. Solicit volunteers from Parent “Walkthrough Maintenance positively to questions
Action Team to conduct periodic Team” Administrative about school climate and
“Walkthroughs” to assess school PTA support atmosphere.
atmosphere. Volunteers
b. Make changes to improve school Possible
climate based on results of Grant & Support
“Walkthroughs” BrigadaEskwela
Form 5

2. School Pride Nights Entire School Materials Attendance is taken. July


a. Events co-planned with students, Community Refreshments Program be documented
faculty and families. Program in multimedia
b. Events to display talents. Coordinator
c. Events to celebrate partnership Student work
despite the diversity of cultures
present at the school.
46

Post-Implementation Stage

Goal: To forge partnership with community and expand resources general during the BrigadaEskwela
through improved communication on school’s accomplishments. Commented [EAA45]: correction

How to Measure
Action /Steps Person(s) Resources
Progress/ Timeline
Responsible Needed
Benchmarks
1. School Newsletter PTA group Materials Increased involvement Throughout Commented [EAA46]: insert No. 1 as Evaluation (specify form)
before Newsletter
a. A monthly newsletter will be Faculty Advance in school events. the year
produced to update community of the Volunteers Preparation Positive responses to
school’s events & accomplishments. Principal questions regarding the
Guidance form of communication
Counselors utilized.
School’s Family Involvement
Journalist Survey.
2. Technology Based IT Staff Revised emergency Increased involvement Throughout
Communication. card to include in school events. the year
a. Improve the School Website to be Entire School e-mail
more family friendly. Community addresses.
b. Increase connectivity with
Principal, Faculty & Parents
47

Conclusion Commented [EAA47]: this should directly answer the objective

Based on the findings obtained in this study, the following conclusions are

drawn: First, the small schools have the most number compared to the big school.

The 62 percent of the respondents are taken from the small schools and 38 percent

of the respondents are taken from the big schools. The implementation of the

BrigadaEskwela of public elementary school is high. Second, there is a significant

difference in the level of implementation of the BrigadaEskwela when analyzed by

school size. Thirdly, In the light of the findings of the study, an action plan is

formulated for the enhancement of the practices in the pre-implementation and post-

implementation where the overall mean below 4.0 as the base mean for an

intervention.

Recommendations

Based on the findings and conclusions, the following recommendations are

suggested: The BrigadaEskwela In-charge in the Region and in the Division of Island

Garden City of Samal may give output on strategies on how to make the planning

work, especially to the small schools and on how to convince the stakeholders to be

part of the planning, and share the best practices of the successful implementers to

those schools who have not succeeded in implementing the program; The School

Heads may design an annual projection of needs and mobilize human resources to

properly plan the actions towards the implementation of the program; The School

Heads together with the PTA (Parents Teachers Association) and SGC(School

Governing Council) must share responsibility in making the planning as early as


48

January as instructed in the BrigadaEskwela Manual; The School Heads should

continue to strengthen their leadership especially in mobilizing people in order to

encourage shared responsibility with the stakeholders in the implementation of the

program; This study may be replicated to other groups to further the level of the

implementation of the BrigadaEskwela in order for the public schools to recognize the

great help of the program to the school improvement and to the strengthening of the

school and community partnership should proper implementation be applied; The

researcher encourages the adoption of the action plan as a guide in findings

innovative ways to actively involve the community in the school through the

BrigadaEskwela Program towards the improvement of the academic achievement of

the students.
49

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1 Brigada-Eskwela-Eskwela-saves-DepEd-p57B.
54

APPENDICES
55

APPENDIX A

SURVEY QUESTIONNAIRE
56

EXTENT OF IMPLEMENTATION
OF BRIGADA ESKWELA
(To be accomplished by the teachers)
Name of School: ______________________________
Name of Teacher: ______________________________
Size of School: Small Elementary School _________
Big Elementary School _________

Dear Respondents:

This study is conducted to evaluate the extent of implementation of


BrigadaEskwela in Public Elementary Schools ofBabak District, Division of Island
Garden City of Samal. The designed questionnaire for the implementation of
BrigadaEskwela is adopted from BrigadaEskwela Manual, (2009).

Direction: Please provide the appropriate answers on the sheet below with open
and honest response. For each item,
 Check ( ∕ ) the column that best describes your school implementation of the
BrigadaEskwela (BE) Program using the following scale.

5- Always
4- Often
3- Sometimes
2- Seldom
1- Never

Some
Always Often Seldom Never
A. Pre-implementation Stage times

Every year, the preparation for the


successful implementation of the
A.1
BrigadaEskwela starts as early as
January.
The students, teachers, parents,
LGUs, and other stake holders are
A.2
involved in the planning for the
BrigadaEskwela Week.
The School Head acts as the chair of
A.3 the committee and he himself/ she
herself spearheads the planning and
57

organizing of committees.
The School Head orients the
A.4
members of each committee yearly.
The School Head sees to it that the
advocacy & marketing committee
A.5
produce materials like flyers, posters,
recorida, etc.
The School Head assists the resource
mobilization committee to list potential
A.6 partners with corresponding skills/
services & resources the school
needs.
The School Head ensures that the
A.7 pledges/commitments of partners are
delivered.
The School Head shares responsibility
with the PTA/SGC in administering
A.8
and managing the funds generated for
the program.
All the activities especially the
improvements done on the schools
A.9
are documented through photos and
video footages.
Different BrigadaEskwela forms are
A.1
summarized and consolidated for
0
submission.

B. Implementation Stage Some


Always Often Seldom Never
times
Kick-off ceremony is initiated during
B.1 the opening of the first day of the
BrigadaEskwela Week yearly.
The School Head appoints team
B.2 leaders and conducts a briefing on the
program of activities
Donations and commitments received
B.3
are posted on the transparency board
The spirit of volunteerism or
bayanihan among the stakeholders is
B.4
manifested throughout
BrigadaEskwela Week yearly.
Recording of the daily
B.5 accomplishments of the volunteers
are monitored by the School Head
B.6 The School Head directs daily
58

updating of records on donations or


resources received during the course
of the Brigada week yearly.

Inventory of all materials are


B.7
conducted regularly.

B.8 Daily updating of BrigadaEskwela


forms are monitored and checked.
Accomplishments such as the report
of resources generated and its
B.9 utilization, total number of volunteers
and number of hours/days rendered
are presented and properly tracked.
Certificate of recognition to partners
B.1
and donors are awarded during the
0
closing program.

C. Post-implementation Stage Some


Always Often Seldom Never
times

The School Head sends letters


of gratitude to partners and
C.1 donors for their contribution in
the conduct of the
BrigadaEskwela Week.
The School Head convenes all
the BrigadaEskwela committee
members for the purpose of
C.2
assessing the level of success
of the BrigadaEskwela
implementation yearly.
The School Head evaluates the
C.3 school BrigadaEskwela
implementation.
The School Head identifies
other needs not covered during
C.4
the BrigadaEskwela Week
yearly.
BrigadaEskwela
C.5 documents/reports for
submission are checked.
BrigadaEskwela reports are
C.6
submitted to the division Office
59

on time.
The School Head disseminates
accomplishments to the
C.7 stakeholders through the school
publications and /or through
letters.
The School Head invites the
parents and other stakeholders
C.8 to visit the school in celebration
of the success of the
BrigadaEskwela.
The School Head welcomes the
DepED Officials who monitor
C.9 and evaluate the school
implementation of the
BrigadaEskwela.
The School Head aligns all
BrigadaEskwela& related
activities to continuous school
improvement in terms of
C.10
increasing participation rate,
reducing drop-out rate, increase
student competition and
achievement rate.

THANK YOU VERY MUCH

The Researcher
60

APPENDIX B

LETTERS TO VALIDATORS AND VALIDATION SHEETS


61

APPENDIX C

LETTER TO SCHOOLS DIVISION SUPERINTENDENT

AND PRINCIPALS
62

APPENDIX D

CERTIFICATE OF APPEARANCE
63

APPENDIX E

SPECIFIC ITEMS PER INDICATOR FOR TABLE 1


64

Table 1.1
Level of Implementation of BrigadaEskwela of BrigadaEskwela in the
Elementary School in terms of Pre-Implementation Stage
Descriptive
Item SD Mean Level
1. Every year, the preparation for the successful
1.23 3.50 High
implementation of the BrigadaEskwela starts as
early as January.
2. The students, teachers, parents, LGUs, and other
1.00 4.13 High
stake holders are involved in the planning for the
BrigadaEskwela Week.
3. The School Head acts as the chair of the
committee and he himself/ she herself .86 4.35 Very High
spearheads the planning and organizing of
committees.
4. The School Head orients the members of each .87 4.17 High
committee yearly.
5. The School Head sees to it that the advocacy &
1.26 3.71 High
marketing committee produce materials like
flyers, posters, recorida, etc.
6. The School Head assists the resource
mobilization committee to list potential partners 1.02 4.07 High
with corresponding skills/ services & resources
the school needs.
7. The School Head ensures that the .96 4.00 High
pledges/commitments of partners are delivered.
8. The School Head shares responsibility with the
3.68 4.48 Very High
PTA/SGC in administering and managing the
funds generated for the program.
9. All the activities especially the improvements
.82 4.45 Very High
done on the schools are documented through
photos and video footages.
10. Different BrigadaEskwela forms are summarized .76 4.43 Very High
and consolidated for submission.

Overall .79 4.13 High


65

Table 1.2

Level of Implementation of BrigadaEskwela of BrigadaEskwela in the Elementary


School in terms of Implementation Stage.
Item SD Mean Descriptive
Level
1. Kick-off ceremony is initiated during the
1.42 3.43 High
opening of the first day of the
BrigadaEskwela Week yearly.
2. The School Head appoints team leaders
1.04 4.07 High
and conducts a briefing on the program
of activities
3. Donations and commitments received 1.38 3.74 High
are posted on the transparency board
4. The spirit of volunteerism or bayanihan
1.07 3.90 High
among the stakeholders is manifested
throughout BrigadaEskwela Week yearly.
5. Recording of the daily accomplishments
1.01 3.90 High
of the volunteers are monitored by the
School Head
6. The School Head directs daily updating
of records on donations or resources
1.01 3.99 High
received during the course of the Brigada
week yearly.

7. Inventory of all materials are conducted .84 4.09 High


regularly.
8. Daily updating of BrigadaEskwela forms .85 4.22 Very High
are monitored and checked.
9. Accomplishments such as the report of
resources generated and its utilization,
.92 4.21 Very High
total number of volunteers and number of
hours/days rendered are presented and
properly tracked.
10. Certificate of recognition to partners and
1.54 3.30 Moderate
donors are awarded during the closing
program

.81 3.88 High


Overall
66

Table 1.3

Level of Implementation of BrigadaEskwela of BrigadaEskwela in the Elementary


School in terms of Post - Implementation Stage.
Descriptive
Item SD Mean
Level
1. The School Head sends letters of gratitude to
1.28 3.52 High
partners and donors for their contribution in the
conduct of the BrigadaEskwela Week.
2. The School Head convenes all the
BrigadaEskwela committee members for the .97 4.04 High
purpose of assessing the level of success of the
BrigadaEskwela implementation yearly.
3. The School Head evaluates the school .98 4.06 High
BrigadaEskwela implementation.
4. The School Head identifies other needs not .96 4.09 High
covered during the BrigadaEskwela Week yearly.
5. BrigadaEskwela documents/reports for .86 4.24 Very High
submission are checked.
6. BrigadaEskwela reports are submitted to the .85 4.24 Very High
division Office on time.
7. The School Head disseminates accomplishments
1.16 3.85 High
to the stakeholders through the school
publications and /or through letters.
8. The School Head invites the parents and other
1.18 3.87 High
stakeholders to visit the school in celebration of
the success of the BrigadaEskwela.
9. The School Head welcomes the DepED Officials
.84 4.39 Very High
who monitor and evaluate the school
implementation of the BrigadaEskwela.
10. The School Head aligns all BrigadaEskwela&
related activities to continuous school
.99 4.17 High
improvement in terms of increasing participation
rate, reducing drop-out rate, increase student
competition and achievement rate.

.66 4.05 High


Overall
67

APPENDIX F

GROUP STATISTICS & REALIBILITY STATISTICS


68

CELESTIAL, MARICHU

Group Statistics
schsize N Mean Std. Deviation Std. Error Mean
preimplem small 130 3.7448 .61442 .05389
Big 80 4.7664 .61323 .06856
implem small 130 3.4192 .68473 .06005
Big 80 4.6412 .21269 .02378
postimple small 130 3.6669 .52686 .04621
m Big 80 4.6638 .26967 .03015
overall small 130 3.6101 .55306 .04851
Big 80 4.6899 .28040 .03135

CELESTIAL , MARICHU

t df Sig. (2-tailed)
preimplem Equal variances assumed -11.710 208 .000
Equal variances not
-11.715 167.590 .000
assumed
implem Equal variances assumed -15.497 208 .000
Equal variances not
-18.919 165.962 .000
assumed
postimplem Equal variances assumed -15.695 208 .000
Equal variances not
-18.067 202.335 .000
assumed
overall Equal variances assumed -16.217 208 .000
Equal variances not
-18.696 201.786 .000
assumed
69

Reliability Statistics
Cronbach's Alpha
Based on
Cronbach's Alpha Standardized Items N of Items
.987 .987 30
70

APPENDIX G

OTHER DOCUMENTS
71

RATING OF EXPERTS AS TO THE VALIDITY


OF THE RESEARCH INSTRUMENT

EXPERTS RATING DESCRIPTION

Dr. Eugenio S. Guhao Jr.

Dr. Gloria P. Gempes

Dr. Alvin Cayogypg

Dr. Genuba

Average Weighted Mean

Point Equivalent

4.1 - 5.00 = Equivalent


3.1 - 4.00 = Very Good
2.1 - 3.00 = Good
1.1 - 2.00 = Fair
0 - 1.00 = Low
72

CURRICULUM VITAE

MARICHU MACATUAL CELESTIAL

Purok 1, SitioDunggas, Tambo Babak District

Island Garden City of Samal

Contact No. 09105802054

PERSONAL DATA

Age : 44 years old

Gender : Female

Height : 5’

Weight ; 58 kilos

Birthdate : October 28, 1970

Birth Place : Island Garden City of Samal

Skills : Computer literate, singing gospel songs

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND

Post Graduate : University of Mindanao

Matina Campus, Davao City


73

Course : Master of Arts in Education

Major in Educational Management

College : University of Mindanao

Bolton St., Davao City

Course : Bachelor of Elementary Education

Major in Home Economics

High School : Holy Cross of Babak

Island Garden City of Samal

Elementary : Tambo Elementary School

Barangay Tambo, Babak district

Island Garden City of Samal

WORK EXPERIENCES

April 10, 1993 – April 10, 2010 : Deeper Life Academy

Bugac, Ma-a, Davao City

June 6, 2011 - Present : Elementary School Teacher I

Camudmud Elementary School

Barangay Camudmud, Island Garden

City of Samal
74

CHARACTER REFERENCES

ARLENE M. LUBRANO

EPS – PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Division of Island Garden City of Samal

EDNA B. LESTOJAS

PRINCIPAL I

CAMUDMUD ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

ISLAND GARDEN CITY OF SAMAL

ENRIQUETA E. TOGONON

ADMINISTRATOR – DEEPER LIFE ACADEMY

BUGAC, MA-A, DAVAO CITY


75
76