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The author…. All you need is....

Media files included…

Wolfgang Kulawik - scales - audio examples


- chords - videos
- solos - backing tracks
- patterns

Guitar Training
Material for the student of jazz guitar
CONTENTS:

Introduction 7
Basic exercises 9
Technical exercises 10

SCALES:

Scales, interval structure, - chord functions 12


Scale overview 13
Practising tips 15
Major scale fingerings 16
Major scale chromatic up and down 17
Diatonic scales position 1 18
Major scale in groups of four 20
Major scale in a II - V - progression 21
Major scale sequencing ideas 23
Major scale diatonic down 25
Major pentatonics 27
Melodic minor pentatonics 30
Melodic minor scale 32
Harmonic minor scale 33
Blues scale 34
Whole tone half tone scale 35
Half tone whole tone scale 36

ARPEGGIOS:

Elementary arpeggios 37
Arpeggios 42
Major arpeggio diagrams and usage 43
Major arpeggio exercises 46

CHORDS:

Chords introduction 52
Chords type 1 53
Chords type 2 54
Chords type 3 55
Chords type 4 58
Chord overview 59
Basic chords notation and tab 60
Block chords introduction 62
Block chords notation and tab 63

VOICINGS:

Voicings introduction 67
Take the A Train - chord melody 68
Take the A Train voicings 69
All the things you are - chord melody 71
Autumn Leaves basic - chords 72
Autumn Leaves comping exercise and voicings 73
Blue in Green - chord melody and voicings 80
Blue Bossa - chord melody and voicings 81
Blues voicings in F7 82
Blues voicings in Bb7 83
Blues voicings (Parker blues) 84
Body and Soul 85
Lullaby of Birdland - chord melody 86
Pent up House - voicings 87
I ́ ve grown accustomed to your face - chord melody transcription 88
Giant Steps - chord melody 90
Have you met Mrs Jones - chord melody 91
Girl from Ipanema - chords 92
How high the moon - chord melody and voicings 94
Misty - chord melody 96
Round Midnight (block chords) transcription 98
One Note Samba - chords 100
Rhythm Changes - voicings 101
Satin Doll - chord melody and voicings 103
Stella by starlight - chord melody 106
It shouldn ́ t happen to a dream - chord melody transcription 108
Yardbird suite - chord melody 109
Patterns for comping 110
Swing patterns 111
II-V-I patterns 114
PATTERNS:

Patterns and Licks introduction 120


Turnarounds 121
Basic patterns in G major 122
Basic patterns in C major 123
Dorian phrases 124
Altered phrases 126
Altered phrases 2 128
Mixolydian phrases 130
Dorian phrases over two octaves 132
Scofield patterns 134

SOLOS:

Take the A Train solo 137


Autumn Leaves solo 1 139
Autumn Leaves solo 2 144
Blue Bossa example solo 150
Blue Bossa extended solo 153
Rhythm Changes Solo 1 159
Rhythm Changes Solo 2 161
2 blues in F7 164
2 bebop blues 165
2 blues in F advanced 167
Blues tribute to Wes 169
All Blues solo 172
Satin Doll solo example 174
There will never be another you 176

THEORY and DIAGRAMS:

Standard chord progressions 178


Articulation and phrasing 179
Substitutions 180
Diagram: scale circle 184
Diagram: chord reinterpretation 186
Diagram: which scale for which chord 187
The principle of drop2 and drop3 188
Diatonic chords in drop2 and drop3 shapes 189
Drop2 and drop3 chords and inversions 192
Drop2 and drop3 chords with extensions (advanced) 199

Addendum:

Empty music notation paper 203


Empty tabulature paper 204
Alphabetical index 205
Introduction

This is the major update of the popular „Guitartraining XL“ jazz guitar course.

This publication is not meant to be a guitar book in the usual way, yet it represents a
profound collection of material for jazz-guitarists. There are no excessive explanations,
you will find them in hundreds of other books or on guitar websites.
The idea was to provide material for all the topics that are essential for improving
improvisational skills and to train them along with suitable standard jazz tunes. That is
why this collection consists of two parts:
- Part I gives you the technical basis - scales, arpeggios, chords, rhythmic exercises,
articulation exercises
- Part II contains II-V-I patterns, chord voicings, chord solos, single line solos by
combining exercises with different jazz standard tunes and chord structures (like Blues
or Rhythm Changes)
This more practically-oriented approach does not cover all topics completely. But it gives
you all the musical vocabulary that helps you to develop your own style by first imitating
and practising the given phrases, voicings and solos with the aim to integrate them into
your own musical language.
Along with this e-book comes a folder with hours of media files. You can listen to each
exercise, watch numerous videos with fretboard view (the number has dramatically
increased to 80) and jam along with the backing tracks. Just click on the icons on the
pages. Moreover I have provided bookmarks so you can jump to any page quickly. If you
like you can print the pdf document and you will get a complete book. I recommend you
contact your local copy shop and let them do that for you.
The media files in the folder “data” are named according to the pages of the book. This is
convenient for those who want to copy the material to a tablet and search for a certain
media file. The format of the files is „mp3“ and „mov“ or “mp4”, so you will be able to play
them in your computer, tablet or standalone DVD-player.

Have fun and keep playing.....

Wolfgang Kulawik

October 2015

7
Some advice:

The Guitartraining material is not a step by step course, but offers different approaches to
your instrument.

1. the technical aspect:


- you have to do daily exercises to improve your left and right hand technique (such as
chromatic exercises, scales and arpeggios). This is the basis of all your improvisations. This
can be fun when you notice that your technique and your knowledge about scales and
arpeggios is getting better through the months. You have to stay concentrated while you´re
practising, set yourself a specific goal each time you practise, don´t let yourself get distracted,
don´t just "noodle" along.

2. the harmonical aspect


- practise blues voicings - as provided in the book - learn them by heart, use them as
"patterns". You won´t forget them anymore, but you can always try to put in your own ideas
later.
- deepen your knowledge about the underlying interval structure in each chord you are about
to play (which fretted note is what interval in the chord). Therefore use the chord diagrams
that I have provided in the XL book.
- omit root notes, play chords in a higher fretboard position (as shown in all of the chord
exercises), practise the given voicing exercises for the tunes provided in the pdf documents.
Don´t analyze every single note you are playing, use the voicings as "licks", learn them by
heart. Everything will brighten up later.
- try to get away from the chord voicings you already know, break from old routines...
- play melodic lines in your chords, use guide tone lines
- learn the progressions of the tunes by heart, so that you can memorize the chords, play
along with the numerous backing tracks.

3. the melodic aspect


- play the blues scale (as it is fundamental for everything that came later..), practise the
written blues improvisations, learn them by heart, use the ideas and included patterns for your
own improvisations, they will broaden your musical horizon, copy licks and melodies from the
great masters, write down any small phrase that you come upon, make up your own
collection of "licks"
- practise II-V-I progressions, again practise the patterns provided in the book.
- practise improvisations, try to write your improvisations down (very time consuming at first),
learn them by heart, so you are always able to play over chord progressions without thinking
which scale or arpeggio goes with what chord.
- repeat phrases in your improvisation, this will make a solo more understandable to the
listener

4. the rhythmic aspect and articulation


- listen to the given audio examples and listen to the great masters like Kenny Burrell (very
bluesy phrases) or Wes Montgomery (octaves and block chords), play behind the beat, play
laid-back lines, when playing chords your guitar is like a four-voice horn section throwing in
accents here and there, but always with a melodic line in the top voice. (there are lots of
examples in the book and even more in the other available add-ons to the guitartraining).

It all depends on how much time you can afford…..

8
Basic exercise
Exercise 1 (Chromatic up):
This is a a technical exercise that is meant to give you strength and control of your left hand:
The fingers hit the fretboard one after the other, stay on the fret until the fourth finger is on the
fourth fret.
Then the first finger moves to the next string, fingers 2 - 4 stay on the precedent string. They
move over to the next string, when the first finger has reached its position. No empty strings are
played, just frets 1,2,3, and 4.

Practise with a metronome in the slowest tempo you can imagine. When all the notes come
without buzz you can increase the tempo. Play each note 4 times, then 2 times, then once. Take
care of clear and even downstrokes. When you have reached a considerable tempo, try to pick
alternate picking (down - up - down - up....)

You must be very patient, don´t take it too quick.....


1 2 3 4
1 2 3 4
1 2 3 4
1 2 3 4
1 2 3 4
1 2 3 4

Exercise 2 (Chromatic down):


This is the same exercise as exercise 1, only reverse.
You start on the highest note and then play down by removing one finger st a time. When you
move over to the next lower string, you first prepare all four fingers, then remove one afier
another.
1 2 3 4
1 2 3 4
1 2 3 4
1 2 3 4
1 2 3 4
1 2 3 4

Exercise 3 (motoric skills)

This is an exercise in triplets. You play three notes on adjacent strings in a group of triplets with
alternate picking. This means you have to change direction of the pick when entering the next
string.

1 2 4
1 2 4

More daily exercises (legato playing etc.) in this video:

9
Technical exercises:

Chromatic exercise 1

Practise the following exercise slowly with a metronome. Mind the alternate picking with
down- and upstrokes. If you get problems in the first position, move the exercise upwards to
the fifth position. Try to increase the tempo (always with a metronome!) without losing the
evenness of your down- and upstrokes.

Watch your left hand. The little finger should not be further away from the fretboard than your
first finger!

The fingers should stay on their fret until the fourth finger hits the fourth fret.
When playing back from g# you should prepare the fingers so that they hit the fretboard at
the same time.

for more fluency exercises see Guitartraining add-on #2

° ≥ U ≥ U ≥ U ≥ U ≥ U ≥ U etc.............
& b œ nœ œ #œ #œ œ bœ nœ
œ #œ
œ #œ œ #œ bœ nœ
1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4

¢⁄
1 2 3 4
1 2 3 4
1 2 3 4
1 2 3 4

° œ #œ œ bœ œ #œ œ #œ #œ nœ #œ nœ bœ œ #œ nœ
&
1 2 3 4 4 3 2 1

¢⁄
1 2 3 4 4 3 2 1

°
& œ bœ œ #œ #œ nœ œ bœ
#œ nœ œ bœ #œ nœ #œ nœ

¢⁄
4 3 2 1
4 3 2 1
4 3 2 1
4 3 2 1

10
2. Chromatic exercise 2:

° ≥ U ≥ U ≥ U ≥ U ≥ U ≥ U ≥ U ≥ U etc............
& œ œ œ œ#œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ#œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ#œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œnœ œ œ œ

¢⁄ 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4
1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4

°
& bœ œ œ œnœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ#œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œnœ œ œ œ

¢⁄
1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4
1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4

° œ œ œ œ#œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œbœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ#œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ#œ œ œ œ


&

1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4

¢⁄
1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4

° #œ œ œ œnœ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œnœ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œnœ œ œ œ


&

4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1

¢⁄
4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1

° œ œ œ œbœ œ œ œ
& œ œ œ œ#œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œnœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œbœ œ œ œ

¢⁄
4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1
4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1

°
& #œ œ œ œnœ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œbœ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œnœ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œnœ œ œ œ

¢⁄ 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1
4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1

11
scale name interval structure options chordal function

m ionian 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 6 7 9
a
j
lydian 1 2 3 #4 5 6 7 b7 9 #11
o
r
Lydian augmented 1 2 3 #4 #5 6 7

Mixolydian 1 2 3 4 5 6 b7 9 13 to I maj
d
o harmonic minor 1 b2 3 4 5 b6 b7 b9 b13
m from the fifth
i altered 1 b2 #2 3 #4 b6 b7 b9,#9,#11,bl3
n
a
n Mixolydian #11 1 2 3 #4 5 6 b7 9 #11 13
t
whole tone (WT) 1 2 3 #4 #5 #6 9 #11 1b13
7
t
h halftone-wholetone 1 b2 #2 3 #4 5 6 b7 b9, #9, #11, 13

melodic minor 1 2 b3 4 5 6 7 6, 7, 9 minor


m
i dorian 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7 9 11 13
n
o
aeolian 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 9 11
r

phrygian 1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 11

locrian 1 b2 b3 4 b5 b6 b7 11 b13
m
i
n locrian #2 1 2 b3 4 b5 b6 b7 9, 11, b13
7
b wholetone-halftone 1 2 b3 4 b5 b6 6 b7
5

12
Scale overview:

Scales derived from the ionian major scale:

step name chord relation

I ionian c d e f g a b c Cmaj7
II dorian d e f g a b c d Dminor7
III phrygian e f g a b c d e Eminor7
IV lydian f g a b c d e f Fmaj7
V mixolydian g a b c d e f g G7
VI aeolian a b c d e f g a Aminor7
VII locrian b c d e f g a b Bminor7 flat5

Scales derived from the melodic minor scale:

step name chord relation


I melodic minor c d Eb f g a b c Cminor6, Cminmaj
III lydian augmented Eb f g a b c d Eb Ebmaj7#11
IV mixolydian #11 f g a b c d Eb f F7#11
VI locrian #2 a b c d Eb f g a Am7b5
VII altered b c d Eb f g a b B7 alt

Scales derived from the harmonic minor scale:

step name chord relation


I harmonic minor c d Eb f g Ab b c Cminor
V harmonic minor g Ab b c d Eb f g G7b9
from the fifth

13
SCALES

The following chapter provides a systematic overview over the scales commonly
used in jazz. Especially for guitarists it is hard not to lose orientation on the fretboard
because (unlike on the keyboard) every note can be found in more than one position
on the fretboard. This means you have to learn scales in different fingerings in
different positions.

This is a different approach than on the keyboard, but it has the advantage that
fingerings remain unchanged for all the twelve keys, and you can move them
chromatically up and down while piano fingerings differ from key to key.

You will find five positions for each scale. Up to the seventh fret (index finger on the
seventh fret) all the fingerings refer to G, the other fingerings are transposed to C, so
that you can practise them comfortably and don´t have to move to high ranges.
The scales are being played as soon as you click on the rectangles on the position
numbers.

In the chapter "patterns" you will find some phrases or patterns that are made up of
scale tones which give you ideas to use the scales in II - V - I chord progressions.

On the following two pages you will find some interesting diagrams which try to
visualize the interval structure and the ralation of the scales to their specific chords in
general.

14
Practising tips:

1. Practise the scales systematically and slowly up and down. Start on the root
and end on the root. Watch your articulation and even up- and down strokes
with your pick.

2. Play the scales through all given fingerings and positions.

3. Play the scales chromatically up and down the fingerboard. The fingering stays
the same but you change positions on the fretboard.

4. Start your scales on different base tones. 1. root, then third, then 5th. Always
have in mind the relation of the played note to the root of the scale, that will
improve your orientation on the fretboard.

5. Try to play all the fingerings in one position on the fretboard.

scale : Bbmaj7 Cmaj7 Ebmaj7 Fmaj7 Abmaj7


fingering No.: 1 5 4 3 2

6. Play the scales through the cycle of fifth

7. Practise scale inversions by changing the order of scale tones, for example:
thirds up and down, groups of four up and down, triads up and down. (more
details see "scale practising examples)
1 3 2 4 3 5 4 6 5 7 6 8... thirds up
9 7 8 6 7 5 6 4 5 3 4 2.. thirds down
1 2 3 4 2 3 4 5 3 4 5 6... groups of four up
8 7 6 5 7 6 5 4 6 5 4 3... groups of four down
1 3 5 2 4 6 3 5 7 4 6 8... diatonic triads up

8. Play rhythmic structures

9. Transfer the phrases into different keys.

15
The major scale (ionian mode)

1 2 4
2 4
Position 1 3 4
1 1 3 4
G-major 1 2 4
1 2 4
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

1 3 4
1 3 4
Position 1 2 4
2 1 2 4
G-major 1 2 4

1 2 4
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
1 2 4
1 2 4
Position 1 3
3 1 3 4
G-major
1 3 4
1 2 4
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

1 2 4
2 4
Position 1 3 4
4 1 2 4
C-major 1 2 4
2 4
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
1 3 4
1 2 4
Position 1 2 4
5
1 4
C-major
1 3 4
1 3 4
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

16
Major scale chromatic up and down:

Play the major scale with a metronome in even eighths up and down the fretboard. Play continuously,
don´t stop to think. There shouldn´t be any gaps. The more you practise that, the more fluent you will
become.

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Practise this exercise by playing the major scale chromatically up and down.
Play regular eights and try not to stop when changing the key.

17
Diatonic scales in Position 1:

Here is an example how to practise the major scale fingerings. You start on the root of
Gmaj7 and play one octave up to the ninth of the chord, then down again. Then you
continue to play the same fingering, but start on A, so that you play the A dorian scale.
Continue the pattern until you are in Gmaj again.

ionian
Gmaj7

dorian
Am7

phrygian
Bm7

lydian
Cmaj7#11

18
mixolydian
D7

aeolian
Em7

locrian
F#m7b5

ionian
Gmaj7

19
Gmaj scale position 1 in groups of four:

Here is another example how to practise the major scale fingerings. This time you
play the Gmajor scale up and down in groups of four. You play the following interval
pattern: 1234 2345 3456 4567 and so on
Practise this through the other fingerings of the major scale as well.

Gmaj7 Am7 Bm7 Cmaj7 D7 Em7 F#m7b5 Gmaj7

Gmaj7 F#m7b5 Em7 D7 Cmaj7 Bm7 Am7 Gmaj7

One octave higher:

Gmaj7 Am7 Bm7 Cmaj7 D7 Em7 F#m7b5 Gmaj7

Gmaj7 F#m7b5 Em7 D7 Cmaj7 Bm7 Am7 Gmaj7

20
Gmaj scale position 1 in a II-V progression:

Here is another exercise variation. This time you play the Gmaj scale fingerings
in a II - V - progression.

Am7 D7

Gmaj7

Whole step up:

Bm7 E7

Amaj7

21
Gmaj scale position 1 in a II-V progression 2:

Another variation. Again you play a II-V progression with the Gmaj scale fingering 1.

Am7 D7

Gmaj7

whole step up

Bm7 E7

Amaj7

22
Gmaj scale position 1 sequencing ideas:

Here you find even more variations on sequencing the scales. Don´t forget to transfer
these scale patterns to the other scale positions.
Try to invent your own sequences. If there are some positions where the fingering
gets uncomfortable, leave them out, as you won´t play them in your solos anyway.

1. Gmajor scale in thirds up and down:

2. Gmajor scale in thirds up and down (Octave higher)

3. Gmajor scale in groups of four and thirds mixed

23
4. Gmajor scale pattern: 12345321 - 23456432 - ......

Gmaj7 Am7 Bm7

Cmaj7 D7 Em7

F#m7b5 Gmaj7

5. Gmajor scale in arpeggios up:


Gmaj Am7 Bm7 Cmaj7

D7 Em7 F#m7b5 Gmaj

24
6. Gmajor position 1 starting from root down

° # œœœœœœ
G ionian F# locrian

œ œœ œœœœœ œ
& œœ œœ œ œ œ œœœ œœœœœœœ

¢⁄
3 2 2 3 2 2
5 3 3 5 5 3 3 5
5 4 2 2 4 5 5 4 2 2 4 5
5 5 5 4 4 5

° # œœœœ
E aeolian D mixolydian
œ
& œœœœ œœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœ

¢⁄
5 3 3 5 3 3
5 4 2 2 4 5 5 4 2 2 4 5
5 4 2 2 4 5 5 4 2 2 4 5
5 5

° #œ
C lydian B phrygian

& œœœœœœ œ œ œ œœœ œœœœœ œ œ œœœ


œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ

¢⁄
5 4 2 2 4 5 4 2 2 4
5 4 2 2 4 5 5 4 2 2 4 5
5 3 3 5 5 3 2 2 3 5

° #
A dorian G ionian

& œœœœœœ œ œœœ œœœœœ Ó


œœ œœ œ œ œœœ ˙

¢⁄
2
5 4 2 2 4 5
2
5 4 2 Ó
5 3 2 2 3 5 5 3 2
5 5 5 3 3

25
26
I. The Major – PENTATONIC

Pentatonic scales consist of five notes that are taken out of the regular 7- tone scales.
Pentatonic in the classic sense has the following structure:

C D E F G A B C ( C-major scale)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

C D E G A C ( C-major Pentatonic)
1 2 3 5 6 8

A pentatonic scale consists of the scale steps 1 2 3 5 6.


fourth and seventh are omitted

Pentatonic scales can be played in four inversions:

scale degree chord relation


1 C D E G A Cmaj6 / C7 (seventh missing)
1 2 3 5 6
2 D E G A C Dsus7
1 2 4 5 b7
3 E G A C D Em7 ( phrygian – aeolian )
1 b3 4 b6 b7

4 G A C D E Gsus6 / G6/9
1 2 4 5 6
5 A C D E G Amin7 / Amin7-11
1 b3 4 5 b7

The a minor pentatonic scale A C D E G is the fourth inversion


( Modus 5 ) of the Cmajor pentatonics ! ! !

27
Interval diagrams:
The following diagrams show the interval relations within a given inversion or chord
interpretation of the major pentatonic scale (in this case: G major pentatonic, position 2)

All intervals are major intervals. So a "2" = major 2nd, a "3" = major third and so on.
A "b" in front of a number means this interval is flat. A "#" in front of a number means this
interval is raised.
example: b3 = flat 3rd, b6 = flat 6th, b7 = flat 7th, #11 = raised (augmented) 4th

root position: inversion 1:

inversion 2: inversion 3:

inversion 4:

28
Major pentatonic scale

This pentatonic scale is often used in rock music, and they call it minor pentatonic,
which is incorrect. When you play the Gmajor pentatonic over an E-minor chord (a
flat 3rd below), you get the impression of a minor sound, but the scale is only an
inversion of the Gmajor pentatonic scale.
The real minor pentatonic is discussed on page 30 of this book.

2 4
2 4
Position 1 3
1 1 4
G-major 1 4
2 4

1 3
1 4
Position 1 4
2 2 4
G-major 2 4
2 4

1 4
2 4
Position 1 3
3 1 3
G-major 1 4
1 4

2 4
2 4
Position 1 4
4 1 4
C-major
2 4
2 4

1 4
1 4
Position
1 3
5
1 3
C-major
1 3
1 4

29
II. The minor pentatonic

Another pure pentatonic is the Cminor6 pentatonic.

This scale can also be played in four inversions:

scale degree chord relation:


1 C D Eb G A Cm6 – Cm7 – Cm maj7
1 2 b3 5 6
2 D Eb G A C Dm7 (b9)
1 b2 4 5 b7
3 Eb G A C D Eb maj7 #11
1 3 4 6 b7

4 G A C D Eb G9/11/b13
1 2 4 5 b6
5 A C D Eb G Am7/b5
1 b3 4 b5 b7

Regarding Bb major you can see the following scale relations:


(you can improvise over any chord with the Cm6 pentatonic)

step V VII I II IV
chord F7/9 Am7/b5 Bbmaj7 Cm6 Ebmaj7/#11

As you see, you can use the minor pentatonic over four chord types:

1. Minor7 minor 6 Pent on the same scale tone


2. Dom7 minor6 Pent a fourth below
3. Maj7/#11 Minor6 Pent a minor third below
4. M7/b5 Minor6 Pent a minor third above

30
Melodic minor pentatonics
This pentatonic scale is a five tone scale just like the major pentatonic with the interval
structure: 1 2 3 5 6 . You can play it over :
Gminor - G minor7th - Gminor-maj7th
Em7b5 / Bbmaj7#11 / D9add13 / F#7 alt
You can also use the scale to add some colour to „harmless“ chords like Gminor or
Bbmajor7. This scale is not the same as the so called „minor pentatonic“ in rock music.
The rock pentatonic is the 4th inversion of the major pentatonic scale.

2 4
Position 2 4
1
1 2
1 4
1 4
2 4

1 2
Position 1 4
2
3
1 3 4
1 3
1 2

1 4
Position
2 4
3
1 3
1 2
1 4
1 4

2 4
Position
2 3
4
1 4
1 4
2 4
2 4

1 4
Position 4
5 1 3 4
1 3
1 2
1 4

31
Melodic minor scale
The melodic minor scale derives from classical music. It is identical to the major scale, except that the 3rd note is flattened.
major scale: 12345678
melodic minor: 1 2 b3 4 5 6 7 8
This scale sounds more modern than the major scale and you can play it over several chord functions:
G melodic minor = Gmmaj = Bbmaj7/#11 = C7/#11 = Em7b5 = F#7alt (for details see "scale overview p.9.)

1 2 4
2 4
Position 1 2 4
1 1 3 4
G minor
1 2 4
2 4

1 2 4
1 3 4
Position 1 3
2 1 3 4
G minor 1 3
1 2 4

1 2 4
1 2 4
Position 1 3
3 1 2 4
G minor 1 3 4
1 2 4

1 3
1 2 4
Position 1 3 4
4
1 2 4
C minor
1 2 4
1 2 4

1 3 4
2 4
Position
1 3 4
5
1 2 4
C minor
1 2 4
4

32
The harmonic minor scale

The harmonic minor scale is played over minor chords. Most of the time it is used for playing over dominant7b9 chords.
leading into a tonic minor chord: example: Am7 - D7b9 - Gm7. Here you can play the harmonic minor scale
throughout the whole progression. It is mainly used in gypsy swing.

1 2 4
Position 2 3
1 1 2 4
Gm 2 4
1 3 4
1 3 4

1 2 4
3 4
Position
2 1 3 4
Gm (1) 1 3 4
(2) (3 )

1 2 4
Position 1 2 4
3 1 2
Gm 1 2 4
(2) 4
(3) (4)

1 2 4

Position 1 2 4
4 2 3
Cm 1 3 4
(1) 1 3 4
(2) ( 3)

1 4 4

Position 1 2 4
5 1 2 4
Cm 1 3
1 2 4
(3) 4

33
The blues - scale
It is mainly used to improvise over a dominant7th chord. It also sounds very nice
over a major chord a minor third higher.

e.g G-blues scale over Bbmaj oder Bb !!!

1 4
1 4
Position
1 1 3 4
G7 1 3
1 2 3
1 4

1 3 4
2 4
Position
1 2 3
2
1 4
G7

1 2 3
1 4
Position
3 1 4
G7 1 3 4
4

1 4
1 3 4
Position
1 3
4
C7 1 2 3
1 4

2 4
2 3 4
Position
5 1 4
C7 1 4
1 3 4
4

34
Whole tone - half tone - scale
You use it to improvise over diminished chords
, e.g. G7dim – Bb7dim
You can move the scale every minor third .

1 2 4
1 3 4
Position 1 2 4
1
1 3 4
G7 dim
1 2 4
1 3 4

1 2 4
Position 1 3 4
2 1 2 4
G7 dim 1 3 4

1 2 4
1 3 4
Position 1 2 4
3
1 2 4 4
G7 dim
4

1 3 4
1 2 4
Position 1 3 4
4 1 2 4
C7 dim 1 3 4

1 2 4
1 3 4
Position
1 2 4
5
1 2 4 4
C7 dim
1 2 4 4
4

35
The half tone - whole tone - scale
You use it mainly over altered seventh chords like
G7b9 – G7 #9 – G7 b9 b13 – etc.

1 2 4
1 3 4
Position 1 2 4
1 1 3 4
G7 alt
1 2 4
1 2 4 4

1 2 4
1 3 4
Position 1 2 4
2 1 2 4 4
G7 alt

1 2 4
1 3 4
Position 1 2 4
3
1 3 4
G7 alt
4

1 2 4
1 3 4
Position 1 2 4
4 1 3 4
C7 alt 1 2 4

1 2 4
1 3 4
Position 1 2 4
5 1 2 4 4
C7 alt
1 3 4
4

36
To get a better overview over the fretboard it is important to practise the basic chord structures (maj7 - minor7 -
dom7) from all possible positions on the guitar.
Here you find the most important arpeggios (I call them elementary arpeggios, because they only consist of the
basic intervals 1 - 3 - 5 - and 7)
Depending on the string where the root is we get four fingerings:
Type a) root on the low E string
Type b) root on the A string
Type c) root on the D string
Type d) root on the G-string
Please have in mind that each elementary arpeggio can be played in at least two fingerings. These alternative
fingerings are placed as pairs.

Minor7th

a)

b)

c)

d)

37
Dom7th

a)

b)

c)

d)

Major 7th

a)

b)

c)

d)

38
Elementary arpeggios exercises:
a) minor 7th

a) b)

c) d)

° œ œ œ œb œ œb œ b œ œbœ œ œ
œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ ™™
& œ œ œ œ œbœ œ
œœ œ œ œœ
4 2 1 4 4 2 1 4 3 1 1 4 3 2 1 4 4 1 2 3 4 1 1 3 4 1 2 4 4 1 2 4



3 6 6 3

¢⁄
3 6 4 4 6 3
2 5 3 5 5 3 5 2
2 5 3 5 5 3 5 2
3 5 5 3
5 5

° œ œ œ œ œ œœœ œœ œ œ œ œœœ
œ œ œ ™™
& œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œœ
œœ œ



5 8 8 5

¢⁄
5 8 8 5 6 6
5 5 2 5 7 7 5 2
2 5 7 7 5 2 3 3
3 3 5 5
5 5

° œ œ
œ œ œ œbœ œ œ œ œ œb œ œbœ œ œ
œœ ™™
& œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œœ œœ œ œ



3 6 6

¢⁄
3 6 6 4 8
2 5 5 3 7 5 5 8
2 5 5 3 7 5 5 8
3 7 5 5 8
5 5 8

39
b) dominant 7th

a) b)

c) d)

° œ œ œ œ œ œb œ b œ œ œ œ œ œ ™™
& œ œ œ#œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ#œ œ œ
œ#œ œ #œ œ



3 6 6 3

¢⁄
3 6 5 5 6 3
2 5 4 5 5 4 5 2
2 5 4 5 5 4 5 2
4 5 5 4
5 5

° œ œ œœ œ#œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ
œ œ#œ ™™
& # œ œ œ œ#œ #œ œ œ
œ#œ œ œ#œ œ œ
œ
œ



5 8 8 5

¢⁄
5 8 8 5 7 7
6 6 2 5 7 7 5 2
2 5 7 7 5 2 4 4
4 4 5 5
5 5

° œ œ œ œ œ œb œ œ œ œ œ ™
œœ œ œ
œ œœ ™
&
œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ#œ
œ œœœ œ



3 6 6

¢⁄
3 6 6 5 5 8
2 5 5 4 4 7 5 5
2 5 5 4 4 7 5 5
4 4 7 5 5
5 5

40
c) major 7th

a) b)

c) d)

° œ#œ #œœ #œœ#œ œ # œ # œ œ #œ


œ#œœ ™™
& œ#œœ#œ #œœ#œ
œ #œœ #œœ
œ#œ #œ œ œ



4 4 5 9 9 5

¢⁄
5 5 2 7 7 2
6 6 2 7 7 2
2 67 7 62 4 4
4 4 5 5
5 5

° #œ œ œ#œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ
œ ™™
& # œ œ#œ œ œ œ œ#œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ



3 7 7

¢⁄
2 3 7 7 5 8
1 2 6 4 7 5 5 9
2 6 4 7 5 5 9
4 7 5 5 9
5 5 9

41
Arpeggios

Arpeggios are broken chords whose notes are played one after the other, not
simultaneously. They only consist of notes of the underlying chord. There are basically
five different types of arpeggios:

1. major7th 1 3 5 7
c e g b

2. minor 7th 1 b3 5 b7
c Eb g Bb

3. dominant 7th 1 3 5 b7
c e g Bb

4. minor7th/b5 1 b3 b5 b7
c Eb Gb Bb

5. diminished 1 b3 b5 bb7
c Eb Gb A

On the following page you will find the fingerings of the major arpeggio.

Practising:
1. Practise all the fingerings of the Gmaj arpeggio

2. Play the arpeggios chromatically up- and down.

3. Play different keys in one position of the fretboard e.g:

Bbmaj7 Cmaj7 Ebmaj7 Fmaj7 Abmaj7


1 5 4 3 2 (No of fingering)

4. Play two alternating fingerings through the cycle of fifths.

5. Start playing the arpeggios from the major 7th.

42
The major arpeggio

1
2
Position 3
1
3 4
G-major
1 4
1 2

4
Position 1 4
2 1 2
G-major
1 4
1 2

1 4
1 2
Position 1
3 3
G-major 3 4
(1) (4)

1 4
3
Position 1 2
4 1 4
C-major (1) 2
(2)

3 (4)
1 4
Position
5 1 1
C-major 2
3
(3) 4

43
What can I use the arpeggio for?

A) Basic use:
In the first place you will use the major arpeggio over major chords. Play the arpeggio from the
7th up or down to the 7th as I do it in almost every exercise. It will sound softer and fits better.
In this add-on I will only cover the major7th arpeggio, because you can improvise over minor and
dominant7th chords as well just by using the 4 notes of the major7th arpeggio.

B) Reinterpretation 1:
If you interprete the root (in this case „g“) as a minor third, the G major arpeggio turns into an
E-minor7th arpeggio with added ninth. So you can play the Gmaj arp over Eminor7. Because of
the ninth, it sounds even more interesting than the regular E minor arpeggio.

C) Reinterpretation 2:

If you interprete the root (in this case „g“) as a minor 7th, the G major arpeggio turns into an
A7 arpeggio with added 9th, 11th and 13th. So you can play the Gmaj arp over A7sus. Try it and
you will love it.

D) Reinterpretation 3:

If you interprete the root (in this case „g“) as a perfect fifth, the G major arpeggio turns into a
C major arpeggio with added 9th and #11. So you can play the Gmaj arp over Cmaj#11. Yet there
is no root and no third, so use it to give colour to the underlying progression.

44
Where can I play the major arpeggio?:

As you can see in the diagram you can use the major arpeggio to play over four chord
types:

- maj7
- min7(9) (maj7-Arp. a minor third higher)
- Dom7 (9/11/13) (maj7-Arp. a whole tone down)
- m7/b5 (maj7-Arp. a tritone higher)

A Gmaj7-Arpeggio can be used for the following chords:

VI I II7 bV
Emin7/9 Gmaj7 A7(9/11) Dbmin7/b5

45
Ex. 1a - Gmajor arpeggio position 1 - octave 1 chromatically up

1
2
3
3 4
1 4
1 2
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

intervals: 7 1 3 5 7

°
GŒ„Š7 A¨Œ„Š7

& œ#œ œ œ œ#œ œ œ b œ œœ b œ œœ


#œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œbœ œ œ œ œbœ œ œœ

¢⁄
4 4 5 5
2 5 5 2 2 5 5 2 3 6 6 3 3 6 6 3
2 3 3 2 3 3 3 4 4 3 4 4

°
AŒ„Š7 B¨Œ„Š7

& œ#œ œ œ œ#œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ


#œ œ # œ œ #œ œ # œ œ œbœ œ œ œ œbœ œ œœ

¢⁄
6 6 7 7
4 7 7 4 4 7 7 4 5 8 8 5 5 8 8 5
4 5 5 4 5 5 5 6 6 5 6 6

°
BŒ„Š7

&
œ #œ #œ #œ œ œ œ œ #œ #œ #œ œ œ œ
#œ #œ
etc...

¢⁄
8 8
6 9 9 6 6 9 9 6
6 7 7 6 7 7

46
Ex. 1b - Gmajor arpeggio position 1 - octave 1 chromatically down, starting in Bmajor
basic exercise
intervals: 7 1 3 5 7

°
BŒ„Š7 B¨Œ„Š7

&
œ #œ #œ #œ œ œ œ b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
#œ œ

¢⁄
8 7
6 9 9 6 5 8 8 5
6 7 7 5 6 6

°
AŒ„Š7 A¨Œ„Š7

& œ #œ œ b œ œ œ
#œ œ # œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ

¢⁄
6 5
4 7 7 4 3 6 6 3
4 5 5 3 4 4

°
GŒ„Š7

& œ #œ œ
#œ œ œ œ œ #w

¢⁄
4
2 5 5 2
2 3 3 2

more arpeggio exercise in Guitartraining add-on 11

47
Ex. 1c - Gmajor arpeggio position 1 - octave 2 chromatically up, starting in Gmajor
basic exercise

intervals: 7 1 3 5 7 (up)

° #œ œ #œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ bœ œbœ œ œ œ œ
GŒ„Š7 A¨Œ„Š7

& #œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œb œ œ œ

2 2 3 3

¢⁄
3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4
4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5
4 5 5 4 5 5 5 6 6 5 6 6

° #œ #œ œ œœœ œ œœœ
AŒ„Š7 B¨Œ„Š7
#œ œ œœ #œ œ œœ œ œ
& #œ œ œ #œ œ œ œbœ œ œbœ œ
etc...

4 4 5 5

¢⁄
5 5 5 5 6 6 6 6
6 6 6 6 7 7 7 7
6 7 7 6 7 7 7 8 8 7 8 8

Ex. 1d - major arpeggio position 1 - octave 2 chromatically down, starting in Bmajor


intervals: 7 1 3 5 7

° #œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ
BŒ„Š7 B¨Œ„Š7 AŒ„Š7

& #œ œ #œ œ œ œ b œ œ œ œ #œ œ #œ œ

6 5 4

¢⁄
7 7 6 6 5 5
8 8 7 7 6 6
8 9 9 7 8 8 6 7 7

° œ œ #œ œ œ
A¨Œ„Š7 GŒ„Š7

b œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ
& œ #œ œ œ #w

3 2

¢⁄
4 4 3 3
5 5 4 4
5 6 6 4 5 5 4

48
Ex. 1e - major arpeggio position 1 - octave 1 chromatically up, starting in Gmajor
intervals: 7 5 3 1 7 (down)

°
GŒ„Š7 A¨Œ„Š7

œœœ Ó
3 3 3 3
& #œ œ #w œ bœ œ œ
œ œ#œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ
3 3 3 3

¢⁄
4 4 5 5 5 5 Ó
5 2 2 5 6 3 3 6
3 2 3 4 3 4

°
AŒ„Š7 B¨Œ„Š7

œœœ Ó
3 3 3 3
& #œ œ #w œ œ
#œ œ#œ œ œ œ œb œ œ œ œ œ
3 3 3 3

¢⁄
6 6 7 7 7 7 Ó
7 4 4 7 8 5 5 8
5 4 5 6 5 6

°
BŒ„Š7

bw
3 3
& #œ #œ #œ œ œ
œ #œ œ
3 3

¢⁄
8 8
9 6 6 9
7 6 7

49
Ex. 1f - major arpeggio position 1 - octave 2 chromatically up, starting in Gmajor

intervals: 7 5 3 1 7 (down)

° #œ œ œ #w œ bœ œœœ
GŒ„Š7 A¨Œ„Š7

& œ#œ œ œ œ œ#œnœ #œ œ œ Ó


3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3

2 2 3 3 3 3

¢⁄
Ó
3 3 4 4
4 4 5 5
5 4 5 6 5 6

° #œ œ#œ #w œ œœ
bœ œ œ œ œ
œœœ
AŒ„Š7 B¨Œ„Š7

œ#œ œ œ œ Ó
&
3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3

4 4 5 5 5 5

¢⁄
Ó
5 5 6 6
6 6 7 7
7 6 7 8 7 8

° bœ bw
BŒ„Š7
#œ bœ œ œ
& œ bœ nœ
3 3
BŒ„Š7 3 3 etc...

6 6

¢⁄
7 7
8 8
9 8 9

Ex. 1g - major arpeggio position 1 - octave 1+2 chromatically up, starting in Gmajor

° œ #œ œ œ
GŒ„Š7 A¨Œ„Š7

& œ œ œ œ b œ œ bœ
œ #œ #œ œ œ bœ
#œ œ œ œ œbœ œ

¢⁄
3 3 4
4 4 5
4 5 5 4 5 6
2 5 5 2 3 6
2 3 3 3 4

50
° œ bœ œ œ #œ œ #œ œ
AŒ„Š7

& b œ œ bœ œ œ #œ
œ #œ #œ œ# œ
bœ #œ œ#œ œ

3 4

¢⁄
4 5 5
5 6 6
6 5 6 7 7 6
6 3 4 7 7 4
4 4 5 5

° œ œ œ
B¨Œ„Š7 BŒ„Š7

& œ œ bœ œ œ bœ œ
œ Œ Ó
œ bœ œ œ bœ œ
etc...

Œ
5

¢⁄
Ó
6 6
7 7
7 8 8 7
5 8 8 5
5 6 6 7

Ex. 1h - major arpeggio position 1 - octave 2 chromatically up, starting in Gmajor


with added 9 and 6 as passing tones

° #œ œ œ œ œ œ b œ œ œ bœ œ
GŒ„Š7 6th 9th A¨Œ„Š7 6th 9th

& œ œ œ #w bœ bœ w

2 3 2 3 4 3

¢⁄
5 3 6 4
4 2 5 3
5 4 6 5

° #œ œ œ #œ œ #œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ
AŒ„Š7 B¨Œ„Š7

& œ œ #w œ bœ w
etc...

4 5 4 5 6 5

¢⁄
7 5 8 6
6 4 7 5
7 6 8 7

51
CHORDS

The chords are divided into four subgroups:

1: shell chords 2: drop2 chords 3: drop3 chords 4: chords laid out in thirds.

And within these groups according to their root string into type A, B and C.

- Type A: root on low E-string


- Type B: root on A-string
- Type C: root on D-string

Each subgroup of chords has an identical interval structure . If you are looking for
the usual way of showing chords with fingering and fretpoints you won´t be happy
with these diagrams. So take your time to get comfortable with this way of structuring chords.
It will help you to understand the fretboard much faster if you know where the intervals in relation to
a root-note are.

More tips:

- play barre-chords only where they are needed


- change the position of the hand as little as possible when moving from one chord to another.
- use one finger as leading finger when changing positions (very often one finger
can stay in its former position)

At the end of the chord diagrams you find a complete overview of all chords in
only one diagram. To use this chart you should already know the subtypes
otherwise it will be difficult not to lose orientation.

CHORD DIAGRAMS

The chord diagrams all have the same internal structure:

- Minor7th chords (m7)


- Dominant7th chords (dom7)
- Major7th chords (maj7)
- Half-diminished chords (m7b5) (not type 1 because they don´t have a fifth)
- Diminished chords (dim7) (not type 1 because they don«t have a fifth)

Instead of fretpoints and finger numbers you will only find numbers that indicate the interval
structure of the chord. So the specification of chords gets dispensable.

If you play a chord with 1, 3, b7 and 9 it is obvious that you are playing a dominant7th chord with
added ninth.

All chords consist of a basic structure: root(1) – third (b3, 3) – seventh (b7,7) – fifth(b5, 5)
and parts of the upper structure: ninth (b9,9,#9), eleventh (11,#11) or thirteenth (b13, 13)

The basic structure remains unchanged while there are options in the upper voice.

52
CHORDS Type 1 (shell chords):

All chords of type 1 have the same interval structure:


a) root b) third c) seventh d) doubled third or ninth or octave

If you concentrate on the first three notes, you´ll get "micro chords" with all the
necessary structural elements. These chords are often called „shell chords“
For more details about shell chords and their usage see „Addon #9“ - (Walking bass lines)

We distinguish the following basic structures:

1 3 7 (or 1 7 3) = major7th
1 b3 b7 (or 1 b7 b3) = minor 7th
1 3 b7 (or 1 b7 3) = dominant 7th

As chords of type 1 don´t have a fifth, you cannot play diminished or half diminished chords.

The audio files always start with the middle diagram. The chord sequence is always : C I F I G
The three basic notes (1,3 and 7) never change. The top note changes and determines the chord
name (like #9, 9 or b9)

Minor 7

F
C
G

Dom 7

F
C
G

major 7

F
C
G
53
CHORDS Type 2 (drop2):

Chords of type 2 are four string chords with the following interval structure:
a) root (1) / fifth (5) / seventh (7) / third (3)
As chords of type 2 have a fifth (which chords of type 1 don´t have) you can play all five basic
chord types:
- major7th (1, 5, 7, 3) - minor7th (1, 5, b3, b7) - Dominant7th (1, 5, 3, b7)
- half diminished (1, b5, b7, b3) - diminished (1, b5, bb7, b3) (bb7 = 6th = diminished 7th)
The intervals in brackets (fourth or sixth) can be used alternatively.

min7

Dom 7

major 7

m7/b5

dim7 (diminished)

54
CHORDS Type 3 (drop3):

These chords are derived from the drop3 system. The basic structure is:
a) root / b) 7th / c) 3rd / d) 5th

The colour of the chords results from the possibilty of playing two colour tones at the same time on
the upper two strings. That implies that the root or the 5th have to be omitted in favour of colour
tones on the upper two strings of the chord.
Moreover there are chord ambiguities due to the fact that the root is not clearly
defined. So one chord shape can have more than one name.

type 3A:
min7

55
3B

maj 7

3C

3D

3E

56
Chords Type 3F:

The chords of type 3G are ambiguous, because tones of the lower interval
structure are left out. So they can be interpreted from different root tones.
The following chart should make it clear:

can
the tone sequence g b d f# be seen as:

The chord can be interpreted as maj7 (intervals: 1, 3, 5, 7)


or minor7th (intervals: b3, 5, b7, 9)
or Dom7th (intervals: b7, 9, 11, 13)

That is why the use of these chords requires a fundamental knowledge


of harmonic relations.

Dom 7
a

57
Chords Type 4:

Chords of type 4 are layers of thirds. They are


difficult to play on the guitar because you have to stretch your
fingers. This is the difference between the piano and the guitar.
Close voicings can easily be played on the piano with one hand
while those voicings (drop2 or drop3) can easily be played on the
guitar with one hand, but it is impossible to play them on the piano
(if you donÿt have giant hands....)

4a 4b

m7

Dom7

maj7

58
chord overview
This should help you identify the intervals in relation to their respective root tone.

59
Instructions for the basic chords and chord exercises:

1. basic chords
Here you will find the basic chords for a standard jazz II-V-I progression.
Always practise only one progression, but don´t forget to transpose it into other keys or positions
on the fretboard. Example:
Am7 - D7/9 - Gmaj7, transpose by moving a whole step up to: Bm7 - E7/9 - Amaj7 and so forth.....

a) II-V-I in Gmaj7:

° w
A‹7 D9 GŒ„Š7 A‹7 D7(#9) D7(b9) GŒ„Š7
w w w ˙˙ b˙˙ w
& w
w w
#w
w #w
w w
w #˙˙ ˙˙ #w
w
w w w w

¢⁄
5 5 3 5 6 4 3
5 5 4 5 5 5 4
5 4 4 5 4 4 4
5 5 5
5 3 5 3

° ww
A‹7(„ˆˆ11) A¨7(#11) GŒ„Š7 A‹7(„ˆˆ11) A¨7(#11) G%

& w ww
bw w
#w
w ww
w ww
bw w
w
w
w bw w w bw w
w
tritone substitution tritone substitution

¢⁄
3 3 3 3 3 3
5 5 4 5 5 2
5 4 4 5 4 2
2
5 4 3 5 4 3

b) II-V-I in Cmaj7:

° w w
D‹7 G13 CŒ„Š7 D‹7 G13 G7(b13) CŒ„Š9
w w
w w
w w ˙˙ b˙˙ w
w
& w w w w ˙ ˙ w
w w w w
˙ ˙ w

¢⁄
6 5 5 6 5 4 3
5 4 4 5 4 4 4
7 3 5 7 3 3 2
5 3 5 3
3 3 3

° w ww
D‹7 D¨7 CŒ„Š7 D‹9 D¨7(#9) C%
w
w w
w w
w w
w w
bw
& b w w w
w w w w bw
w w
w
tritone substitution tritone substitution

¢⁄
6 6 5 5 5 3
5 4 4 5 4 2
7 6 5 3 3 2
5 4 3 5 4 3

60
c) II-V-I in Fmaj7:

° w
b w bG‹7
w bG¨7
w w
G‹7 C7 FŒ„Š7 FŒ„Š7
w
w bw
w w
w w
w b ww w
w
& w w
w w w b w w
tritone substitution
6 5 6 6 5

¢⁄
6 5 5 6 5 5
7 3 5 7 6 5
5 5 3 5 4 3
3

° w
b bG‹6
w w w #w w
G‹7 = C9 F6 G‹7(„ˆˆ11) C7[áÆ] F%
w ww w w w
& ww w ww
w
w
w bw
w w
w
6 6 5 8 8 8

¢⁄
6 5 3 6 9 8
7 7 5 7 9 7
5 5 3 5 8 7

d) II-V-I in Gm7:

° bw w
A‹7(b5) A¨7(#11) G‹7 A‹7(b5) D7(#9) G‹7
bw
& w
w ww
bw bw
w
w w
w #w
w
w
bw
w
w
w bw w w w

¢⁄
4 3 3 4 6 3
5 5 3 5 5 3
5 4 3 5 4 3
5
5 4 3 5 3

e) II-V-I in Cm7:

° w w ww
D‹7(b5) G7(b13) C‹7 D‹7(b5) Dº C‹7
bw bbw bbw
& bw
w
w
w
w w
w bw
w
w bw
w
w
w
w w w

¢⁄
6 4 4 6 6 4
5 4 3 5 4 3
6 3 5 6 6 5
5 3 5 5 3
3

f) II-V-I in Fm7:

° bbw bbw bw bGº


w bbw
G‹7(b5) C7 F‹7 G‹7(b5) F‹7
w bw w bw bww w
& ww w
w w
w
w
w w w
w
w
6 4 6 6 4

¢⁄
6 5 4 6 5 4
6 3 5 6 6 5
5 5 3 5 5 3
3

61
Block Chords:

Block chords are four-string voicings with the melody tone on top of the chord in
order to harmonize the melody. For guitarists the term block chords goes with
Wes Montgomery who transferred the original piano voicings onto the guitar.

He harmonizes with these (mostly drop2-chords) the chord tones of a melody


or uses them for comping, and of course for improvising.

In the following chapter you will find the basic block chords used for harmonizing
scale tones in major, minor and dominant7.

After that you find options to play block chords in II-V-I progressions
and in turnarounds( I - VI - II - V)

62
Basic block chords

a) block chords in A minor:

w w
° w
w
A‹7 A‹9 A‹7 A‹7(„ˆˆ11) A‹7 A‹7
w w
w w ww w
w
w w w w w
& w
w w
w w w w
5 7 8 10 12 15

¢⁄
5 5 8 8 10 13
5 5 9 9 12 14
5 5 7 7 10 14

w w
°
w
A‹7
w w
A‹7 A‹7(„ˆˆ11) A‹7 A‹9 A‹7
w ww w w w w
w w w
w w
w w
w w
w
& w w
15 12 10 8 7 5

¢⁄
13 10 8 8 5 5
14 12 9 9 5 5
14 10 7 7 5 5

b) block chords in D minor:

° ww
D‹7 D‹9 D‹7
w w
D‹7(„ˆˆ11)
w
D‹7 D‹7 w
w
w w w ww w
w
& w w w w w w
w w w w
5 8

¢⁄
3 5 6 8 3 6
5 5 5 5 5 7
3 3 7 7 3 7
5 5 5 5

w w w
° w
w D‹7 D‹9
w w
D‹7
w
D‹9
w w
D‹7
w
D‹7
w
w w w w w w
w
& w w w w w

10 12 13 12 10 8

¢⁄
10 10 13 10 10 6
10 10 14 10 10 7
10 10 12 10 10 7

° ww w w
D‹7 D‹7(„ˆˆ11) D‹7 D‹9 D‹7
w
& w w
w w
w w ww
w w w w
w w
w
5

¢⁄
3 8 6 5 3
5 5 5 5 5
3 7 7 3 3
5 5 5 5

63
c) block chords in C major:

w
° w w w w
CŒ„Š7 C% CŒ„Š9 C% C6 C%
w
w ww w
w ww w
w
& w
w w w w w w
w w
3 7 8 12 8

¢⁄
5 3 5 8 10 8
4 2 7 7 12 7
5 2 5 7 10 7
3

° ww w
CŒ„Š9 C% CŒ„Š7 C6 CŒ„Š7(„ˆˆ13)
w w w
w w w
& w w
w w w
w w
w
w w w
7 3

¢⁄
5 3 5 1 0
7 2 4 2 2
5 2 5 2 2
3 3 3

d) block chords in F major:


w
° w
F% F6 F% FŒ„Š9
w w w ww
& w
w ww w
w w
w w
1 5 8 12

¢⁄
1 3 8 10
0 5 7 12
0 3 7 10

w w
° w w
F% FŒ„Š9 F% F6 F%
w ww w w w
& w w w
w ww
w w
w
w
13 12 8 5 1

¢⁄
13 10 8 3 1
12 12 7 5 0
12 10 7 3 0

64
Block Chords 2:
II - V - I progressions in Fmaj

G‹9 C9 F%
5 3 8


1
3
3
3 2
3
3 7
7
8

G‹11 G‹7 G‹9 C9 F6


8 6 5 3 5


2
6
5
7
5
6
7
3
3
3 2
3
3
3
3
5 ∑

G‹9 G‹7 G‹7(„ˆˆ11) C7[äÆ] F%

5 3 8 11 8


3
3
3
3
3
3
3 5
6
7
8
9
9 7
7
8

G‹7 G‹11 C7[áÆ] C7[äÆ] FŒ„Š9

6 8 9 11 12


4 5
6
7
5
6
7
8
9
9
8
9
9
10
10
12 ∑

G‹7 G‹7 G‹9 C7 F6


10


5
8
8
10
11
10
12 8
10
10
8
8
9
6
7
7

10 8

G‹7 C‹7(„ˆˆ11) C©7 F%


6 10 13 13 13


6 5
6
7
8
8
10
11
10
12
12
11
13 12
12
13

II - V progressions in whole steps down:


G‹9 C13 C7 F%


7 8
10
10
8
9
10 8
8
9 7
7
8

F‹11 B¨13 B¨7(b13) E¨%


6 6 6 6


8
6
8
8
6
7
8
6
7
7 5
5
6

65
E¨‹9(„ˆˆ11) A¨13(b9) D¨%
4 5 4


9 4
6
6
4
5
6
3
3
4

D‹9 G13 C‹9 F9


12 12 10 8


10 10 8 8
10 10
10 9
10 8
8 7
8

B¨‹7 E¨9 A¨‹7 D¨7(b9„ˆˆ13) F©%


6 6 4 6 9


6 6 4 3 9
11 6
6 5
6 4
4 3
4 8
8

Turnarounds:

F% D7(b9) G‹7 C7(b9)


8 10 6 8


8 7 6 5
7 8 7 6
12 7 7 5 5

FŒ„Š7 D7[áÆ] G‹9 C9(„ˆˆ13) F%


5 6 3 5 1


5 4 3 3 1
5 5 3 3 0
3 4 3 2 0

F9 D13(b9) G‹9 C13(b9)


8 11 10 9


13 8
8 11
12 10
10 9
10
7 10 8 8

F% D7(b13) G‹11 C7(b13) F9


8 8 8 8


8 11 10 9 8
7 11 10 9 8
7 8 8 7

D7[äÆ] G‹7 C7[äÆ] F%


13 11 8


11 11 9 8
11 10 9 7
10 12 8 7
10

66
VOICINGS

On the following pages you find voicings (prewritten chord progressions) and chord
melody arrangements for different standard tunes. From Blues over Rhythm
Changes to commonly played jazz-tunes.

Blues voicings:

The blues voicings are notated in F7 and in Bb7. You can use the same voicings for
both keys, but you would get into positions that are too high on the fretboard.
The audio examples start very straight, then get rhythmically and tonally more
complex each chorus. Only the notated chords are used, but they sometimes move
chromatically up and down, so you get a more complex rhythmic structure by only
using a few chord shapes. (chromatic approach)

Rhythm Changes:

These voicings start in a very reduced form, but get more complex each chorus.

Chord melody arrangements

Guideline:

1. Start with ballads where the melody is moving slowly.


2. Learn to play and sing!!! the melody.
3. Practise the root tones of the chord progression.
4. Combine the melody with the root tones.
5. Harmonize the melody with a chord on the 1st beat of each measure. Take a
basic chord (like a regular drop2 or drop3 chord)
Leave the rest as it was (melody plus root tones)
6. Harmonize the melody with a chord on the 1st and 3rd beat. That is where most
of the chord changes are.
7. Try to find chords with some colour tones to replace the basic drop2 or drop3
chords that you were using.
8. Leave out some the root tones or approach them chromatically.
9. Fill in some improvised lines between the chords or where the melody has whole
or half notes.

67
Take the "B" - Train
(in the style of "Take the A-Train") - chord melody arrangement

œ œ œ #œ œ ™
œ œœ
° ™w Œ œ œœ œœ œJ #œœœ ™™™
œ
D7(#11)
œ ˙˙
& ™w
C%

w ˙˙ ∑
w œ
j ™
™ 78
™7
Π12 7 7
12 8 12

¢⁄ 8
10 8
10
8 13
13
9
9
7 7 12 10
9
9
10
∑
7 9 9

1. 2.
œ b ˙ b˙
° œ # œ œ œbœ œb œ œœœ œ ™ ˙
œ œœ ™™ ˙˙ ™™ b˙˙ ˙˙
D‹7 G7 C% Fine D‹7 G7 C7½
w
w ˙˙ # #˙˙ b˙ ˙
& w ˙ b b˙˙
w J ˙
j ™


12 9 8 11 9

¢⁄
10 10 11 12 8 6 7 9 9
10 12 11 10 7 9 9 5 6 9 9
10 7 9 9 7 8 8 8
10 10 5 6

œœ ™™
10

° œœœ œœ ™™ œ
œœ™™
œœ ™™
FŒ„Š7 ˙˙ œœœ œœ œœ œœ œœ ˙˙ œœ #œ nœ
˙˙ œœ œœ œœ ˙˙ Œ œœ œœ bb œœ
& œ œ™ ˙ œœ œ bœ
J J
j ™ ™ j
Œ
8 8 12 8 12

¢⁄
10 10 10 10 6 10 8 10 10 10 10 9 8
9 9 9 12 5 9 7 12 9 9 9 7 6
10 10 10 10 5 10 7 10 10 10 10 9 8
8 8 8 5 8 8 8 8 7 6

° #œœj œœ ™™ œœ œœ œœ œœ ™™
œœ ™™ œ™
˙˙ œœ ˙˙ ˙˙ b ˙˙
D7 D‹7 G7

˙˙ #œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ ˙ ˙˙ ˙˙
& œœ œ™ ˙ #œœ J œ™ ˙
j
5
™ 5 12 8
j
12

¢⁄
7 7 7 12 10 7 10 10 10 10 9
5 5 5 11 11 9 9 10 10 10 10 10
7 7 7 10 10 10 7 10 10 10 9 9
5 5 5 9 9 10 10
10 10 10
D.C. al Fine

68
Take the "B" - Train
basic voicings

° w w #w #w w w ˙˙ #˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙
CŒ„Š7 D7 D‹7 G13 CŒ„Š7 A7(b13) D‹7 G13

& w
w w
w w
w w
w w
w w
w ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙
w w w w w w ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙

¢⁄
5 5 7 7 6 5 5 6 6 5
4 4 5 5 5 4 4 6 5 4
5 5 7 7 7 3 5 5 7 3
3 3 5 5 5 3 5
3 5 3

° #w w b#w w bG‹7
˙˙ G¨7
˙
CŒ„Š7 D9 D7(#11) D‹7 G7[áÆ] C%
w w w w w w w ˙ #˙˙
& w
w
w
w
w
w #w
w
w #w
w w
w w
w w
w ˙ #˙

4 5 4 3

¢⁄
5 5 5 5 5 4 3 11 11
4 4 5 5 5 4 2 10 9
5 5 4 4 3 3 2 12 11
3 3 5 10 9

° w
FŒ„Š7
w
w
F%
w
FŒ„Š7
w
w
F% D7
w
D9 D‹7 G13 G7(b13)
w w w w #w w w ˙˙ b˙˙
& w
w w w
w w w
w
w
w
#w w
w
w ˙ ˙
˙ ˙
8 8 5

¢⁄
10 8 10 8 7 5 6 5 4
9 7 9 7 5 5 5 4 4
10 7 10 7 7 4 7 3 3
8 8 5 5
3 3

° w w #w w bw ˙˙ ˙˙
CŒ„Š7 C% D9 D7(#11) D‹9(„ˆˆ11) G7(b13) C% A7[áÆ] D‹7 D¨7
w w w w w w ˙˙ ˙˙
& w
w
w
w
w #w
w #w
w w
w w
w ˙˙ #˙˙ ˙˙ #˙

3 5 4 3 3 3 5

¢⁄
5 3 5 5 5 4 3 6 6 6
4 2 5 5 5 4 2 6 5 4
5 2 4 4 3 3 2 5 7 6
3 5 4

69
Take the "B" - Train
voicings with some block chords

° w
C% D9 D‹7 G13 G7(b13) C% C6
w w w w ˙˙ b˙˙ w
& w
w
w
w
w
w #w
w
w #w
w
w
w
w
w ˙ ˙ w
w
w
w
w
w
w
˙ ˙

¢⁄
3 3 5 5 5 5 4 3 1
2 2 5 5 5 4 4 2 2
2 2 4 4 3 3 3 2 2
3 3 5 5 5 3 3
3 3

˙
° w
˙˙ w
w ˙˙ #w
CŒ„Š7 C% D7(#11) D‹7 G13 G9 C% C7[áÆ]

w w ##ww
w #w
w w ˙ w w
& w w
w #w
w
w ˙ ˙ w
w bw
w
w w
w w w

12 10 8 8

¢⁄
8 8 9 9 10 10 10 8 9
9 7 11 9 10 10 10 7 9
9 7 10 10 10 9 9 7 8
7 9
8 8 10 10

w
° w
FŒ„Š7
w
F%
w ww
F6 F%
w
w #w
D7
w
D9 D‹7(„ˆˆ11) D‹7
˙˙ ˙˙
D‹9 G7

w
w w w w w w ˙˙ ˙˙
& w w w w
w #w
w ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙ ˙
8 12 8 5

¢⁄
10 8 10 8 7 5 8 6 5 3
9 7 12 7 5 5 5 5 5 4
10 7 10 7 7 4 7 7 3 3
8 5 5 5

˙˙
°
D‹9
C%
w w
C9 D7(#11)
#w #w
D‹7
˙˙ ˙˙˙ ˙˙
G9
˙˙
C% A7[áÆ]
b ˙˙
D‹7 G7[áÆ]
˙˙
w ww w w ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ b#˙˙˙
#w #w ˙˙ ˙
& w w #˙˙ ˙˙
w w w ˙

3 7 4 4 5 8 12 10 8 6 5 4

¢⁄
3 5 5 5 3 6 10 10 8 6 5 4
2 7 5 5 5 7 10 10 7 6 5 4
2 5 4 4 3 7 10 9 7 5 3 3

70
All the things you are:


F‹7 B¨‹7 E¨7 A¨Œ„Š7
9 8


9 9 9 8 8 8 8 8 8 8
8 10 6 6 5 8 5
10 8 8 8 6 6 6
8 6

D¨Œ„Š7 D‹7(b5) G7(b9) CŒ„Š7 D‹7 E‹7 D‹7


7


6 6 6 6 5 6 8 6
5 5 7 4 4 5 7 5
6 6 6 6 5 7 9 7
4 5 5 3 5 7 5


C‹7 F‹7 B¨7 E¨Œ„Š7
4


4 4 4 8
3 5 7 7 7 7 7 7 7
5 3 6 5 8 5
3 5 6 6 6
6

A¨Œ„Š7 A‹7 A¨7(#11) G% G6


3 GŒ„Š7

Œ
3 7


3 4 3 3 3 5
5 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 4 2 7
5 5 4 4 4 4 2 5
3 2
4 5 4 4 3

A‹11 A‹7 D7 GŒ„Š7 G% G6

Œ
10 8 8 8 7 3 7


8 8 7 7 3 3 5
9 9 9 6 7 7 4 2 7
7 7 7 5 4 2 5

F©‹11 B7(b9) B7(b9) E6 C7(b13)

Œ
7 5 5 4


5 4 4 2 9
6 5 3 4 5 4 9
4 4 4 2 8
8


F‹7 B¨‹7 E¨7 A¨Œ„Š7
9 8


9 9 9 8 8 8 8 8 8 8
8 10 6 6 5 8 5
10 8 8 8 6 6 6
8 6

D¨Œ„Š7 D¨‹9 D¨‹7 C‹7 E7(#9) E7(b9)


11 9


6 9 9 8 6
5 9 9 8 8 8 8 7 7
6 9 8 8 6 6
4
8 7 7

B¨‹7 B¨‹9 E¨9(„ˆˆ13) E¨9 A¨6 G‹7(b5) C7(b9)


8 13


6 9 6 13 8 9 11 11
6 6 6 6 12 10 10 10 9
6 6 8 6 11 11 10 11 11
11 10 10
6 11

71
Autum Leaves easy voicings

A section 1: three-voice chords

° w
A‹7 D7 GŒ„Š7 CŒ„Š7 F©‹7 B7 E‹7 Fº

& w w #w w w w w #w
#w
w w w
w w #w
w w w
w w #w w w

¢⁄
5 5 4 4 2 2 0 1
5 4 4 2 2 1 0 0
5 3 2
5 3 2 0 1

A section 2: four-voice chords

° w
A‹7 D9 GŒ„Š7 CŒ„Š7 F©‹7(b5) B7(#9) E‹7
w w w w
& w
w #w
w
w #w
w w
w
w
w
w
w #w
w
w
w
w
w
w
w
w w #w w
w w

¢⁄
5 5 3 5 1 3 0 0
5 5 4 4 2 2 0 0
5 4 4 5 2 1 0 0
5 3 2
5 3 2 0 0

Bridge: four-voice chords

° w
subst for B7 subst for D7

bw w w
F©‹7(b5) F©º E‹7 A‹7 A¨7(#11) GŒ„Š7 CŒ„Š7
w w w w w w w w
& #w
w #w
w w
w
w
w
w
w #w
w #w
w w
w
w
w #w w

¢⁄
10 10 8 8 5 3 3 5
9 8 7 7 5 5 4 4
10 10 9 9 5 4 4 5
9 9 7 7 3
5 4 3

° w ˙˙ #˙
F©‹7(b5) B7(#9) E‹7 E¨‹7 D‹7 D¨‹7 F©‹7(b5) B7(#9) B7(b9) E‹7 Fº
w ˙˙b# ˙˙ ˙˙ b˙˙ w ˙˙ ˙˙ w
& w
w #w
w b˙ ˙˙ bb˙˙ w
w # ˙˙ ˙˙ w
w #w
w
w
#w w #w w w

¢⁄
1 3 8 7 6 5 1 3 1 0 0
2 2 7 6 5 4 2 2 2 0 1
2 1 9 8 7 6 2 1 1 0 0
2 7 6 5 4 2 2
2 2 0 1

72
Autum Leaves comping exercise

73
74
75
76
77
78
79
Blue and Green
in the style of "Blue in Green" as played by Kenny Burrell

˙
° b˙˙˙
B¨Œ„Š7(#11)
˙ ˙
A7[äÆ]

D‹7/F
œœ ˙ œF7(b9„ˆˆ13)
˙ C‹11

#˙˙˙ œ œ bœœ #˙˙


& œ b œ ˙
˙
12 10 8 6 10 10

¢⁄
10 6 10 10 8 6 7
10 6 9 8 8
8 5 10 8 7
0 8

° œœ ™™
B¨%(#11)
œ œœ
A7[äÆ]
œ
D‹11(„ˆˆ13)
œœ ˙
& œ™ œ #œ œ œ #œœ Œ Œ œœ œ
bœ ™ J œ
™ j
Œ Œ
5 8 5 3 3

¢⁄
5 6 6 5 6
5 7 6 7 6 4
5 5 3
5
6

œ œ œ
° œœœ œ œ #œ œ
E7[äÆ] A‹(Œ„Š9) A‹9 D‹(Œ„Š7) D‹
œœ œ œœ œ œ œ
& #œœ #œœ nœœ #œœ nœœ

8 8 8 4 7 7 7 5 13 13 13 8

¢⁄
8 5 5 10 10
7 5 5 10 10
6 6 5 11 10
7

80
Blue Boss
in the style of "Blue Bossa"

1. melody

™ j j j ™ j
C‹7 C‹11 C‹7 C‹9 C‹7 F‹7 F‹9 F‹7

Œ
15 13 11 10 8 8 15 13 13


13 11 11 8 8 8 11 9 13 13 13
15 12 12 8 8 8 8 13 13 13
13 10 10 8 8 8 10 13 13 13
8

™ ™
D‹7(b5) j j j
G7(#9) G7(b9) C‹7 C‹11
j
C‹7
13 11 10 8 13 11 11


6 6
13 10 9 7 6 6 9 8 11 11 11
13 11 10 8 4 4 5 12 12 12
12 10 9 7 5 5 8 10 10 10

™ j j j
E¨‹7 A¨7 D¨Œ„Š7 D¨%
11 6 4 4


11 14 13 11 9 9 7 7 6 6 6 4 4
11 11 11 11 5 6 5 6 5 3 3
11 13 10 10 6 7 6 6 6 3 3
5 4

D‹7(b5) G7(#9) D‹7(b5) G7(#9) G7(b9) C‹7 G7[äÆ]


9 8 11 11 9 8 11 11 9 8 11 11
10 10 10 10 10 10 10 8 8 8
10 9 9 10 9 9 9 8 9 9
10 10 10 10 10 10 10
10 10 8

2. Voicings (2 chords per measure)


C‹7 F‹7 D‹7(b5) G7 C‹7
10 13 11 11 8 6 4


8 8 11 11 9 9 6 9 6 4 4 4 4
8 8 12 12 8 8 8 8 5 4 4 3 3
8 8 10 10 10 10 6 10 6 3 3 5 5
8 8 8 5 3 3
8
E¨‹7 A¨7 D¨Œ„Š7 D‹7(b5) G7(#9) C‹7 G7(#9)


6 6 5 4 4 6 8 11 9 8 11
6 5 5 5 3 5 5 8 8 8 8
4 4 4 3 3 6 6 9 9 8 9
6 4 4 5 5 8 8 10
4 4 8

C‹7 F‹7 D‹7(b5) G7 C‹7


8 11 11 10 10


4 6 8 11 9 11 6 9 9 11 8 8
3 3 5 8 8 8 8 10 10 10 8 8
5 5 8 10 10 10 6 10 10 9 8 8
3 3 8 8

E¨‹7 A¨7 D¨Œ„Š7 D‹7(b5) G7(#9) C‹7


6 4 8 3


4 7 6 4 6 4 6 8 6 4 4 3 3
6 6 6 5 5 3 8 5 5 4 4 3 3
4 8 4 4 6 3 6 6 6 3 3 1 1
6 4 5 5 3 3
3

81
Blues voicings in F7
see Guitartraining add-on #8 for more voicings and videos

1.
F9 B¨13 F9 F7(b9) B¨9 B¨7(b9)


8 8 8 7 6 6
8 7 8 8 5 4
7 6 7 7 6 6
8 8 8 5 5
6

F13 D7(#9) G‹9 C7(b13) F9 D7(b13) G‹9 C7(b13)


6 6 10 9 8 11 10 9
7 5 10 9 8 11 10 9
7 4 8 8 7 10 8 8
6 5 10 8 10
8 10 8

2.
F9 B¨13 F9 F7[äÆ] B¨13 B¨7(b13)
8 8 8 9 6 6


8 8 8 9 8 7
8 7 8 8 7 7
7 6 7 7 6 6

F9 D7[áÆ] G‹9(„ˆˆ11) C7[áÆ] F9 D7[áÆ] G9 C7[áÆ]

8 11 8 8 8 11 10 9


8 11 10 9 8 11 10 9
8 11 10 9 8 11 10 9
7 10 8 8 7 10 9 8

F13 B¨9 B¨7(b9) F13 F7(b13) B¨9 B¨7(b9)


3.


6 6 6 6 6 6 6
7 5 4 7 6 5 4
7 6 6 7 7 6 6
6 5 5 6 6 5 5

F13 D7[áÆ] G‹9(„ˆˆ11) C7[äÆ] C7[áÆ] F9 D7[äÆ] G13 C7[äÆ]

10 8 11 9 8 6 5 4


6 11 10 9 9 8 6 5 4
7 11 10 9 9 8 5 4 3
7 10 8 8 8 7 4 3 2
6

82
Blues voicings in Bb7

1.
B¨7 E¨7 B¨7 E¨7


7 6 7 7 6 6
6 5 6 6 5 5
6 6 6 6 6 6

B¨7 G7 C‹7 F7 B¨7 D¨7 C7 B7


7 4 8 8 7 10 9 8
6 3 8 7 6 9 8 7
6 3 8 8 6 9 8 7

2.
B¨13 E¨9 B¨13 B¨7(b13) E¨9 E¨9


8 6 6 7 6 6
7 6 5 7 6 6
6 5 6 6 5 5
6 5 6 6
6 6

B¨9 G7(#9) C‹7 F7(#9) F7(b9) B¨7 D¨7 C7 B7


6 11 8 9 7 6
5 10 8 8 8 7 10 9 8
6 9 8 7 7 6 9 8 7
5 10 8 8 8 7 6
8 6 9 8 7

3.
B¨13 E¨9 B¨13 B¨7(b13) E¨9 E¨7(b9)
6 6 6 6 6 6


8 6 8 7 6 5
7 6 7 7 6 6
6 5 6 6 5 5

B¨13 G7(#9) C‹7 F13 F9 B¨13 G7[áÆ] C9 F7[áÆ]

6 6 8 10 8 6 4 3 2


8 6 8 8 8 8 4 3 2
7 4 8 8 8 7 4 3 2
6 5 8 7 7 6 3 2 1

83
Blues voicings (Parker Blues)

1. FŒ„Š7 E‹7(b5) A7(b9) D‹7 D¨7 C‹7 B7 B¨Œ„Š7 B¨‹7


10 8 8 6 6 4 4 3 6
9 7 6 5 4 3 2 2 6
10 8 8 7 6 5 4 3 6
8 7 7 5 4 3 2 1
6

A‹7 A¨‹7 G‹7 G‹9 G‹11 C7[äÆ] F% D7(b9) G‹7 C7(b9)

7 6 5 8 11 8 8 6 6


5 4 3 3 6 9 8 7 6 5
5 4 3 3 7 9 7 8 7 6
5 4 3 3 5 8 7 7 5 5
5 4 3

F% A7[äÆ] A7[áÆ] D‹9 G7[áÆ] C‹9 F7[áÆ] B¨% B¨9 B¨‹9 E¨9
2.
8 8 6 5 4 3 2 1 5 8 6


8 6 6 5 4 3 2 1 3 6 6
7 6 6 5 4 3 2 0 5 6 6
7 5 5 3 3 1 1 0 3 6 5

A‹9 D9 A¨‹9 D¨9 G‹9 G‹7 G‹11 C7[äÆ] F% A¨% G% G¨%

7 5 6 4 5 3 8 11 8


5 5 4 4 3 3 6 9 8 11 10 9
5 5 4 4 3 3 7 9 7 10 9 8
5 4 4 3 3 3 5 8 7 10 9 8

3. F% FŒ„Š7 E‹7(b5) D‹11 D¨7(#11) C‹11 B7(#11) B¨% B¨Œ„Š7 B¨‹9 E¨9

8 5 8 8


8 10 10 8 8 8 6 6 6 6 9 8
7 9 7 7 10 10 8 8 5 7 10 10
7 10 8 8 10 9 8 7 5 8 11 11
8 7 7
10 9 8 7 6

A‹9 D9 A¨‹9 D¨9 G‹9 G‹11 C7[äÆ] C7[áÆ] F% D7(b13) G‹11 C7(b13)

7 7 6 6 5 8 11 9 8 8 8 8


8 7 7 6 6 6 9 9 8 11 10 9
9 9 8 8 7 7 9 9 7 11 10 9
10 10 9 9 8 8 8 8 7

84
Body and so
in the style of "Body and Soul"

° bœœ bœ œ œ œ œ œœ ™ bœ bœ œ
nœœ ™™J bœœœ bœœœ bœœ
E¨‹7 B¨7(b9) A¨13 A¨7(b13) D¨% C7(b9) F‹7 B¨‹7 B¨‹9 E¨9
b œ œ œ œ b œ œb œ œ œ œ b b œœ
Ϫ
bœœ œ
œ bb œ
œ b œ
& bbœœ bœ œ bœœ œ bœ œ


j
6 6 5 5 4 4 6 4 6 4 11 9 8 6

¢⁄
6 4 6 4 6 4 6 5 4 5 9 9 6 6
6 4 5 5 3 6 8 10 6 6
4 6 4 4 3 5 10 8 6 5
6 4 8
6

° bœœ ™™b bœœ bœœœ


1. 2.

œœ bœ bœj bœ œ b œœ b œ œœ bbw ™™ bb˙˙
E¨‹9 A¨13 Aº B¨‹7 E¨‹7 A¨7 D¨6 D¨6 A13
œœ b˙
& bbœœ ™™ b œJ œ
˙
œœ œœœ b˙˙ œ ‰b œ bœœ bœ w w n˙˙
b˙ nœ bœ b b œ bw b˙˙ ˙
3

™ j9 j
3 Fine




6 6

¢⁄
6 7 4 7 6 6 4 6 9 1 2 2 7
6 8 6 6 3 5 5 6 8 6 3 3 3 4
4 8 4 8 4 4 4 6 8 4 3 3 5
6 6 6 6 4 4
4 5 6 4 5

°
œœ œ
œœ bbœœ nnœœœ œ œJ bœ œœ œ nœ bœœ
DŒ„Š7 A7(b9) E‹7(„ˆˆ11) D% G‹9 F©‹7 E‹7 A7 D

œ œœ œ œ œœ bœ
œ b
& œbœ n œ œ œ J bœœ J bœœ J nœœ b œœ bww
œ J J J J œ ww
j j j j j j j j
10 10

¢⁄
3 5 7 10 10 10 10 7 10 10 8 7 7 5
4 3 6 7 9 10 9 7 7 6 2
4 5 5 9 9 8 7 5 5 4
5 0 7 10 9 7 4 5
5 5

° œœ œ œ œœœ œA‹11œ œœ œ œ D‹7


œœ œ œ G7œ G13
D‹7 G13(„ˆˆ9) C6 C7 B7 B¨7 A7(b9)
œ
œœ œœ œœœ
& œœ œ œ œœ J œ œœœ œœ J œœ œœœ œœœ œœœ bœœ bœœ bœœ bœœœ
J J J J œJ J œ œœ bœ œ
œ bœ
j j j j j j j j
5 5 3 12 12 7 10 10 5 8 8 5 7 3 5

¢⁄
3 5 6 5 10 5 8 6 3 6 5 6
5 4 5 4 12 7 9 5 5 7 4 9 8 7 6
3 3 7 3 10 5 7 7 3 5 3 8 7 6 5
5 5 5 7 6 5
8 7 6

D.C. al fine

85
Lullaby of Dirtland
(in the style of "Lullaby of Birdland")

j ™
F‹7 D‹7(b5) G‹7 C7 F‹7 B¨9

8 3 1 1


6 11 9 8 6 3 6 5 5 1 1 1 1
8 8 8 5 5 3 3 3 1 1 1 1
6 10 10 6 6 3 5 5 1 1 0 0
8 8 5 5 3 3
3 1


B¨‹7 E¨9 A¨% F‹7
j B¨‹7 E¨7 j

8 6 6 11 11 9 8 8 6 8 6


6 6 6 11 9 6 11 9 6 5 4
6 6 6 6 10 10 8 8 8 6 6 5
6 6 5 5 10 8 6 10 10 6 5 5
8 8 6
6 6 4

1. 2.
j j A¨%


A¨Œ„Š7 D¨7 C7 A¨Œ„Š7


‰ ‰
6 4 4 3 3 4


4
5
5
2
3
4
2
4
3
1
2
3
1
3
2
4
5
5
4
2
2
3
3
3
4
∑
4 4 3 3
4 4


dim chord substitution
F7(b9) B¨‹7 E¨7(b9)


8 9 10 11 11 9 9 6 7 8 9 9 8


Ó
7 8 9 10 10 9 9 5 6 7 8 8 8
8 9 10 11 11 10 10 6 7 8 9 9 8
7 8 9 10 10 8 8 5 6 7 8 8 6


F7(b9) B¨‹7
A¨Œ„Š7


8 8 9 10 11 11 9 9


Ó
8 7 8 9 10 10 9 9
8 8 9 10 11 11 10 10
6 7 8 9 10 10 8 8

E¨7(b9) A¨Œ„Š7
C7

6 7 8 9 9 8 8


5 6 7 8 8 8 8 11 9 8 8
6 7 8 9 9 8 8 10 10 9 9
5 6 7 8 8 6 6 9 9 8 8

D.C. thru 2nd ending

86
Pent up House
4 different voicings

A‹7 A¨7(#11) GŒ„Š7 A‹7 D9 GŒ„Š7


tritone subst


1 5
5
5
3
4
5
3
4
4
 5
5
5 4
5
5
3
4
4

5
5 4 3 5 3

D‹7 G13 C‹7 F13 A‹11 A¨7(#11) G%


tritone subst



6 5 4 3 3 3 3
5 4 3 2 5 5 2
7 3 5 1 5 4 2
5 3
3 1 5 4 3

A‹7 A¨7(#9) GŒ„Š9 A‹9 D7(b9) GŒ„Š7


tritone subst
7 7 7
 

12 12 10 8 7 7
2 10
12
12
11
10
11
9
11
10
9
10
9
10
7
9
10

D‹11 D¨7(#11) C‹7 B7(#11) A‹7 D7(#9) GŒ„Š7


tritone subst tritone subst



8 8 8 6 5 6 7
10 10 8 8 5 5 4
10 9 8 7 5 4 5
5
10 9 8 7 5 3

A‹9 D9 GŒ„Š9 G6 A‹11 D9 G% G6


drop2 block chords:
7 5 5 3 10 10 10 7


3 5
5
5 4
5
5
3
4
4 2
3
4
7
8
9
7
7
9
10
9
9
5
5
7

D‹7 D‹11 D‹7 D‹7 C‹7 C‹11 C‹7 C‹7 A‹7 D13 G%
5 8 3 6 5 7 10


5
6
7
5
8
7
3
3
5
6
7
7
3
4
5
3
6
5
1
1
3
4
5
5
5
5
5 4
5
5
10
9
9

5 5 3 3

A‹9 A‹7 A‹11 D¨7 G% A‹9 D7 A‹7 D7 GŒ„Š9


7 5 10 10 10


5 5 8 9 10 12 10 8 7 10 8
4 5
5
5
5 7
9
8
10 9
9 10
12 11
10
9
10
9
10 9
11 9
10

D‹11 D‹7 D‹9 G7 C‹7 C‹11 C‹7 C‹7 A‹9 D7b913 G9


3 6 7 7 10


8 6 5 3 4 6 1 4 5 4 10
5 5 5 4 3 3 3 5 5 5 11
7 7 3 3 5 5 1 5 5 4 9
5 5 3 3

87
I´ve grown accustomed to your grace
(in the style of "I've grown accustomed to your face") arr: Wes Montgomery

! #""" " " """ " " #""" " #"" " "" " " $"
1. 2.

## #"" & $""" '""" ##"""


3 3 E 3

! #" " " " #%% $$%%%%


##"" #"" ##"" #"" %% "" "" "
" " " " "
E F/E E Am6 E D/E E FŒ„!7(#11) A(“4) A13
3 3 3

#
#
&
"$
4 4 4 5 7 5 4 4
5 6 5 5 7 5 3 0 0 3 5 7
4 5 4 5 4 4 2 5 1 4 1 4 3 6
6 7 6 7 6 4 2 3 2 5 5 5
7 2 2 3 2 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0

! ###""" " " % "" " " " " #" """ " " %%% "" " " #"" " "
! # ""
6 3 3 3 3

$$%% # "" #""" " % " "


3 $% #" 3
" "
DŒ„!7 G13 F©‹7 B‹7 B7b9 E‹11 E‹7 A7(“4) A13 A7(b9)
3 3 3 3 3 3

#
#
"$
5 5 5 5
7 5 5 5 5 3 5 7 10 10 10 8 8 8 8 7 8
6 4 2 2 5 7 7 7 6 6
7 3 2 4 7 9 5 5 5 8
5 4 2 6 7 7 0 0
3 2

! #""" " " $""" ### #"" #""" " " $'""" #'#"""
# $ "" #" "
$$""" & $"""'$"""# "" ##
#"" "
1.
$"
#" # $"" # "
#"
10

! # "" " &'' "" $$ """ & ""$'"" &'#'"""


( 3
3 3 3 3 3
3

A13
# 4)
A¨‹7(b5) D¨7(b9) F©‹11 B7(b9) E‹7 B7(b9) E‹7
3 3 3 3 3 3 3

#
#
& & 79 & &
"$
9 9 9 7 7 7 7 5 6 7 5
7 6 3 5 4 7 8 10 7 8 4 5 7 8
7 7 4 6 5 6 7 8 5 7 2 3 6
9 6 3 4 4 8 9 9 10 7 9 4 5 5
6 7 8 9 6 7 0
9

! #""" # " " $""" " ' " #""" $ " " $'""" " #" $""" " "'#""" * "#"$" '#""" " " $"" " " "
$
14 2.

! #" " #" " $" " " *


$" $"
3 3 3 3 3 3
A¨‹7(b5) D¨7(9) F©‹ B7(9) E‹7 A13 F©‹7(b13) B7[áÆ]
3 3 3 3 3 3

* *7
"$
7 9 7 9 7 6 5 7 5 7 5 4 3 5 3 5 3 2
7 6 5 4 3 7 5 7 8 7 8 5
7 7 6 5 4 6 7 5 7
6 9 4 7 2 5 8 7
0
8 7

88
play this bar when you al %

! ##"" " " '"" & " #"" " " "" & #"" " " "" "" # %%%
arrive here for the 2nd time

%% ' #"" $""#""" "


18 3 3 3 1. 2.

! "" "" "" "" " "" # %


$" # " # #%% $ "# " #%
" #" $ " " "
" 3
E‹% G‹7 F©‹7 B‹7 E‹9 A(“4) Dmaj9 A13 D6/9
3 3 3 3

& &
"$
2 2 2 5 5 5
7 7 7 3 5 2 3 7 7 7 3 3 4 5 2 3 7 7 10
6 3 2 2 7 4 4 5 6 3 4 6 6 9
5 3 2 4 5 5 2 3 4 3 4 7 5 9
7 4 2 7 0 3 4 5 0 9
0 3 2

"" #" " " "" ## " $"" " # " " # "" # """
"
!
##"" " " $ "
#"" ## ( $ "
"" #"" %% """ '""" ##"""
22 3
"" " #" " ""
! #" # " #" #"" $%
" " % " " "

#
A¨‹7(b5) D¨7[áÆ] F©‹7 D‹7 AŒ„!9 F©‹7 B‹7 E9 A(“4)
) 3

"$
9 9 9 7 9 10 12 9
7 10 9 7 9 10 10 10 12 12 10 10 7 5 3 5 7
7 7 9 10 13 9 7 7 7 4 3 6
9 9 11 10 11 11 7 6 5 5 5 5
9 9 9 7 0 0 4 0
9 9 10 0 7 0
D.C. al Coda thru 2nd ending

% ! $ ""
# " " " $"" " " #""" " #"" "
" $
26 3 3

$ "" " " $"


! #" "
##"" #""" # ""
# #""" #%%
%% $$%%%%
" " " "
E F/E E D E D/E E FŒ„!7(#11)
3 3
4 4

"$
4 4 4 5 7 5
5 6 5 5 7 5 3 0
4 5 4 5 4 4 2 5 1 4
6 7 6 7 6 4 2 3
7 2 2 3
0 0 0 0 0 0

+
! #""" " " #"" " " #""" " " $""
" " " " "
"" " " """ "
+
3

##+
#
30 3 3

+
! #" #"" #" " #" +
" 3 " 3 " +
E D E F(#11) E D‹ E%
3 3 3 3 3

"$
4 4 4 2 2 2 4 4 4 7 7 7 7 7 7 10 7 12
5 3 5 6 5 10 12
4 2 4 5 4 10 11
6 4 6 7 6 7 11
11
0 0 0 0 0 0 0

89
Giant Claps
in the style of "Giant Steps"

bbB%
˙˙
° bb˙˙
n˙ œœ ™™ bnœœ
D13 GŒ„Š7 B¨13 E¨% A‹9 D9
b ˙˙ #˙˙˙ w ˙ ˙˙
bœ ™ œœ
˙ w
w ˙˙
& ˙
J
w ˙ b˙˙
14 10
™ j
7 5

¢⁄
14 12 12 11 11 5 5
13 11 11 12 10 10 5 5
13 10 12 12 10 10 5 4
10 11 10 10

° ˙˙˙ œœ ™™
˙
bœœ ™™
G%
b ˙˙
B¨13 E¨Œ„Š7
˙˙
F©13
# œj B%
w
F‹9
˙
B¨7
b œœ
E¨%

& b˙˙ b ˙˙
b
nœ ™
## œœ w
w bb˙˙˙ œ™ œœ
#œ w J
10 6
™ j ™ 6
j

¢⁄
10 8 8 7 7 8 6 6
9 7 7 8 6 6 8 7 5
9 6 8 8 6 6 6 6 5
6 7 6 6 8

œœ ™™ #b œœ ™™
œœ
bbB%
°
œœ w
## ˙˙˙
A‹9 D9 G% C©‹9 F©9

#œ ™™
w ˙˙
bœœ ™™
w œœ w
w œ bœœ
& w
w ˙˙ w ˙ J
J
6 7 5
™ 10
j
10 11 9
™ j
14

¢⁄
6 5 5 10 10 9 9 14
5 5 5 9 9 9 9 13
5 5 4 9 9 9 8 13

œœ ™™™ b œœ w
F‹9 B¨9 E¨% C©‹9 F©7(b9)
w ˙ w # ˙˙ b˙
°
w
w bb˙˙˙ œœ ™ œœ w
w ##˙˙ bn ˙˙
w J ˙
&

14 15 13
™ 18
j
18 14 14

¢⁄
14 13 13 18 18 12 11
13 13 13 17 17 13 12
13 13 12 17 17 11 11

90
Have you met Mrs Bones
in the style of "Have you met Mrs Jones"

™ j j j j j j
FŒ„Š7 F©º (subst for D7) G‹7
A

5 2 5 8 6 3 5


3 3 1 3 1 1 1 4 7 6 3 5 6 3 3
5 2 2 2 2 5 8 7 3 3 3 3
3 2 1 1 1 4 7 5 3 5 3 3
2 2 3

j j ™ ™ j j j ™
1.
C7 C13 C13(b9) A‹7(„ˆˆ11) D‹7


G‹7(„ˆˆ11) C9


‰ 57
6 8 8 9 10 5 8 8


10 10 10 8 8 6 8 6 6 6 5
9 9 9 9 5 5 7 7
5 8 8 8 7 7 7 5 5
5 5

B
™ ™ ™
j j j j
2.
C‹7 F13 B¨Œ„Š7 A¨‹7
j D¨9 G¨Œ„Š9 E‹7
j

8 10 10 10 8 6 4 4 4 4 4 2


8 8 6 6 8 4 4 4 4 2 5
8 8 7 4 4 4 4 3 6 8 7
8 7 7 4 4 3 3 3 5
7

™ 6j
A7 DŒ„Š7 D% A¨‹7(„ˆˆ11) G¨Œ„Š7 G‹7 G¨7
5 9 9 6 6 6


5 5 5 5 3 7 5 7 6 4 4 6 5
7 6 6 6 4 6 4 8 7 6 6 7 6
5 5 5 4 4 7 4 6 6 4 4 5 4
7 7 7 5 5
(tritone subst)

™ j E&7j j ™ j j j j j j j j
FŒ„Š7 E¨6 D7 G‹7 B¨13 C13
A
‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰
5 3 5 6 8 10 12


3 3 5 6 3 3 8 10 10 10
5 7 5 7 5 5 5 5 3 3 3 3 7 9 9 12
3 6 5 5 4 4 3 5 3 3 6 8 8 10
7 6 6 5 5
3

™ j ™ j ™ j
A‹7 D13(b9) G‹7 C7 F% D7(#9) G‹7 C(“4)

‰ Œ™
12 11 10


10 12 8 10 8 6 6 6 6 6 6 6
12 11 10 10 9 7 5 5 3 3 7 7
10 10 8 8 8 7 4 4 3 3 8 8
5 5 5 5
3 3 8 8

91
Girl from Ipanema
chord arrangement (easy)

° b
FŒ„Š7 G13 G7

& œœ
œœ ‰ j œœ œœ ‰ j nœœœ œœ ‰
œ j nœœ
œ
œœ ‰
œ j
œ œ œ œ
œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ
j j j j
1 ‰ 1 ‰
4 ‰
3 ‰

¢⁄
1 1 5 5 3
2 2 2 2 4 4 4
2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

° ™™
G‹7 G¨7(#11) FŒ„Š7 G¨7(#11)

&b bœœœ œœ ‰ j
œ œœœ œœœ‰ j œœ
œ
œœ ‰ j œœ œœ Ó
œ œ œ
œ œœ œ #œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ #œ œ
j j j

Fine


3 ‰ 1 ‰ 1 ‰

¢⁄
3 Ó
3 1 1 1 1
3 3 3 3 2 2 3
3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2
3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 2

° b nœœ œœ ‰ j nœœ œœ ‰
F©Œ„Š7 B13
# œ
œ bœœ ‰ #œ
œ bœœ ‰
& #œ # œ œ œ #œ # œ œ n œ n œ œ œj j j
œ nœ œ œ œ
j j j j
10 ‰ 10 ‰ 8 ‰ 8‰

¢⁄ 9 9 9
10 10 6 6
8 8 8 8 7 7 7 7
9 9
9 9 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7

° b bnœœ œœ j b œœ œœ
F©‹9 D9
œ #œœ ‰ j œœ #œœ ‰ j
& #œn œ # œ œ œ œ #œ nœ # œ œ œ ‰ œj œ#nœœ
‰ œ œ œ #œ œ œ
nœ œ œœ

j j j j
‰ ‰ ‰ ‰
¢⁄
9 9 9 9 5 7 5 7
9 9 9 9 5 5 5 5
7 7 7 7 4 4 4 4
9 9 9 5 5 5 5 10
9 9 9 9 5 5 5 5

92
° nœœ œœ j œœ œœ œœ œœ j #œœ œœ
G‹9 E¨9

b
& œ œœ œ œ ‰ œ
œ œ œ œ bœ bœ œ œ ‰ j # ‰
œ œ bœ œ œ‰ j
œœ œœ œ
j j j j
10 ‰ 10 ‰
6 ‰ 6 ‰

¢⁄ 10 10 10
10 10 6 8 6 8
10 10 10 10 6 6
8 8 8 8 5 5 5 5
10 10 6 6 6 6
10 10 6 6 6 6 5

° b
A‹7(b5) A¨7(#11)

nbœœœ œœ ‰
j ‰ #œœœ œœœ ‰
= D7b5
& œ j j
œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ
j j j
‰ ‰ ‰
¢⁄
4 4 3 3
5 5 5 5
5 5 4 4
5 5 5 5 4 4 4 4

° b
G‹7 G¨7(#11)

& j ‰ œ
œ œ
œ ‰ j
= C7b5
j ‰ œœœ œœ ‰ j
nœ œ œ
œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ
j j j j
‰ 33 ‰ ‰ 13 ‰
¢⁄ 3
3 1
3 3
3 3 2 2
3 3 3 2 2 2 2

D.C. al fine

93
How low the moon
in the style of "How high the moon"

™ j
GŒ„Š9 G6 G‹7 D7(b9) G‹7 C7(b9)


A

Œ Œ Œ
3 5 5 7 7 3 5 6 1 3


3 5 4 3 5 5 3 3 4 6 1 2
5 5 4 7 7 3 5 7 3
4 4 5 5 3 4 5 2

™ j
F9 F6 F‹7 B¨7

Œ Œ
3 5 5 1 3 4


1 3 3 1 2 4 3 4 6
2 5 5 3 5 5 5 4
2 3 3 2 3 6 6 6

1.
E¨Œ„Š7 A‹7(b5) D7(b9) 3 G‹7 A‹11 D7(b9) 3

3 3 5 3 5 6 3 3 5 3 5


8 8 8 8 4 4 6 5 4
7 5 5 7 5 5
8 4 5 4
6 0 0

GŒ„Š7 A‹7 D7[áÆ] D9 B‹7 B¨7 A‹7(„ˆˆ11) D11 D7(b9)



Œ
7 5 7 8 10 10 10 10 10 3 5


7 5 4 7 10 9 8 3 5 4
7 5 5 9 11 10 9 5 5
5 5 4 7 9 8 7 4

2.
GŒ„Š7 A‹7 D7[áÆ] D9 B‹7 B¨7 A‹7(„ˆˆ11) D11 D7(b9) G6

Π55
7 5 7 8 10 10 10 10 10 3 5 3

⁄ 5
7
7
5
4
4
5
7
7
9
10
9
11
9
8
10
7
8
9
3 5
5
4
4
5 4
5
5
∑

94
How high the moon voicings

G% G6 G‹7 G‹7 F% F6 F‹7 F‹7


A 10 7 10 6 8 5 8 4


10 5 8 6 8 3 6 4
9 7 10 7 7 5 8 5
9 5 8 5 7 3 6 3

E¨% E¨Œ„Š7 A‹7(b5) D7(b9) G‹7 A‹7(b5) D7(b9)


6 8 8 6 8 8


6 8 8 7 6 8 7
5 7 8 8 7 8 8
5 8 7 7 5 7 7
6

GŒ„Š7 A‹7 B‹7 B¨7 A‹11 D7(b9)


7 8 10 10 10 10


7 8 10 9 8 7
7 9 11 10 9 8
5 7 9 8 7 7

G% G6 G9 G6 G‹7 G‹11 G‹9 C9


A2
10 7 5 3 6 8 5 3


10 5 3 3 6 6 3 3
9 7 4 4 7 7 3 3
9 5 4 2 5 5 3 2

F% FŒ„Š7 FŒ„Š9 F6 F‹9 B¨7 B¨7½ B¨7(b9)


8 9 7


8 10 8 6 8 8 7 7
7 9 5 5 8 7 7 7
7 10 7 7 6 6 6 6
8 7 5

E¨% A‹7(b5) D7[äÆ] G% GŒ„Š7

6 8 10 13 11 10


6 8 11 10 12 10 8
5 8 11 9 11 11 9
5 7 10 9 12
10

B‹7 B¨7(#11) A‹7 A¨7(#11) G%


3 3


7 5 5 3 3 3
7 7 5 5 2 2
7 6 5 4 2 2

95
Misterious
(in the style of "Misty")

° b œœ œ
™™ ˙˙˙ ™™™™ œ œ œ œ E¨13
œ œ œ
œœ œœ œœ
E¨Œ„Š7 B¨‹7

&b b Ó Œ œœ œœ œ œ ##œœ nœ œ
˙ œ




Œ
6 8 8 8 8 6

¢⁄
Ó
6 8 3 6 6 8 4
5 7 3 5 6 6 6 6
5 8 5 8 6 5 8 5
6
6

° b ˙ œ œœ œ œ #œ œœ œ œ
A¨Œ„Š7 A¨‹9 D¨13
œ œ
& b b ˙˙ ‰ œ #œ #nœœ nœœ
3

#˙ 3

3 3


3 6 6 6 4 6 4 6

¢⁄
4 4 4
5 5 4 4
5 5 6 4 3
3
4

° b œœœ #œ œ œ
E¨Œ„Š9 C‹7 F‹7 B¨7
nœ #œœœ
‰ œ œ #œœ œœ œœ
3

&b b œ ‰ œœ œJ œ
œ J œ œ œ
3 3

3 3
j j 3

‰ ‰
3 4 6

¢⁄
1 4 6 8 9
3 3 8 7 8 10
1 5 10 10 10 6 8 10
3 8
6 8 10

° bb ˙˙˙
1. 2.

œœ œ œœ œ œ œ
œ ™™ w
G‹7 C7(b13) F‹9 B¨13 E¨6
n#˙˙˙ ˙˙ w Œ ‰ œ œ
& b ˙ #˙˙ œ w
w
˙ œ 3 3
3 3



Œ ‰
6 8

¢⁄
8 9 8 8 8 4 8 11
10 9 8 7 7 5 8 10
8 8 6 6 6 5
10 8 6
8 6

96
° b #œœœ
#B¨‹7
œ œ ˙ #E¨9
œ œ œ n œœœ n b#œœœ œ
œœ #œ n œ nœœœ
&b b œ ‰ œ ‰
3 3
3

3 3 3

‰ ‰
9 9 9 9 9 9 11 12 11 9

¢⁄
9 8 11 10 8
10 10 12 11 9
8 8 11 10 8

° b œœ
œ œ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ
œœ ‰ œ œ
A¨Œ„Š7 A¨6

& b b #œ ‰ #œ
3 3 3

3 3 3

‰ ‰
8 8 8 8 8 8

¢⁄
8 6 8 11
8 8 8 10
6 6

œœ œ œ
° bb nœœ
œ A‹11
œ œ œ ˙˙ œ D7(b9)
œ œ D7(#9)

˙˙ #œœ œœ œœ œœ
& bn œ ‰ nœ œ œ
3
3

3 3


10 10 10 8 10 10 8 10 13 10 8

¢⁄
8 8 7 11 7 7
9 9 8 11 8 8
7 7 7 10 7 7

° bb #˙˙˙ n˙˙˙ ˙˙ œ œœ
œœœœ
G‹7(b5) C7(b9) F‹11 B¨7(b9) B¨(“4) B¨9(„ˆˆ13)

& b˙ ˙ ˙˙ nœœœ #œœ

6 6 6 6 6 3

¢⁄
6 5 4 3 4 3
6 6 5 4 5 5
5 5 3 3 6 6

D.C. al 2nd ending

97
Round Midnight
as played by Wes Montgomery

This is probably the best chord solo played by Wes Montgomery. I transcribed the bridge of the
chorus, because here you can find all the typical elements of his block chord playing.

œ™ b œ3
° b œœ ™™ n nœœ nbb œœœ nb œœ
œ
 nœ ™ ‰ b œ
b œœ œ nœ œ œ œ œ n b œœ
b b bœ b œ ‰ n œœ nœœ œœ œœ n œœ bœ
& b b b nœ œ nb œœ n œ bœœ œ œ Œ ‰ bœ
R J nœ
R R

j™
G¨‹7 D¨7(b9) G¨‹7 D¨7(b9) G¨‹7 F‹11 B¨9
r 3
r r
9 9 7 5 4 2 5 6 6 6 6 5

¢⁄
7
9  7
9 ‰ 6
7
5
6
3
4
2
2 ‰ 3
4
4 4
5 5
4
5
3
5 Œ ‰  56
7 7 6 4 3 2 5 6 6 6 6 4

alternating diminished chords as subst for 7b9 chord

° b b b  n nœœ b œœ
bœ œ
b œ bœ œ bœ
b œœ nœ
n œœ nb œœ b œœ œ n œœ
b œ nœ n n œœ b œœ œ
‰ 
& b b b œ nœ bœ nœ bœ œ bœ
R
G¨‹7 B7(b9) G¨‹7 B13
r
7 9 12 11 7 9 5 7 8

¢⁄
 6
7
7
9
11
12
10
11
6
7
7
9
5
6 8
9 ‰  6
8
6 7 11 10 6 7 4 7 6

alternating diminished chords as subst for 7b9 chord

° œ b œœ b œœ
œ œ œ œ œ
b b œœ œœ b œœ œœ nœœ nœ œœ œœ œ bœ œ œœ œ œ œœ
nœ  bn œœ nœœ b œœ
& b b b œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ

F‹7 B¨7 E¨7

8 8 3 6 9 8 6

¢⁄
6
8
6
8 9
11
8
9 8
8
6
7
4
5
3
5  2
4
3
5 2
3
5
6
8
9
7
8
5
6
6 6 11 10 6 6 6 6 4 5 2 5 8 7 5

dim chords again

98
° b b œœ nœ ™
œ nœ œ bœ œ
œœ ™™
bœ b œœ œ œ n
b œœ œœ b œœ œ b œœ œœ œœ bnœœ
bœ nœ œ œ bœ
& b b b bœ nœ bœ ‰ œ nœœ


A¨‹7 D¨7

7 11 6 4 13 13 12 11

¢⁄
7
8
9
11
5
6
4
4 ‰ 7
8 3
5
4
6 10
11
10
11
10
11
9
10
6 9 5 4 6 5 6 10 10 10 9

° b b œœ b œ œœ œ
‰ ™ bœ b œ
œ œ œ nb œœ n n œœ

n œ bœ œn œ œ b œœ
b œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ nœ œ nœœ œ œ œœ œ œœ  b œ
œ nœ
& b b b œ ‰ œ nœ n œ œ œ Œ n œ nœ œ œb œ œ
R nœ
R
G¨Œ„Š7 G¨7 B7 A¨‹7 D¨13 G‹7 C7
3
r r
‰™
9 9 6 7 11 11 6 8 10 6 5 3 5

¢⁄
9
10 ‰ 8 5
9 6
7
8
7 7
8 8 Π7 11 11
8 10 10
6 7
7 8
8
10
6
7
4
5
3
3  5
6
8 8 5 7 7 7 6 9 9 5 7 8 5 4 3 4

II-V progression chromatically down ............................

° b b b  n œœœ bn œœœ bbœœ œœ œœ n nœœ œœn œœœ bb bœœœ œœ nœœœ nœœ œœ bb œœ nœœœ
bœ œ bœ nœ œ nœ bœ w
w
w
& b b nœ œ œ b œ nœ bœ n œ œ œ n œ b œ w

G¨‹7 B7 F‹7 B¨7 E¨‹%

12 11 9 10 11 8 7 6 6

¢⁄
 11 10
12 11
9
9
9
9
7
8
6
7
7
8
8
10 11 8 8
99 6 8
8
6 7 6
7 6 5 5
6
11 10 7 7 7 6 7 8 9 6 10 6 6 5 4 4
8
II-V progression chromatically down ............................................................................................

99
One Note Mamba
(in the style of "One Note Samba")

° b œœ ™™ œ œ œ œj œj œ œ ™™ œ œ œ nœj
D‹7 C©7 C‹11 B7(#11)

œœ ™™ J œœ nbœœ ™ J
œ w
&b ™
‰# nœœ ‰# nœœ Œ œœ ‰ #œœ w
w
#œ #œ œ œ nœ nœ w
™ j j j ™ j j
6 6 6 ‰ 6 ‰ 46 Œ 6 6 6 ‰

¢⁄
6 6 6 6 6 6
5 4 4 4 3 2 2
7 6 6 6 6 5 4 4
5 4 4 4 4 3 2 2


° bb œœ ™ œ œ œ ‰ nœœ ‰ nœœj Œ
j ™ j bœ œ
nnbœœœ ™™™ J
C‹11

& œœ ™™ J
D‹7 C©7 B7(#11)
œœ œœ œ œ œ œ n œ
‰ #œœ ˙˙ ˙
## œœ ## œœ œœ œœ
nœ ˙
™ j j j ™ j j
6 6 6 ‰ 6 ‰ 6 Œ 6 6 6 ‰
6 6

¢⁄ 5
6 6 6 6 6 6
5 4 4 4 4 3 2 2
7 6 6 6 6 5 4 4
4 4 4 4 3 2 2

™ ™
° bb œœ ™™ J œ nœœœ ™™™ J
œ
F‹11
œ œ œ # œ
œ
E7(#11)
# œœ œœ œœ E¨%œ œ œ œ n œ
œ ˙˙
A¨13
œ œ
& nœ ™ œ bœ ™
‰ œ ‰ œŒ œ ‰ #œ ˙˙
œ
nœJ nœJ œ
# œJ # ˙
™ ™ 6 6 6 6j 6
j j j j
‰ 77 ‰ 77 Œ ‰ 56 56
¢⁄
6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6
8 7 7 6 6 6
8 7 7 5
5 4 4
8 7 7 7 7 6
4 4


° bb œœ ™ œ œ œ ‰ nœœ ‰ nœœj Œ
j b œ
& œœ ™™ J
D‹7 C©7 C‹11 B¨%
B7(#11)
œœ œœ b œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ ‰n nœœœ 
## œœ ## œœ œœ œœ nœ œ nœ œ b œ
JFine
™ j j j j
6 6 6 ‰ 6 ‰ 6 Œ 6 ‰ 6
6



¢
6 6 6 6 6 6
5 4 4 4 4 8 8 8 8 5
7 6 6 6 6 8 8 7 7 5
5 4 4 4 4
8 8 7 7 6

° bb b#w n˙˙˙ n ˙˙˙ b w


E¨‹7 A¨13 A¨13(b9) D¨% D¨‹7 G¨13 G¨13(b9) B% C‹11 B7(#11)
w bnw bb˙˙ ˙˙ b#w
& w
w
w #˙ ˙ bnw
w
w  b nwww bn ˙˙ ˙˙ b bw
w
w b#˙˙˙ nnœœœ œ
b˙ ˙ w b w
#˙ ˙ n w ˙ nœ

¢⁄

6 6 5 4 4 4 3 2
7 6 6 4 5 4 4 2 7 6 6
6 5 5 3 4 3 3 1 8 8
8 4 4 3 6 2 2 1 8 7
6 4 4 2
4 4 2 2 8 7
D.C al fine

100
Rhythm Changes 1
On the following two pages you will find voicings for Rhythm Changes chord progressions.
The voicings start very slowly and easy but get more complex as the chorus moves on.

° bb w w w w ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙
A1 B¨Œ„Š7 C‹7 D‹7 F‹9 E¨Œ„Š9 D‹7 D¨7(#11) C‹7 B7(#11)
w w w
& w w w w bw
w
w
w
w
w
˙ n˙ ˙ ˙
w w w ˙ #˙ ˙ n˙

¢⁄
6 8 10 8 6 10 8 8 6
7 8 10 8 7 10 10 8 8
7 8 10 6 5 10 9 8 7
8 6
6 8 10 10 9 8 7

° b ˙˙ ˙˙
A2
n˙˙˙ ˙˙
B¨Œ„Š7 Bº C‹7 D¨º D‹7 G7(#9) C‹7 F7(#9)
˙˙ ˙˙
˙
˙˙ #˙˙
&b ˙ b˙ ˙
˙ b˙ ˙
n˙˙ ˙
˙
˙˙
˙ n˙

¢⁄
6 8 8 10 10 11 8 9
7 7 8 9 10 10 8 8
7 6 8 8 10 9 8 7
10 8
6 7 8 9 10 8

° bb ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ bb˙˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙˙ w
w
F‹9 E7(#9) E¨Œ„Š7 E¨‹7 C‹7 F7(„ˆˆ11) B¨%

& b˙˙ ˙˙ ˙ w
n˙˙ ˙ ˙
b˙˙ w
w

¢⁄
6 6
8 8 8 7 8 8 6
8 7 7 6 8 8 5
6 6 8 8 8 6 5
8 7 6 6 8
8 6

B° w w w #ww w #w
D9 D7(b9) G13 G7(b13) C9 C7(b9) F13 F7(#9)
b nw w nnw nw w w w
& b #ww
w
w
#w w
w w
w w
nw
w
w
nw w
w w
w

¢⁄
5 3 3 3 1
5 4 5 4 3 2 3 9
5 5 4 4 3 3 2 8
4 4 3 3 2 2 1 7
5 3 8

˙˙ nD¨º
˙˙ ˙˙ ˙ ˙˙ ˙
° bb ˙˙˙
˙ b ˙˙˙
B¨Œ„Š7 Bº C‹7 D‹7 G7(b9) C‹7 F7(b9)
A3
˙˙ b˙˙
˙˙ b ˙˙
n ˙˙ b˙˙
& n˙ ˙ ˙

¢⁄
10 10 11 12 13 15 11 13
10 9 11 11 13 12 11 10
10 10 12 12 14 13 12 11
8 9 10 11 12 12 10 10

101
° bb ˙˙
b ˙ ˙˙˙ ˙˙ ˙
bE¨‹7
b˙˙ ˙˙˙ ˙˙˙ w
F‹11 E7(#11) E¨Œ„Š7 C‹11 F7 B¨Œ„Š7

& ˙ w
w

¢⁄
11 11 11 11 6 6
13 13 12 11 8 8 7
13 12 12 11 8 7 7
6

Rhythm Changes 2 (TAB only)

A1 - shell chords
B¨Œ„Š7 D‹7 C‹7 B7 B¨Œ„Š7 D‹7 C‹7 B7 F‹7 E7 E¨Œ„Š7 E¨‹7 D‹7 D¨7 C‹7 B7


7 10 8 8 7 10 8 8 13 13 12 11 10 10 8 8
7 10 8 7 7 10 8 7 13 12 12 11 10 9 8 7
6 10 8 7 6 10 8 7 13 12 11 11 10 9 8 7

B¨Œ„Š7 Bº CŒ„Š7 C©º D‹7 G7½ C‹7 F7½


A2


6
3 3 4 5 6 4 4 9
2 1 3 3 5 4 3 6
3 3 5 5 7 3 5 7
1 2 3 4 5 3 6

F‹7 E7 E¨Œ„Š7 E¨‹7 C‹7 B7 B¨Œ„Š7


9 9 8 7 4 4 3
8 7 7 6 3 2 2
10 9 8 8 5 4 3
8 7 6 6 3 2 1

A‹9 D9 A‹7(„ˆˆ11) D7½ G9 G‹9 C9 G‹7(„ˆˆ11) A¨7 F9


B


∑ ∑
7 5 10 13 10 5 3 8 8 8
5 5 8 11 10 3 3 6 7 8
5 5 9 11 10 3 3 7 8 8
5 4 7 10 9 3 2 5 6 7

B¨% G7(b9) C‹7 F7(b9) B¨Œ„Š7 G7[áÆ] C‹7 F7[áÆ]


A3


13 15 11 13 10 11 8 10
13 12 11 10 10 9 8 7
12 13 12 11 10 10 8 8
12 12 10 10 8 9 8 7

F‹9(„ˆˆ11) B¨7(b13) E¨% E¨7(b9) C‹7 F7[äÆ] B¨%


6 6 6 6 6 9 6
8 7 6 5 4 9 6
8 7 5 6 3 8 5
6 6 5 5 5 7 5
3

102
Gratin Doll
(in the style of "Satin Doll")

° °™ œœœ œœ œœœ œœ œœ œœœ Œ œœ ™™ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œA7œ œœE‹7


œœ œœ ™™™ œœ œœ
A & ¢™ œ œ œ
D‹7 G7 D‹7 D‹7 G7 D‹7 E‹7 E‹7 A7 E‹7

‰ œ™ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œŒ ‰ œ #œ œ

° ™ ™


Œ ‰ Œ ‰
¢⁄ ¢
5 3 5 3 3 5 5 3 5 7 5 7 5 5 7 7 5 7
6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8
5 4 5 4 4 5 5 4 5 7 6 7 6 6 7 7 6 7

œ™ œœ ™™ #A¨‹9 ™
° ‰ œœ ™™ œœ™™ ‰ #œœ ™™ œœœ bnœœœ nnœœœ œœ n˙ œœ ™™™
#œœœ ˙˙˙ ™™ ü w
1. 2.
n œœ
A‹11 A‹7 A‹11
œ b
D¨9 D¨13 C% D‹7 E‹7(b5) A7(b9) C%
œœ
# œ ™ nœ œ œ œœ Œ ˙˙ bœœ ™ w
& œ™ J n˙ œJ ˙ † w w ∑

™ 8j ™ ™ ™
Db13 = G7b13#9

ü C%3
j


‰ ‰ Œ
¢⁄

10 10 6 4 6 3 3


8 8 8 4 4 4 3 3 6 8 8 8 3
9 9 9 4 4 4 2 2 5 7 6 6 2
7 7 7 4 3 3 2 2 7 8 8 8 2
5 7 7 7

B °&
G‹7
œœ b œ œ œœ
C7
œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ b œ œ
G‹7 C7
œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ F%
w
w
œœ œœ bœœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ bœœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ w
w ∑
œ œ œ œ
block chords in G minor (see Chapter about block chords for detail)

¢⁄

8 6 5 3 3 5 6 8 8 6 5 3 3 5 6 8 8
66 3 3 3 3 6 6 6 6 3 3 3 3 6 8 8
7 7 3 3 3 3 7 7 7 7 3 3 3 3 7 7 7
5 5 3 2 2 3 5 5 5 5 3 2 2 3 5 7 7

œœ ™™ # œœ œœ ™™
° b œœ œœœ œœœ n œœœ
œ œœ nœœ n œœœ #œœœ b œœœ n œœœ œœœ n œœ œœ nœœ n œœœ œœ
œœ ™™ œœ
˙˙ nD‹7 œœ ˙˙
˙˙ nœœ ™™
A‹7 D7 A‹7 D7 E‹7 A7 G7

Ϫ J
œœ œœ œ œ œ nœ #œ #œœ œ œ œœ ˙˙
& œ nœ #œ #œ #œœ #œ œ œœ œ™ J

™ 9j ™ 7j
block chords in A minor (same sequence as above))

¢⁄
10 8 7 5 5 7 8 10 10 8 7 5 5 7 8 10 10 9 8 7
9 8 6 5 5 6 8 9 9 8 6 5 5 6 8 8 8 8 8 6 6 6
10 9 7 5 5 7 9 10 10 9 7 5 5 7 9 7 7 9 9 5 7 7
9 7 6 4 4 6 7 9 9 7 6 4 4 6 7 9 9 7 7 7 5 5
7 7 5

repeat A

103
Satin Doll voicings

° œœ ™™ œj œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ #œœ ™™ #œœ Ó
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ™ œJ
#œœ œœ œœ œœ #œœ œœ
D‹9 G7 E‹9 A7

A & œ™ œœ Ó œœœ œœ œ

™ j ™ j
chords (root omitted throughout chorus))

¢⁄
Ó Ó
5 3 5 5 5 5 3 3 7 5 7 7 7 7 5 5
5 4 5 5 5 5 4 4 7 6 7 7 7 7 6 6
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

° nœœœ ™™™ œœœ œœ ™™


‰# œœ ™™
##A¨‹9 #D¨9
œœ œœ nnC%œ w œœ # #œœ nnœœ ˙˙
& œ ™ #œ Ó
A‹9 D9

nœœ œœ nœœœ w
w œœ ##œœ œœ ˙˙
J w
™ j ™

¢⁄
7 5 6 4 4 3 3 3 2 3 3

Ó
5 5 4 4 4 3 3 3 2 3 3
5 5 4 4 4 2 2 2 1 2 2
5 4 4 3 3 2 2 2 1 2 2

˙˙ œœ œœ #E‹9
˙˙ b œœœ # œ œ
b œœ n œœ œœ œœœ
œ ˙˙
° n˙
n œœ œœ œœ ˙˙
D‹9 G9 D‹9 G9 A9 E‹9 A9

œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ ˙˙ ˙˙ œ œ œ #œ
˙˙
A &n ˙ #œ

¢⁄
12 10 10 12 12 10 10 14 12 12 14 14 12 12
10 10 10 10 10 10 10 12 11 11 12 12 12 12
10 10 10 10 10 10 10 12 12 12 12 12 12 12
10 9 9 10 10 9 9 12 11 11 12 12 11 11

° n˙˙˙ #˙˙˙ ##A¨‹9


˙˙ #˙˙˙ w œœ ##œœ nœœ ˙˙
A‹9 D13 D¨13 C%

& ˙ nw
w œ #œ œ ˙

¢⁄
12 12 11 11 8 8 7 8 8
12 11 11 10 7 7 6 7 7
10 10 9 9 7 7 6 7 7

104
w
° b˙˙˙
G‹9 G‹7
˙˙
G‹11
˙˙ ˙ C9
w
F%
w ww
F6

˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙˙ w
w w
B &n ˙

¢⁄
5 3 8 8 8 12
3 3 6 5 8 10
3 3 7 7 7 12
3 3 5 5 7 10

° ˙˙˙
˙˙ b ˙˙˙ nw n œœ ™™ œ ˙˙
A‹9 A‹7 A‹11 B¨7 G% E‹7(b5) A7[äÆ]
˙˙ w
#œœ ™™ bœœœ
˙˙ ˙˙ b˙ nw
w ˙˙
& ˙ J
™ j

¢⁄
7 5 10 10 10 8 8
5 5 8 9 10 10 6 6
5 5 9 10 9 7 6 6
5 5 7 8 9 8 5 5
7

° œœ ™™ œ œœ ™™ A9œ
œœ ™™ #œœœ Ó
œœ œœ G9œ ˙ œœ œœ A9œ ˙
A & nœœ ™™ œœœJ Ó
D‹11 G9 D‹11 E‹11 E‹11

œœ œœ œœœ ˙˙˙ œœ œœ #œœœ ˙˙˙


J
™ j ™ j

¢⁄
3 3 3 3 3 3 5 5 5 5 5 5

Ó Ó
1 0 1 1 0 0 3 2 3 3 2 2
2 2 2 2 2 2 4 4 4 4 4 4
3 3 3 3 3 3 5 5 5 5 5 5

° nœœœ œœœ
œœ A¨‹9
œœ A‹11
œœ œœ Œ ™ ##œœœ ‰# œœ œœœ œœ nœœœ œœœ ‰ nnnœœœ
# œ # œ œ
A‹9 G7[äÆ] G7[áÆ] C%
#œ œ w
w
& œ œ w ∑
J #œJ œ œ œ
J w
j j j
Œ ™ 44 ‰ 44 44 44 44 44 ‰ 23
¢⁄

7 5 7 10 6 4 6 4 6 4 3 3
5 5 5 8 3
5 5 5 9 2
5 5 5 7 4 4 4 4 3 3 2 2

105
Ella by barlight
in the style of "Stella by Starlight"

b˙˙ ™™
arr. W. Kulawik

° bœ w œ œ œœ b œœ b ww
˙ ™
œ
& ΠΠΠbw
w #
b œœ œœ œœ b w
w œ nw n˙ ™

E‹7(b5) A7(b9) C‹11 B7(#11)

Œ Œ Œ
5 6

¢⁄
11 10 10 8 6 6 6 6 6
7 6 6 6 8 8
8 8 5 5 8 7
7 7
8 7

° bnww nœœ œœ œœ œ
˙
& #ww #œ œ œ nbbw
w
w #b˙˙˙ ˙˙
bœ #˙ ˙
F9 B¨13 E¨ A¨9

¢⁄
8 8 6 6 8
8 7 7 7 3 3 5
6 6 6 6 5 4 4
8 6 3 3
6 4 4

° bœ œ™
nœœ ™™ œ ˙˙ ˙˙ n˙
œœ nœœ œ b˙˙ #œœ nœ # ˙ b ˙˙
#
Ϫ
& bbœœ J ˙ b ˙
œ b œœ œ nnœœ n˙ œ ˙ b˙
™ j
B¨Œ„Š7 E‹7(b5) A7(b9) D‹7 B¨‹7 E¨7

¢⁄
5 8 6 6 6 8
8 7 5 3 7 6 5 5 6 6
8 7 5 3 8 8 7 7 6 8
6 5 7 7 5 5 6
8 6 5 3 6

œ ™ nœ ˙ ˙™
° b œœœ nnœœœ œœ bœœ ™™ J b#˙˙ ™™
œ bœ œ
˙
œ™ ˙™
œœ #œœœ œœœ œœ
& nœ œ nbœœ œ b˙˙ œ
œ ˙
™10 ™8
FŒ„Š7 E‹7(b5) A7(b9) Am7b5(11)
j D7(b9)

5 6 8 8 10

¢⁄
11 10 8 6 8 6 5 8 7 7
10 9 7 5 7 6 6 8 8 8
12 10 8 7 8 5 5 7 7 7
10 8 7 5 7

106
b œœ ™™ b œœ œ œ b w
° #œœ ™™
œœ ˙˙ w bb œœœ œœ œ œ
œ ˙ œ w
& œ ˙ Ó #œ nw Œ œ bbœœ
J
3 3

™ j
G& 3 C11 3

Œ
11 11 11 11 11 10 13 11 10 8

¢⁄
Ó
12 12 12 12 11 11 8 11
12 12 12 12 12 12 8
11 11 11 11 10 10 8

œ™ œ™ ˙™
° b#œœœ ™™™ nœœ ™™
œ ˙ œ œ ˙
#œœ bnœœœ œœœ bœ
Ϫ
J b
Œ œ œ #œ J
&


j ™ j

B¨9
A¨7(#11)

Œ
10 10 10 8 6 5 8 8 8 8

¢⁄
11 7 6 4 6 11
11 8 7 5 7
10 7 5 4 7

° bw
w
œ
b#œœ
œ œœ b œœ
œœ œœ w œ œ œ bœ
& w
w œ #nw
w
w #œœœ
E‹7(b5) A7(b9) D‹7(b5) G7(b9)
5 6

¢⁄
10 10 8 6 5 6 6 6 6 4
7 6 6 6 5 4
8 8 5 5 6 6
7 7 5 5

° b #œœ ™™™ œ ˙ b#œœ œ nœ w


w
& b œ™ J nœ œ w
œ bw
™ j
C‹7(b5) F7(b9) B¨Œ„Š7

¢⁄
7 7 7 7 7 6 6
8 8 7
8 7 7
8
8 6

107
It shouldn´t happen to a cream
in the style of "It shouldn´t happen to a dream" as played by Kenny Burrell

G7(“4) CŒ„Š7 G9(b13) E‹7(b5) A7(b9)


3


A


3 3 3 3 5 3 5 3 5 6 6 6 6


1 1 1 3 4 8 5
2 2 2 2 4 7 3
0 0 0 2 3 5
3 7 0
3 3 3 3

FŒ„Š7 FŒ„Š13 F‹7 B¨7 C6 G9


3 3 3 3

‰ ‰
3


1 3 1 3 3 1 3 4 4 4 4 5
2 2 5 1 1 2 0 2 0 2 5
2 2 6 1 0 2 3
1 1 1 3 3

1.


j
E‹7 A¨13(b9) D‹11 A¨7(b13) G7(“4) G7[áÆ]
3
j

3


‰ ‰ ‰
7 7 7 7 5 3 4


7 6 5 8 6 5 5 3 4
7 5 5 5 5 5 4
5 4 7 7 4 3 3
4 5
4 4 3

2. D‹11 G13 CŒ„Š7 A‹7 A¨7 G‹7 A¨º


3
j B 3
j
‰ ‰ ‰

8 6 5 5 3 3 5 5 3
5 5 5 4 5 5 5 5 3 5 5 4
7 7 3 3 5 4 3 3
5 3 3
5 4 3 4

G‹7 C7(#9„ˆˆ13) FŒ„Š9 C7(“4) F B¨‹7 A7


3 3 3
j
‰ ‰ ‰ ‰
5 5 5 5 3 3 3 3 1 1


6 6 6 3 4 1 3 1 1
3 3 2 3 2 2 2 6 6
3 3 2 2 0 6 5
5 3 3 4 4
3 6 5

A‹7 Bº A‹7 D7(#9„ˆˆ13) D‹9 E¨9


3
j 3 3 3

‰ ‰ ‰ ‰
7 7 7 7 5 5 5 5


5 7 7 5 8 8 8 5 6 5 6 6
5 7 7 6 5 5 5 6
5 5 5 5 3 5
7 5 5
5 6 5 6

A¨7(#11) G7(b9) very last:


3


8 8 8 6


3 3 3 3 3 9 8 7 6 8 8 8 6
5 1 8 7 6 5 8 7 6 5
4 3 8 7 6 5 8 7 6 4
7 6 5 4
4 3
repeat A thru 2nd ending

108
Yardbird Sweet chord arrangement
in the style of: "Yardbird Suite"

      
CŒ„Š7 F‹7 B¨7 CŒ„Š7 B¨7 A7

   

8
8 8 10 11 9 8 8 8 5 5 6 5 6 8
7 8 8 8 10 7 7 7 6
7 5 7 10 10 7 7 6 5
8 8 6 8

   
D‹7 G7 E‹7 A7 D‹7 G7
5

    6 10 

5 5 3 3 5 6 8 8 8 5 6 8 8 8 8
5 5 4 7 5 4
3 3 9 8 7 6
7 6 5 4

substitution: E¨7(#11) D¨7(#11)

      
CŒ„Š7 F‹7 B¨7 CŒ„Š7 B¨7 A7
9

   

8
8 8 10 11 9 8 8 8 5 5 6 5 6 8
7 8 8 8 10 7 7 7 6
7 5 7 10 10 7 7 6 5
8 8 6 8

     10
D‹7 G7 CŒ„Š7 B7(#9)


13

 

3

 
5 5 3 4 5 5 8
5 5 4 5 5 8
3 3 7

  
E‹7 F©‹7(b5) B7(b9) E‹7 A7
17

  

5 6 6 5
8 8 10 10 10 7 8 7 8 10 8 7 5 8 8
7 9 11 9 8 9 7 6
9 5 7 10 10
7 7 9 9 9

 

D‹7 E‹7(b5) A7(b9) D‹7 G7
21   
  

5


6 5 6 8 8 6 8 6 5 5 6 8 8
7 7 7 7 7
2 3 5 8 2 3 5 5
5 7 5

      
CŒ„Š7 F‹7 B¨7 CŒ„Š7 B¨7 A7
25

   

8
8 8 10 11 9 8 8 8 5 5 6 5 6 8
7 8 8 8 10 7 7 7 6
7 5 7 10 10 7 7 6 5
8 8 6 8

   
D‹7 G7 3
29 CŒ„Š7 D‹7 G7

 


5 5
5 3
5 4 7
3 3 7 9 10 10 10
10 10

109
Comping patterns

Here you will find 18 one-bar patterns for comping. You can combine them as you like, but before you do
that you should check your rhythmic sight reading ability by playing along with the backing track until all
accents are in the right place. You can also clap the accents with your hands or use a percussive instrument.
Listen to the phrasing of the backing track, play the 8th note offbeats as
late as possible. Remember they aren´t played as binary eighths but as triplets. If you are tired of playing
the "Charleston" rhythm, give it a try.

1.

& ˙ œ ™ œ ∑ ˙ œ ™ œ ∑
j j
˙ œ œ œ ∑ ˙ œ œ œ ∑

˙ œ ™ œ ∑ ˙ œ ™ œ ∑
3.
j j
& ˙ ‰œ ‰œ ∑ ˙ ‰ œ ‰ œ ∑

& œ ™ œ œ ™ œ ∑ œ ™ œ œ ™ œ ∑ œ œ œ ™ œ ∑ œ œ œ ™ œ ∑
5.
j j j j j j

œ œ Œ ™ œ ∑ œ œ Œ ™ œ ∑
j j
7.
& œ œ Œ œ œ ∑ œ œ Œ œ œ ∑

j j j j
9.
& œ œ œ ‰ œ ∑ œ œ œ ‰ œ ∑ œ œ œ Œ ‰ œ ∑ œ œ œ Œ ‰ œ ∑

œœ ‰ œ Œ ™ œ ∑ œœ ‰ œ Œ ™ œ ∑
j j
11.
& œ œœ ‰ œ ‰ œ ∑ œ œœ ‰ œ ‰ œ ∑

13.
& œ œ œ œ œ ∑ œ œ œ œ œ ∑ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ ∑ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ ∑

15.
& œ Œ ‰ œ ‰ œ ∑ œ Œ ‰ œ ‰ œ ∑ œœ ‰ œ ‰ œ ‰ œ ∑ œœ ‰ œ ‰ œ ‰ œ ∑
17.

& œ œ œ œ œ œ ∑ œ œ œ œ œ œ ∑ œ œ œ œ œ œ ∑ œ œ œ œ œ œ ∑

110
Swing patterns

Here you will find 8 four-bar patterns for comping. First clap the accents with your hands or use a
percussion instrument. Then practise the given chord changes on the guitar.
The comping makes use of chromatic approaches and chord anticipations on the off-beats.
Listen to the phrasing of the backing track, play the 8th note offbeats as late as possible.
Remember they aren´t played as binary eighths but as triplets.

1. E‹7

& œ œ ‰ œ ‰ œ œ™ œ ˙ œ™ œ ˙
B¨13 A13 DŒ„Š7 E‹7 F‹7 F©‹7
j j j j j j
œœœœ‰œ‰ œ
j j ™ j j j ™ j
‰ ‰ ‰ ‰

8 8 8 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 8 8 9 9 10 10
7 7 7 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 7 7 8 8 9 9
9 9 6 5 5 5 5 7 7 7 9 9 10 10 11 11
7 7 5 5 5 7 7 8 8 9 9
6 5 5 5 5

2. E‹7

œ™ œ œ™ œ œ œ œ™ œ ˙
A13 A7(b13) DŒ„Š9 F©‹7 F‹7
j j j ‰ œj ‰ œj œ œ
& ˙

™ j ™ j ™ j j j
‰ ‰

8 8 7 7 7 6 6 7 8 8 10 10 9 9
7 7 6 6 6 6 6 6 7 7 9 9 8 8
9 9 5 5 5 5 5 7 9 9 11 11 10 10
7 7 5 7 7 9 9 8 8
5 5 5 5 5

3. E‹7

œ™ œ ‰ œ ‰ œ œ œ
B¨13 A13 DŒ„Š7 E‹7 F‹7 F©‹7

& ˙ ‰ œj ‰ œj ˙ j j j
œœœœÓ

j j ™ j j j
‰ ‰ ‰ ‰

Ó
8 8 7 7 7 7 7 7 8 8 9 9 9 10
7 7 6 6 6 6 6 6 7 7 8 8 8 9
9 6 5 5 5 7 7 7 9 9 10 10 10 11
7 5 5 5 7 7 8 8 8 9
6 5 5 5

4. A‹7

Ϫ Ϫ
D9 GŒ„Š7 A‹7
j j
& ˙ œ œ Œ œ Œ œ ˙ œ œ Œ œ Œ œ

™ j ™ j
Œ Œ Œ Œ

5 5 5 5 5 3 3 3 3 3 3 5
5 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 5
5 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5
5 5
5 5 5 3 3 3 3 3 3 5

111
œ œ œ Œ™
5. F9

œ™ œ ‰ œ œ œ ˙
B¨13 E¨ E FŒ„Š7 E FŒ„Š7
j j j
& ˙ œ œ Œ œ Ó

™ j j j
Œ ‰ Œ™

Ó
8 8 8 8 8 8 9 10 10 10 9 10 10
8 8 8 7 7 7 8 9 9 9 8 9 9
7 7 7 6 6 8 9 10 10 10 9 10 10
8 8 8 6 7 8 8 8 7 8 8
6 6

6. E‹9

& œ œ Œ ‰ œ ‰ œ ˙™ œ™
B¨13 A13 D¨ DŒ„Š7 E‹7 F©‹7 F‹7
j j j
œ œ Ó ˙ œ Ó
j j ™ ™ j
Œ ‰ ‰

Ó Ó
7 7 8 7 7 6 7 8 10 9
7 7 7 6 6 5 6 7 9 8
5 5 6 5 5 6 7 9 11 10
7 7 4 5 7 9 8
6 5 5

7. G‹9

Ϫ
G¨7(#9) G¨Œ„Š9 FŒ„Š9 F E F
j ‰ œj ‰ œj Ó
& ˙ œ ˙ ˙ œ œ œ Ó

™ j j j
‰ ‰

Ó Ó
10 10 10 10 9 8 8 10 9 10
10 10 9 9 10 9 9 9 8 9
8 8 8 8 8 7 7 10 9 10
10 10 9 9 9 8 8 8 7 8

œ œ™ œ Œ™
8.

œ œ™ œ œ™ œ œ™ œ Ó
F9 E¨7(#9) D7(#9) G‹7 C9
j j j j j
& ˙ œ œ

™ j j ™ j ™ j ™ j
Ϊ

Ó
8 8 7 6 6 6 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
8 8 6 5 5 5 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
7 7 5 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 2 2 2
8 8 6 5 5 5 3 3 3
3 3 3 3

112
113
On the following pages you will come upon II-V-I patterns derived from the major scale.
They are based upon the six fingerings of the major scale (see p 10) and mainly use the
diatonic material of the scale.
Some passing tones and alterations are used to make them sound more interesting. It is
important to keep to the orinal fingerings and to stay in the indicated position.

The patterns always start in Aminor7. The tonal material used is always
the Gmajor scale (ionian). So you could think "why not always play the
scale up and down if the notes are the same?"

The answer is: the notes are the same, but the tonal focus is different.
In A minor the focus lies on the 2nd, 4th and 6th tone of the G major scale
whereas in D7 the focus lies on the 5th, 7th and 9th tone of the G major scale.
So it is very important to play along these chordal tones, otherwise it sounds
weird and unharmonical.

ionian

dorian mixolydian

114
G maj Scale ( 1. Position)

1 2 4
2 4
Position
1 3 4
1
1 3 4
G-major
1 2 4
1 2 4

dorian mixolydian
1 2 4 1 2 4
2 4 2 4
1 3 4 1 3 4
1 3 4 1 3 4
1 2 4 4
4

First be sure to practise the dorian and mixolydian modes in the first position
before practising the patterns.

115
G maj Scale ( 2. Position)
1 3 4
1 3 4
Position
1 2 4
2
1 2 4
G-major
1 2 4
1 2 4

dorian mixolydian

1 3 4 1 3 4
1 3 4 1 3 4
1 2 4 1 2 4
1 2 4 1 2 4
1 2 4 2 4
2 4

116
G maj Scale ( 3. Position)
1 2 4
1 2 4
Position
1 3
3
G-major 1 3 4
1 3 4
1 2 4

dorian mixolydian

1 2 4 1 2 4
1 2 4 1 2 4
1 3 1 3
1 3 4 1 3 4
1 3 4
4

117
C maj Scale ( 4. Position )
1 2 4
1 3 4
Position
1 3 4
4
1 2 4
C-major
1 2 4
1 2 4

dorian mixolydian

1 2 4 1 2 4
2 4 2 4
1 3 4 1 3 4
1 2 4 1 2 4
4 1 2 4
2 4

118
C maj Scale ( 5. Position )
1 3 4
1 2 4
Position
1 2 4
5
C-major 1 4
1 3 4
4

dorian mixolydian

1 3 4 1 3 4
1 2 4 1 2 4
1 2 4 1 2 4
1 4 1 4
1 3 4

119
Patterns, Phrases and Licks

On the following pages you will find an enormous amount of of precomposed phrases.
They are not always diatonic, as you move on you will find many alterations and chromatic
components that make your lines sound more interesting.
Again: these are only examples. It is very important that you modify the given phrases and even
write down your own variations.....
Practise them slowly with a metronome. Learn them by heart, transpose them into other keys and
try to integrate them into your own improvisation.
Create your own patterns, write them down , collect them and create your own phrase book!

Solos

After the chapter about patterns you will find solos for many standards - the same standards that
were used in the chapter about chords and voicings. These improvisations are full of useful lines,
II-V-I phrases, mixolydian and dorian licks.
They are meant to give you inspiration to use them in your own playing.
Don´t think too much about harmonic details, just keep playing. You will understand why some
lines work well after you have played them several times.
Practise the solos slowly with a metronome, learn them by heart, pick out the phrases you like
most, write them down into your phrase book. Then try to create your own solos, first by copying
the example solos and replace some parts with your own lines.

Finally invent your own solos and write them down in notation or tabulature. Learn to play them
by heart so that you are able to reproduce them on stage. All the great guitarists have practised
pattern playing, the more patterns you have at your disposal the more variable you can use them
during your solos.
90 per cent of your improvisation is precomposed, only 10 per cent is spontaneous

120
Turnarounds

!"# $# %"# &# '


""
! ! " " #" " $ " %"
" " " " "
%" & ' (
! ! " # ! " ! ! $ ! ! " # ! !

!"# $# %"# &# '


""" %" " %" %" &
% " ! " #" " " """"" ' (
! ! $ ! ! " # ! ! ! $ ! ! " # ! !
!"# $# %"# &# '
" %" " " %"
% # ! " " " #" " " """"" " $ '
"
(
! ! $ ! ! " # ! ! $ ! ! " # ! " $ #

" " %" " %"


!"# $# %"# &# '
" %"
% $ ! " " " #" " " " " " ) (
! ! $ ! ! " $ # ! ! $ ! ! # ! $ #

" " %" %" " " %" " " " " %" " "
!"# $# %"# &# '
% % ! " " ""$ ' (
$ ! ! " $ ! ! $ ! $ ! " $ ! ! $ # !

" " %" "


!"# $# %"# &# '
" " " """
!
%" " " & ' (
% & ! " " "
$ ! # " # ! ! " ! " $ # ! # ! " $
!"#
" " " %"
$#
%"
%"#
" " %" " " "
&#
" %" " " " " $ '
'
% ' ! " (
! $ ! " $ ! ! $ ! $ ! " $ ! ! $ # "
!"# $# %"# &# '
" "
% ( ! " " " " " " " " %" " " " " " " $ ' (
$ ! ! $ # ! ! " $ ! ! $ # ! ! " #

" " " %" %" " " " #" "# " " " "
% ) ! " " %" " $ ' (
! $ ! " $ ! ! $ ! $ ! " ! # $ " " $

121
Basic Patterns in G major

Here are some examples for longer phrases that are always a mixture of the major scale and major arpeggio

 
II.
           
1               

   
2 1 2 4 1 2 4 1 3 4 3 1 4 1 3 1 3 4 3 2 1 2 1 4 2 4 1 4 2 421 4

2 3 2 2 5 3 5 3 2


3 5 3 5 5
2 4
2 4 5 4 2 2 4 4 5
2 3 5 5
3 2 3 5

  
           
  
     
2 3 1 4 3 4 3 1 4 1 4 2 1 2 1 4 3 4 1


3
4 2  
5 4 5 4 2 4 2
5 2 2 5 5
5 3 2 3

 
VII.
               
      
2         

4 3 4 1 3 1 1 4 2 1 2 4 1 2 4 1 2 4 21 4 2 3 1 4 3 4 3 1 4 1 4 2

7 8 10 7 8 10 8 7


7 10 8 7 8 10 10 8
7 9 7
7 9 10 9 10 9 7
10 9 10 10 7
10 8

          
 
  
         
 
1 2 1 4 3 4 3 2 1 3 4 1 3 2 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 1 4 3 2

7 8 9 10 7


8 8 10 8
7 9 9 7 9
9 10 9 8 7 9 10
7 10
7 8

122
Basic Patterns in C major


II.

3                   
             
1 2 1 4 3 4 3 1 4 1 4 2 1 2 1 4 2 4 1 4 2 1 4 3 2 3 4 2 3 4 1 3


3 3
4 5 4 2 4 4 5 4 2 4
2 5 5 2 2 5 5
2 3 5 3 2 3 2 2 5 3
5 3 5

 
                 
   
4 1 2 4 1 4 3 2 1 2 1 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 4


4 5 6 7 4 
5 2 3 5 2 2 5 5 7 7
5 4 3 2 3

      IV.
V. IV. V. V.
  
4                  
  
   
3 4 3 2 1 2 1 4 1 4 1 4 2 4 1 4 3 4 3 1 4 1 4 2 1 2 1 4 1 3 1 4

7 8 7 5


5 8 8 5
4 5 4 4 7 5 7 7 5 4 5 4
5 7 5 7 7 5
7 7 5
7 8 8

 IV. V.
                     
    
  
3 4 3 2 1 2 3 4 1 2 4 1 2 4 1 2 4 1 2 4 1 1 3 1 1 1


5 6 8 5 6 8 5 5 
4 5 6 7 4 4 5 7 5 7 5
5 5 7 5 5
7
7 8

123
Dorian Phrases 1

Here you find dorian phrases for improvising over longer passages in minor (e.g. "Impressions"). The patterns
are similar to those in Pat Martino´s book "Linear Expressions"

  III.
G‹7
II. III.
            
1                       
 
1 3 4 1 2 3 1 3 1 3 4 1 2 4 2 1 4 3 2 4 1 3 4 1 2 4 1 4 3 4 2 3

5 4


3 3 6 6 5
2 3 5 2 5 4 3 5 2 2 3 5
3 2 4 5 4 5
3 4 5 5
3 5 6

                      
  
     
1 4 1 3 1 2 3 4 1 4 1 4 2 3 2 1 4 3 2 4 1 2 1 2 3
V.

3 5 8 6 5


6 3 3 6 6 8 7 6 8 5 6 5
5 3 4 5 6 7 6 7

 V.   
  
             
  
2          

3
 
1 2 1 4 3 4 3 2 1 3 4 1 3 2 1 4 2 3 2 1 4 3 2 4 1 2 3 1 2 4 12 3
3

5 8 6 5 5 6 7


6 6 8 7 6 8 5 5 6 8
5 7 7 6 7
7 8 7 6 5 7 8
5 8
5 6

                           
IV. III.
 II.
      
4 1 1 4 4 1 1 4 3 4 1 2 1 4 1 2 3 1 3 2 1 4 1 3 4

8 5 4 7 4 3 5 6 5 4 3


7 6 6 3 4 5 3 6
5 4 3 2
4 5

124
This is the "trickiest" phrase...........


D‹7 VII. VI.
V. IV. V. V.
      3     3        

3            

1 3 4 1 2 3 1 3 1 3 4 1 2 4 1 1 4 1 1 4 1 1 4 3 2 4
3 3


5 6 8 5 10 7 6 9 6 5 8 7 6 8
5 4 6 7
5 6 7 7
5 7 8

       
VIII. 3
      3 VII. 3   3 V. 3  3 3

3
     

1 2 3 1 2 4 1 4 4 14 13 2 4 14 123 414123441234 1
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

5 8 12 8 12 8 10 7 10 7 8 5 8 5 8 5


5 5 6 8 10 8 6 8 6 8 5
6 7 10 9 7 7

How can I use these patterns?

1. over Gm7 (Phrase 3: Dm7)


2. over C7/9 (Phrase 3: G7/9)
3. over F#7alt (Phrase 3: C#7alt)
4. over Bbmaj7(#11) (Phrase 3: over Fmaj7(#11)

Explanation:
The used tonal material is a mixture of dorian and melodic minor, so you can use it over all the chords where
you would play the melodic minor scale:

root: minor7 - a fourth above: Dominant7 - minor third above: maj7(#11) - half step below: altered
Gm7 C7(9) Bbmaj F#7#9

125
Altered Phrases 1

Here are some examples for patterns using the altered scale over G7b9 (or #9)

 II.   
D‹7 G7(b9) CŒ„Š7
3 3
        
1             
4 2 1 4 4 1 2 1 4 4 1 4 3 2 1-1 4 3 1 2 4 1 4 3 2 4 3


3 3


5 6 5 4 3
2 5 4 3 4 5
3 2 5 2 3 6 5 2 3 5 2 5 5 5
5 5

     
II. D‹7 CŒ„Š7  G7(b9)
          
2               
4 1 2 4 1 2 1 4 4 1 2 4-4 2 1 4 3 1 4 1 2 421 4 2 4 3 4 1 4


3

3 7 3 5 7 5 3


5 8 6 5 3 6 5 5 3
5 7 4 5 4 2
7 5 2 3 5 6 5 5
8

 II. D‹7 G7(b9) C‹7

  
3                   


4 4 1 2 4 1 4 1 4 1 4 3 1 3 4 1 1


2 5 3 3  
2 3 5 6 6 3 5 5
5 5 6 6 3
3


V. D‹7 G7(b9) C‹7
                 
4              
3
4 3 1 1 4 2 1 3 1 2 1 4 3 4 3 1 - 1 4 1 2 1 4 1 2 3 2 1
3


5 8 6 5 8
5 7 6 7 6 7 8 8 7 7
7 9 8 9 8 6 5 5 8
8 8 5 6

126

D‹7 G7(b9) CŒ„Š7
VII.

  
V. VI.
V.
                          3 
5  
2 4 1 2 3 1 2 4 - 4 1 3 4 1 3 4 1 - 1 2 3 4 3 1


3

6 6 7 3


6 8 5 6 5 6 8 9 8 9 6 8 9 5
7 5 4 
7


D‹7 G7(b9) CŒ„Š7
IV. III.
       
6           
4 1 2 4 2 1-1 4 - 4 2 1 4 2 1-1 4 3


5 4
4 5 7 5 4 4 3 4 3 
7 7 6 6 6 5


V. D‹7 G7(b9) C‹7
       III.
             
7     
4 2 3 1 1 2 1 3 1 2 1 4 1 2 4 1 4 2 4 1 2

3 4 6 3


8 6 5 6 5 3 6 6 4 6 3 4 4
5 7 5 4 
7

127
Altered Phrases 2

These patterns show different options for playing over m7b5 - Dom7#9 progressions.

Examples 1+2 use G half tone - whole tone (equals D Whole tone - half tone)

  II.   
D‹7(b5) III. G7(b9)      C‹7  
  
   
1          


4 1 2 4-4 1 2 4 1 3 4 1 2 4 2 1 4 2 4 1 2 1 3

3 4 6 4 3 3


3 5 6 6 4 6 4 3
3 4 6 5 
2 3 5 6
5

 
D‹7(b5) G7(b9) C‹7


III.
VII. VI.
II. V.
               
2           


4 1 2 4-4 1 2 4 - 4 1 2 4-4 3 1 3 4 1 3 4 3


5 6 8 9 9 8 6
3 4 6 7 8 7 
2 3 5 6 10 9 10
5 10

Examples 3+4 use F dorian over Dm7b5

 
G7(b9) C‹7
D‹7(b5)
V.
  
3          
      
1 3 4 1 2 1 4 3 4 1 2 4 1 3 4 2 4


6 8
5 7 8 
5 6 5 5 6 8
5 7 8 8 7 8


D‹7(b5)
G7(b9)
V. VI.   C‹7
   
4           
       
1 3 4 1 2 4 1 3 4 2 1 4 2 1-1 4 3 2 4 4 1 2 4


6 9 8
5 8 7 8 10 7 
5 6 5 6 10 8 10
5 7 8 8 7 8

128
Examples 5+6 use fourths and fifths upwards in minor thirds:

 
C‹7
V. D‹7(b5)
 G7(b9)       
      
5     
1 2 1 4 1 2 3 4 1 1 4 4 1 1 3 4 1

8 11 8


8 11 8 11 8 11 8
5 8 7 10 10 
5 6

 
D‹7 G7(b9) C‹7
V.
    ViII.   
Vi.
VII. 
   
6        
1 2 4 3 1 1 4 4 1 2 4 3 1 1 4 4 3

8 11 10


8 11 8 11
6 9 7 10 
6 9 6 9
5 8

Examples 7+8 use Abmaj7 as substitute for Dm7b5 (tritone substitution)

 
III. D‹7(b5) G7(b9) C‹7

7           
           
3 4 3 2 1 2 4 1 2 3 1 4 3 4 1 3 4 1

3 3


4 4 6 4
5 5 3  
5 6 6 5 3 5
6 6 3 3

        
III. D‹7(b5) G7(b9) C‹7
       
8       
   

4 3 2 1 4 1 2 4 1 2 4 1 2 1 1 4 3 4 2 1 3 4 2 4 1

3 6 3 4 6 3 3 6 3


4 4 6 4 4 6 4
5 4 3 5 3 5
6 6 5

129
Mixolydian Phrases over two octaves:

These patterns can be played over D7 or Am7....

 
D7
IV.
                     
1     
   
2 4 1 2 4 1 4 3 2 4 1 3 4 1 2 4 1 4 1 2 3 1 3 2 1 3 1 2 4


5 8 5 6 7 5
4 7 6 5 7 4 4 5 7 7 6 5 7 4
4 5 7 6 7 6 7
5 7

             
IV. D7
        
 
2       
3 4 1 3 4 1 3 2 1 1 4 1 2 4 1 2 1 4 1 1 4 3 1 4 3 1 3 2 1

7 5 7 5


8 7 8 5 7 5 5 8 8 7 5
7 5 7 4 5 4 5 7 6 5
7 5 4 7

                  
D7
IV.

3            
3 4 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 4 1 3 4 1 2 4 1 1 4 2 1 4

7 8 7 6 5


8 7 6 5 5
8 7 6 5 4 4 5 7 5 7 
7 6 7 7 5 4

4  
D7
IV.
                   
        
2 4 1 2 4 1 2 4 1 2 4 1 2 4 1 2 4 1 2 421 2 1 4 2 1 4 1 1 3


5 
4 4 5 7 4 5 7 5 4 5 7
4 5 4 5 7 4 5 7 5 7 5 4 4 7
5 7 7 7 5

130
This phrase starts in Cmaj7 (which is 7/9/11/13 of D7)

 II.
D7
IV.
      
5                        
2 4 1 4 3 4 3 2 1 4 1 2 1 2 3 4 2 1 4 1 2 421 4 2 1 4 2


4 5 4 3 2 5 4 7 4 5 7 5 4
2 5 5 2 3 4 5 6 7 7 5 4
3 5 7 5 5

           
V. D7 II. IV.
V.
 
6      
       
 
1 3 2 4 1 1 3 4 1 2 4 4 1 2 1 2 2 4 1 2 4 1 2 4 2 4 3

5


7 8 5 5 8 7
7 5 7 4 4 5 7
7 5 7 4 2 4 5 7
7 5 3 5 7

   
This phrase makes use of a 7/#11 scale:
D7
V.
       
7           
 
3 2 1 3 1 4 3 4 1 4 1 1 2 2 1 4 3 1 1 4

7 8 4 7 5 4


   5 8 5
7 6 5 7 5 4 7 
7 5 4
7

Here the augmented scale is used:


D7

      
             
8  
4 1 2 4 1 2 4 1 2 1 3 1 1 2 4 1 2 3

7 4 5 7 4 4


5 7 5 5
5 7 5 5  
6 8 6
7

131
Dorian Phrases over two octaves:

These patterns can be played over D7 or Am7....

  II.
V.     II.
      
1        

       
  
 
1 3 5 1 2 4 1 4 1 3 4 1 2 4 1 4 3 2 1 4 1 2 1 4 3 1 1 2 4 1 1 3 4

7 6 5


5 8 8 5
4 4 5 7 5 4
2 5 6 7 7 5 4
2 2 3 5 7 5 7 3 2
4 5 4 5

 
II.

2           
                     
4 1 2 4 1 2 1 4 4 1 2 4 1 4 3 4 3 2 1 4 1 2 1 4 4 1 2 4 1 2 4 1


4 5 4 3 2
2 2 5 5 2
2 3 5 3 2 5 2 3 5 3 2 5 2 3 5 2
5 5 5 3 5 5

 

V.
        
3  
   
         
 
1 4 3 2 1 3 4 1 2 4 1 4 3 4 1 2 1 214 2 1 4 1 1 4 1 1 4 3 2 1 1 1 4

7


5 8 8 5 5 5 8 7 5
4 4 5 7 5 4 5 4 5 5 7 5 4 
5 6 7 7 5 4 7 7 7
7
5 8

132
           II.       
V.

4                   

3 4 3 2 1 4 1 2 3 1 3 2 1 4 1 3 4 1 2 4 1 2 1 4 2 1 2 4 1 2 4

7 8 7 6 5
II.


8 5 6 7 5 5
7 6 5 4 4 5 7 5 4
7 6 7 7 5 4 5 7 4
5 7 7

   
V.
      
5       
 
3 1 1 4 3 2 1 1 1 214 2 1 2 4 2 4 1 2 1 2 4 1 4 2 1 3 4 4 1 3 1 3

5 7


5 8 7 5 5 7 8 5 7
5 7 5 4 5 4 4 5 4 7 5 7
7 7 5 4 5 7 4 5 7
5 7

   
V.

   
         
6          
1 3 1 4 3 2 1 1 4 1 4 2 1 2 1 4 1 2 1 4 3 4 3 2 1 4 1 1 1 4

5 7 8 7 6 5


7 5 8 7 5 5 8 8 5
7 5 7 4 5 4 4 5 5 4
7 5 4 7 7

133
Scofield patterns

These small phrases can be played over Bb7, Bb7alt or Bbm7. They are ambiguous and work fine
over Dbm as well. Listen to the audio. Each example is played twice. The phrases can be
combined, so you may have the impression of a modal solo.

° œ œ œ œ #œ nœ œ œ b œ #œ œ bœ œ œ ™
1. B¨7½ (or Dbm7)

& J ∑

6
j ™

¢⁄
5 7
6 8 9 8 6
7
9 6
8
9 6
∑

° œ œ œ œ #œ nœ œ œ b œ #œ œ bœ œJ œ ™
alternative fingering:

& ∑


j
1 3 4 3 1 6 4 4

¢⁄
1 3 3 6 4 6
∑

° nœ œ œ
2. B¨7
#œ œ
& Ó œ #œ b œ nœ œ bœ #œ nw

¢⁄
Ó
8
6 7 7 6
5 6 8 9 9 8 6 5

3. bB¨‹7
˙
° #˙ #œ œ
(or Dbm7)
œ b œ #œ w
& ‰ J

j

11 9 9

¢⁄
12 12 11 9 9

134
° œ b œ œ #œ # œ œ œ bœ #œ bœ
4. B¨‹7 (or Dbm7)

& #œ œ œ œ w

¢⁄
12 11 10 9 11
9 8
11 8 11 11 8 8
11

° œ #œ b œ œ œ # œ
5. B¨‹7
œ nœ #œ œ bœ
(or Dbm7)
#œ ˙
& ∑

9 10 7 9 9 6

¢⁄
10 11
11
9 10
9 6
∑

°
6. B¨‹7 (or Bb7)

#œ œ bœ nœ œ œ bœ œ #œ œ œ œ w
& Ó

¢⁄
Ó
6
6 7 8 9 9 8 7 6 8 6 7 7

° œ #œ
7. B¨7(#9)
bœ #œ œ
(or Dbm7)

œ œ œ w ∑
&

¢⁄
9
11
11
11 11
11
11
9 ∑

135
° œ b œ # œ œ n œ b œ #œ#œ b œJ n œ œJ œ œ #œ œbœ œ œ œ#œ bœ#œ œ ˙
8. B¨7(#9) (or Dbmaj7)

& J J J J
j j j j j j
7 6 9 6 7 6 6 8 6 6 6

¢⁄
9 7 9 6 6 9
8 8 8 8 6 6 6

° œ #œ nœ œ œ bœ œ œ œ #œ nœ #œ nœ œ bœ
9. B¨‹7 (or Fm7)

& #œ bœ œ œ nœ w
9.

¢⁄
8 9 8 8 6 6
8 8 8 6 5 6 5 5
8 6 8 6 6 5
8

° œ bœ œ bœ
10. F7 (mixolydian)
œ
& œ œ œ œ bœ œ
œ b˙ ∑

¢⁄
10 8
10 8 7 8 10
8
10 8 7
∑
8 6

136
Take the A-Train
!"#"$%
$# mixolyd = G ion
!"# ionian

! " " " " " " " "" " " # $ " "%" "
" " " " %" # $
"
! " # ! " # ! "! # ! " # $ " # $ " # $ "

$%# dorian = C ion &# !"#


" !!"" " &
! """""""" """"""""
"
!!
%

" # ! " # ! " # $ " # $ " # ! " # $

"' " " " ) " ) "' " " " %"' " " " ) " " # $
!"# $#

% ! ( (
$ ! # " $ ! # # $

" " """


$%#'(')) !"#$%%&' &# ()(*(&'+((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((
!"#
" " ) """" * " " ) "'
% ! """ " "' "
# " $" # # " ! # " ! # " # " " ! # " !

" """""""" "" "


*"# !"#$%%&'
" " " " " " " # " # # "%"
% ! "" "
" $ # # $ # # " ! " # " # ! # $ # $ # " # ! # # !

" " " " " " " " "%" " " " "+ " &#" " "+"
mixolyd=G ion
" "
$# $%#
""%" "" "" " &
% !
$ # $ " # $ " # $ "$# " $ # $ # ! " # " # ! $ # " $ !

" "' !"" "' !!"%" "'


$# D triad
%"
!"# C triad
!!" !""
! ( ( "' "") # ) ( ) ( " ""$
! !
%

# " # # # # # $ # $ ! # # "

" " " " " !" " %" " ,,,,,, "
"""
$%# !"#$%%&' &# ()(*(&'+((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((
!"#
" " " " !" ,,,,
% ! """ " )
# " $ # # ! " # ! " # " $ # " ! # ! $ " "

137
Take the A-Train
!"#"$%

!"# $#
" # " " " " !!"" " " % &
###$ &$
"# "
" " % % ( "$
! " " '"
"
$ $
!!
!

" % " " % % " " " % " " " ' "

"""""""
$%# &# !"#
" """"" % & "
#&$ ###$ ##$
! ! "" " " """" """
( " ( ' ( " ' " " ( " ' ( " "
"
' ( " ' " ( ' " ( " '

&$ "
$#
" " "'*
!"#
" "
#&$
!
)
! "" # " " " " % " "'" " " "'" " " " "
" ' % ( " ' % ' ( " ' ( ' " ( ' " ( ' " ' " ( %
&#$

""""""""
$%# &# !"#
"" " "# '"$ "+" " " ")"#
###$
"""""
##$
! ! " " " "
" ' ( " ' ( " % " " " ' ( " " ' ( " ' % " " " " ' ( " '

'"#
" "" " "
"" " """" "
" " " " " " " " " *# "'"
&$
! ! "
% " " ' ( ' " ' " ( " % " % " ' % ' % " " " % % (

$#
" " " " +" " " $%#
" " ###$+ "+&#
" " "+" " "
" " " " " " " " "
! ! " " " " ('"
" % " ' % ' % ( " ' " " " ' ( % " ( ' " ( " % ' ( ' ( " ' "

" "
* " "'" " ( " ( " ( " ('" " "'" " " " " " " " "'" " " "
!"# $#
&$
! !
' " ( % ( " ( % " % ' " % ' " % '%" ' % ( " "

" " " " " " " " ###$ " " "+ "+ " " " " " ##$ " "#
$%# &# !"#

! ! " """$
( ' " ( % " " % ( " ' " ( '( " ' % ( " % ( '

138
Autumn Leaves solo 1

Chorus 1:
Am7 D7 Gmaj7 Cmaj7

4 1 2 4 2 1 1 4 2 2 1 4 1 3 4 2 3 1 4 3 3 1 3

5 3
4 5 7 5 4 2 4 5 4 2
7 7 5 5 4 5 5 4 4 2 4

5 F#m7¨5 B7¨9 Em7

4 1 3 4 1 4 1 3 1 3 1 3 4 1

5
2 4 5 2 2 2
5 5 2 4 4 4 5 2 2

9 Am7 D7 Gmaj7 Cmaj7

1 3 2 1 2 1 2 1 4 2 3 4 2 1 2 1 2 1 3

3
5 7 7 4 4 4
7 6 5 4 5 4 3 2
7 7 6 5 5 4

13 F#m7¨5 B7¨9 Em7(maj)

1 2 4 1 1 3 2 4 1 4

1
2
4 4 2 1 1
3 2 2 5 5
5 3

139
Bridge:
17 F#m7¨5 B7¨9 Em7

1 2 4 1 2 1 4 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 4 1 2 2 2

4 5 4
4 5 7 7 5 4 5 4 2 1 2 4 1 2
2 2

Am7
21 6 D7 Gmaj7 Cmaj7

4 442221 4 3 1 1 3 2 1 2 3 1 3 1 3 4 343 1 4 3 1 1 4
slide.. slide..
6
5 8 7 5 3 5 3
5 4 5 5 4 5 2 4 2 4 5 4 5 4 2 5 5
7 6 7 5 4 1 2

25 F#m7¨5 B7¨9 Em7

3
2 2 1 3 1 2 1 214 1 1 1 4 1 3 1 3 1 313 1 3
3 3 5
3 5 5 3 3 5 5 3 5 5
4 4 4 4 2 2 3 2 2 2 4
5 2 2 5 5

F#m7¨5 B7¨9 Em7


29 3
3
3

4 31 3 1 3 1 2 1 1 3 2 1 4 1 4 1 4 1
3
5 6 5 3 5 3
5 3 3 3 5
4 3 2 2
5 5 2 2 2
5
3
3

140
Chorus 2:

33 Am7 D7 Gmaj7 Cmaj7

2 2 1 1 3 3 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 2 2 3 3 1 1 1 3 1214

5 5 2 3 3
5 5 7 7 4 4 4 4 4 5 4
7 7 5 5 4 5 5 3 3 2 7

37 F#m7¨5 B7¨9 Em7

1 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 4 2 4 1 2 1 21 4 4 2

5 4
4 4 4 5 4 5 4 4
7 5 7 5 4 4 5 4 7 5 6
7

41 Am7 D7
3

3 3 3 3
3
4 4 4 2 1 4 3 1 3 3 1 3
arpeggios in triplets (use the same finger for one triplet)

5 4 5 8 7 8 7 6 7 5 4 5
5 4 5 7 6 7 5 4 5
7 6 7

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

43 Gmaj7 Cmaj7
3

3 3 3 3 3
3 3
3 2 1 4 1 3 2 3

2 1 2 5 4 5 3 2 3
3 2 3 5 4 5
4 3 4 5 4 5
5 4 5

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

141
45 F#m7¨5 B7¨9 Em7

1 2 4 1 2 4 1 4 2 4 2 1 4 1 2 1 4 2 1

4 5 7 4
4 5 7 7 5 5 7 5 4 4 5 1 4 2
7 2

Bridge:
49 F#m7¨5 B7¨9 3 Em7

2 1 1 3 2 1 1 3 2 1 1 3 1 2141 1 4 1 4 1 1
3
3 3 5 3 3 5 3 3 5
4 4 4 2 32 2
5 2 5 2 2 2
5

53 Am7 D7 Gmaj7 Cmaj7


3

3 1 3 4 313 1 3 1 4 1 4 3 1 4 1 2 3 4 1 3 2 1 1 1 1 4
3
3 5 5 6 5 3 5 3
5 5 3
5 2 5 4 2 4 5 6 7 4
5 5 5
5 3 3 1 2

57 F#m7¨5 B7¨9 Em7 E¨m7


3 3

3
2 1 3 3 3 3 1 2 1 13 1 3 1 2 1 1 3 1 2 1 3
3
12
8 10 11 12 10 10 11 10 8 10 8 8 5 7 6
9 9 7 7 7 4 8

142
60 Dm7 D¨m7 F#m7¨5 B7¨9 Em7

2 1 3 2 1 3 1 1 4 3 1 1 1 1 1 3 4

7 5 3 2 3 2
6 5 5 4 5 8 4 5 5
7 6 5

Chorus 3 (beginning...)
65 Am7 D7 Gmaj7
3

3 1 1 4 3 1 3 4 2 3 2 1 4 3 1 4 1 3 4 2 4 1 4

2 5
5 8 7 5 3 3 3 5
5 7 5 4 2 5 4 2 2 4 5
7 6 7 5

68 Cmaj7 F#m7¨5 B7¨9 Em7


3

2 1 4 2 4 3 1 4 3 1 2 4 1 4 2 421 4 4 1 2
3 2
5 3
5 4 2 4 7 5 7 5 4 4
5 4 4 5 7 7 7 5 5

73 Am7 D7 Gmaj7 Cmaj7

1 1 1 4 3 1 3 1 1 3 1 1 4 2 4 1 2 4
5 5 5
8 7 5 5
7 7 5 7 4 4 4
7 5 7 4 5
7

77
3

5 8 5 7 4 5
2 3 5 5 4 7 5 7 5 4
2 4 5 4 7 7 5
5 4 5 7 9 6 7
7
3
fade out

143
Autumn Leaves solo 2

Am7 D7 Gmaj7 Cmaj7


3 3

3 3

6 F#m7¨5 B7¨9 Em7

10 Am7 D7 Gmaj7 Cmaj7


3 3

3 3

14 F#m7¨5 Em7
B7¨9

144
B7¨9 Em7
18 F#m7¨5

22 Am7 D7 Gmaj7 Cmaj7 3

3 3

26 F#m7¨5 B7¨9 3 Em7


3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3

F#m7¨5 B7¨9 Em7


30

145
34 Am7 D7

36 Gmaj7 Cmaj7

F#m7¨5 B7¨9 Em7


38 3

Am7 D7
41

146
Gmaj7 Cmaj7
44

46 F#m7¨5 B7¨9 Em7


3

50 F#m7¨5 B7¨9

52 Em7

147
54 Am7 D7 Gmaj7 Cmaj7

Am7 D7

58 B7¨9 3 3 Em7
F#m7¨5

3 3

61 F#m7¨5 B7¨9 Em7


3 3

66 Am7 D7 Gmaj7 Cmaj7

148
70 F#m7¨5 B7¨9 3 Em7

74 Am7 D7 Gmaj7 Cmaj7

78 F#m7¨5 B7¨9 Em7

149
Blue Bossa solo
chorus 1

Cm7 Fm7

Dm7¨5 G7¨9 Cm7

E¨m7 A¨7 D¨maj7

Dm7¨5 G7¨9 Cm7 G7#9

150
chorus 2
Cm7 Fm7

Cm7
Dm7¨5 G7¨9

E¨m7 A¨7 D¨maj7

Dm7¨5 G7¨9 Cm7 G7#9

151
chorus 3
Cm7 Fm7

Dm7¨5 G7¨9 Cm7

E¨m7 A¨7 D¨maj7

Dm7¨5 G7¨9
Cm7 G7#9

152
Blue Bossa extended solo

œ œ œ œ ˙. œœ œœœ œ œ
CHORUS 1

b œ œ œ
&b b Œ œ œ œ ˙. Œ ‰ œœ œœœ œ œ ‰ J ‰ J
J
.
octave fills ................................ Cm7

Œ
8 10 11 8 8
. Œ ‰
8 10 8 10 11 8 8
‰ 11J ‰ 8J
5 7 8 5 5
J
5 7 5 7 8 5 5

b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ. œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ
5
œ
3 3
b ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰
3
& b J
3
C blues scale (Ebmaj pentatonic)...............................................................................................
3 3 Fm7 3
.
‰ 10 8 ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰
J
8
8 10 10 8 10 8 10 8 8 8 10 8
10 10 8 10 10
3

b
8

&b b œ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œœœ
G7#9 Cm7
Dm7b5 C harm minor.......................................................................................................
7 7 7
10101010 9 9 9 9 6 6 6 6 5 5 5 5 5
8 8 8 8 6 8 6 5 6 5
8

b Œ Œ Œ bœ œ œ œ bœ œ œbœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
11

b
& b œbœ œ œ œ œ œbœ œ œ œ œ œbœ œ œ œ œ œ
œ
Ebm7 Ab7
Eb dorian..............................................................................
Dbmaj7 arpeggio...
ŒŒŒ 7696 76
8 6565 65 5 653 35
4
8 86 4634 3 36 6
6 4634

b œ œœœœœœ
œœœœ œ œœœœ Œ ‰ œ œ
14
œ bœ
&b b
3

Dbmaj7&#11 Dbmaj7 lyd = Abmaj7=Fm7


3
 Œ ‰
4
6 8 9 8
5 6 10 8 8 8
10 10 8 6 6 5 5 10
8

153
œ œ bœ œ
b œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ nœ œœœ œ œœœ
16

b
& bJ œ
3
Dm7b5 G7#9
C blues scale........................................................................................................................


J
13
10 11 10 8 10 10 8 10 11 12 10 1110 8 10 8 8
10 10 10 8
3

œ œ nœ œ
b
18

& b b œ œ  œ bœ œ œ ® œ œ Œ Œ
œ
Cm7 G7#9 Cmelodic minor

 ® Œ Œ
10 11 7 10

10 8
8 9 8 6 8 6
8

œ œ œ
CHORUS 2:

b ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
20

&b b
3

Cm7 Cm pent=Ebmaj pent.................................................................................................


3

8
8 8
10 8 10 8 10 10 8 8 8 10
10 10 8 8 10 8 10

œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙
b œ œ œ œ œ ‰ nœ œ
22

&b b J
Fm7 Fm7 arpegg...... Dm7b5


8 11 8

J
9 11 9 8 8 8 8 8
10 1110 8 10 8 8 9 10 10 8 1010
10 10

25
b œœœœ œ œœœ œ œ bœ œ
&b b œ œ œ
nœ œ œ. œ œ œ œ œ ‰ Œ Œ
œ œ œ
C harm minor.....................................................
G7#9 Cm7
8 9 8
10 8 7 8 7 5 4 5 7 4 5 . ‰ Œ Œ 8
7
6
5 5 3 1 0 3 0 1
3

154
b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ bœ œ œ
bb Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ
28

& b
Ebm7 Ab7
Eb dorian.............................................................................................................
Œ
9 8 6 8 6 6
9 9 7 9 9 7 6 7 7 6 6 6
8 8 6 8 8 6 5

b
30

& b b bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œbœ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œbœ œ œ œ œbœ œ œ


œ
Dbmaj7 Db arp......................
6 6 5 5 5 5 6 5 3
8 8 6 8 8 6 4 6 6 4 3 4 4 3 4 3 3 6
6 6 4 3 4

œ œœœœœ
b Œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ
32

&b b ˙ œbœ œ œ œ œ œ . œj
œ œ œœœ
G7alt = Ab melodic minor .............
Dm7b5 Cm7
G7#9
Œ
3 6 4 3

.
3 6 6 4
J
5 4 4 3
6 6 6 5 6 5 3 3
5 8 6 5 6 3

œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ
œœ œ
CHORUS 3:
b œ œ œœ bœ œ œ  œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
35

& b b Ó ‰ œJ 
Cm7

Ó‰ 
10 10 8 8
10 8
811 11 11 8 8
J
8 1010 8 8 11 10 8 810
10 10 10 810

œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
b nœ œœœœ
38

&b b œœœ
Fm7
8 11 8
9 8 11 8 9 11 9 8 9 8 8 9 11 9 9 8
10 10 9 10 10 10 8
10 8 6 5
8 6

155
b œ œ nœ. œ œ œ œ œ œ. nœ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ
40

& b b ˙. œœ J J
Dm7b5 G7alt Cm7

. .
J ‰
4 3 3

. J
3 6 4
5 8 7 4 5 5 8 7
6 10
8 8

43
b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ n œ b œ œ œ bœ œ œœ œ
b
& b œ œ œ nœ œ œ J œ œ œbœ nœ œ
3
Ebm7

10 7 8 7 7 8 10
8 11
8 7 6
9
6
J 7
8 7 6 5
4 7 7
10 9 10 8 8 7
3

45
b œ n œ b œ n œ b œ bœ œ nœ œ bœ
bœ œ nœ bœ œ
&b b bœ
Ab7

6 7 6 5 4
7 4 5 6 4
6 5 4 3
6 4

œ œ b œ nœ œ œ b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
b œ œ œ œ œbœ œ œ œ œ
46

& b b œ œ œ œbœ œ œœœ


3

Dbmaj7
4 8 9 1011 8 9 8 6
4 6 11 9 8 9 6 8 6
5 5 6 8 6 8 5 6 5
3 6 8 6 8 5
3

b ‰ œj œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
48

&b b ˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ. œ œ œ . œ œ œ
Dm7b5 G7alt Cm7

‰ . .
6
J
6 8 6 5 6 5
8
5 3 5 3
6 5 6 5 3 5 3 3
1
3 3
3 1

156
CHORUS 4:
b
51

& b b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ eœ œ bœ œ œ œ œ  œ œ œ
3

œ
Cm7


8
8 8 6 8 8 6 8 8 6 8 8 6 10 9 8 6 8 6
8 8 8 8 8 8 6 8
3

b
53
3
& b b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ eœ œ bœ œ œ œ œ  œ œ œ
œ Fm7


8
8 6 8 8 6 8 6 8 8 6 8 6 8 6 10 9 8 6 8 6
8 8 8 8 6 8
3

b œ œ œ œbœ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œnœ œ
55

&b b Œ
œ
Dm7b5

Π5 5 8 4
3 6 9
8 5 6 5
6 5 8 5 6 5 6 6
8 6 5 6 5 5 8 8
8

œ
57
b œ œœ œœ œ œœœœœœœœ œœœœœ
&b b œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ
Cm7
G7alt


6 8 11 8
3 6 8 11 11 8 11 8
3 5 3 3 5 10 10 8 8 10 8 10 10
6 10

59
b œ bœ œ œ. œœ
& b b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ. bœ œ
3
Ebm7
.
.
6 9 6 9
8 6
10 8 10 8 10 10 8 8
10 10 8 8 6 9
11 11 9
3

157
b œ œ œ œ œ n œ œ œ œ œ œbœ
J œœ Œ œ œ œ œ
61
bœ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œbœ œ œ œ œ œbœ
&b b
Ab7 3
Dbmaj7

6
6
6
6 6 5
4
5 6
6
4 7 8 4 8 4
J6 65 Π6585
8 8 585 46 3 6 8
3

64
b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœ
& b b bœ œ œ œ œ œ. œJ nœ.bœ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œbœnœ
Dm7b5 G7alt Cm7
. . ‰ 3 2 3 4
3 6 10 6 1010 6 3 6 3

J
6 5 6 5 5 3
8 8 7 4 3 5
6 5 3 6

67
b œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ
& b b œ bœ œ œ œ
Ab7
6 6 3
4 6 7 6 4 6 4
5 5 3
4 3
6 3

158
Rhythm Changes solo 1

Bbmaj G7 Cm7 F7 Bbmaj G7 Cm7 F7

5 Fm7 Bb7 Ebmaj7 Ebm7 Dm7 G7 Cm7 F7

9 Bbmaj G7 Cm7 F7 Bbmaj G7 Cm7 F7

Fm7 Bb7 Ebmaj7 Ebm7 Cm7 F7 Bb


13

17 D7 G7

159
21 C7 F7

3
3

25 Bbmaj G7 Cm7 F7 Bbmaj G7 Cm7 F7

29 Fm7 Bb7 Ebmaj7 Ebm7 Cm7 F7 Bb

160
Rhythm Changes advanced solo

F7
b œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ
F7
œ
ùJ Œ ‰ J
Bb G7 Cm7 3 Bb G7 Cm7

& b Œ Œ bœnœ bœnœ œJ œ. œ œ œ œ œ œœœ œ œ


3 3 3

.
ùJ
Œ Œ Œ ‰
J . J
3 3 3 3

Fm7 Bb7 Ebmaj Ebm7


.
œ
Dm7
.
G7
œ
& b ù œJù œ œj bœ œ œ
b ‰ œJ œ ‰ œJ ‰ œJ. nœ œ œ
5

œ œ Œ

ù Jù
Œ ‰ ‰ ‰
J J J
J . . .

‰ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
Cm7 F7 F7
b œ œ œ bœ
8 Bb G7 Cm7

&b œ bœ œ œ œ œP Ó J 3 3
3

P Ó ‰
J
3 3 3

bùœ œ œ œ
œ ù œbœ œ œ œ Œ ‰ œJ œ nœ œ œ nœ bœ œ œ
Fm7 Bb7
b
11 Bb G7 Cm7
bœ nœ
F7

&b nœ œ œ

ù
ù ‰ ‰ ‰ J

œ æ œ æ nœ œ œ bœ
Ebmaj Ebm7 Cm7 F7 Bbmaj7
b œ œ
14
œ bœ nœ bœ nœ œ œ Œ Œ
& b œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ

æ æ Œ Œ

161
b œ œ
Am7
nœ œ#œ œ œbœ œ nœ
D7

œ bœ nœ œ œ nœ œ nœ œbœ nœ œbœ#œ œ. œ œ œ
17

&b

œ œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ
œ #œnœ œnœbœnœ œ œ œ
G7
b nœ
19

b nœ œ œbœnœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
& œ

& b ùJ
œ œ. œ
ù J œ œ #œ nœ nœ œ. œ. œ
œ
Gm7 C7
b
21 3
œ bœ
œ œ œ bœ nœ œ
œ œ bœ

ùJ
3
.
ùJ . .
3
3

F7
œ œ œ œb œ n œ œ œ œœœœœ
b œ nœ œ œ
23

b
& œœœ œ œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ œbœ œ

F7 œ
œ œ œ#œ œ œ œ œ œDm7
œœ œ b œ œ œ œ F7 œ œ#œ
&b ù
b
25 Bb G7 Cm7 G7 Cm7
œ œ nœ œ œœ

162
b ùœ œ ‰ 3œ œ œ œœœ œ
Fm7 Bb7 Ebmaj Ebm7 Cm7 F7 Bb

bœ œ œ œ œ ù ù œ ‰œœœ ˙
29

& b ‰ œ œ j Ó

ù ù ù
3
‰ ‰ Ó
J

163
Blues in F7 - easy solos

™ œ œ
chorus 1
F7
œ b œ œ œ œ n œ œ
F7 B¨7
b 4 œ œ œ œ eœ œ œœ ˙ œœœœ
&b 4 J Πe
e
J J
j j ™ j
44 8 10 Œ

9 9 9 11 10 10
8 10 10 10 10 8 8 10 8 7
10 10 10 10

& b e œJ œ ™ ˙
œ jÓ œœœœ
B¨7 F7 D7
b
3
œ nœbœbœ œ œ nœ Ó
œ œ™ e

j ™ 3
™ j


Ó Ó
6 4 3
7 10 5
8 8 10 9 8 6 8 6 7
8 8

œ œnœ œ œ œ œ œj Œ ‰ œ œ œnœ œ
G‹7 C7 F7 D7 G‹7 C7
b œœ œ
& b œœœ œ œ œ œ™ ˙ J
j ™ j
Œ ‰

3 3 6 5 3
3 2 3 5 5 3 2 2 8 9 10
5 3 5 5 10 10
3 3

chorus 2

b˙ œœ œ œ bœ œnœbœ œ œ œ œ w
F7 B¨7 F7

& b ‰J ‰ œ œ nœ œ œ œ nœ
3 3
J
j 3 3
j
‰ ‰

9 11 12 11 9
10 10 10 10 10 10 8 10 10 7 7 8 9
10 9 10

b œJ œ bœ œ ™ œj bœ œ œ œ j nœj œ™ œj œ œ nœ œ œ Œ ‰ œJ
B¨7 F7 D7

& b œœ
J
j j ™ j j j ™ j j
Œ ‰

10 7 5 10
8 8 7 6 8 6 5 7 7 7 8 8 9 9 10
8

164
b œ œ œ œ C7 œ b œ œ œ œ œ F7œ ™ D7
b œ œ œ œ™ œ œ™ œ Ó
G‹7 G‹7 C7
b ‰J œ 44
&b ‰J ‰J J J J
3

j j j ™ j ™ j ™ j
3

‰ 10 ‰ 10 ‰ 44

Ó
9 9 11 9 11 9 11 9 6 6
10 8 7 7
8 8 10

Blues in F7 - Bebop style


chorus 1:

b j
F7
j œ œ bœbœnœbœ œ œ œ œ B¨7 F7
4 j j
& b 4 œ™ œ œ œ bœ œ™ œ #œ nœ #œ nœ œ
3

™ j j j ™ j 3

44

9 11 12 11 9
8 10 10 8 10
7 7 6 6 6 7 8 9 10
8 8 8

œ œ œ œ™ j
œ œ b œ F7
b˙ nœ bœ bœ œ nœ bœ ˙
B¨7
3
& b Ó bœ
3

™ j
3 3


11 8

Ó
9
10 10 10 10 8 10
9 8 6 9 8 8 6

D7
œ œ b œ nG‹7
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ C7
bb nœ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ
bœ œ œ
&


11 8 9 10 5 8 5 6 8 6 5
8 7 8 6 6 5
8 7 5
7 10 6 5
8

165
chorus 2:
F7
œ#œ
D7 G‹7

C7 F7
j j
B¨7
b nœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ nœbœ œ œ œ™ j œ bœ œ™ j bœnœ œnœ
& b nœ œ œ œ œ

™ j j j ™ j

5 8 7
5 8 7 7 10 9 6 5
7 10 8 10 8 7 7 6 6 6 7 8 9
8 8 8

œ
F7b œ n œ œ œ b œ œ œ bœ œ bœ nœ
B¨7

bbœœ œ œœ œ
œ

b œ œ œ
& œ œ
3
3


8 11 10 8 9 5 8 6
8 10 8 7 8 5 6 7 5 8
10 10 8 7 6
10 8

j ˙ ™™
bœbœ œ œ œ œ œ G‹7
œ œ #œ œ œ œ œnœ
œ ™ œ
F7 D7
b œ #œ œ
& b J œ nœ œœ ‰J
3
3
j ™ j ™™ j


6 10 5 8 6 5 6 5
8 9 8 6 8 6 8 7 7 8 6
8 7
8 7 7 10

œ
C7œ œ b œ b œ œ œ œ F7œ œ œ D7 œ #œ G‹7
œ œ œ œ œbC7œ
b nœ nœbœ nœ nœbœbœ
&b
3


6 8 9 11 9 8 8
5 8 11 10 8 11 7 10 11 10 8 9
10 9 8 7 9 8
11

for more exercises and blues solos refer to Guitartraining Add-on #8

166
2 Blues in F

F7 3
B¨7 F7 F7/¨9

substituting Cdorian for F mixolyd. subst. F dor for Bb mixo


3

B¨7 F7 D7#9

3 3 3
F blues scale substituting Cdorian for F mixolyd.
3 3 3

Gm7 C7 F7 D7 Gm7 C7

F7 B¨7 F7 F7/¨9

substituting Cdorian for F mixolyd. F melodic minor pentatonic

167
B¨7 F7 D7

F melodic minor pentatonic D wholetone-halftone scale

Gm7 C7 F7 D7 Gm7 C7

168
Blues tribute to Wes
Chorus 1:
F7/13 Bb7/9 b9 F7/13 Bb7/9 b9

6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6
7 7 7 5 5 4 4 7 7 7 5 5 5 4
7 7 7 6 6 6 6 7 7 7 6 6 6 6
6 6 6 5 5 5 5 6 6 6 5 5 5 5

6 F7/13 D7#9

6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6
4 4 4 7 7 7 5 5 5 5 5
6 6 6 7 7 7 4 4 4 4 4
5 5 5 6 6 6 5 5 5 5 5

9 Gm7 C11 F7/13 D7#9 Gm7 Ab6

6 6 6 6 6 6
3 3 7 5 3 4
3 5 7 4 3 4
5 3 6 5 5 6
3 3

Chorus 2:
13 F7/13 Bb7/9 b9 F7/13

6 6 6 8 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 9 8 6
7 7 7 5 4 4 7 7 7 7 8 7 5
7 7 3 5 3 6 6 6 7 7 7 7 6 5 3
6 6 5 5 5 5 6 6 6 6 6 5 3

17 Bb7/9 A7/9 Bb7/9 b9 C7#9b13 F7/13 E7/13 F7/13 D7#9 b9 Gm7

6 6 6 6 5 6 6 9 9 6 6 5 6 6 6 6 6 4 6
5 5 5 5 4 5 4 8 8 7 7 6 7 7 5 5 5 5 3
6 6 6 6 5 6 6 8 8 7 7 6 7 7 4 4 4 4 3
5 5 5 5 4 5 5 7 7 6 6 5 6 6 5 5 5 5 5
3

169
Gminor block chords..........
m7/9 m7/11 C7#9b13 C7b9b13 Ab6 Gm7/9 C7b13
21 F7/9

5 5 3 5 8 8 6 8 11 9 7 8 8 8 8
6 3 3 3 3 6 6 6 6 9 9 7 8 11 10 9
3 3 3 3 3 7 7 7 7 9 9 6 8 11 10 9
3 3 3 3 3 5 5 5 5 8 8 5 7
5
3

Chorus 3:
Bb7/9 F7/13
25 F7/13

6 6 6 8 6 6 6 6 6 6 8
7 7 7 7 5 5 4 7 6 7
7 7 3 5 3 6 6 6 7 3 5
6 6 5 5 5 5 5 6 4 5

B7/9 Bb7/9 Bb7/b9 F#7/13


28 F7/13

3 3

10
9 10 9 8 6 7 6 6 6 6 6 6 5 6 6 7 6
7 6 5 5 5 5 4 4 3 4 4 8 7
6 7 6 5 3 7 6 6 6 6 6 6 5 6 6 8 7
6 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 5 5 7 6
3 3
31 D7#9 Gm7

6 8 6 8 6 6 6 6
6 7 7 5 3 3
3 5 3 5 3 4 3 3
4 5 5 5 5 5
3 3

34 C11 C7 F7/13 D7#9 Gm7/9 F#7#9 F7/13

6 6 6 5 6 6 6 6 10 10 10 6
3 3 3 3 7 7 5 5 10 10 9 7
5 5 5 5 7 7 4 4 8 8 8 7
3 3 3 3 6 6 5 5 10 10 9 6

170
Chorus 4:

F7/13 Bb7/9 F7/13


37 F7/b13 Bb7/9

10 8
9 8 6 6 7 6 6 8 6 6 6 6
7 5 7 6 7 6 7 7 5 6 5
6 5 3 3 7 7 3 5 3 6 7 6
5 6 6 4 5 5 5 6 5

41 Bb7/9 F7/13 D7#9

6 8 9 8 6 6 6 6 8 9 8 6 6
6 7 5 7 6 7 5
3 5 6 5 3 6 7 3 5 6 5 3 4
4 5 5 6 4 5 5

45 Gm7 Gm7 Ab6


F7/13 D7#9

5 8 8 5 8 5
6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 7 6
3 6 7 2 5 5 2 5 2 7 7 5 3 4 8 7
3 3 3 3 7 4 3 4 8 7
5 4 5 5 6 5 5 6 7 6
3 3

171
All Blues solo
Listen to the audio file to get the articulation and the laid back timing....
G7
j ‰ j œ œ Œ Œ Œ ‰ œj œ
& œœŒ Œ Œ ‰ œœœ œœŒ Œ Ó œ œ
j j j
Œ Œ Œ ‰ Œ Œ Ó ‰ Œ Œ Œ ‰
⁄ 5 5 5 3
5
5 5
5
5 5 5 3
5

& œ œ œ œ œ j œ ™ ‰ œj œ œ Œ Œ
C7

Œ ‰ œj œ œ œ Œ Œ
œ œ
j ™ j j
‰ Œ Œ Œ ‰ Œ Œ
⁄ 5 3
5 3 5 2
5 3 5 5 5 3
5
5 5

G7 D7(#9)
j j
& ‰ œ bœ œ œnœ œ œ Œ Œ Œ ‰ œ bœ œ œ œ œ Œ Œ Ó œ œ œ œ œ™ bœJ
3

j j ™ j
3

‰ Œ Œ Œ ‰ Œ Œ Ó

3 5 4 3 5 5 5 3
5 5 5 5 5 5 3 5 5 3 5

E¨7(#9) D7(#9)
3 3

& œ bœ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ™ bœ œ bœ œ œ
3 3

J œ œ œ

™ j
3 3 3 3



5 3 5 5 5 3 5 3 3
5 5 3 5 5 5 3
5

G7

& œ œ œ Œ Œ Œ ‰ œj bœ nœ œ#œ
3
œœœœ œ œ ˙
œ
3
j
Œ Œ Œ ‰

3 4 5 6
5 5 5 5 3 5 5 5
5 3 5 2

172
All Blues solo chorus 2: Practise the timing and the repeating blues phrases....

. ˙
Ϫ
& œ. ™ ˙ Œ ‰ œj bœnœ œ#œ œ œ. ™ œ ™ œj
G7
œ j
Œ ‰ œ bœnœ œ#œ œ

™ j ™3 j ™ ™ j
Œ ‰ Œ ‰ 3 45 6 3

3
3 3
3 4 5 6
5 5 5 5 5 5 3

Œ ‰ œj bœnœ œ#œ œ œ. ™ œ ‰ œ œ œj œ™ bœnœ œ#œ


C7
3
& œœœ ˙
œbœ œ œ
j ™ j ™
3

Œ ‰ ‰

3
3 4 5 6 5 3 4 5 6
5 3 5 5 5 5 3 5 2
5 3 1 3 2

& œ œ. ™ œ ‰ œ œ œj œ bœJ œ#œnœ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ œj œ ™


G7

‰ œj œ œ Œ
3 3

™ j j j 3 j ™
3

‰ Œ ‰ Œ

3 1
5 3 6 5 3 5 4
5 5 3 5 2 5 3 5 3 5
5 3 5 2

j œ#œ œ œnœ œ œ œ ™ bœ œbœ œ œ œ3 œ #œ œ œ #œ b3œ œ œ œ œ bœ


D7(#9) E¨7(#9) D7(#9)

& ‰ œ bœnœ œ J ‰ J ‰‰ ‰J
3 3

j ™ j j j
3 3 3 3

‰ ‰4 6 ‰‰ ‰

3 6 6 6 4 6 4 7 5 7 7 4 7 6 6 6 4
3 4 5 6 6 5 4 5 5
5

start next
G7
œ œ
chorus..
& œœ ‰ œ #œ œ œ ‰ œ œ bœJ ‰ œJ œ Œ œ# œ n œ œ
3 3

b œ œ œ œ n œ œ ˙™

3
3 3
j3 j
4 4 ‰ 5 6 ‰ 3 ‰ 3 Œ

3 3
5 5 3 5 5
5 4 3 3 2 2
6 6 3 1 3

173
Satin Doll solo

Dm7 G7 Dm7 G7 Em7 A7 Em7 A7


3

3
3 3

Dm7 3rd of Em7 3rd of


arpeggio Dom7 chord arpeggio Dom7 chord

Am7 D7 A¨m7 D¨7 C Dm7 Em7 A7

intervals:

Am = D7 Abm = Db7
scale mixolyd. scale mixolyd.

Dm7 G7 Dm7 G7 Em7 A7 Em7 A7

3 same intervals 3
on E-minor
3 3

Dm7/9/11=Fmaj9 Em7/9/11=Gmaj9
arpeggio starting on 3rd arpeggio starting on 3rd

Am7 D7 A¨m7 D¨7 C

3
3

Am7 Abm7 Cmaj7


arp. arp. arp.
down down

174
Gm7 C7 F F

Gm chromatic approach
scale

Am7 D7 G

Am same as above
scale

Dm7 G7 Dm7 G7 Em7 A7 Em7 A7

chromatic chromatic
thirds thirds

Am7 D7 A¨m7 D¨7 C

3 3
intervals:
3 3

Am dorian G half tone


+passing notes whole tone

175
There will never be another you solo

Ebmaj7 Dm7b5 G7b9

Cm7 Bbm7 Eb7


5

Fm7b5 Bb7 Ebmaj7 Cm7


Abmaj7
9

13 F7 Fm7 Bb7

176
17 Ebmaj7 Dm7b5 G7b9

21 Cm7 Bbm7 Eb7

Bb7 Ebmaj7
25 Abmaj7 Fm7b5 Cm7

Fm7 Bb7 Ebmaj7


29 Fm7 Bb7 Ebmaj7 C7

177
:

1. Diatonic chords:

2. Diatonic II – V Progression ( like „Autumn Leaves“ )

3. TURNAROUNDS:

4. Rhythm Changes:

or

or

dann:

5. Blues :

or

or

178
Articulation and Phrasing:

1. Creating tension:

- suspension of target tone by using intervals of the chordal upper structure


- increase of rhythmical densitiy (vertical density) - more note events in the same
amount of time by doubling notes)
- increase of horizontal density by widening the range of used tones, larger intervals
or using notes from the higher range of the instrument
- use of dynamical means
- repetition of tones or phrases
- sequencing of phrases along with rhythmic variations of the same motif or variing
the rhythmic structure

2. Tonal material

- guide tone lines (melodic lines following the chord progression in small (often
chromatic) movements down or up.
- improvisation over scales, chords or arpeggios (following the chord structure)
- finding and improvising over tonal centres.
- using patterns

3. RHYTHM

- off beats
- laid back playing (playing behind the beat)
- repetitions:
giving the audience the opportunity of "being familiar with" something by
- repating a phrase melodically or rhythmically
- varying a phrase

179
SUBSTITUTIONS

An often discussed chapter of jazz theory. Here I will only roughly mention some commonly
used substitutions.

1. MEDIANTS

If you layer the notes of the major scales up in thirds you get the following chords:

C E G B = Cj7
E G B D = E-7
G B D F = G7
B D F A = B-7/b5
D F A C = D-7
F A C E = Fj7
A C E G = A-7

These chords only contain scale immanent tones. Neighbouring chords have three notes in
in common. The more thirds you move up or down, the more intervals of the upper structure
are included (9th, 11th, 13th)
In Cmajor you get the following intervaI relations:

e g b d f a c e g b
3 5 7 9 11 13 1 3 5 7 in Cj7
5 b7 9 11 b13 1 b3 5 b7 9 in A-7
7 9 #11 13 1 3 5 7 9 #11 in Fj7
9 11 13 1 b3 5 b7 9 11 13 in D-7
11 b13 1 b3 b5 b7 b9 11 b13 1 in B-7/b5
13 1 3 5 b7 9 11 13 1 3 in G7
1 b3 5 b7 b9 11 13 1 b3 5 in E-7

How to read the chart:

- tone "e" is "3rd" in chord "Cmaj", at the same time "e" is "5th in Am7 or
7th in Fmaj7

Notice the "3" means major third while "b3" means minor third (this applies
to all intervals and saves writing space)
An interval is always "major" unless there is a "b" in front of the number.

180
Usually the direct mediants are of special interest. In the following chart you can see what direct relations are of interest.
All the chords have at least three notes in common.
What you receive are chords with no root but a ninth in the upper voice instead.

A B

Especially important is the chord on the 4th scale degree.

Regarding F as degree IV in C major, then D is degree II and G is degree V.


As a consequence of this you can use the arpeggio of the fourth degree to improvise over II and over V as well.
You can use the Fmajor7 arpeggio to solo over Dminor7th and G7th without any problems !!!

181
2. Diatonic Substitution

In einer diatonic progression

you can replace the chords der V.,IV. und III. degree with a Sixth-chord of the II, I. und VII.degree.

The resulting substitutes haven´t got a root but a ninth instead.


There is another special chord in this progression.
It´s the diminished chord on the seventh scale degree.
Every dimished chord is at the same time a Dominant7th/b9 chord.
and can be repeated or moved at an interval of a minor third.

So you can use it in a II - V - I progression leading to a I minor.

or

Graphically the relations can be seen as follows::

182
3. TRITONE-SUBSTITUTION
In a II-V-I progression the chord on the Vth degree can be replaced with a chord a tritone below.
Example:

You can get a colourful leading voice by changing the upper note.

183
Diagrams
On the following pages you find diagrams based on the cycle of fifths. They are
meant to visualize melodic and chordal relations.

The$scale$circle:!
!
This!diagram!offers!an!overview!of!all!scales!from!any!root!note.!
!
Cut!out!the!small!cycle!of!fifhts!and!put!it!into!the!centre!of!the!large!circle.!
9!Place!the!desired!key!onto!the!12!o´clock!position!and!read!the!scales!in!the!three!
outer!circles.!
!
!
Circle$1:$all$diatonic$chords$and$scales$that$are$part$of$the$ionian$scale$
Circle$2:$all$scales$that$belong$the$melodic$minor$(MMi)$scale$
Circle$3:$all$scales$that$belong$to$the$harmonic$minor$scale$
$
Example:$
$
If!you!put!the!small!circle!into!the!middle!of!the!diagram!and!move!it!around!until!"F"!
is!at!the!12!o´clock!position,!then!you!can!find!out!all!the!scales!that!are!derived!from!
the!"F"!ionian!scale!(outer!circle)!(Bb!is!at!11!o´clock!=!the!chord!is!called!Bb!maj7#11!
and!the!scale!is!called!Bb!lydian)!9!C!is!at!1!o´clock,!the!chord!is!called!C7!and!the!scale!
is!called!C!mixolydian)!and!so!on.!
!
If!you!look!at!the!circle!in!the!middle!(which!belongs!to!the!melodic!minor!scale!
MMi)!you!can! read!at!11!o´clock!Bb7#11!which!is!a!dominant7th!chord,!the!name!of!
the!scale!is!Bb!mixolydian!#11.!At!1!o´clock!you!find!no!chord!or!scale,!because!there!
is!no!scale!derived!from!melodic!minor!on!scale!tone!5.!

In!circle!#3!(the!inner!circle)!you!only!find!two!scales.!One!is!the!regular!harmonic!
minor!scale,!the!other!is!called!"HM5"!which!means!"harmonic!minor!from!the!fifth!
scale!degree".!This!scale!is!often!used!in!gypsy!jazz!over!a!dominat7th!(b9)!chord.!
So!you!play!the!"C"!harmonic!minor!scale!over!a!G7b9!chord.!

The!more!you!experiment!with!this!scale!circle!the!more!relations!and!insights!you!
will!get.!At!least!it!helps!to!get!familiar!with!the!circle!of!fifths!in!detail!as!well!as!with!
the!modes!of!the!ionian!scale!and!the!derived!scales!of!the!melodic!minor!scale.!

184
Scale Circle
Detailed instructions for the use of the scale circle on the following page...

IV
maj7
ion V
maj7#11 dom7
lyd mixo
MMi
dom7
mixo#11 HM
bVII HM5 m7 II
dor
3
2
1

7#11 m7b5 m7
bIII lyd. augm. locr#2 aeol VI

1
2
3 m7
phryg
bVI III
dom7
alt
m7b5
locr

bII VII

C
bV
C
F G F G

Bb D Bb D

Eb A Eb A

Ab E Ab E

Db B Db B
F# F#

185
Chord reinterpretation
I

IV
dim7 V
mmaj7
7b9 7
7#11 m6/9 6
7/9/13 5
m7 4
bVII m6 3
7b9 II
7/9 2
m7/9
7sus 1
7/9/11/13

m7b511
bIII dim7 maj7#11 maj6 maj7 m7b5 dim7
VI
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

maj7/9

1
7b9 2 7b9b13
bVI 3
III
4
7b13#9
5
6 7b13
7 7b9

bII dim7
VII
bV
C
F G
- Cut out the small cycle of fifths and place it in the center
of the large circle.
- Place the desired chord at "12 o'clock" on the large circle Bb D
and read the different chord interpretations from the subcircles.

Example: Eb A

- C is at the 12 o'clock position, you can see the following relations:


Cm7 = Abmaj7/9 = Ebmaj6 =Bb7/9/11/13 (subcircle 3) or: Ab E
Cm6 = F7/9 = Am7b5 = B7b9b13 (subcircle 2)
- At 12 o'clock you find variations of the minor chord. Db B
F#
- At 9 o'clock you find variations of the major chord.
- At 11 o'clock you find variations of the Dominant7th chord.
- At 3 o'clock you find variations of the m7b5 chord.
186
Which scale for which chord?

ION -3 phryg

o
mix
-7
ION
MMA +5 mixo#11
MMA +1 alteriert
Dom7
m7
IO

ION +3 aeol
N-
2d
or

C
F G

Bb D

Eb A

Ab E

Db B
F#

Similar procedure here:


Cut out the outer diagrams, or print them onto a transparency film. Place them onto the cycle of fifths in the middle.
By turnig the transparency around you can find out which scales go with any given chord.ION stands for the ionian (major) scale.
MMA stands for the melodic minor scale

You find all the scales and their names in the overview on page 9 of the book.
ion
+1
ION ion

loc
r
lyd
-5
N
IO

m7b5
r#2
oc
3l
A+ MMA -3 lyd augm
MM
maj
187
The principle of drop2 harmonisation:

If you drop the 2nd note of a chord down one octave the sound changes from narrow to
open. Chords on the guitar in narrow position are difficult to finger. That is why we have
to use drop2 and drop3 voicings to keep the chords within the range of two or three frets.

D‹7 (drop2)

& w
w w w
ww w
w
w
w w
w w w
w
w
w w
w
& w
ww
w
w
w ww
w ww
w
w

The principle of drop3 harmonisation:

Basically the same as drop2, but here you drop the third note of a chord down an
octave, so its range becomes even wider and sometimes very difficult to finger.

D‹7 (drop3)

& w
w w
w w
ww ww
w
w w w w
w w
w w w
w
& w
ww w
w ww
w w
w
w w

188
Diatonic chords in all drop2 and drop3 shapes

° ˙ ˙˙
1. Drop3 - F shape with root in bass (intervals: 1 7 3 5)
˙˙ ˙ ˙˙ b ˙˙
b˙˙˙ ˙˙ b˙˙ ˙ ˙ ˙
& ˙˙ ˙ ˙
˙ ˙ ˙
˙ ˙ ˙ b˙ ˙
FŒ„Š7 G‹7 A‹7 B¨Œ„Š7 C7 D‹7 E‹7(b5) FŒ„Š7

¢⁄
1 3 5 6 8 10 11 13
2 3 5 7 9 10 12 14
2 3 5 7 8 10 12 14
1 3 5 6 8 10 12 13

b ˙˙˙ ˙˙
° b ˙˙ ˙˙
2. Drop2 - F shape with root on top (intervals: 7 3 5 1)
˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙
˙˙ ˙ ˙˙
& ˙˙ b˙˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ b˙˙ ˙

FŒ„Š7 G‹7 A‹7 B¨Œ„Š7 C7 D‹7 E‹7(b5) FŒ„Š7


1 3 5 6 8 10 12 13

¢⁄
1 3 5 6 8 10 11 13
2 3 5 7 9 10 12 14
2 3 5 7 8 10 12 14

b ˙˙ ˙˙
° ˙˙ ˙ b ˙˙˙
3. Drop3 - Bb shape with root in bass (intervals: 1 7 3 5)
˙ ˙˙ b ˙˙ b˙˙ ˙ ˙
& ˙ bb˙˙ ˙ ˙
˙ ˙ ˙ b˙
b˙ ˙ ˙ b˙
B¨Œ„Š7 C‹7 D‹7 E¨Œ„Š7 F7 G‹7 A‹7(b5) B¨Œ„Š7
1 3 5 6 8 10 13

¢⁄
11
3 4 6 8 10 11 13 15
2 3 5 7 8 10 12 14
1 3 5 6 8 10 12 13

° ˙ b ˙˙ ˙ ˙˙˙˙
4. Drop2 - Bb shape with root in bass (intervals: 1 5 7 3)

bb˙˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ b˙˙˙˙ ˙˙ b˙˙˙˙


b ˙˙
& ˙˙ ˙˙ b ˙ b˙
b˙ ˙
B¨Œ„Š7 C‹7 D‹7 E¨Œ„Š7 F7 G‹7 A‹7(b5) B¨Œ„Š7

¢⁄
3 4 6 8 10 11 13 15
2 3 5 7 8 10 12 14
3 5 7 8 10 12 13 15
1 3 5 6 8 10 12 13

189
° b˙˙ b ˙˙ b ˙˙ b ˙˙
5. Drop3 - Eb shape with third in bass (intervals: 3 1 5 7)
b˙˙ ˙˙ b˙˙ b ˙˙ b˙
&b ˙ ˙ b˙ b˙ ˙ ˙ ˙
˙ b˙ ˙ ˙ b˙ ˙
˙ b˙
E¨Œ„Š7 F‹7 G‹7 A¨Œ„Š7 B¨7 C‹7 D‹7(b5) E¨Œ„Š7

¢⁄
3 4 6 8 9 11 13 15
3 5 7 8 10 12 13 15
1 3 5 6 8 10 12 13
3 4 6 8 10 11 13 15

˙ ˙
° b˙˙˙
˙˙ b ˙˙˙ bb ˙˙˙ b ˙˙˙ bb˙˙˙
6. Drop2 - Eb shape with third on top (intervals: 1 5 7 3)
bb˙˙ b ˙˙
b ˙˙
˙˙ ˙˙ b b˙ ˙
&b ˙
E¨Œ„Š7 F‹7 G‹7 A¨Œ„Š7 B¨7 C‹7 D‹7(b5) E¨Œ„Š7

3 4 6 8 10 11 13 15

¢⁄
3 4 6 8 9 11 13 15
3 5 7 8 10 12 13 15
1 3 5 6 8 10 12 13

b ˙˙ b ˙˙˙ b ˙˙
° b˙˙ bbb˙˙˙
7. Drop3 - Ab shape with third in bass (intervals: 3 1 5 7)
b ˙˙ b ˙˙ bb˙˙˙ ˙ b˙
&b ˙ b˙ ˙ ˙ b˙ b˙ ˙
˙ b˙ b˙ ˙
A¨Œ„Š7 B¨‹7 C‹7 D¨Œ„Š7 E¨7 F‹7 G‹7(b5) A¨Œ„Š7
3 4 6 8 9 11 13 15

¢⁄
4 6 8 9 11 13 14 16
1 3 5 6 8 10 12 13
3 4 6 8 10 11 13 15

° b˙ bbb˙˙˙
˙˙ b ˙˙ bb˙˙˙
8. Drop2 - Ab shape with third in bass (intervals: 3 7 1 5)
˙ ˙˙ bb˙˙˙ ˙ b˙˙ ˙
& b ˙˙˙ bb˙˙˙ b
b ˙˙ ˙ ˙ b˙

A¨Œ„Š7 B¨‹7 C‹7 D¨Œ„Š7 E¨7 F‹7 G‹7(b5) A¨Œ„Š7


3 4 6 8 9 11

¢⁄
4 6 1 2 4 6 8 9
1 3 3 5 6 8 10 12
5 6 1 3 5 6 8 10
3 4

190
° ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙
9. Drop3 - C shape with fifth in bass (intervals: 5 3 7 1)
˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙
& ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙
˙ ˙ ˙ ˙
CŒ„Š7 D‹7 E‹7 FŒ„Š7 G7 A‹7 B‹7(b5) CŒ„Š7

¢⁄
1 3 5 6 8 10 12 13
4 5 7 9 10 12 14 16
2 3 5 7 9 10 12 14
3 5 7 8 10 12 13 15

˙ ˙ ˙
° ˙˙˙ ˙
10. Drop2 - C shape with third in bass (intervals: 3 7 1 5)
˙ ˙ ˙ ˙˙ ˙˙
˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙ ˙
& ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙
CŒ„Š7 D‹7 E‹7 FŒ„Š7 G7 A‹7 B‹7(b5) CŒ„Š7
3 5 7 8 10 12 13 15

¢⁄
1 3 5 6 8 10 12 13
4 5 7 9 10 12 14 16
2 3 5 7 9 10 12 14

˙˙˙ ˙˙˙
° ˙˙ b˙˙ b ˙˙˙ ˙˙˙
11. Drop3 - F shape with fifth in bass (intervals: 5 3 7 1)
˙ ˙˙˙
& ˙˙ b˙˙ ˙
˙
˙ ˙ ˙ b˙ ˙
˙
FŒ„Š7 G‹7 A‹7 B¨Œ„Š7 C7 D‹7 E‹7(b5) FŒ„Š7
1 3 5 6 8 10 12 13

¢⁄
5 6 8 10 11 13 15 17
2 3 5 7 9 10 12 14
3 5 7 8 10 12 13 15

˙˙
°
12. Drop2 - F shape with fifth in bass (intervals: 5 1 3 7)
˙˙ ˙˙ b ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙
b˙˙˙
˙˙ ˙˙
& ˙˙ ˙˙ b˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ b˙˙
˙
FŒ„Š7 G‹7 A‹7 B¨Œ„Š7 C7 D‹7 E‹7(b5) FŒ„Š7
12

¢⁄
5 6 8 10 11 13 15 10
2 3 5 7 9 10 12 10
3 5 7 8 10 12 14 10
3 5 7 8 10 12 13

° ˙ ˙ b ˙˙ b ˙˙ bb˙˙˙
13. Drop3 - Ab shape with 7th in bass (intervals: 7 5 1 3)

bb˙˙˙ b˙˙ ˙ bb˙˙


& bb˙˙ ˙ bb˙˙ b˙ b˙
˙ b˙
˙ ˙
˙ b˙ b˙ ˙
A¨Œ„Š7 B¨‹7 C‹7 D¨Œ„Š7 E¨7 F‹7 G‹7(b5) A¨Œ„Š7

¢⁄
1 2 4 6 8 9 11 13
1 3 5 6 8 10 12 13
1 3 5 6 8 10 11 13
3 4 6 8 9 11 13 15

191
Drop2&and&drop3&chords&in&detail&
!
The!following!pages!are!intended!to!give!a!complete!overview!over!the!principle!of!drop2!
and!drop3!chords!and!how!they!are!derived!from!each!other.!You!will!find!a!lot!of!chords!in!
their!interval!structure!(no!fingerings!given)!

The!structure!is!always!the!same:!

Row!1:!major!chords!in!four!inversions!
Row!2:!dominant7th!chords!in!four!inversions!
Row!3:!minor!chords!in!four!inversions!
Row!4:!half!diminished!chords!in!four!inversions!
Row!5:!diminished!chords!in!four!inversions!
!
Example:&drop2&voicings&in&C&
&
Here!you!can!see!how!the!chords!are!derived!from!each!other.!The!first!row!gives!major7th!
chords.!By!lowering!the!7th!into!a!minor7th!you!get!dominant7th!chords.!(2nd!row)!
In!the!third!row!the!third!is!lowered!to!a!minor!third,!so!you!get!minor7th!chords.!
In!row!4!the!fifth!is!lowered,!the!result!are!minor7/b5!chords.!
Lastly!in!row!5!the!minor7th!is!diminished!(bb7)!and!what!you!get!are!diminished!chords!
which!repeat!every!minor!third,!so!they!all!look!alike.!

What!you!can!visualize!very!nicely!is!where!the!chord!specific!intervals!are.!On!each!string!
you!will!have!an!arpeggio!that!gives!you!the!chord!tones!on!one!string.!

The!following!pages!are!built!the!same!way.!All!basic!chord!types!(root,!third,!fifth!and!7th!P!
no!ninth,!11th!and!so!forth)!are!placed!on!the!fretboard!in!their!four!inversions.!
!
Some!are!difficult!to!play,!so!if!you!don´t!feel!comfortable,!don´t!practise!them,!as!you!will!
never!play!them!in!a!jazz!situation!anyway.!

But!for!studying!the!structure!of!the!fretboard!and!the!relations!of!chords!and!their!
inversions!these!diagrams!are!of!high!importance.....!

192
Drop2 and drop3 chords and inversions

° w
1. Drop3 - in F
w ww w
w
& w w w w
w w w w
w w
root 3rd 5th 7th
FŒ„Š7

¢⁄
1 5 6 10
2 5 9 10
2 3 7 10
1 5 8 12

° w bw
w bww w
w
w
& bw
w w w
w bw
w w
F7

¢⁄
1 4 6 10
2 5 8 10
1 3 7 10
1 5 8 11

° w bw w bw
w
& bbw
w
w
w bbww w
bw
bw w
w
F‹7

¢⁄
1 4 6 9
1 5 8 10
1 3 6 10
1 4 8 11

° bw w bw
w
ww
& bbw w
w bbw
w bw
w
w bw w
F‹7(b5)

¢⁄
0 4 6 9
1 4 8 10
1 3 6 9
1 4 7 11

° w w bw
w
& bww w
w bw
w w
w bw w w
w

¢⁄
0 3 6 9
1 4 7 10
0 3 6 9
1 4 7 10

193
w
°
w
2. Drop2 - in F
w w
w ww w
w
& w
w w
w w w
w
7th root 3rd 5th
FŒ„Š7
1 5 8 12

¢⁄
1 5 6 10
2 5 9 10
2 3 7 10

bw
° w
w
bw
w bww w
w
& bw
w
w
w
w w w

F7
1 5 8 11

¢⁄
1 4 6 10
2 5 8 10
1 3 7 10

° w bbw
w b w
w
w bb w
w
w
& bbw
w
w
w
w b w w
F‹7
1 4 8 11

¢⁄
1 4 6 9
1 5 8 10
1 3 6 10

° ww bbw
w b ww
w bb w
w
w
& bbw
w w
w b w w
F‹7(b5)
1 4 7 11

¢⁄
0 4 6 9
1 4 8 10
1 3 6 9

° w bw
w
w
w bw
w
w
& bww w
w bw
w w
w

1 4 7 10

¢⁄
0 3 6 9
1 4 7 10
0 3 6 9

194
° w
3. Drop2 - in Bb

w w bw
w
& w
w bww bw
w
w
w
w
bw w
root 3rd 5th 7th
B¨Œ„Š7

¢⁄
3 6 10 11
2 3 7 10
3 7 8 12
1 5 8 12

° w w bw bw
w
& bw bbww bw
w bw
w
bw
w w w
B¨7

¢⁄
3 6 9 11
1 3 7 10
3 6 8 12
1 5 8 11

° bw ww bbw
bw
bww
&bw bbbw w bbw
w
bw w w
w
B¨‹7

¢⁄
2 6 9 11
1 3 6 10
3 6 8 11
1 4 8 11

° bw bbw bw
&bw bbbw
ww bww bbww
w
bw
w w w
B¨‹7(b5)

¢⁄
2 5 9 11
1 3 6 9
2 6 8 11
1 4 7 11

° bw bw
w
w
bbw
w
bw
bww
& w bw w
bw
w w w
B¨º

¢⁄
2 5 8 11
0 3 6 9
2 5 8 11
1 4 7 10

195
° w
4. Drop3 - in Bb
w
w bww bw
w
w
w bw w
& w w w w
bw
root 3rd 5th 7th
B¨Œ„Š7
1 5 6 10

¢⁄
3 6 10 11
2 3 7 10
1 5 8 12

° w w bw
w bbww
w
bw
w
w
& bw bw w bw
bw w
B¨7
1 4 6 10

¢⁄
3 6 9 11
1 3 7 10
1 5 8 11

° bw bw bbbww bb w
w
bw
w w w
&b w w w bw
bw bw
B¨‹7
1 4 6 9

¢⁄
2 6 9 11
1 3 6 10
1 4 8 11

° bww bw bbbww bb w
w
&b w bw
w w
w bww
bw bw
B¨‹7(b5)
0 4 6 9

¢⁄
2 5 9 11
1 3 6 9
1 4 7 11

° bww w
bw
w
bw
bw
w
bb w
w
w
& w bw w w
bw
B¨º
0 3 6 9

¢⁄
2 5 8 11
0 3 6 9
1 4 7 10

196
5. Drop2 - in Eb

° bw bw w
w bb w
w
w
w bww bbw w
&b w
w w w
E¨Œ„Š7
3 6 10 11

¢⁄
3 4 8 11
3 7 8 12
1 5 8 12

° bw bw bw
w bb w
w
& bbw
w bbww
w bbw
w bww
w
E¨7
3 6 9 11

¢⁄
2 4 8 11
3 6 8 12
1 5 8 11

bw
° bbbw bw
bbbww b bbw
w bb bw
w
& bw
w
w w bw w w
E¨‹7
2 6 9 11

¢⁄
2 4 7 11
3 6 8 11
1 4 8 11

bw
° bbw bbbww
w bbbw
w
w bbww
& bw
w
w w w w

E¨‹7(b5)
2 5 9 11

¢⁄
2 4 7 10
2 6 8 11
1 4 7 11

bw
° bw bw
w bbw
w
w bww
& bw
w
w bw
w w w

E¨º
2 5 8 11

¢⁄
1 4 7 10
2 5 8 11
1 4 7 10

197
° bw
6. Drop3 - in Eb

w bw
w
bww bbw w
&b w
w w w
w bw
w bw
7th
3rd
5th root
E¨Œ„Š7

¢⁄
3 4 8 11
3 7 8 12
1 5 8 12
3 6 10 11

° bbw bbww w bw
bw
& bw
w w bbw
w w
bw
w bw bw
E¨7

¢⁄
2 4 8 11
3 6 8 12
1 5 8 11
3 6 9 11

° bbw b w bbbw
w
bb w
bw
bb w
w
& bw
w w w
bw bw
bw bw
E¨‹7

¢⁄
2 4 7 11
3 6 8 11
1 4 8 11
2 6 9 11

° bw bbbww bbw
w bbww
w
& bw
w w bw
w bw
bw w
E¨‹7(b5)

¢⁄
2 4 7 10
2 6 8 11
1 4 7 11
2 5 9 11

° w bw bbw
w bww
& bw
w bw
w w w
bw
bw w w
E¨º

¢⁄
1 4 7 10
2 5 8 11
1 4 7 10
2 5 8 11

198
Drop2 and drop3 chords and inversions

Here you find the most common drop2 and drop3 voicings in four inversions.
Some are comfortable, others are "almost impossible" to finger. But they sound
very colourful, so why don´t you give them a try.........

Gminor:

° bw
w bw
drop2 drop3
bw
w w w
w w bw
w
G‹7 w
& w
w
w
w b ww w bw
w
w
w
w
w bww w
w
bw w
w
3 6 10 13

¢⁄
3 6 8 11 3 6 8 11
3 7 10 12 3 7 10 12
3 5 8 12 3 5 8 12
3 6 10 13

#w
° w b#w w bw bw
w w w w w
b#ww
#w
G‹(Œ„Š7)
& #bw
w
w
w
w w w
#bw
w
w
w b#ww w
#w
w bw w
3 6 10 14

¢⁄
3 7 8 11 3 7 8 11
3 7 11 12 3 7 11 12
4 5 8 12 4 5 8 12
3 6 10 14

w w
° bww wb w
w w
w b ww
w bw ww bw
w b ww
w
&n w bw w w
G‹%
w w w w w w
w bw
5 6 12 13

¢⁄
5 6 10 11 5 6 10 11
3 9 10 14 3 9 10 14
3 7 8 14 3 7 8 14
5 6 12 13

w
° w bw w bww bww
w w
w ww w w
w ww
& bw w bw bw
w w bw w
G‹('9)
w w w w
w bw
5 6 10 15

¢⁄
3 8 10 11 3 8 10 11
3 7 12 14 3 7 12 14
5 7 8 12 5 7 8 12
5 6 10 15

199
w
° wb w bw
Gmadd11
w
w w
w b ww w bw
w b ww
w bw
w w w ww bw
w w w
& w w w w w
bw
6 8 10 15

¢⁄
3 8 11 13 3 8 11 13
5 7 12 15 5 7 12 15
5 8 10 12 5 8 10 12
6 8 10 15

° # w bw #w
w bw
w bw
#w ww w
G‹7(b5)
#w w w
& b ww
w w
w b w w b#w
ww # w
w b w #w
w
w b w #w
3 6 9 13

¢⁄
2 6 8 11 2 6 8 11
3 6 10 12 3 6 10 12
3 5 8 11 3 5 8 11
3 6 9 13

dominant7:

w
° nw
drop2
w
drop3
w
w ww w
w w ww w
w
w w w w w w
G7
& w
w w w w
w w w
w w
w w
3 7 10 13

¢⁄
3 6 8 12 3 6 8 12
4 7 10 12 4 7 10 12
3 5 9 12 3 5 9 12
3 7 10 13

w
° #ww w
#w
#w
ww w
#w w ww w
#w
G7(#11)
& ww
w
w w w #w
ww #w
w w
#w
w
w
w w
3 7 9 13

¢⁄
2 6 8 12 2 6 8 12
4 6 10 12 4 6 10 12
3 5 9 11 3 5 9 11
3 7 9 13

200
bw w
° bw w w
bw
drop3
ww bw ww w
drop2
w nww w bw nww w
G7(b13) & w
w w w w
w w w
bw w
w w
3 7 11 13

¢⁄
4 6 8 12 4 6 8 12
4 9 10 12 4 9 10 12
3 5 9 13 3 5 9 13
3 7 11 13

° bw nw
w bw
w nb ww
w bw nb ww
nw
w bw w w w
G7(#9) & nw
w w w nw
w bw
w nw w
bw w w
w nw
6 7 10 13

¢⁄
3 6 11 12 3 6 11 12
4 7 10 15 4 7 10 15
3 8 9 12 3 8 9 12
6 7 10 13

w w
° w w ww
w ww ww
w w ww ww ww
w
G13
& nw
w w w w
w w w
w w
w w
3 7 12 13

¢⁄
5 6 8 12 5 6 8 12
4 9 10 12 4 9 10 12
3 5 9 15 3 5 9 15
3 7 12 13

w
° ww
w w w w
G7(“4)
w w
w ww
w
w
w ww w
w ww
w
w
w
& w w w w w w
w w
3 8 10 13

¢⁄
3 6 8 13 3 6 8 13
5 7 10 12 5 7 10 12
3 5 10 12 3 5 10 12
3 8 10 13

201
major7:

#w
° w
w
drop2 drop3

w #w
w
w #ww w
w
w w #w
w #ww w
w
w
& #w w #w w
GŒ„Š7
w w w w w #w
w w
3 7 10 14

¢⁄
3 7 8 12 3 7 8 12
4 7 11 12 4 7 11 12
4 5 9 12 4 5 9 12
3 7 10 14

#w
° #ww w
#w
# #w
#ww w
#w #ww ##w #ww w
w
GŒ„Š7(#11)
&# w
w w
w w w
#w
w
w w
w #w
# w
w w
3 7 9 14

¢⁄
2 7 8 12 2 7 8 12
4 6 11 12 4 6 11 12
4 5 9 11 4 5 9 11
3 7 10 14

bw #w
° bww b#ww
w #ww
w bw
w
w bw b#ww #ww bw
w
w
GŒ„Š7(#5)
& #w
w w #w
w w b
w
w #w
w w
3 7 11 14

¢⁄
4 7 8 12 4 7 8 12
4 8 11 12 4 8 11 12
4 5 9 13 4 5 9 13
3 7 11 14

w
° w w
w ww
w ww w ww ww
& w w w
w w w w
w w
w w w
w w w
G('9)

w w w
5 7 10 15

¢⁄
3 8 10 12 3 8 10 12
4 7 12 14 4 7 12 14
5 7 9 12 5 7 9 12
5 7 10 15

202
&

&

&

&

&

&

&

&

&
203
204
Alphabetical index:

All Blues solo 172


All the things you are - chord melody 71
Altered phrases 126
Altered phrases 2 128
Arpeggios 42
Articulation and phrasing 179
Autumn Leaves basic - chords 72
Autumn Leaves comping exercise and voicings 73
Autumn Leaves solo 1 139
Autumn Leaves solo 2 144
Basic chords notation and tab 60
Basic exercises 9
Basic patterns in C major 123
Basic patterns in G major 122
Bebop blues solos 165
Block chords introduction 62
Block chords notation and tab 63
Blue Bossa - chord melody and voicings 81
Blue Bossa example solo 150
Blue Bossa extended solo 153
Blue in Green - chord melody and voicings 80
Blues in F advanced solo 167
Blues in F7 solo 164
Blues scale 34
Blues tribute to Wes 169
Blues voicings (Parker blues) 84
Blues voicings in Bb7 83
Blues voicings in F7 82
Body and Soul 85
Chord exercises type 1 52
Chord exercises type 2 54
Chord overview 59
Chords introduction 50
Chords type 1 51
Chords type 2 53
Chords type 3 55
Chords type 4 58

205
Diagram: chord reinterpretation 186
Diagram: scale circle 184
Diagram: which scale for which chord 187
Diatonic chords in drop2 and drop3 shapes 189
Diatonic scales position 1 18
Dorian phrases 124
Dorian phrases over two octaves 132
Drop2 and drop3 chords and inversions 192
Drop2 and drop3 chords with extensions (advanced) 199
Elementary arpeggios 37
Empty music notation paper 203
Empty tabulature paper 204
Giant Steps - chord melody 90
Girl from Ipanema - chords 92
Half tone whole tone scale 36
Harmonic minor scale 33
Have you met Mrs Jones - chord melody 91
How high the moon - chord melody and voicings 94
I ́ ve grown accustomed to your face - chord melody transcription 88
II-V-I patterns 114
Introduction 7
It shouldn ́ t happen to a dream - chord melody transcription 108
Lullaby of Birdland - chord melody 86
Major arpeggio 43
Major arpeggio exercises 45
Major pentatonics 27
Major scale chromatic up and down 17
Major scale diatonic down 25
Major scale fingerings 16
Major scale in a II - V - progression 21
Major scale in groups of four 20
Major scale sequencing ideas 23
Melodic minor pentatonics 30
Melodic minor scale 32
Misty - chord melody 96
Mixolydian phrases 130
One Note Samba - chords 100
Patterns and Licks introduction 120
Patterns for comping 110
Pent up House - voicings 87

206
Practising tips 15
Rhythm Changes - voicings 101
Rhythm Changes Solo 1 159
Rhythm Changes Solo 2 161
Round Midnight (block chords) transcription 98
Satin Doll - chord melody and voicings 103
Satin Doll solo example 174
Scale overview 13
Scales, interval structure, - chord functions 12
Scofield patterns 134
Standard chord progressions 178
Stella by starlight - chord melody 106
Substitutions 180
Swing patterns 111
Take the A Train - chord melody 68
Take the A Train solo 137
Take the A Train voicings 69
Technical exercises 10
The principle of drop2 and drop3 188
There will never be another you 176
Turnarounds 121
Voicings introduction 67
When lights are low - chord melody 108
Whole tone half tone scale 35
Yardbird suite - chord melody 109

207
208
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jazz guitar: a new way

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Wolfgang Kulawik
209