Sie sind auf Seite 1von 285

Harry – gefangen in der Zeit

Begleitmaterialien

Episode 001 – Grammar

1. Verb placement

In German, a declarative sentence contains at least one verb and one or more other elements. In a declarative sentence, the conjugated
verb is always in the second position.

1st position 2nd position 3rd position


(konjugiertes Verb)

Die Welt ist verrückt.


Das Ende ist nah.
Alle Zeitungen sind weg.

Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Capitalization

Some words in German begin with a capital letter, while others are written in lower case. The main words that are always capitalized
include:

Names Ich heiße Harry Walkott.


Nouns Die Welt ist verrückt, das Ende ist nah.
Words that begin a sentence Alle Zeitungen sind weg. Mir geht es gut, danke.
The polite form of address, "Sie" Wie heißen Sie?

Use the lower case for words like adjectives, verbs and articles, unless they begin the sentence.

Adjectives Die Welt ist verrückt, das Ende ist nah.


Verbs Die Welt ist verrückt, das Ende ist nah.
Articles Die Welt ist verrückt, das Ende ist nah.

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 002 – Grammar

Definite articles

German nouns are often preceded by an article.

The article indicates the case, number and gender of the noun it precedes.
There are definite and indefinite articles.

A definite article refers to an object or person


whose identity is already known to the speaker or listener.

German has three classes of gender: masculine, feminine and neuter.

Definite article Noun

Masculine der Fahrer


Feminine die Katze
Neuter das Taxi

Important note!
Unfortunately there's no general rule for articles. You have to learn the gender of each noun by heart. The nouns in your vocabulary list
are shown with their articles, so always learn both: the noun and the article that goes along with it!

Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

More:

For all three genders - masculine, feminine and neuter - the definite article in the nominative plural is always "die".

German cases:
German has four cases.
The following chart shows the case of definite articles in the singular for all three genders.

Masculine Feminine Neuter


Nominative der die das

Accusative den die das

Dative dem der dem

Genitive des der des

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 003 – Grammar

Indefinite articles

German nouns are often preceded by an article.

The article indicates the case, number and gender of the noun it precedes.

There are definite and indefinite articles.

Indefinite articles refer to an object or person whose identity is not already known or hasn't yet been specified.

German has three classes of gender: masculine, feminine and neuter.

Indefinite article + noun Definite article + noun

Masculine ein Blitz der Blitz


Feminine eine Milch die Milch
Neuter ein Brötchen das Brötchen

The plural is easy: Indefinite articles have no plural, so plural nouns appear without an article.

Indefinite article Definite article

Singular Ich möchte ein Brötchen. Ich möchte das Brötchen.


Plural Ich möchte Brötchen. Ich möchte die Brötchen.

Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

More:

German has four cases.


In this chart you can see the definite and indefinite articles in each case in the singular.

Masculine Feminine Neuter

Nominative ein eine ein


der die das

Accusative einen eine ein


den die das

Dative einem einer einem


dem der dem

Genitive eines einer eines


des der des

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 004 – Grammar

1. Personal pronouns

All nouns can be replaced by pronouns. Personal pronouns stand in place of people, living beings, things or contexts.

Harry lernt Deutsch.


Er lernt Deutsch.

Harry und Julia nehmen ein Hotel.


Sie nehmen ein Hotel.

There are three personal pronouns for the singular and three for the plural.

Singular 1st person ich


2nd person du
3rd person er/sie/es

Plural 1st person wir


2nd person ihr
3rd person sie

Seite 1/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

The polite form of address

To address strangers and other people in the polite form in German, you use "Sie" instead of "du". "Sie" takes the same verb form as
the 3rd person plural ("sie" - they).

But note that unlike the personal pronoun "sie" used for both the 3rd person singular and the 3rd person plural, the polite form of
address "Sie" is always capitalized. For example: "Was möchten Sie?"

Seite 2/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Regular verbs

German has regular and irregular verbs.

The majority of verbs are regular, meaning that their stem doesn't change when they are conjugated. Their endings change according
to the person and number of the subject.

machen lernen

Singular ich mache lerne


du machst lernst
er/sie/es macht lernt

Plural wir machen lernen


ihr macht lernt
sie machen lernen

For some regular verbs, an -e- is inserted before the ending in the 2nd and 3rd person singular and the 2nd person plural to make
pronunciation easier:

warten

Singular ich warte


du wartest
er/sie/es wartet

Seite 3/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Plural wir warten


ihr wartet
sie warten

For almost all verbs, the 1st and 3rd person plural in the present tense are the same as the infinitive.

Infinitive: gehen lernen warten

wir gehen lernen warten


sie gehen lernen warten

Seite 4/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 005 – Grammar

1. The possessive determiners "mein", "dein" and "Ihr"

Possessive determiners replace a definite or indefinite article.


They express a sense of possession or a sense of belonging to someone or something.
In the singular, they follow the same pattern of declension as the indefinite article "ein" and refer to the noun that follows.

Definite article Indefinite article Possessive determiner


ich du Sie

Masculine der ein mein dein Ihr

Feminine die eine meine deine Ihre

Neuter das ein mein dein Ihr

Plural die / meine deine Ihre

Seite 1/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural


Possessive determiner ich mein Sohn meine Tochter mein Kind meine Kinder
du dein Sohn deine Tochter dein Kind deine Kinder
Sie Ihr Sohn Ihre Tochter Ihr Kind Ihre Kinder

Examples:
Taxifahrer: Das ist mein Sohn.
Taxifahrer: Das ist meine Tochter.
Harry: Julia hat mein Geld.
Herr Strobel: Sind das Ihre Kinder?

More:

This chart shows the possessive determiners in the nominative case according to person and gender:

Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural

Singular ich mein meine mein meine


du dein deine dein deine
er sein seine sein seine
sie ihr ihre ihr ihre
es sein seine sein seine

Seite 2/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Plural wir unser unsere unser unsere


ihr euer eure euer eure
sie ihr ihre ihr ihre

Polite form Sie Ihr Ihre Ihr Ihre

Seite 3/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Yes/no questions

Yes/no questions can be answered with either "yes" or "no".


Do you remember that in a simple declarative sentence, the verb comes second?
Well, with yes/no questions, you switch the position: The verb comes first.

Declarative sentence: Julia zahlt meine Rechnung.

Yes/no question: Zahlt Julia meine Rechnung?

Declarative sentence: Julia ist meine Freundin.


Yes/no question: Ist Julia meine Freundin?

Declarative sentence: Julia hat Ihr Geld.


Yes/no question: Hat Julia Ihr Geld?

More:

In colloquial speech, yes/no questions can also be formed using the same word sequence as in the declarative sentence by simply
adding a question mark and raising your voice at the end.

Example:
Sie zahlt Ihre Rechnung?

Seite 4/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 006 – Grammar

1. Negation using "kein" and "nicht"

Use "kein" to negate a noun that appears with "ein" in a positive statement.

Example:
Harry hat ein Taschentuch. – Harry hat kein Taschentuch.

The endings for "kein" in the singular are the same as for "ein".

Masculine ein Sohn kein Sohn


Feminine eine Tochter keine Tochter
Neuter ein Kind kein Kind

"kein" is also usually used to negate nouns that have no article.

Example:
Harry spricht Deutsch. – Harry spricht kein Deutsch.
Harry hat Kinder. – Harry hat keine Kinder.

More:
"kein" changes its form like indefinite articles according to case and gender.

Seite 1/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Case Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural


Nominative ein kein eine keine ein kein / keine
Accusative einen keinen eine keine ein kein / keine
Dative einem keinem einer keiner einem keinem / keinen
Genitive eines keines einer keiner eines keines / keiner

You can use "nicht" to negate either an entire sentence or just one word or group of words (e.g. a noun or adjective). "nicht" doesn't
change its form. "nicht" directly precedes the word or group of words it negates. When "nicht" is used to negate a whole sentence, it
comes at the end.

Adjective: Das ist normal.


Das ist nicht normal.

Noun: Das ist der Bahnhof.


Das ist nicht der Bahnhof.

Whole sentence: Er versteht Sie.


Er versteht Sie nicht.

Seite 2/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Irregular verbs

German has regular and irregular verbs.

With regular verbs, the endings change when they are conjugated.
With irregular verbs, the stem also changes.

When an irregular verb stem changes in the present tense, then it usually affects only the 2nd and 3rd person singular.

nehmen sprechen
Singular ich nehme spreche
du nimmst sprichst
er/sie/es nimmt spricht
Plural wir nehmen sprechen
ihr nehmt sprecht
sie nehmen sprechen

The most important irregular German verbs are "haben" and "sein" - and they are very irregular! Learn them by heart because you'll
need them often.

haben sein
Singular ich habe bin
du hast bist
er/sie/es hat ist
Plural wir haben sind
ihr habt seid
sie haben sind

Seite 3/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 007 – Grammar

1. Verbs and the accusative (indefinite articles)

Most German sentences contain at least one conjugated verb and a component in the nominative that it modifies - a subject.

Many verbs, however, also require other components in the nominative - or components in the accusative, dative or genitive (objects).
Direct objects (accusative) are the most common.

Nominative component for instance with the verb "sein"


Accusative component for instance with the verbs "haben", "möchten", "rauchen", "trinken"
Dative component for instance with the verb "zuhören"
Genitive component extremely rare

If the subject or object is a noun, you usually need an article for the singular. If you use an indefinite article, only the masculine form
changes in the accusative.
The other forms stay the same. The noun itself doesn't change in the accusative.

Masculine Feminine Neuter

Nominative ein eine ein


Accusative einen eine ein

Seite 1/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Verb + nominative Verb + accusative

Masculine Das ist ein Stadtplan. Ich brauche einen Stadtplan.


Feminine Das ist eine Zeitung. Ich brauche eine Zeitung.
Neuter Das ist ein Auto. Ich brauche ein Auto.
Plural Das sind Autos. Ich brauche Autos. -

Never leave a verb all alone!

Always learn verbs along with the case required by the components they modify!

Seite 2/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Adverbs of location

German adverbs provide more information about the nature of an action, process or condition. They refer to another word in the
sentence (such as the verb) or to the sentence as a whole. Adverbs are not conjugated or inflected.

Adverbs of location are used to describe the place or direction of something. They answer the questions "Wo?" (where?) or "Wohin?"
(where to?).

Examples:
Wo bist du? – Ich bin hier.
Wo ist der Bahnhof? – Der Bahnhof ist links. (Der Bahnhof ist rechts.)
Wohin möchten Sie? – Zum Bahnhof. Geradeaus, bitte.

More:

Besides place adverbs, there are also adverbs that refer to time, manner and cause or reason. They answer the questions "when?",
"how?" and "why?".

Seite 3/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 008 – Grammar

1. The formal imperative

The imperative is used to express a request, command or instructions.

Use the formal imperative for people addressed with the polite form "Sie". There is no difference between the singular and plural
formal imperative. It is formed by the 3rd person plural present tense. Unlike the informal imperative, a sentence in the formal
imperative keeps the personal pronoun, which comes after the verb.

Simple sentence Sie warten.


Imperative sentence + Sie Warten Sie!

The imperative form "sein" is irregular.

Example:
Sie sind nicht verrückt. Seien Sie nicht verrückt!

Seite 1/11

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Verbs and the accusative (definite articles)

Most German sentences contain at least one conjugated verb and a component in the nominative that it modifies - a subject.

Many verbs, however, also require other components in the nominative - or components in the accusative, dative or genitive (objects).
Direct objects (accusative) are the most common.

Nominative component for instance with the verb "sein"


Accusative component for instance with the verbs "haben", "möchten", "brauchen", "trinken"
Dative component for instance with the verb "zuhören"
Genitive component extremely rare

If the subject or object is a noun, you usually need an article for the singular. If you use a definite article, only the masculine form
changes in the accusative.
The other forms stay the same. The noun itself doesn't change in the accusative.

Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural

Nominative ein der eine die ein das / die


Accusative einen den eine die ein das / die

Seite 2/11

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Verb + nominative Verb + accusative

Masculine Das ist der Regenschirm. Ich nehme den Regenschirm.


Feminine Das ist die Uhr. Sie bekommen die Uhr.
Neuter Das ist das Auto. Ich möchte das Auto.
Plural Das sind die Brötchen. Ich brauche die Brötchen.

Reminder: Never leave a verb all alone!

Always learn verbs along with the case required by the components they modify!

More:

The following charts show you how personal pronouns, definite and indefinite articles, possessive determiners and the negation word
"kein" change in the nominative, accusative and dative. Can you detect any patterns?

Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural


Nominative
Personal pronouns er sie es sie
Definite articles der Mann die Frau das Kind die Kinder
Indefinite articles ein Mann eine Frau ein Kind Kinder
Possessive articles mein Mann meine Frau mein Kind meine Kinder
Negation kein Mann keine Frau kein Kind keine Kinder

Seite 3/11

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural


Accusative
Personal pronouns ihn sie es sie
Definite articles den Mann die Frau das Kind die Kinder
Indefinite articles einen Mann eine Frau ein Kind Kinder
Possessive articles meinen Mann meine Frau mein Kind meine Kinder
Negation keinen Mann keine Frau kein Kind keine Kinder

Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural


Dative
Personal pronouns ihm ihr ihm ihnen
Definite articles dem Mann der Frau dem Kind den Kindern
Indefinite articles einem Mann einer Frau einem Kind Kindern
Possessive articles meinem Mann meiner Frau meinem Kind unseren Kindern
Negation keinem Mann keiner Frau keinem Kind keinen Kindern

Seite 4/11

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

3. The numbers 10 - 100

The numbers 10 to 100 are read and spoken as follows: First, the ones place, then the tens place. 11 (elf) and 12 (zwölf) are exceptions,
but 13 and up are quite regular.

The numbers 13 - 19 are formed like this:

13 = 10 + 3 dreizehn

zehn + drei

19 = 10 + 9 neunzehn

zehn + neun

16 and 17 are slightly irregular:

16 = 10 + 6 sechzehn

zehn + sechs

Seite 5/11

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

17 = 10 + 7 siebzehn

zehn + sieben

The tens are formed by adding "zig" to the end of the ones.
20, 30, 60 and 70 are slightly irregular: zwanzig, dreißig, sechzig, siebzig.

20 zwanzig
30 dreißig
40 vierzig
50 fünfzig
60 sechzig
70 siebzig
80 achtzig
90 neunzig
100 einhundert

For numbers greater than 20, the compound numbers are also joined by "und":

23 = 20 + 3 dreiundzwanzig

zwanzig + drei

Seite 6/11

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

47 = 40 + 7 siebenundvierzig

vierzig + sieben

Irregularity:

21 = 20 + 1 einundzwanzig

zwanzig + eins

Here are all the numbers from 1 to 100.

0 null
1 eins
2 zwei
3 drei
4 vier
5 fünf
6 sechs
7 sieben
8 acht
9 neun
Seite 7/11

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

10 zehn
11 elf
12 zwölf
13 dreizehn
14 vierzehn
15 fünfzehn
16 sechzehn
17 siebzehn
18 achtzehn
19 neunzehn
20 zwanzig
21 einundzwanzig
22 zweiundzwanzig
23 dreiundzwanzig
24 vierundzwanzig
25 fünfundzwanzig
26 sechsundzwanzig
27 siebenundzwanzig
28 achtundzwanzig
29 neunundzwanzig
30 dreißig
31 einunddreißig
32 zweiunddreißig
33 dreiunddreißig
34 vierunddreißig
35 fünfunddreißig
36 sechsunddreißig
37 siebenunddreißig
Seite 8/11

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

38 achtunddreißig
39 neununddreißig
40 vierzig
41 einundvierzig
42 zweiundvierzig
43 dreiundvierzig
44 vierundvierzig
45 fünfundvierzig
46 sechsundvierzig
47 siebenundvierzig
48 achtundvierzig
49 neunundvierzig
50 fünfzig
51 einundfünfzig
52 zweiundfünfzig
53 dreiundfünfzig
54 vierundfünfzig
55 fünfundfünfzig
56 sechsundfünfzig
57 siebenundfünfzig
58 achtundfünfzig
59 neunundfünfzig
60 sechzig
61 einundsechzig
62 zweiundsechzig
63 dreiundsechzig
64 vierundsechzig
65 fünfundsechzig
Seite 9/11

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

66 sechsundsechzig
67 siebenundsechzig
68 achtundsechzig
69 neunundsechzig
70 siebzig
71 einundsiebzig
72 zweiundsiebzig
73 dreiundsiebzig
74 vierundsiebzig
75 fünfundsiebzig
76 sechsundsiebzig
77 siebenundsiebzig
78 achtundsiebzig
79 neunundsiebzig
80 achtzig
81 einundachtzig
82 zweiundachtzig
83 dreiundachtzig
84 vierundachtzig
85 fünfundachtzig
86 sechsundachtzig
87 siebenundachtzig
88 achtundachtzig
89 neunundachtzig
90 neunzig
91 einundneunzig
92 zweiundneunzig
93 dreiundneunzig
Seite 10/11

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

94 vierundneunzig
95 fünfundneunzig
96 sechsundneunzig
97 siebenundneunzig
98 achtundneunzig
99 neunundneunzig
100 einhundert

"Einhundert" or "hundert"?

People often like to use a shortened version of 100. Instead of "einhundert", they simply say "hundert".

Seite 11/11

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 009 – Grammar

1. W-Fragen

"W" questions are open questions that can't be answered with "yes" or "no". They begin with a question word:

Wie?
Wo?
Wohin?
Woher?
Was?

When forming questions that begin with these "W" words, the question word usually comes at the beginning.
It is followed by the conjugated verb - just like in a declarative sentence.
The subject and the rest of the sentence follow the verb.

1st position 2nd position 3rd position

Declarative sentence Ich komme aus Traponia.

„W“ question Woher kommen Sie?

Wie heißen Sie?


Wo wohnen Sie?
Wohin gehen Sie?
Was war das?
Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. The polite form of address, "Sie"

In German, you address relatives, friends, children and other people you know well with the informal "du". But if you're addressing an
adult you don't know well or figures of authority, such as police officers or your teacher, it is a sign of respect to use the polite form of
address: "Sie".

You already know the verb form that "du" takes. Its conjugation is the 2nd person singular.

Example:
Verstehst du Traponisch?

The formal form of address, "Sie", takes the same verb form as the 3rd person plural. But remember that unlike the personal pronoun
"sie" used for both the 3rd person singular and the 3rd person plural, the pronoun "Sie" to address someone formally is always
capitalized.

Example:
Verstehen Sie Traponisch?

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 010 – Grammar

1. Joining main clauses with "und" and "oder"

A main clause contains at least a subject and a conjugated verb. "und" and "oder" are conjunctions that can connect two independent
clauses.

No conjunction: Ich bin in Deutschland. Ich mache Urlaub.


Bist du dumm? Bist du klug?

With a conjunction: Ich bin in Deutschland und ich mache Urlaub.


Bist du dumm oder bist du klug?

If the two clauses share the same subject, then the subject can be omitted from the second main clause. That's shorter:

Shortened form: Ich bin in Deutschland und mache Urlaub.

If the subject and conjugated verb are identical in each of the main clauses, then both can be dropped from the second clause.

Shortened form: Bist du dumm oder klug?

Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Adjectives describing a person

German adjectives provide more information about something or someone, an occurrence or a condition. They often describe nouns
and personal pronouns. For many adjectives there is an opposite (antonym).

Examples:
Ich bin nicht klein. Ich bin groß.
Ich bin nicht dick. Ich bin schlank.
Ich bin nicht hässlich. Ich bin schön.
Bist du klug oder bist du dumm?

More:

When adjectives are placed after the noun or personal pronoun - like in the examples above - the basic form doesn't change.

If the adjectives precede the noun that they modify, then they are inflected. That means their endings change.

Definite article der kluge Mann


Indefinite article ein kluger Mann

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 011 – Grammar

1. Plural forms of nouns

Most nouns can be either singular or plural. The plural indicates that you're talking about several units of the same thing.

Example:
Ist das Bett zu hart? – Sind die Betten zu hart?

The definite article in the nominative and the accusative is always "die" in all three genders: masculine, feminine and neuter. The
indefinite article is omitted.

Example:
Ich mache einen Test. – Ich mache _ Tests.

The negative article in the nominative and the accusative is "keine".

Example:
Haben Sie ein Zimmer? – Nein, wir haben keine Zimmer.

Seite 1/6

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

There are altogether five different endings to form the plural:

Singular Plural
-n oder -en: das Bett die Betten
der Name die Namen
-e: der Arm die Arme
-er: das Kind die Kinder
-s: das Sofa die Sofas

Some nouns stay the same in both the plural and the singular.

Example:
das Zimmer – die Zimmer (endungslos)

In such cases, the definite article "die" or the use of a determiner indicating number or amount - such as "zwei" (two), "viele" (many),
or "mehrere" (several) - help to identify the plural.

Example:
Wir haben ein Zimmer. – Wir haben viele Zimmer im Hotel.

Seite 2/6

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Memorize it!

It is very hard to list all the rules that determine which plural endings go with which nouns - and it's even harder to remember them all
and use them. The best way is to always learn the nouns along with their article and plural form.

The vocabulary list will also help you. Each noun is listed along with its article and plural ending. The entries look like this:

Bett (das); -en


So the plural of "Bett" is formed with the ending -en: die Betten.

Fernseher (der); -
The plural of "Fernseher" is formed without an ending (-): die Fernseher.

More:

In many cases, turning a noun into the plural requires not only adding an ending, but also changing a stem vowel to an umlaut: a
becomes ä, o becomes ö or u becomes ü. Sometimes an umlaut change is the only indication of the plural.

Singular Plural
die Hand die Hände
der Fuß die Füße
die Tochter die Töchter

Seite 3/6

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Note that with some words, the final consonant is doubled before the plural ending is attached. This doesn't happen often and affects
mainly words that end with -nis and -in. But it applies to most female forms of describing people because they often have -in at the
end:

Masculine Plural Feminine Plural


der Freund die Freunde die Freundin die Freundin-n-en
der Verkäufer die Verkäufer die Verkäuferin die Verkäuferin-n-en

Seite 4/6

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. The modal verbs "möchten", "können", "müssen"

Modal verbs usually accompany another verb in a sentence. They not only modify the main verb, they change the nature of the
sentence. Modal verbs describe the subject in relation to the action expressed by the main verb.

The modal verbs "möchten", "können" and "müssen" have the following basic meanings:

"möchten" - would like - to indicate a wish or desire:


Harry möchte in die Stadt fahren.
= Harry would like to go to the city.

"können" - can, be able - to describe an ability or option:


Harry kann Deutsch sprechen.
= Harry can speak German.
Sie können gerne ein anderes Zimmer haben.
= Harry has the option of getting a different room.

"müssen" - must, have to - indicates a necessity:


Harry muss in die Stadt fahren.
= It is absolutely necessary for Harry to get to the city.

Placement of modal verbs in a sentence


In a sentence, the modal verb is conjugated, meaning its form is an indication of the person, number and tense. It is placed in the usual
position for conjugated verbs: 2nd position in simple declarative sentences and "W" questions. The main verb is placed at the end of
the sentence in its basic form, the infinitive.

Seite 5/6

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Modal verb Main verb


Harry möchte fahren.
Warum möchten Sie fahren?

Conjugation of modal verbs


The verbs "können" and "müssen" are irregular. The verbs "möchten", "können" and "müssen" are conjugated as follows:

möchten können müssen


Singular ich möchte kann muss
du möchtest kannst musst
er/sie/es möchte kann muss
Plural wir möchten können müssen
ihr möchtet könnt müsst
sie möchten können müssen

More:

Strictly speaking, "möchten" isn't a verb; it's a verb form of "mögen". But it is used as a modal verb. "möchten" has a similar meaning
to "wollen", which is another modal verb. It's simply more polite.

Seite 6/6

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 012 – Grammar

1. Numbers greater than 100

Once you know the cardinal numbers up to 100, it's not hard to form bigger numbers.

To express the hundreds, you just add the respective "ones" numbers in front of "hundert":

100: (ein)hundert
200: zweihundert
300: dreihundert
400: vierhundert
500: fünfhundert
600: sechshundert
700: siebenhundert
800: achthundert
900: neunhundert

Germans often omit the number "ein(s)" from 100. Instead of "einhundert", they simply say "hundert".

To add to numbers greater than 100, the last two digits are formed the same way as the cardinal numbers less than 100. The hundreds
simply precede them.

201 = zweihunderteins
212 = zweihundertzwölf
215 = zweihundertfünfzehn
231 = zweihunderteinunddreißig
Seite 1/5

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

More:

Forming numbers in the thousands works the same way as in the hundreds. The respective "ones" are placed in front of the word
"tausend".

1.000: (ein)tausend
2.000: zweitausend
3.000: dreitausend
4.000: viertausend
5.000: fünftausend
6.000: sechstausend
7.000: siebentausend
8.000: achttausend
9.000: neuntausend

Adding numbers to the thousands also follows the same pattern. The thousands precede the hundreds and are combined with the
cardinal numbers under 100:

2.222 = 2.000 + 200 + 20 + 2


zweitausendzweihundertzweiundzwanzig

Seite 2/5

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Years are expressed differently!

When talking about years, the thousands are expressed as hundreds. So if you were born in 1990, you wouldn't say
"tausendneunhundertneunzig". You'd say "neunzehnhundertneunzig".

Why is that? Perhaps because it's shorter - or because it just sounds better. The years since 2000, however, revert to the rule of
expressing numbers in the thousands.
So, 2011 = "zweitausendelf".

Numbers between 1,000 and 1 million are expressed as thousands:

10.000 = zehntausend
100.000 = hunderttausend
120.000 = hundertzwanzigtausend
125.000 = hundertfünfundzwanzigtausend
100.500 = hunderttausendfünfhundert
1.000.000 = eine Million
1.500.000 = eine Million fünfhunderttausend

Seite 3/5

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Irregular verbs "lesen" and "fahren"

Some irregular verbs change their stem in the present tense. The stem of a verb is the infinitive form without the –en ending:

Infinitive: fahren  verb stem: fahr-  stem vowel: a

Typical vowel change in the present:

In the 2nd and 3rd person singular, the stem vowel e changes to ie, for example with "lesen", or to i, as with "sprechen":

lesen sprechen
Singular ich lese spreche
du liest sprichst
er/sie/es liest spricht
Plural wir lesen sprechen
ihr lest sprecht
sie lesen sprechen

The root vowel a changes to ä in the 2nd and 3rd person singular, like with "fahren":

fahren
Singular ich fahre
du fährst
er/sie/es fährt
Plural wir fahren
ihr fahrt
sie fahren
Seite 4/5

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

More:

In some cases, not only the vowel changes; the whole stem changes. You already know:

nehmen
Singular ich nehme
du nimmst
er/sie/es nimmt
Plural wir nehmen
ihr nehmt
sie nehmen

Seite 5/5

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 013 – Grammar:

Location prepositions

What's a preposition?

Prepositions connect words and groups of words together. They express the relation between living beings, things or contexts.

Here's an example:
"Harry - fliegt - London" doesn't make much sense. Is Harry flying to London or from London?
Inserting a preposition, such as "über", describes the relation between Harry and London:
"Harry - fliegt - über - London".
Now we know that London is just a stopover on Harry's trip. He's actually flying to Traponia.

Location prepositions

German prepositions that describe spatial relations, like placement, or directional relations, are called location prepositions or
prepositions of location.
They answer the questions "Wo?" (where?), "Woher?" (from where?) or "Wohin?" (to where?).

The following spatial prepositions answer the question "Wohin?". Use them when you want to talk about a destination or buy a ticket.

Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Wohin? (Where to?)


These prepositions are used to describe a change of location and directional movement.
nach Names of countries without an article, Ich fliege nach Brasilien.
cities, directions Ich fliege nach Rio.
Gehen Sie nach rechts.
zu e.g. to people Ich fliege zu meiner Familie.
auf e.g. to islands, mountains Es gibt Flüge auf die Kanarischen Inseln…
in Names of countries with an article, closed Es gibt Flüge in den Libanon und in die USA.
regions and spaces Harry möchte in die Stadt fahren.
über e.g. stopovers on a trip Wir fliegen um 20 Uhr über London nach Traponia.

Memorization makes it easier!

There are many prepositions that can mean more than one thing, depending on the relations they describe. For example, the German
preposition "in" can indicate where something or someone is.

Harry ist in Deutschland.


Wir haben viele Zimmer im Hotel.

So it doesn't make sense to translate and learn individual prepositions. It's better to learn them within their context.

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 014 – Grammar

1. Adverbs of time

What's an adverb?
Adverbs describe when, where or how something happens. They refer either to another word in the sentence (such as the verb) or to
the sentence as a whole. Unlike adjectives, they don't refer to someone or something, in other words nouns or pronouns.

Adjective: das frische Brötchen


("frisch" (fresh) describes "das Brötchen" – a noun.)
Adverb: Harry geht schnell.
("schnell" (quickly) refers to "gehen" (to go) and doesn’t describe "Harry", the noun, but the manner in which he is
going.)

Temporal Adverbs
Temporal adverbs give more information about when something happened. They indicate a point in time, a length of time, or
frequency.

gestern yesterday
heute today
morgen tomorrow
übermorgen the day after tomorrow

Seite 1/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

"früh am Morgen" or "morgen früh"

The adverb "morgen" (tomorrow) is written in lower case. The noun, "der Morgen"
(morning), is capitalized. So:

heute Morgen (= earlier today)


Ich komme morgen früh. (= tomorrow)

Here are some other adverbs of time that you already know:

endlich Endlich (sind wir) auf der Autobahn!


immer Mein Tag ist immer gleich.
zuerst … zuerst das Wetter …

More:

Adverbs can be placed at the beginning of a sentence to give them special emphasis. In this case, the subject is placed after the
conjugated verb.

Wir haben heute frische Brötchen.

Heute haben wir frische Brötchen.

This sentence structure emphasizes the adverb "heute". That could, for example, mean that there were no fresh rolls yesterday, but
there are some today.
Seite 2/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Irregular verbs "sehen" and "wissen"

Here are two more irregular verbs. As with many irregular verbs, the stem vowel of "sehen" changes in the present tense for the 2nd
and 3rd person singular.

sehen
Singular ich sehe
du siehst
er/sie/es sieht
Plural wir sehen
ihr seht
sie sehen

The forms for "wissen" are very irregular. Keep in mind that the stem changes for all three singular forms and the endings are different
than those for regular verbs.
compared to
a regular verb
wissen heißen
Singular ich weiß heiße
du weißt heißt
er/sie/es weiß heißt
Plural wir wissen heißen
ihr wisst heißt
sie wissen heißen

Seite 3/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Long or short?

As you can see, the stem consonant in "wissen" changes from ss to ß. So which verb forms use ss and which use ß? That's easy, if
you're familiar with articulation.

Both letters require a voiceless "ess" sound, but ss follows a short vowel and ß follows a long vowel.

So if the stem vowel of a verb changes, the spelling of the "ess" can change. With the verb "wissen", the vowel changes from a short i to
a long ei. (Double vowels are never short.)

Seite 4/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 015 – Grammar

1. Ordinal numbers

Ordinal numbers can be used to determine a sequence. The ordinal number represents the position of an element in the sequence. For
example, the days of the month are a series of numbers in which one day ranks in a certain position:

Example:
der siebzehnte März = the 17th day in the month of March
der dreißigste April = the 30th day in the month of April

In German, ordinal numbers are written as digits followed by a period:

Examples:
der 17. März = March 17th
der 30. April = April 30th

When spoken or written out as a word, they are formed as follows:

For the numbers 1 to 19, the ending -te is added to the cardinal number in the singular.
Exceptions for ordinal numbers are "eins", "drei", "sieben" and "acht".

eins der erste (irregular)


zwei der zweite
drei der dritte (irregular)
vier der vierte
fünf der fünfte
Seite 1/5

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

sechs der sechste


sieben der siebte (en is omitted)
acht der achte (only one t)
neun der neunte
zehn der zehnte
elf der elfte
zwölf der zwölfte
dreizehn der dreizehnte
… etcetera

zwanzig der zwanzigste


dreißig der dreißigste
vierzig der vierzigste
… etcetera

Combined ordinal numbers greater than 13 are formed the same way as cardinal numbers:
First you say the hundreds, then the ones, then the tens. Only the last part is given the ending for ordinal numbers.

14. = der vierzehnte


21. = der einundzwanzigste
155. = der hundertfünfundfünfzigste
Note: 101. = der hunderterste

Seite 2/5

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

More:

Ordinal numbers usually precede the noun they describe. They can be used with definite or indefinite articles - or no article at all.
Ordinal numbers have different endings according to gender, case and number and the accompanying article.

Example:
Das erste Problem: Heute ist der 31. April.

But:
Ich sehe Sie heute zum ersten Mal.

Seite 3/5

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Expressing dates

Use ordinal numbers to express the date. First you name the day, then the month, then the year. Days are always masculine, meaning
they are preceded by a masculine definite article. In written German, the day and year are always given in numerals.

Examples:
Heute ist der 31. April. = spoken as: der einunddreißigste April
Mein Geburtstag ist der 17. März 1950. = spoken as: der siebzehnte März neunzehnhundertfünfzig

If you want to mention the day of the week, it precedes the date and is separated by a comma.

Example:
Heute ist Mittwoch, der 31. April = spoken as: Mittwoch, der einunddreißigste April

More:

The months can be referred to by their names or as ordinal numbers in written and spoken German. January is the first month of the
year, February is the 2nd, and so on. Since this is much shorter to write, you'll see it often in business correspondence and e-mails.

Example:
der 31.4. = spoken as: der einunddreißigste Vierte

Seite 4/5

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

3. The pronoun "es"

The pronoun "es" (it) is usually used for a neuter noun.

Example:
Ist das Bett zu hart? - Nein, es ist nicht zu hart. (es = das Bett)

But:
Es gibt Pinguine.

In this sentence, "es" has a different function. Here it doesn't stand for a particular noun. It functions as the subject, without having
any actual meaning. This construction is used frequently for impersonal phrases which have no other subject.

Fixed phrases: Es gibt ... Es geht mir gut. Es tut mir leid.
Time expressions: Wie spät ist es?
Weather: Es regnet. Es ist heiß.

Seite 5/5

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 016 – Grammar

The informal imperative

The imperative is used to express a request, command or instructions. You already know how to construct the formal imperative.

To create the more familiar form, use the verb form for the 2nd person singular in the present tense. The personal pronoun and the -st
conjugation ending are left out. The verb moves to the beginning of the sentence.

gehen: Du gehst mit mir zur Walpurgisnacht. Geh mit mir zur Walpurgisnacht!
nehmen: Du nimmst den Apfel. Nimm den Apfel!

For verb stems that end with -s, only the –t ending is left out.

lesen: Du liest die Zeitung. Lies die Zeitung!

Irregular verbs don't have an umlaut in the imperative.

fahren: Du fährst. Fahr!

An -e ending is added in the imperative form for verb stems that end with -d/-t in the present tense, or that end with the + -m/-n/-l

warten: Du wart-est Warte!


atmen: Du atm-est Atme!

Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Stay polite!

When making demands, you can combine imperative with "bitte". It sounds friendlier:
Komm bitte mit!

More:

Of course you can use the imperative when speaking to more than one person. For the more familiar form, just use the 2nd person
plural. As with the singular, the verb moves to the first position and the personal pronoun is left out.

Examples:
Ihr passt auf. Passt auf!
Ihr macht die Augen auf. Macht die Augen auf!

The imperative forms of "sein" are irregular:

For the imperative in the singular sei Sei nicht so!


For the imperative in the plural seid Seid nicht so!

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 017 – Grammar

1. The simple past tense of "sein" and "haben"

The simple past tense, or preterite, is a verb tense that describes the past. In German it is more frequently used in the written form
than in spoken language. For example, you'll see it used often in newspaper articles and novels.

The past tense of "sein" and "haben", however, are used for speaking. They are irregular verbs and you should get to know their forms.

sein haben
Present Simple past Present Simple past

Singular ich bin war habe hatte


du bist warst hast hattest
er/sie/es ist war hat hatte

Plural wir sind waren haben hatten


ihr seid wart habt hattet
sie sind waren haben hatten

Seite 1/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. The present perfect and past participles

The present perfect is a verb tense that can be used to express the past. Unlike the simple past tense, the perfect tense is often used in
spoken German.

The present perfect is formed using the helping verbs "sein" or "haben" and the past participle. The helping verbs are conjugated in the
present tense while the past participle remains unchanged.

Examples:
Ich habe getanzt.
Was haben Sie mit Julia gemacht?
Toll, sie hat es gemacht!

Past participles

The past participle is part of a verb form used to create compound tenses. The past participles of regular verbs always end with "t".
Most of them also begin with the prefix "ge". So,

ge- + verb stem + -t

Verb Past participle


machen gemacht
tanzen getanzt
lernen gelernt

Seite 2/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Sentence structure for the perfect

In German, the perfect tense combines two parts - the conjugated form of the helping verbs "sein" or "haben" and the past participle.
In a main clause, the helping verb is placed in the second position and the past participle comes at the end of the sentence:

Example:
Ich habe zuerst einen Kaffee gemacht.

Seite 3/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 018 – Grammar

Temporal prepositions

Prepositions connect words and groups of words together. They express the relation between living beings, things or contexts.

Prepositions that describe relations of time are called temporal prepositions. They answer the questions "Wann?" (where?) or "Wie
lange?" (how long?).

Some prepositions can be merged with the article they precede to form a contraction. Here are the most common contractions:

Preposition + article Contraction Example


an + dem am am Montag
in + dem im im Sommer
bei + dem beim beim Essen

Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

You're already familiar with the following temporal prepositions. They are used to indicate a point in time:

an e.g. days oft he week Sie arbeiten am Samstag oder Sonntag?


times of day Am Morgen gibt es Frühstück.
dates Ich habe am 17. März Geburtstag.
in e.g. seasons Hier schneit es im Sommer.
um precise times Geht es auch um 14 Uhr dreißig?
für e.g. a future point in time Sie möchten einen Termin für Montag?
e.g. appointments and
meetings

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 019 – Grammar

1. Separable and inseparable verbs

In German, prefixes can be added to verbs, giving them a completely new meaning.

stehen aufstehen
stehen verstehen
suchen versuchen
nehmen übernehmen

Some verbs with prefixes form an inseparable unit. They are called inseparable verbs.

stehen verstehen
suchen versuchen
nehmen übernehmen

With others, the conjugated form of the verb can be separated from the prefix. The prefix is placed at the end of the sentence and the
second part of the verb is conjugated as usual.

aufstehen: Harry möchte aufstehen.

Er steht jeden Morgen um 7 Uhr auf.

Seite 1/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Separable verbs

Prefix + verb Example


aufstehen Harry steht um 7 Uhr auf.
zuhören Harry hört nicht zu.
losgehen Harry geht jetzt los.
aufessen Ich esse alles auf.
einschlagen Am Abend schlägt der Blitz ein.
anfangen Jeder Tag fängt gleich an.

Inseparable verbs

Prefix + verb Example


verstehen Ich verstehe kein Deutsch.
bekommen Sie bekommen die Uhr.
übernehmen Wir übernehmen den Fall.

Pay attention to emphasis!

You can detect whether a verb is separable or inseparable by paying attention to the emphasis. If the prefix isn't emphasized, then
it's an inseparable verb. If the prefix is emphasized, the verb is separable.
[:] [:]
aufstehen verstehen

Seite 2/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Expressing times of the day

In German there are two way of expressing the time. One is formal, the other informal.

To give the time formally, you first say the hours, then the minutes. The word "Uhr" comes in between the two. In Germany, the 24-
hour-clock is used to denote time.

Examples:
7.30 Uhr – sieben Uhr dreißig
20.55 Uhr – zwanzig Uhr fünfundfünfzig

The informal way of telling time is to first say the minutes, then the hours. The prepositions "vor" (before) and "nach" (after) are
used to indicate the intervals between the full or half-hour marks. The 12-hour-clock is used to express the time informally.

Examples:
14.50 Uhr – zehn vor drei
15.10 Uhr – zehn nach drei

Seite 3/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Informal Official/Formal
7.00 sieben (Uhr) sieben Uhr
7.05 fünf nach sieben sieben Uhr fünf
7.10 zehn nach sieben sieben Uhr zehn
7.15 Viertel nach sieben sieben Uhr fünfzehn
7.20 zwanzig nach sieben sieben Uhr zwanzig
7.25 fünf vor halb sieben Uhr fünfundzwanzig
7.30 halb acht sieben Uhr dreißig
7.35 fünf nach halb acht sieben Uhr fünfunddreißig
7.40 zwanzig vor acht sieben Uhr vierzig
7.45 Viertel vor acht sieben Uhr fünfundvierzig
7.50 zehn vor acht sieben Uhr fünfzig
7.55 fünf vor acht sieben Uhr fünfundfünfzig

12.00 zwölf (Uhr mittags) zwölf Uhr


13.00 eins/ein Uhr (mittags) dreizehn Uhr
16.30 halb fünf sechzehn Uhr dreißig
24.00 / 0.00 zwölf (Uhr)/Mitternacht vierundzwanzig Uhr / null Uhr
3.00 drei Uhr (nachts) drei Uhr

Regional differences

In some parts of Germany, 7:15 and 7:45, for example, aren't expressed as "Viertel nach sieben" and "Viertel vor acht", but instead as
"viertel acht" and "drei viertel acht".

Seite 4/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 020 – Grammar

The modal verb "sollen"

You already know the modal verbs "müssen", "können" and "möchten". Here's another one, "sollen". Like the others, it usually refers
to another verb in the sentence, the main verb.

"sollen" (should, ought to) is conjugated without a vowel change and is used predominantly to express demands and
recommendations:

Examples:
Sie sollen im Bett bleiben. (You should stay in bed.)
Sie sollen Ihre Medizin nehmen. (You should take your medicine.)

The difference between "sollen" and "müssen"

"sollen" und "müssen" are used similarly, but there are slight differences in meaning. "müssen" is used to express an objective
necessity. It sounds more pressing and demanding. "sollen" is mainly a way to reflect someone else's orders.

Statement Meaning
Sie sollen zum Doktor gehen. The doctor would like to see Harry now and the nurse passes this information on to Harry.
Sie müssen zum Doktor gehen. Harry is so ill that he must pay a visit to the doctor.

Harry soll Deutsch lernen. Julia would like Harry to learn German.
Harry muss Deutsch lernen. It is necessary for Harry to learn German if he wants to cope well in Germany.

Seite 1/1

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 021 – Grammar

1. Personal pronouns in the accusative case

Any noun can be replaced by a pronoun. Personal pronouns refer to living beings, things or contexts.

All German pronouns can be expressed not only in the nominative, but in all the other grammatical cases, too (accusative, dative and
genitive). In other words, they can be inflected. Personal pronouns in the accusative are listed here:

Nominative Accusative

Singular 1st person: ich mich


2nd person: du dich
3rd person: er/sie/es ihn/sie/es

Plural 1st person: wir uns


2nd person: ihr euch
3rd person: sie sie

Personal pronouns in the accusative answer the question "Wen?" (whom):

Examples:
Ich liebe dich!
Wen liebe ich? – Ich liebe dich.
Ich vermisse dich!
Wen vermisse ich? – Ich vermisse dich.
Seite 1/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Diminutives

Many German nouns can be turned into diminutives by adding a suffix to the end: "chen" or "lein".

Examples:
Bär – Bärchen
Harry – Harrylein

Diminutives denote people, animals and things that are cute or small (e.g. "Brötchen", the German word for roll; it literally means
"small bread"). Diminutive forms can also be used as terms of endearment (e.g. "Harrylein")

Forming the diminutive often means a change to the stem vowel.

Examples:
Schatz – Schätzchen
Brot – Brötchen

Regardless of the gender of the original word, the diminutive form always turns it into the neuter form.

Examples:
der Bär - das Bärchen
der Schatz - das Schätzchen
der Harry - das Harrylein

Seite 2/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Pet names for people

Usually, the use of diminutives as pet names for people is meant as a sign of affection and tenderness. Sometimes the person's name
itself is turned into a diminutive ("Harrylein"). But it's more common to use the diminutive form of animals or objects.

Bärchen
Schätzchen

Seite 3/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 022 – Grammar

1. The possessive determiners "sein" and "ihr"

Possessive determiners can be a substitute for definite or indefinite articles. They indicate that something belongs to someone or
something else. Which possessive determiner to use in a sentence depends on the gender of the living being, thing or context to which
the object belongs.

Examples:
Seine Stiefel waren hellbraun. (= The boots belong to a man. His boots were light brown.)
Ihre Stiefel waren hellbraun. (= The boots belong to a woman. Her boots were light brown.)

In German, the possessive determiners follow the same pattern of declension as the indefinite article "ein" and refer to the noun that
they precede.

Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural


Indefinite article ein eine ein /

Possessive determiner er sein Mantel seine Hand sein Haar seine Stiefel

sie ihr Mantel ihre Hand ihr Haar ihre Stiefel

Seite 1/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

More:

German has four cases. In this chart you can see how the possessive determiners change according to case. In the singular the endings
are the same as with indefinite articles.

Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural

Nominative ein Mantel eine Hand ein Haar Stiefel


sein Mantel seine Hand sein Haar seine Stiefel
ihr Mantel ihre Hand ihr Haar ihre Stiefel

Accusative einen Mantel eine Hand ein Haar Stiefel


seinen Mantel seine Hand sein Haar seine Stiefel
ihren Mantel ihre Hand ihr Haar ihre Stiefel

Dative einem Mantel einer Hand einem Haar Stiefeln


seinem Mantel seiner Hand seinem Haar seinen Stiefeln
ihrem Mantel ihrer Hand ihrem Haar ihren Stiefeln

Genitive eines Mantels einer Hand eines Haares Stiefel


seines Mantels seiner Hand seines Haares seiner Stiefel
ihres Mantels ihrer Hand ihres Haares ihrer Stiefel

Seite 2/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. The question words "welcher", "welche", "welches"

The words "welcher", "welche" and "welches" can be used to begin a question. You can use them to ask about someone or something in
particular or to choose something from a certain contingent.

Examples:
Ich suche eine Frau. – Welche Frau?
Welche Farbe hatten ihre Schuhe? – Weiß.

The question words reflect the number, gender and case of the noun they modify:

Masculine Feminine Neuter

Nominative welcher welche welches

Accusative welchen welche welches

Dative welchem welcher welchem

Genitive welches welcher welches

Seite 3/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 023 – Grammar

1. The modal verb "dürfen"

You're already familiar with several modal verbs: "möchten", "können", "müssen" and "sollen". They describe the subject in relation to
the action expressed by the main verb. "dürfen" is also a modal verb that provides more information about the nature of an action.

"dürfen" means to be allowed or have the permission to do something.

Example:
Darf ich mich setzen? (Habe ich die Erlaubnis, mich zu setzen?)

Conjugation

The conjugation of "dürfen" is irregular. Pay particular attention to the 1st, 2nd and 3rd person singular in this chart:

dürfen
Singular ich darf
du darfst
er/sie/es darf
Plural wir dürfen
ihr dürft
sie dürfen

Seite 1/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Location preposition "in"

Prepositions connect words and groups of words together. They express the relation between living beings, things or contexts.
Prepositions that describe spatial relations, like placement, or directional relations, are called location prepositions or prepositions of
location.

"in" is one of the most common location prepositions. It is used in the context of movement within a closed space, building or a region.

Example:
Ich gehe in das Kino.

It usually answers the question "Wohin?" (to where/where to).

Example:
Wohin gehst du? - In das Kino.

In such cases, the accusative case always follows.

If "in" is followed by the neuter definite article "das", then it can often be contracted to form the article "ins":

Preposition + article Contraction Example


in + das (accusative) ins Ich gehe ins Kino.
Ich gehe ins Fitness-Studio.

Seite 2/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

"in", "zu" or "nach"?


It's not always easy to decide when to use which preposition, so you're better off learning them in context. But for a loose general rule,
you can follow these pointers:

Wohin? (where to?) Destination of the movement


Ich gehe ins Kino. enclosed spaces/buildings
Ich fliege in die USA. geographical locations with an article

Ich fahre nach Berlin. cities


Ich fliege nach Brasilien. geographical locations without an article

Das Taxi fährt zum Bahnhof. places (except for geographical locations)
Ich fliege zu meiner Familie. people

Seite 3/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 024 – Grammar

1. The use of "man" in impersonal sentences

"man" is an impersonal pronoun that substitutes a noun. It is used to signify a person or several people, but no one in particular. So it
is often used to express generalizations.

Example:
Hier darf man nicht Fahrrad fahren. (= That applies to everyone.)

"man" is always used in the nominative and the singular, even when it applies to "everyone". There is no plural form of "man".

"man" vs. "Mann"

Don't confuse "man", the impersonal pronoun, with the noun "Mann".
Written with one "n", "man" signifies people in general, including females.
"Mann" spelled with "nn" is the word for an adult male.

Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Proper nouns in the genitive case

German has four grammatical cases: nominative, accusative, dative and genetive. The genitive is used to indicate possession.

A noun can be modified by another noun in the genitive, explaining what belongs to whom. When proper names are used in the
genitive, they usually precede the other noun and an –s is added to the end.

Name + -s Noun
(possessive proper noun)
Das ist Julias Fahrrad.
Kennst du Julias Freunde?

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 025 – Grammar

1. Placement of the subject in a sentence

In a simple declarative sentence in German, the subject is often placed at the beginning of the sentence:

Subject Conjugated verb Object


Sie müssen den Rhein unbedingt sehen.

You can emphasize other information by placing it first instead. In that case, the subject comes after the conjugated verb:

Object Conjugated Verb Subject


Den Rhein müssen Sie unbedingt sehen.
Das weiß ich nicht so genau.

Adverb Conjugated Verb Subject Object


Heute gibt es frische Brötchen.

For questions, the subject also follows the conjugated verb:

Question word Conjugated Verb Subject Object


Möchtest du einen Kaffee?
Wo ist Julia?

Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Modal particles

Modal particles are words that don't have just one clear-cut and specific dictionary definition. But they play a very important part in
the meaning of a sentence. They're predominantly used in spoken language (discourse particles). They convey additional meaning and
signalize the speaker's point of view of what is being said. Some of the most common modal particles are "doch", "denn" and
"eigentlich".

Modal particles don't refer to a particular part of the sentence, but instead to the sentence as a whole. Their meaning depends very
much on the context.

Examples:
Kommt doch rein, Kinder. (freundlicheAufforderung)
Wo ist denn Julia? (Erstaunen)
Wo waren Sie denn schon? (Interesse)
Ich habe eigentlich erst Ende der Woche mit euch gerechnet. (Erstaunen)
Nach Dresden müssen die beiden eigentlich auch noch fahren. (Idee)

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 026 – Grammar

Negation words

You've already learned how to negate using the words "kein" and "nicht".
In German, there are other words to express negation:

Examples:
Ich verstehe nichts.
Ich bin nicht mehr deine Freundin.
Das hast du noch nie gemacht.
Nein, ich habe keine Bahncard.

Definition Negation word Positive word


nothing nichts alles
no-one, nobody niemand jemand, alle
never, at no time nie immer
nowhere nirgendwo überall

"Nein" can be used to answer a question about decision. Its positive opposite is "ja".
"Nein" can stand on its own as an answer, but it is frequently followed by a comma and an explanation:

Example:
Haben Sie eine Bahncard? – Nein. Oder: Nein, ich habe keine Bahncard.

Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Qualifying the negation


Words like "noch" and "mehr" can be used to frame the time of a negation:

"noch nie" means that something has never happened up to this point in time.

Example:
Du bringst mir Blumen mit? Das hast du noch nie gemacht.
= Harry has never previously brought flowers for Julia, but now he has brought her flowers.

"nicht mehr" means that something was the case previously, but now is no longer true.

Example:
Ich bin nicht mehr deine Freundin.
= Julia was Harry's girlfriend but now they are no longer a couple.

Intensifying negation
The word "gar" can be used to intensify the negation.
It directly precedes the negation word.

Example:
Ich habe gar nichts gemacht. (I didn't do anything at all!)
Du willst mich gar nicht heiraten! (You don't really want to marry me!)

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 027 – Grammar

Past participles of irregular verbs

The past participle is part of a verb form used to create compound tenses. You're already familiar with how the past participle of
regular verbs is formed.
For irregular verbs, the past participles also usually begin with a prefix, ge- but they don't have a –t at the end. Instead they end with
- en.

regular irregular
ge- + verb stem + -t ge- + verb stem + -en

üben – ich habe geübt sehen – ich habe gesehen


lesen – ich habe gelesen

Frequently there is also a vowel change in the stem. It's easiest if you learn the irregular verbs along with their past participles.

Examples:
trinken – ich habe getrunken
liegen – ich habe gelegen
saufen – ich habe gesoffen
gehen – ich bin gegangen

Seite 1/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Past participles of inseparable verbs


Verbs that have no emphasis on the prefix - in other words that cannot be separated - are called inseparable verbs. Their past
participles are formed without the prefix ge-. Regular verbs end with -t and irregular verbs end with -en.

Regular, inseparable verb Irregular, inseparable verb


prefix + verb stem + -t prefix + verb stem+ -en

besuchen – Ich habe dich besucht. verlassen – Ich habe dich verlassen.

There can also be a stem change in inseparable verbs if they are irregular:

verstehen – Ich habe dich verstanden.

"sein" or "haben"?
The perfect tense of most verbs is formed with the helping verb "haben". For the most part, they are verbs that can take an accusative
object.

Example:
besuchen Du hast einen Kollegen besucht.

Some verbs require the helping verb "sein" to form the perfect. These are mainly verbs that involve a change of location or condition.
The helping verb is conjugated in the present tense and the past participle remains unchanged.

Seite 2/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Examples:
gehen Ich bin nicht ins Kino gegangen.
fahren Wir sind nach Hamburg gefahren.
fliegen Er ist nach Traponia geflogen.

More:

The past participle of separable verbs


Verbs that have an emphasis on the prefix are called separable verbs because the conjugated form can be separated from their prefix.
You're already familiar with such verbs. Their past participles are formed differently than normal verbs. With separable verbs, the ge-
comes after the separable prefix.

The participle ending is -t for regular verbs and -en for irregular verbs.

Regular, separable verb Irregular, separable verb


prefix + ge- + verb stem + -t prefix + ge- + verb stem+ -en

zuhören – ich habe zugehört anfangen – ich habe angefangen


aufmachen – ich habe aufgemacht aufessen - ich habe aufgegessen

There can also be a stem change in separable verbs if they are irregular:

aufstehen – ich bin aufgestanden


losgehen – ich bin losgegangen

Seite 3/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 028 – Grammar

1. The modal verb "wollen"

You've already learned nearly all the modal verbs: "müssen", "können", "möchten", "sollen" and "dürfen". There's one more - "wollen".
Like all the other modal verbs, it is usually used in conjunction with a second verb, the main verb.

The modal verb "wollen" means to want to or intend to do something.

Example:
Harry will frühstücken.

Conjugation
The conjugation of "wollen" is irregular. Pay particular attention to the 1st, 2nd and 3rd person singular:

wollen
Singular ich will
du willst
er/sie/es will
Plural wir wollen
ihr wollt
sie wollen

Seite 1/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

The difference between "wollen" and "möchten"


"wollen" and "möchten" are similar in meaning. They both describe the intention and desire to do something, but with different
intensities.

"möchten" expresses a wish or desire and sounds more polite.


"wollen" is stronger and more concrete.

Examples:
Bedienung: "Was möchten Sie?"
(= The waitress politely asks what Harry would like.)
Harry: "Ich will Kaffee, Brötchen, Wurst und Käse."
(= Harry is hungry and wants to eat now.)

Seite 2/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. The demonstrative determiners "dieser", "diese", "dieses"

Demonstrative determiners are used to refer more specifically to someone or something or to differentiate a particular person or object
from a larger group. For example, when Harry discovers a few strands of gray hair, he can point to one of them and use the word
"diese" - indicating "this one" or "that one". The demonstrative determiners answer the questions "Welcher?", "Welche?" and
"Welches?" ("which one" in the three gender classes respectively).

Masculine: Welcher Mann? – Dieser Mann.


Feminine: Welche Waffe? – Diese Waffe.
Neuter: Welches Haar? - Dieses Haar.

As with definite and indefinite articles, the demonstrative articles precede the nouns they modify and are governed by the gender,
number and case of those nouns.

More:
Demonstrative articles follow the same patter of declension as definite articles. The following chart shows how they are inflected
according to gender and case.

Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural


Nominative dieser Mann diese Waffe dieses Haar diese Tabletten
der Mann die Waffe das Haar die Tabletten
Accusative diesen Mann diese Waffe dieses Haar diese Tabletten
den Mann die Waffe das Haar die Tabletten
Dative diesem Mann dieser Waffe einem Haar diesen Tabletten
dem Mann der Waffe dem Haar den Tabletten
Genitive dieses Mannes dieser Waffe dieses Haares dieser Tabletten
des Mannes der Waffe des Haares der Tabletten

Seite 3/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Folge 029 – Grammatik

1. The pronoun "es" (review)

"es" is a pronoun that usually substitutes a neuter noun.

Example:
Ist das Bett zu hart? - Nein, es ist nicht zu hart. (es = it das Bett = the bed)

But:
Es gibt Pinguine.

The "es" in the above sentence has a different function. It isn't the replacement for a particular noun; instead it serves as the subject of
the sentence without really meaning anything. This construction is frequently used in impersonal turns of phrase in which there is no
other subject. It is comparable to "there is" or "there are".

Idiomatic expressions Es gibt ... Es geht mir gut. Es tut mir leid.
Time expressions Wie spät ist es?
Weather Es regnet. Es ist heiß.

Seite 1/5

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Modal verbs (summary)

Modal verbs usually modify another verb in the sentence - the main verb. They provide more information about the nature of the
action expressed by the main verb. You have learned all about the modal verbs "können", "müssen", "sollen", "dürfen", "wollen" and
"möchten".

Modal verbs are irregular, but their endings in the 1st and 2nd person singular and in the 1st and 2nd person plural are identical
respectively. Here is an overview of their conjugation in the present tense:

können müssen sollen dürfen wollen möchten


ich kann muss soll darf will möchte
du kannst musst sollst darfst willst möchtest
er/sie/es kann muss soll darf will möchte
wir können müssen sollen dürfen wollen möchten
ihr könnt müsst sollt dürft wollt möchtet
sie können müssen sollen dürfen wollen möchten

The modal verbs change the meaning of a sentence.

Example:
Ihr spielt mit dem Pinguin. = The children are playing with the penguin.
Ihr dürft mit dem Pinguin spielen. = The children have permission to play with the penguin.

Seite 2/5

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

The modal verbs are used in the following situations:

"können" indicates the ability or opportunity to do something.

Examples:
Harry kann Deutsch sprechen.
= Harry has learned German and can (has the ability) to speak the language.
Sie können gerne ein anderes Zimmer haben.
= You are welcome to have a different room. You can have a different room.

"dürfen" gives permission to do something.

Examples:
Der Pinguin darf bleiben, aber nur eine Nacht.
= The penguin may stay for one night.
Dürfen wir mit dem Pinguin spielen?
= Are we allowed to / may we play with the penguin?

"dürfen" + negation means that someone does not have the permission / may not do something.

Examples:
Pinguine dürfen nicht im Hotel übernachten.
= Penguins are not allowed to stay in the hotel.
Der Pinguin darf nicht bleiben.
= The penguin may not stay. The hotelier prohibits it.

Seite 3/5

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

"müssen" indicates an order or necessity.

Examples:
Der Pinguin muss das Hotel verlassen.
= The hotelier demands that the penguin be removed from the hotel.
Ich muss jetzt gehen.
= I have to go now.

"sollen" means should or ought to.


It denotes a challenge or strong recommendation for someone to do something or conveys someone else's instructions.

Examples:
Kinder zum Hotelier: Der Pinguin soll bleiben.
= The children request that the penguin be permitted to stay.
Krankenschwester zu Harry: Sie sollen zum Doktor gehen.
= The nurse relays to Harry that the doctor would like to see him now.

"wollen" means to want to do something. It is used to express a strong wish, desire or intention to do something.

Examples:
Ich will jetzt frühstücken.
= I am hungry and want to eat now.
Wir wollen heiraten.
= We intend to be married. / We want to get married.

Seite 4/5

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

"möchten" means someone would like to do something. Like "wollen", it signifies the wish to do something, but it is more polite.

Examples:
Harry möchte in die Stadt fahren.
= Harry would like to go to the city.
Was möchten Sie (haben)?
= The waitress politely asks Harry what he would like to order.

Seite 5/5

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 030 – Grammar

1. Verbs with two objects

At the heart of any German sentence is the conjugated verb. Usually there is another component to the sentence - the subject in the
nominative. Many verbs require an object as well. The majority of German verbs require an accusative (direct) object, e.g. "nehmen"
(to take) and "treffen" (to meet).

Examples:
Ich nehme den Füller.
Ich möchte dich treffen.

Some verbs can have another (indirect) object in the dative. Verbs that express the acts of giving, receiving and telling fit into this
category.

Who Whom What


Subject Verb Dative = person / indirect object Accusative = thing / direct object

Ich schicke Helen den Brief.

The nominative subject ("ich") indicates who is carrying out the action.
"Helen" is the dative (indirect) object of the action.
"den Brief" is the accusative - or direct - object of the action.

In sentences with two objects, usually the dative object comes first, followed by the accusative object. So a typical main clause with the
subject placed first would look like this:
Seite 1/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Who Whom What


Subject Verb Dative = person / indirect object Accusative = thing / direct object

Harry gibt dem Mann den Brief.

More:

Generally, the dative object also precedes the accusative object when sentences are formulated as questions or imperatives. Only the
subject and verb switch positions:

Verb Subject Dative = person / indirect object Accusative = thing / direct object
Geben Sie mir den Brief!
Wann schickst du Helen den Brief?

However, if the accusative object is a pronoun, then it moves in front of the dative object, even if the dative object is a pronoun, too.

Ich schicke Helen den Brief. Ich schicke Helen den Brief. Ich schicke Helen den Brief.

Ich schicke ihr den Brief. Ich schicke ihn Helen. Ich schicke ihn ihr.

Seite 2/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. References to people in the female form

German nouns that refer to people can be changed to indicate whether they are male or female. Some nouns are entirely different
words to make that differentiation:

Male Female
der Mann die Frau
der Sohn die Tochter

But more often, the female form is created by adding "in" to the end of the male form. This is the case for most occupations, for
instance.
For some nouns, there is a vowel change as well.

Male Female
der Freund die Freundin
der Schauspieler die Schauspielerin
der Arzt die Ärztin

If the male version of the word ends with an "e", then it is dropped before adding the female ending "in":

Male Female
der Meteorologe die Meteorologin
der Computerexperte die Computerexpertin

Seite 3/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Nouns with the "in" ending get a double consonant in the plural. The following plural ending is always "en":

Singular Plural
die Freundin die Freundin-n-en
die Schauspielerin die Schauspielerin-n-en
die Ärztin die Ärztin-n-en

Seite 4/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 031 – Grammar

1. Dative verbs

Most German sentences contain at least a conjugated verb and another component in the nominative (a subject). But many verbs need
another component (an object) in the accusative, dative or genitive case. Accusative objects are the most common, but some German
verbs require a dative object.

Dative objects are usually the target or recipient of the action. In most cases, the dative object is a person.
Nouns in the dative case answer the question "Wem?" (whom?):

Examples:
Helfen Sie dem Mann, er ist verletzt!
Die Jacke steht meiner Freundin gut.

Here are some of the most important German dative verbs:

Verb Noun + article as the dative object


helfen Sie haben dem Mann sehr geholfen.
danken ich danke der Frau.
gefallen Die Hose gefällt der Verkäuferin.
passen Hose passt dem Kind genau.
zuhören Hören Sie dem Professor zu!
glauben Sie sind kein Dieb. Ich glaube dem Polizisten.
gut tun Das tut dem Kind gut.
vertrauen Ich vertraue dem Doktor nicht.

Seite 1/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

When the dative object is a noun along with an article, then the article changes its form according to gender and number:

Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural

Indefinite article Nominative ein eine ein —


Dative einem einer einem —

Definite article Nominative der die das die


Dative dem der dem den

Most nouns only change their form in the plural. The most common ending is "n". There are some exceptions that take an "s" instead
of an "n".

Gender Nominative Plural Dative Plural

Masculine die Freunde Das gefällt den Freunden.


Feminine die Frauen Das gefällt den Frauen.
Neuter die Kinder Das gefällt den Kindern.

But: die Chefs Das gefällt den Chefs.

Seite 2/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Personal pronouns in the dative

Any noun can be replaced by a pronoun. Personal pronouns refer to living beings, things or contexts.

Pronouns can be in the nominative, accusative, dative and genitive cases. In other words, they can be inflected.
The following chart shows the personal pronouns in the dative:

Nominative Accusative Dative


Singular 1st person: ich mich mir
2nd person: du dich dir
3rd person: er/sie/es ihn/sie/es ihm/ihr/ihm

Plural 1st person: wir uns uns


2nd person: ihr euch euch
3rd person: sie sie ihnen

The polite form of address: Sie Sie Ihnen

Personal pronouns in the dative answer the question "Wem?" (whom).

Examples:
Die Hose gefällt mir.
Wem gefällt die Hose? — Die Hose gefällt mir.

Ich danke Ihnen!


Wem danke ich? — Ich danke Ihnen.

Seite 3/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 032 – Grammar

1. Subordinate clauses with "weil"

Subordinate clauses are dependent upon main clauses or other dependent clauses. They cannot stand on their own. Often they begin
with words (subordinating conjunctions, relative pronouns or question words) that connect them to the independent clause. "weil" is
one such conjunction that introduces a subordinate clause. So the dependent clause provides more information about the independent
clause. Subordinate clauses that begin with "weil" (because) answer the question "Warum?" (why?).

Example:
Ich will den Job haben. — Warum?
Ich will den Job haben, weil ich Geld brauche.
(= I need money. That is why I want the job.)

Subordinate clauses with "weil" are always separated from the independent clause by a comma.

Seite 1/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Word order in subordinate clauses

The verb in a clause that begins with a subordinating conjunction always moves to the end. The other parts of the clause keep their
positions.

No conjunction: Ich will den Job haben. Ich brauche Geld.


Coordinating conjunction: Ich will den Job haben und ich brauche Geld.

Independent and subordinate clauses: Ich will den Job haben, weil ich Geld brauche.

The short form:

Clauses that begin with a subordinating conjunction can sometimes stand on their own in spoken language. But that only works in
situations in which the context is clear:

Question: Warum wollen Sie den Job haben?


Reply: Weil ich das Geld brauche.

More:

If a subordinate clause that begins with a subordinating conjunction has not only a conjugated verb, but also another (unconjugated)
verb form, such as the infinitive or a participle, then this second verb form precedes the conjugated verb in the second-to-last position.

Seite 2/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Perfect tense with helping verb and participle:

Example:
Harry stinkt. Er hat sich lange nicht gewaschen.

Harry stinkt, weil er sich lange nicht gewaschen hat.

Modal verb plus the infinitive:

Example:
Harry bekommt den Job. Er will kein Geld haben.

Harry bekommt den Job, weil er kein Geld haben will.

For separable verbs, the prefix stays attached to the verb:

Example:
Sie freut sich. Ich komme morgen wieder.

Sie freut sich, weil ich morgen wiederkomme.

Seite 3/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 033 – Grammar

1. The declension of adjectives

Adjectives modify a living creature, an object, an action or a condition. They often provide more information about a noun or a
pronoun.

When adjectives come after the noun or pronoun, they don't change their basic form. That's often the case with verbs like "sein",
"werden", "bleiben" and "finden".

Examples:
Helen ist verrückt.
Ich finde den Tag immer wieder schön.

When adjectives directly precede the noun they modify, then they follow a pattern of declension. That means that their endings change.
The adjective is placed between the article and the noun.

Article Adjective Noun


Hier ist der neue Computer.
Helen möchte den perfekten Wetterbericht machen.

Seite 1/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

The declension of adjectives depends on:

- the gender and number of the noun:


Singular Hier ist der neue Computer.
Plural Hier sind die neuen Computer.

- the case of the noun:


Nominative Hier ist der neue Computer.
Accusative Ich möchte den neuen Computer.

- the type of the article:


Definite article Hier ist der neue Computer.
Indefinite article Hier ist ein neuer Computer.

Seite 2/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Declension of adjectives in the nominative and accusative cases

There are three patterns of declension for adjectives depending on whether they are accompanied by a definite article, indefinite article
or no article.

Declension of adjectives preceded by a definite article


This chart shows you how an adjective's form changes when there is a definite article. The pattern has only the endings -e and -en.

Example:
Wollen Sie die graue oder die schwarze Tastatur?

Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural


Nominative der neue Drucker die neue Tastatur das neue Notebookdie neuen Computer

Accusative den neuen Drucker die neue Tastatur das neue Notebookdie neuen Computer

Declension of adjectives preceded by an indefinite article


The declension following an indefinite article also applies to the possessive determiners (possessive adjectives) "mein", "dein", "ihr",
etc. and the negation article "kein". In the singular in the nominative and accusative cases, the adjective changes to reflect the endings
of definite articles. Since the indefinite article has no plural, the adjective endings are shown here using the example of "kein".

Example:
Hier ist Ihr neuer Arbeitsplatz.

Seite 3/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural


Nominative ein neuer Drucker eine neue Tastatur ein neues Notebook keine neuen Computer

Accusative einen neuen Drucker eine neue Tastatur ein neues Notebook keine neuen Computer

Declension of articles when there is no article


This pattern is common for the plural, but rare in the singular. You need it, for instance, after ordinal numbers "two" and up.
In the nominative and accusatives cases, the adjective changes to reflect the endings of definite articles.

Example:
Jeden Tag gibt es drei warme Gerichte.

Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural


Nominative der Drucker die Tastatur das Notebook die Computer
neuer Drucker neue Tastatur neues Notebook neue Computer

Accusative den Drucker die Tastatur das Notebook die Computer


neuen Drucker neue Tastatur neues Notebook neue Computer

Seite 4/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 034 – Grammar

1. Connecting main clauses with "denn"

A main clause usually contains a subject and a conjugated verb. Coordinating conjunctions can be used to connect two main clauses.
Both clauses are independent and equal. The word order in each one doesn't change.

The conjunction "denn" is a coordinating conjunction that joins two main clauses. The second part provides more information about
the first part.

Unlike the conjunctions "und" and "oder", there is always a comma before "denn"!

Without conjunction: Wir brauchen einen Staubsauger. Der Teppich hat Flecken.
With conjunction: Wir brauchen einen Staubsauger, denn der Teppich hat Flecken.

Without conjunction: Du bist ein Säufer. Du hast alles getrunken.


With conjunction: Du bist ein Säufer, denn du hast alles getrunken.

Seite 1/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

A subtle difference

"denn" has the same meaning as "weil". Both words introduce a reason. Grammatically, however, they differ.

"denn" is a coordinating conjunction, connecting one main clause to another. That's why the word order of the second clause doesn't
change.
"weil" is a subordinating conjunction that introduces a subordinate clause to a main clause. The conjugated verb moves to the end of
the subordinate clause.

Examples:
Wir brauchen einen Staubsauger, denn der Teppich hat Flecken.

Wir brauchen einen Staubsauger, weil der Teppich Flecken hat.

Seite 2/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Connecting main clauses with "nicht ... sondern"

After a negation, you can use "sondern" to provide an alternative or contrast.

Examples:
Harry ist nicht mutig, sondern feige.
Dr. Anderson ist kein Arzt, sondern ein Mörder.

"sondern" is a conjunction that connects two main clauses. If the verb and/or subject is the same in both sentences, then they can be
dropped from the second part.
That makes the compound sentence shorter.

Without conjunction: Harry ist nicht mutig. Er ist feige.

With conjunction: Harry ist nicht mutig, sondern er ist feige.

Shortened: Harry ist nicht mutig, sondern feige.

Sometimes the negation doesn't apply to the whole sentence, but to only part of it or a group of words or a single word. "sondern" can
still be used to provide a contrast.

Example:
Ich habe den Stein nicht geworfen, sondern eine Frau.

In this case, the pronoun "ich" is negated and so only "eine Frau" is added.

Seite 3/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Example:
Ich habe den Stein nicht geworfen, sondern mitgebracht.

In the above sentence, only the past participle is negated.

The part of the sentence to be negated is often pronounced more heavily either through stronger emphasis or through word order.

Example:
Question: Wieso haben Sie das Fenster kaputt gemacht?
Reply: Das war ich nicht, sondern der Stein. (= regular word order)
Reply: Das war nicht ich, sondern der Stein. (= emphasized word order)

"sondern" always requires a comma

No matter whether "sondern" introduces a whole clause or just a single word, it is always preceded by a comma!

Seite 4/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 035 – Grammar

1. Degrees of comparison of adjectives

Adjectives modify a living being, an object, an action or a condition. They often provide more information about a noun or a pronoun.

Adjectives can also be used to compare things. They change their form to show higher or highest degrees of a particular quality.
There are three degrees of comparison: the positive, comparative and superlative.

Seite 1/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. The positive and the comparative forms

The positive is the simple, most basic form of an adjective. To use it in a comparison you have to use other comparative phrases before
and after the adjective,
such as "so ... wie" ("as ... as"), to express that living beings or objects share a similarity or have the same level of a quality or
qualification.
Other comparative phrases in German include "genauso ... wie" ("exactly as ... as"), "gleich ... wie" ("as ... as") and "nicht so ... wie"
("not as ... as").
The two beings or things being compared are always in the same grammatical case.

so + adjective in ist basic form + wie

Person/object 1 Comparative phrase Person/object 2


Dr. Anderson ist so gut wie die anderen Professoren.
Professor Meyer ist genauso gut wie Dr. Anderson.
Niederangelbach ist nicht so schön wie Leipzig.

The comparative form shows a difference between the living beings or objects being described. The degree of the adjective can be
increased by adding the suffix -er:

Example:
schlecht — schlechter.

There are also irregular forms. The comparative form of "gut", for example, is "besser".

The comparative word "als" (than) comes after the adjective. In the comparative, the living beings or objects being compared share the
same grammatical case.

Seite 2/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Comparative (Endung -er) + als

Person/object 1 Comparative Person/object 2


Harry ist besser als Nick.
Dr. Anderson ist schlechter als Professor Meyer.
Leipzig ist schöner als Niederangelbach.

Higher, faster, more irregular!

Besides "gut" (good), there are other adjectives that have irregular forms in the comparative. Most of them end with the suffix-er, but
their stem changes.
Take note of these adjectives because some of them are quite common!

Adjectives that take an umlaut: alt – älter, dumm – dümmer, groß – größer, hart – härter,
jung – jünger, kalt – kälter, lang – länger, nah – näher, warm – wärmer ...

Adjectives with irregular degrees of comparison: gut – besser, hoch – höher, teuer – teurer, viel – mehr

More:

Just like an adjective in its basic form, a comparative adjective can precede the noun it modifies, in which case it is inflected:

Examples:
Ich habe eine bessere Idee!
Professor Meyer ist ein besserer Professor als Dr. Anderson.
Ich habe einen schlechteren Test als du.

Seite 3/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 036 – Grammar

The superlative form

Adjectives can be used to show that a living being or object has more of a certain quality than another. There are three degrees of
comparison. First, there is the positive, which is the basic uncompared degree. Then there are the comparative and superlative degrees
of comparison. For the comparative and superlative, the adjectives take on special forms.

The comparative compares living beings or things and indicates a difference.

Example:
Leipzig ist schöner als Niederangelbach.

The superlative is the highest degree. It is used to show that a living being or object has the highest level of the quality expressed by the
adjective.

It is formed by adding the suffix -(e)st.

Example:
Der ICE ist der schnellste Zug in Deutschland.

An "e" is included in the suffix for adjectives that end with emphasis on the last syllable and the last letters d, t, s, ss, ß, sch, z, tz or
x. This extra "e" before the "st" makes the word easier to pronounce.

Example:
Heinz ist verrückteste Mann in Niederangelbach.

Seite 1/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

There is one exception: "groß"

Positive Comparative Superlative


groß größer am größten

The superlative form can follows the word it modifies by using it in combination with "am". In that case, the superlative always ends
with -en.

am + superlative adjective -(e)st) + ending –en

Example:
Leipzig ist am schönsten.
Der ICE fährt am schnellsten.

Irregular forms:
If the comparative adjective has an umlaut, then the superlative keeps it.

Positive Comparative Superlative


alt älter am ältesten
dumm dümmer am dümmsten
hart härter am härtesten
jung jünger am jüngsten
kalt kälter am kältesten
warm wärmer am wärmsten
lang länger am längsten

Seite 2/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Note:

Positive Comparative Superlative


nah näher am nächsten

Higher, faster, more irregular!

Some superlative forms are irregular. Pay attention to these adjectives because you'll need them often!

gut — besser — am besten


viel — mehr — am meisten

Seite 3/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
+
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 037 – Grammar

1. Reflexive verbs

Reflexive verbs are verbs whose object is the same as the subject. The object is called a reflexive pronoun.

Example:

Er wäscht sich nicht mehr.

Many verbs can be used reflexively or non-reflexively with an accusative object. In German these are called "unecht" or "false" reflexive
verbs.

Examples:
Er wäscht sich nicht mehr. – Er wäscht die Hände nicht mehr.
Er kämmt sich nicht mehr. – Er kämmt seine Haare nicht mehr.

Other verbs, however, are exclusively reflexive. Such verbs cannot be used without the reflexive pronoun. Nor can the reflexive
pronoun be replaced by another pronoun or noun. In German these are called "echt", or "true", reflexive verbs.

Examples:
Beeil dich!
Ich beeile mich.

Seite 1/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Reflexive pronouns in the accusative and dative cases

German reflexive pronouns are a category of pronouns that always refer back to the subject. Truly reflexive verbs cannot be used
without their reflexive pronouns, which are usually in the accusative. Other verbs can be used in a reflexive and non-reflexive way, so
the reflexive pronoun requires the dative and is replaced by an accusative object.

The reflexive pronouns take the same forms as personal pronouns. The only exception is in the 3rd person singular and plural, which
has its own form: "sich".

Accusative Dative
Ich wasche mich. Ich wasche mir die Hände.
Du wäschst dich. Du wäschst dir die Hände.
Er/Sie/Es wäscht sich. Er/Sie/Es wäscht sich die Hände.
Wir waschen uns. Wir waschen uns die Hände.
Ihr wascht euch. Ihr wascht euch die Hände.
Sie waschen sich. Sie waschen sich die Hände.

Seite 2/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

3. Compounds

In German, two or more nouns can be combined to create compound nouns. German is full of them!

To form a compound noun, the base noun comes at the end. The preceding nouns provide more information about it. The base noun at
the end determines the gender of the whole word.

Description word Base word Compound noun


der Termin der Kalender der Terminkalender
die Polizei das Auto das Polizeiauto
das Gewitter die Wolke die Gewitterwolke
der Regen der Schirm der Regenschirm
das Auto der Unfall der Autounfall

Description word Description word Base word Compound noun


die Zeit die Schleifen der Experte der Zeitschleifenexperte
der Kopf der Schmerz die Tablette die Kopfschmerztablette

The inserted -s

Many compound words in German are simply composed by stringing the words next to one another. But sometimes an extra sound is
inserted between them. Usually an –s is inserted, and sometimes -es, -ens, -n, -er. There are no clear-cut rules about when to use
such insertions and when not to use them.

Seite 3/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Description word Base word Compound noun with insertion


die Universität der Professor der Universitätsprofessor
das Leben der Gefährte der Lebensgefährte
die Tomate der Saft der Tomatensaft

More:

Nouns aren't the only types of words that can be used to form compounds. In these cases, too, the base word determines the part of
speech of the entire compound word.

Description word Base word Compound

Adjektiv + noun schwarz + der Wald der Schwarzwald = noun


Verb + noun sprechen + Zeit die Sprechzeit = verb
Adjektiv + Adjective hell + braun hellbraun = adjective
Substantiv + Adjective Preis + wert preiswert = adjective

Seite 4/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 038 – Grammar

1. Two-way prepositions requiring the dative

Prepositions connect words and groups of words, showing their relationship to one another. They determine the case of the word or
group of words they precede. In other words, they govern the grammatical case.

They can govern the accusative, dative and genitive cases, but not the nominative. Most prepositions always govern just one case. But
there are also prepositions that can be in the dative or the accusative. These are called two-way prepositions.

You are already familiar with the following prepositions that require the dative when they answer the question "Wo?" (where). They
refer to a place or location.

Preposition Example Question Preposition + dative


word
über Über dem Schreibtisch hängt eine Landkarte. Wo? Über dem Schreibtisch.
auf Auf dem Schreibtisch steht mein Notebook. Wo? Auf dem Schreibtisch.
hinter Hinter dem Schreibtisch steht ein Pinguin. Wo? Hinter dem Schreibtisch.
vor Vor dem Schreibtisch sitzt meine Sekretärin. Wo? Vor dem Schreibtisch.
unter Unter dem Schreibtisch liegen drei Brötchen. Wo? Unter dem Schreibtisch.
neben Neben mir steht Frau Meister. Wo? Neben mir.
in Harry ist in Deutschland. Wo? In Deutschland.
an Bitte Vorsicht an der Bahnsteigkante! Wo? An der Bahnsteigkante.

Seite 1/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

More:

Some two-way prepositions can be an indication of time. The prepositional phrase answers the question "Wann?" (when), which
always requires the dative.

Examples:
an – Sie arbeiten am Samstag und Sonntag?
in – Hier schneit es im Sommer.

Seite 2/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. The verbs "stehen", "liegen", "sitzen"

The use of two-way prepositions can be determined by certain verbs. For example, the verbs "stehen", "liegen" and "sitzen" are often
used together with a prepositional phrase that answers the question "Wo?" (where). These verbs usually require the two-way
preposition to be in the dative.

Verb Example Question Preposition + dative


word
stehen Mein Notebook steht auf dem Wo? Auf dem Schreibtisch.
Schreibtisch.
liegen Drei Brötchen liegen unter dem Wo? Unter dem Schreibtisch.
Schreibtisch.
sitzen Meine Sekretärin sitzt vor dem Wo? Vor dem Schreibtisch.
Schreibtisch.

Seite 3/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 039 – Grammar

1. Two-way prepositions requiring the accusative

Prepositions express the relationship between words or groups of words. They determine the case of the word or group of words they
precede. In other words, they govern grammatical case.

They can govern the accusative, dative and genitive cases, but not the nominative. Most prepositions always govern just one case. But
there are also dual prepositions that can be in the dative or the accusative. These are called two-way prepositions.

You are already familiar with the following prepositions that require the accusative when they answer the question "Wohin?" (where
to). They refer to a direction.

Preposition Example Question Preposition + accusative


word
über Harry hängt die Landkarte über den Schreibtisch. Wohin? Über den Schreibtisch.
auf Ich stelle die Teller auf den Tisch. Wohin? Auf den Tisch.
hinter Die Sekretärin setzt sich hinter den Schreibtisch. Wohin? Hinter den Schreibtisch.
vor Ich stelle mich vor den Schreibtisch. Wohin? Vor den Schreibtisch.
unter Ich lege die Brötchen unter den Schreibtisch. Wohin? Unter den Schreibtisch.
neben Ich lege das Messer neben den Teller. Wohin? Neben den Teller.
in Ich fliege in die USA. Wohin? In die USA.
an Ich gehe an die Tür. Wohin? An die Tür.

Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. The verbs "stellen", legen", "setzen"

The use of two-way prepositions can depend on the verbs that accompany them. The verbs "stellen", "legen" and "setzen" nearly always
refer to a prepositional phrase that indicates a direction. It answers the question "Wohin?" (where to). These verbs often require the
two-way preposition to be in the accusative.

Verb Example Question Preposition + accusative


word
stellen Ich stelle die Gläser auf den Tisch. Wohin? Auf den Tisch.
legen Ich lege das Messer neben den Teller. Wohin? Neben den Teller.
setzen Jetzt setze ich mich auf den Stuhl. Wohin? Auf den Stuhl.

Verbs used to indicate direction often also have an accusative object. In that sense they differ from the verbs that indicate a situation,
which have neither a dative nor an accusative object.

Verb + Accusative object + Two-way preposition in the accusative/dative


stellen Ich stelle die Gläser auf den Tisch. (=Direktivergänzung)
stehen Mein Notebook steht (-) auf dem Tisch. (=Situativergänzung)

legen Harry legt das Messer neben den Teller. (=Direktivergänzung)


liegen Das Messer liegt (-) neben dem Teller. (=Situativergänzung)

setzen Der Pinguin setzt sich auf den Stuhl. (=Direktivergänzung)


sitzen Der Pinguin sitzt (-) auf dem Stuhl. (=Situativergänzung)

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 040 – Grammar

1. Final clauses with "damit"

Subordinate clauses are dependent upon main clauses or other dependent clauses. They cannot stand on their own. Often they begin
with words (subordinating conjunctions, relative pronouns or question words) that connect them to the main or independent clause.

"damit" (so that) is a conjunction that introduces a final clause. In other words, the clause reveals a purpose, intention or goal behind
the action of the independent clause it links to. Clauses with "damit" answer the question ("Wozu?") (for what reason/purpose).

Examples:
Wir demonstrieren gegen das Experiment. – Zu welchem Zweck?
Wir demonstrieren gegen das Experiment, damit die Welt eine Zukunft hat.
(= We are protesting. Our goal is to ensure that the world has a future.)

Clauses with "damit" usually follow the independent clause and are separated from it by a comma.

The conjugated verb goes to the end of a final clause.

Example:
Ich bin hier, damit ich mehr über das Experiment erfahre.

Seite 1/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Infinitive constructions with "um ... zu"

When an independent clause and a subordinate clause share the same subject, the final clause can be expressed in short form with the
infinitive construction "um ... zu". The subject is left out and the infinitive verb goes to the end of the sentence. The infinitive
construction is separated from the independent clause by a comma.

Examples:
Harry muss zuhören, damit er Deutsch lernt.
Harry muss zuhören, um Deutsch zu lernen.

Wir demonstrieren gegen das Experiment, damit wir eine Katastrophe verhindern.
Wir demonstrieren gegen das Experiment, um eine Katastrophe zu verhindern.

Seite 2/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

3. Verbs with fixed prepositions

Prepositions connect words and groups of words together. They express the relation between living beings, things or contexts. German
has many different prepositions. You've already learned about location prepositions that give information about a place, position or
direction, and temporal prepositions that refer to time. Knowing how to categorize and when to use them isn't always easy because
they can mean different things depending on how they're used. In many instances you can only know the meaning of a preposition
from its context.

Some prepositions serve the function of connecting a verb to an object. In other words, they don't describe a relationship (location or
temporal). Such prepositions are simply fixed to certain verbs. For example,

demonstrieren gegen + accusative:


Wir demonstrieren gegen das Experiment.

sich engagieren für + accusative:


Wir engagieren uns für die Natur.

warten auf + accusative:


Ich warte auf dich.

Since there is no strict rule that says which prepositions must be used with which verbs, it's better to memorize such verbs along with
their prepositions and case.

Seite 3/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 041 – Grammar

Infinitive constructions with "zu"

The infinitive is the most basic form of a verb. It is composed of the verb stem and the ending "en" or "n". You've already seen this form
when you learned about the modal verbs.

Example:
Harry soll sein Zimmer putzen.

You'll often see the infinitive form in connection with the word "zu". This is called an infinitive construction that is usually
accompanied by other words or groups of words. These constructions refer back to a word in the independent clause. They have no
conjugated verb or subject of their own. The subject derives from the independent clause. The "zu" + infinitive verb comes at the end of
the subordinate clause and the two words are usually written separately.

Example:
Harry Walkott hat keine Lust, das Zimmer zu mieten.
Heute ist Tom an der Reihe, das Geschirr zu spülen.

Not all main and dependent clauses can be given an infinitive construction. There are certain expressions that make the additional
phrase possible, for example:

1. "haben" + noun
Ich habe kein Interesse, das Zimmer zu mieten.
Tom hat die Aufgabe, das Bad zu putzen.

Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Impersonal expressions
Es ist wichtig, das Experiment zu stoppen.
Es ist schön, in Deutschland zu sein.

3. The verb "helfen"


Ich will helfen, das Experiment zu stoppen.

Using infinitive constructions with separable verbs


Some verbs have a prefix that can be separated from the conjugated form of the verb. These are called separable verbs.

To use the infinitive construction with separable verbs, the "zu" comes between the verb and its prefix
and all the elements - prefix + "zu" + infinitive - are written together as one word.

Examples:
ein|kaufen:
Tom kauft ein. – Tom hat die Aufgabe, einzukaufen.

runter|bringen:
Tom bringt den Müll nicht runter. – Tom hat kein Interesse, den Müll runterzubringen.

Comma placement
The infinitive phrase is often separated from the independent clause by a comma. But that's not mandatory. You can leave it out if the
infinitive construction is especially short.

Examples:
eher ohne Komma: Harry hilft(,) zu putzen. (= better without a comma)
eher mit Komma: Harry hilft, das Bad zu putzen. (= better with a comma)

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 042 – Grammar

1. Subordinate clauses with "dass"

Subordinate clauses are dependent upon main clauses or other dependent clauses. They can't stand on their own. Often they begin
with certain parts of speech (subordinating conjunctions, relative pronouns or question words) that connect them to the independent
clause.

"dass" clauses begin with the word "dass" and can serve in their entirety as either the subject or the object of the independent clause.
So these types of subordinate clauses can be called subject clauses or object clauses.

Das Stoppen des Experiments ist für uns wichtig.


(Subject)

Es ist wichtig, dass wir das Experiment stoppen.


→Subject clause

Ich glaube nicht an das Funktionieren der Aktion.


(Object)

Ich glaube nicht, dass die Aktion funktioniert.


→ Object clause

Seite 1/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Not all main or dependent clauses can be given a "dass" clause. There are only certain instances that make this construction possible,
for example:

1. Certain verbs pertaining to perception, thinking, expressing feelings, knowing or wanting:

Examples:
wissen: Ich weiß, dass ich das Experiment stoppen kann.
glauben: Ich glaube, dass Tom verrückt ist.

2. Adjectives + sein:

Example:
sicher sein: Bist du sicher, dass du das Experiment stoppen kannst?

3. Impersonal expressions:

Example:
es ist wichtig: Es ist wichtig, dass wir das Experiment verhindern.

Seite 2/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Factual conditional clauses with "wenn"

A subordinate clause with "wenn" usually describes a condition for the consequence, or result, of the independent clause. It can also be
called a conditional clause. It answers the question "Unter welcher Bedingung?" (under what condition).

Examples:
Wenn du die Karte nicht abstempelst, dann ist sie nicht gültig.
(= Unter welcher Bedingung ist die Karte nicht gültig? - Wenn du sie nicht abstempelst.)

Wenn das Experiment stattfindet, gibt es eine Zeitschleife.


(= Wann gibt es eine Zeitschleife? - Wenn das Experiment stattfindet.)

If the condition and resulting action are predictable, the clause is considered to be a factual condition clause. The present tense is then
used in both the independent clause and the subordinate clause.

Seite 3/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 043 – Grammar

Declension of adjectives in the dative case

Adjectives modify a living creature, an object, an action or a condition. They often provide more information about a noun or a
pronoun.

When adjectives directly precede the noun they modify, then they follow a pattern of declension. That means that their endings change.
The adjective is usually placed between the article and the noun.

There are three patterns of declension for adjectives depending on whether they are accompanied by a definite article, indefinite article
or no article.

Declension of adjectives with a definite article in the dative


This chart shows you how an adjective changes its form when it follows a definite article.

Example:
Professor Zweistein ist der große Mann neben dem gelben Sportwagen!

Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural


Dative dem gelben Sportwagen der gelben Tür dem gelben Auto den gelben Sportwagen

Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Declension of adjectives with an indefinite article in the dative


The declension following an indefinite article also applies to the possessive determiners (possessive adjectives) "mein", "dein", "ihr",
etc. and the negation article "kein". Since the indefinite article has no plural, the adjective endings are shown here using the example of
"kein".

Example:
Er trägt einen Anzug mit einem weißen Hemd.

Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural


Dative einem schwarzen Anzug einer grünen Krawatte einem weißen Hemd keinen weißen Hemden

Declension of adjectives in the dative when there is no article


This pattern is common for the plural, but rare in the singular. You need it, for instance, after the ordinal numbers "two" and up.
The adjective changes to reflect the endings of definite articles.

Example:
Er trägt ein Hemd mit schwarzen Streifen.

Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural


Dative dem Anzug der Krawatte dem Hemd den Streifen
schwarzem Anzug schwarzer Krawatte schwarzem Hemd schwarzen Streifen

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 044 – Grammar

Verbs with prefixes

Prefixes can be added to German verbs to give them completely new meanings.

Examples:
suchen: Ich suche meine Freundin Julia. (= I'm looking for my friend Julia.)
aussuchen: Ich suche mir ein Trikot aus. (= I choose one of several uniforms.)
versuchen: Versuchen Sie es an der Information. (= Try asking at the information desk.)

With some verbs, the conjugated form of the verb can be separated from the verb prefix. These are called separable verbs. The prefix is
placed at the end of the sentence and the second part of the verb is conjugated as usual.

Examples:
einsteigen: Harry steigt in die U-Bahn ein. (= Harry gets into the tram.)
umsteigen: Er steigt an der nächsten Haltestelle um. (= Harry switches trams at the next stop.)
aussteigen: Harry steigt am Bahnhof aus. (= Harry gets out at the train station.)

Some verbs have prefixes that cannot stand by themselves. These are called inseparable verbs because the verb and its prefix jointly
form an inseparable unit.

Examples:
versuchen: Versuchen Sie es an der Information.
besuchen: Harry besucht Tom in Berlin.

Seite 1/1

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 045 – Grammar

1. Relative clauses

Subordinate clauses are dependent upon main clauses or other dependent clauses. They cannot stand on their own.
Often they begin with words (subordinating conjunctions, relative pronouns or question words) that connect them to the independent
clause.

Relative clauses are subordinate clauses that modify a noun or pronoun in the independent clause. Hence they refer back to a word in
the main clause. Usually the relative clause comes directly after the word it modifies and is separated by a comma. If the independent
clause continues after the relative clause, then a comma comes after the relative clause as well.

Examples:
Der Mann hat ein blaues Auge. Fußballfans haben den Mann geschlagen.
Der Mann, den Fußballfans geschlagen haben, hat ein blaues Auge.

Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Relative pronouns in the nominative and accusative cases

Relative clauses begin with a relative pronoun: "der", "die" or "das" in the nominative and "den", "die", das" in the accusative. The
number and gender of the relative pronoun is determined by the word it refers to in the main clause. The case of the relative pronoun,
however, is determined by its role in the relative clause. It can be the subject or the object in the relative clause.

If the relative pronoun serves as the subject of the subordinate clause, then it is in the nominative case.

Examples:
Es gibt eine Seilbahn. Die Seilbahn fährt bis zum Gipfel.
Es gibt eine Seilbahn, die bis zum Gipfel fährt.

If the relative pronoun serves as an accusative object in the subordinate clause, then it is governed by the accusative case.

Examples:
Er ist ein Mann. Die Fußballfans haben den Mann geschlagen.
Er ist ein Mann, den Fußballfans geschlagen haben.

Declension of relative pronouns in the nominative and accusative cases


This chart shows the forms that relative pronouns take in the nominative and in the accusative:

Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural

Nominative der die das die

Accusative den die das die

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 046 – Grammar

1. The future tense

The future is a grammatical tense that can be used to talk about events that will occur in the future.

It is a compound tense that combines the helping verb "werden" and the infinitive. The word "werden" is conjugated in the present
tense. The infinitive doesn't change its form and goes to the end of the sentence.

Examples:
Das Experiment findet gerade statt. (present)
Das Experiment wird heute Abend stattfinden. (future)

Die Naturkatastrophen nehmen zu. (present)


Die Naturkatastrophen werden in Zukunft zunehmen. (future)

Conjugation of "werden"
"werden" is an irregular verb. Pay particular attention to the verb stem and the endings in the 2nd and 3rd person singular:

werden
Singular ich werde die Umwelt schützen.
du wirst die Umwelt schützen.
er/sie/es wird die Umwelt schützen.
Plural wir werden die Umwelt schützen.
ihr werdet die Umwelt schützen.
sie werden die Umwelt schützen.

Seite 1/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Using the future tense


The future tense is often used to express expectations, plans and intentions. It is also used to make predictions. For predictions, you'll
often hear it accompanied by adverbs like "wohl" (well), "wahrscheinlich" (probably) or "bestimmt" (surely).

Examples:
Wir werden das Experiment verhindern. (intention)
Dr. Zweistein wird wohl beim Experiment dabei sein. (supposition)

Seite 2/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Using the present tense to describe the future

The present is a grammatical tense used mainly to talk about events taking place now, but in German it can also be used to talk about
the future. Usually this requires a reference to time to make that clear.

Examples:
Das Experiment findet heute Abend statt.
Ich fahre morgen nach München.
Was machst du nach der Arbeit?
Achtung, die Sendung fängt gleich an.

It's so common in German to use the present tense to talk about the future that you hardly ever need to use the future tense.

Seite 3/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 047 – Grammar

1. Concessive clauses with "obwohl"

Subordinate clauses are dependent upon main clauses or other dependent clauses. They can't stand on their own. Frequently they
begin with certain words (subordinating conjunctions, relative pronouns or interrogative words) that connect them to the independent
clause.

"obwohl" is a conjunction that heads a concessive clause. "obwohl" (although) clauses express something contradictory or surprising in
contrast to the statement made by the main clause.

Example:
Ich trinke ein Bier, obwohl ich lieber Wein mag.
(= I prefer to drink wine, but I am drinking a beer, e.g. because this bar doesn't have any decent wine.)

Subordinate clauses with the "obwohl" conjunction are always separated from the independent clause by a comma and the conjugated
verb always comes at the end of the subordinate clause.

Examples:
Das Lieblingsbier der Deutschen ist das Pils, obwohl ich es überhaupt nicht mag.

Seite 1/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Connecting main clauses with "deshalb" und "trotzdem"

German has some adverbs that can be used to connect two independent clauses. They are called conjunctive adverbs. They have similar
functions and meanings to conjunctions, but differ grammatically.

"deshalb" (therefore) is an adverb that indicates a reason for something like the conjunctions "denn" (for) and "weil" (because). So
"deshalb" answers the question "Warum?" (why?) and creates a causal relationship between the two clauses. But the word order is
different for all three:

"denn" is a coordinating conjunction that introduces a second, explanatory main clause. The word order of the second main clause
doesn't change.

"weil" is a subordinating conjunction that introduces a dependent clause with explanatory information about the clause to which it
refers. The conjugated verb moves to the end of the subordinate clause.

"deshalb" is an adverb that connects two main clauses. But in this case, the explanatory part comes first and "deshalb" precedes the
actual action, statement or fact of the sentence. Also, the conjugated verb comes directly after it in the second position.

Fact/action Reason
Ich trinke ein Kölsch, denn ich bin ein Kölner.

Ich trinke ein Kölsch, weil ich ein Kölner bin.

Reason Fact/action
Ich bin ein Kölner, deshalb trinke ich ein Kölsch.

Seite 2/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

"trotzdem" (nonetheless) is an adverb that indicates a contradiction like the conjunction "obwohl". The sentence structure here is the
same as above.

Fact/action Contradiction
Ich trinke ein Bier, obwohl ich lieber Wein mag.

Contradiction Fact/action
Ich mag lieber Wein, trotzdem trinke ich ein Bier.

In compound sentences that contain conjunctive adverbs to connect clauses, the two main clauses can be separated by a comma or a
period. Even if they are separated by a period, the conjugated verb keeps its position after the adverb.

Examples:
Ich mag lieber Wein, trotzdem trinke ich ein Bier.
Ich mag lieber Wein. Trotzdem trinke ich ein Bier.

Seite 3/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 048 – Grammar

Expressing recommendations with "sollen"

Modal verbs usually modify another verb in the sentence - the main verb. They provide more information about the nature of the
subject's relation to the action expressed by the main verb.

"sollen" (should or ought to) denotes a challenge or strong recommendation for someone to do something or conveys someone else's
instructions.

Examples:
Sie sollen im Bett bleiben.
Sie sollen Ihre Medizin nehmen.

However, "sollen" can also be used to give advice by using it in the subjunctive II.

Examples:
Christian: Du solltest dich mehr bewegen, Harry.
(= Christian thinks it would be good for Harry to get in better shape. He advises Harry to get more exercise.)

Anna: In Berlin solltest du dir den Reichstag ansehen.


(= Anna gives Harry her recommendation to go see the Reichstag when he's in Berlin.)

Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Here are the most important subjunctive II forms of "sollen":

du: Du solltest deine Kondition verbessern.


ihr: Ihr solltet in die Sauna gehen.
Sie: Sie sollten mehr Sport treiben.

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 049 – Grammar

The simple past tense of modal verbs

The past (also known as preterite) is a grammatical tense to make statements about the past. In German it isn't often used in speech.
It's more common in written language, such as in newspaper articles and books.

Modal verbs are an exception. They're frequently used in the simple past tense. Just like in the present tense, the modal verbs often
indicate something about the relationship of the subject to the action expressed by a second verb in the sentence - the main verb.

Examples:
Wir wollten nach München fahren.
Ich musste auf die Toilette gehen.
Ich konnte nicht ohne Helen abfahren.

How to form it
Forming the simple past is the same for all the modal verbs:

Verb stem + -te + conjugated ending


Sollen ich soll + -te
du soll + -te -st
er/sie/es soll + -te
wir soll + -te -n
ihr soll + -te -t
sie soll + -te -n
Sie soll + -te -n

Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Note that "können", "müssen" and "dürfen" lose their umlauts.

können müssen sollen dürfen wollen


ich konnte musste sollte durfte wollte
du konntest musstest solltest durftest wolltest
er/sie/es konnte musste sollte durfte wollte
wir konnten mussten sollten durften wollten
ihr konntet musstet solltet durftet wolltet
sie konnten mussten sollten durften wollten

Word order in sentences


Just like in the present tense, modal verbs in the past tense are conjugated and placed in a sentence according to the regular rules for
conjugated verbs. For simple declarative sentences and "W" questions, that means they come second. The main verb - in the infinitive
form - is placed at the end.

Modal verb Main verb


Wir wollten ein Kölsch trinken.
Helen wollte auf mich warten.

No wishes in the past

Strictly speaking, "möchten" (would like) isn't a verb in itself. It's actually a form of "mögen". Nonetheless, it is often used in the same
way as a modal verb and has a different meaning than "mögen". There is no past tense of "möchten". Usually the past tense of "wollen"
is used instead.

Present: Ich möchte ein Bier trinken gehen.


Past: Ich wollte ein Bier trinken gehen.

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 050 – Grammar

Attributive genitives

There are four grammatical cases in German: nominative, accusative, dative and genitive. The genitive case shows possession.

A noun can be modified by another noun in the genitive to indicate ownership or to express that something belongs to something or
someone else. In German this is referred to as an attributive genitive.

Proper nouns can be used as attributive genitives. They precede the noun they modify.

Attributive genitive Noun


(proper noun)
Das ist Annas Pistole.

In other cases, the modified noun precedes the attributive genitive together with its article.

Noun Attribute genitive


(noun)
Das ist die Waffe des Mörders.

Seite 1/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

How to form it
When an attributive genitive is a proper noun that precedes the noun it modifies, then it is given the ending -s.

Example:
Das ist Julias Fahrrad.

The forms for all other attributive genitives depend on the gender and number of the modifying element:

1. Masculine and neuter nouns


Most masculine and neuter nouns take the ending-(e)s.

Nominative Genitive
der Wein des Weins
das Heim des Heims
der Psychiater des Psychiaters

Nouns that end with an "s" sound (s, ss, ß, tz, z or x), are given the ending "es".

Nominative Genitive
der Deutschkurs des Deutschkurses
der Arbeitsplatz des Arbeitsplatzes

Seite 2/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Feminine nouns
Feminine nouns have no ending in the genitive.

Nominative Genitive
die Pistole der Pistole
die Waffe der Waffe
die Mörderin der Mörderin

3. Plural nouns
The endings for all plural nouns in genitive are the same as for plural nouns in the nominative.

Nominative Singular Nominative Plural Genitive Plural


der Wein die Weine der Weine
die Waffe die Waffen der Waffen
das Kind die Kinder der Kinder

The following chart shows you how the nouns and their articles change in the genitive according to gender and number:

Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural


Definite
article der Name des Weins der Name der Mörderin der Name des Opfers die Namen der Kinder

Indefinite
article der Name eines Weins der Name einer Mörderin der Name eines Opfers (-)

Seite 3/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Exceptions
For proper nouns that end with the letter s, there is no additional "es" ending. Instead, an apostrophe is added!

Example:
Das Auto gehört Thomas. - Das ist Thomas' Auto.

Words that end with "nis" are given a double s!

Example:
das Missverständnis – des Missverständnisses

Some masculine nouns take the ending "en" in the genetive.

Example:
der Mensch - der Menschen.

Dative instead of genitive

In spoken German, the preposition "von" + dative is often used instead of the genitive, especially with names.

Das ist Toms Zimmer.


or: Das ist das Zimmer von Tom.

Das Aroma des Weins ist einmalig.


or: Das Aroma von dem Wein ist einmalig.

Seite 4/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 051 – Grammar

Regular and irregular verbs in the simple past tense

The simple past tense, or preterite, is a verb tense that describes the past. In German it is more frequently used in the written form
than in spoken language. For example, you'll see it used often in newspaper articles and novels.

Examples:
Professor Zweistein lebte und studierte in Heidelberg.
Das Studium beendete er mit den besten Noten.
Schon als Kind las Zweistein alle Bücher über schwarze Löcher.
Er schrieb seine Doktorarbeit über das Experiment.

Regular verbs in the simple past tense


For regular verbs, the simple past is formed by adding "te" and the personal ending to the end of the verb stem. When the verb stem
ends with d or t, then "ete" is added.

Verb stem + -(e)te + personal ending

leben beenden
ich leb-te beend-ete
du leb-te-st beend-ete-st
er/sie/es leb-te beend-ete
wir leb-te-n beend-ete-n
ihr leb-te-t beend-ete-t
sie leb-te-n beend-ete-n

Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Irregular verbs in the simple past tense


For irregular verbs, the stem form changes in the simple past tense. Usually there is just a vowel change, but sometimes one or more
consonants can change too. They are conjugated according to the personal forms but don't take the (e)te ending.
You've already learned the simple past forms of "sein" and "haben".

schreiben lesen
ich schrieb las
du schrieb-st las-est
er/sie/es schrieb las
wir schrieb-en las-en
ihr schrieb-t las-t
sie schrieb-en las-en

Some German verbs are mixed and have elements of both irregular and regular verbs. Like irregular verbs, their verb stem changes -
but they also follow the conjugation pattern of regular verbs with the (e)te endings.

wissen bringen
ich wuss-te brach-te
du wuss-te-st brach-te-st
er/sie/es wuss-te brach-te
wir wuss-te-n brach-te-n
ihr wuss-te-t brach-te-t
sie wuss-te-n brach-te-n

Note that in the simple past tense, the 1st and 3rd person singular do not take a personal ending.

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 052 – Grammar

1. Time prepositions that relate to duration

Prepositions connect words and groups of words together. They express the relation between living beings, things or contexts.

Prepositions that describe relations of time are called temporal prepositions. You're already familiar with some of them:
"im Sommer" (in the summer), "am Montag" (on Monday), "um 14 Uhr" (at 2 o'clock).

The following temporal prepositions describe a duration of time. In other words, they indicate a longer interval. Each of them
expresses something different about the beginning and end of that period of time.

seit describes a period of time that Nick schreibt seit 11 Jahren Artikel über Physik.
began in the past and continues up to (= Nick began writing articles about physics 11 years ago. He still does so today.)
now.
von … bis specifies the beginning and end of a Von 2005 bis 2008 forschte er an der Universität München.
period of time. That period of time (= Nick began conducting research at the University of Munich in 2005 and
can be in the past or in the future. stopped in 2008.)
It can start now or in the future.
ab describes the beginning of a Ab dem kommenden Semester ist Nick Physikprofessor an der Universität
period of time starting now or in the Hamburg.
future. The end is indefinite. (= Nick will begin his job as a physics professor next semester. There is no
indication of when he will stop.)

Seite 1/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

bis indicates the end of a period of time Wir brauchen den Artikel über die Zeitschleife bis Freitag.
but says nothing about its beginning. (= It doesn't matter when Nick begins writing his article, but he needs to hand it
in by Friday at the latest.)

More:

To ask about a duration of time, you simply place the question word "Wann?" in front of the corresponding preposition.

Examples:
Question: Seit wann schreibt Nick Artikel über Physik?
Answer: Nick schreibt seit 11 Jahren Artikel über Physik.

Question: Von wann bis wann forschte Nick an der Universität München?
Answer: Von 2005 bis 2008 forschte er an der Universität München.

Question: Ab wann ist Nick Physikprofessor an der Universität Hamburg?


Answer: Ab dem kommenden Semester ist Nick Physikprofessor an der Universität Hamburg.

Question: Bis wann brauchen Sie den Artikel über die Zeitschleife?
Answer: Wir brauchen den Artikel über die Zeitschleife bis Freitag.

Seite 2/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Dialog particles "ja", "nein" and "doch"

Dialog particles serve as replies during a conversation. They can stand as an answer all on their own or be followed by a comma and
explanation.

Example:
Ist Julia hier? — Nein. Or: Nein, sie ist nicht hier.

The dialog particles "ja", "nein" and "doch" can be used in a conversation to answer yes-no questions or to signify agreement or
disagreement with a statement. "doch" is used to contradict a negative statement.

Positive yes-no question Positive declarative statement


Ist Julia im Zug? Ich muss Deutsch sprechen.
Agreement Ja, sie ist im Zug. Ja, du musst Deutsch sprechen.
Contradiction Nein, sie ist nicht im Zug. Nein, du musst kein Deutsch sprechen.

Negative yes-no question Negative declarative statement


Ist Julia nicht im Zug? Ich muss kein Deutsch sprechen.
Agreement Nein, sie ist nicht im Zug. Nein, du musst kein Deutsch sprechen.
Contradiction Doch, sie ist im nächsten Abteil! Doch, du musst mit Julia Deutsch sprechen!

Seite 3/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

More:

Here are some more examples of dialog particles used in conversation.

Kann ich meine Zeitung wiederhaben? — Bitte, hier ist sie.


Ich habe Ihre Artikel gelesen, sie sind toll. — Oh? Danke!
Erzählen Sie mir etwas über die Zeitschleife. — Gerne.
In der Zeitschleife ist also jeder Tag gleich? — Genau, mein Tag ist immer gleich.
Ich möchte mit Ihnen zum Experiment fahren. — Okay, Sie haben mich neugierig gemacht.
Ich komme mit nach München. — Super!

Seite 4/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 053 – Grammar

1. The prepositions "bis" and "durch" to describe direction

Prepositions connect words and groups of words together. They express the relation between living beings, things or contexts.

To describe how to get somewhere, you need to use location prepositions, in other words, prepositions that indicate spatial relations,
such as the location of a place or the direction. These prepositions answer the questions "Wo?" (where?), "Woher?" (from where?) or
"Wohin?" (to where?).

Examples:
Fahren Sie die Straße geradeaus bis zur Tankstelle.
Biegen Sie links ab, und fahren Sie dann durch den Tunnel.

"bis" is a preposition that indicates the end of a movement. When used as a location preposition, "bis" is special because it can only
stand on its own in conjunction with locations that don't require an article, for example the name of a place.

Examples:
Wir fahren nicht bis Hamburg, wir steigen in Hannover aus.
oder: Wir fahren nicht bis nach Hamburg.

When "bis" precedes other nouns, it needs another preposition. The second preposition governs the case.

Examples:
Fahren Sie bis zur Tankstelle. (Drive to the gas station. / Dative)
Mit dir fahre ich bis ans Ende der Welt. (With you I´d travel tot he end of the world. / Accusative)

Seite 1/5

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

"durch" is a preposition that describes a movement that involves crossing or passing through something. It always requires the
accusative case.

Examples:
Fahren Sie durch den Tunnel. (Drive through the tunnel.)
Durch diese Tür kommen Sie ins Aufnahmestudio. (Go through that door to get to the recording studio.)
Harry geht durch den Park ans Rheinufer. (Harry walked through the park to the shore of the Rhine.)

More:

Contractions of prepositions and articles


Some prepositions can be merged with the definite articles they precede to form a contraction.

Preposition + article Contradiction Example


zu + der (Dative) zur Fahren Sie bis zur (zu der) Tankstelle.
an + das (Accusative) ans Mit dir fahre ich bis ans (an das) Ende der Welt.

Here is a chart of possible contradictions:

Dative Accusative
Masculine + Neuter Feminine Neuter
an dem  am an das  ans
in dem  im in das  ins
bei dem  beim auf das  aufs
(gesprochene Sprache)
Seite 2/5

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

von dem  vom durch das  durchs


(informal speech)
zu dem  zum zu der  zur für das  fürs
(informal speech)
hinter dem  hinterm hinter das  hinters
(informal speech) (informal speech)
über dem  überm über das  übers
(informal speech) (informal speech)
unter dem  unterm unter das  unters
(informal speech) (informal speech)
vor dem  vorm vor das  vors
(informal speech) (informal speech)

Seite 3/5

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Summary of location prepositions

These charts provide an overview of the location prepositions that you've learned so far and the cases they govern. Many location
prepositions are two-way prepositions that require either the dative or the accusative depending on whether they indicate a place
("Wo?") or a direction ("Wohin?).

Dative prepositions
nach Ich fliege nach Brasilien. Wohin?
Ich fahre nach Berlin.
Gehen Sie nach rechts.
zu Ich fliege zu meiner Familie. Wohin?
Ich will zum Max-Planck-Institut.
bei Niederangelbach liegt bei Freiburg. Wo?
von Ich komme von der Arbeit. Woher?
aus Ich komme aus Traponia. Woher?
Wann kommt er aus dem Krankenhaus?

Accusative prepositions
durch Fahren Sie durch den Tunnel. Wo
entlang?
bis Fahren Sie bis Stuttgart. Wohin?
um Das ist hier gleich um die Ecke. Wo?

Seite 4/5

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Two-way prepositions
Akkusativ auf die Frage "Wohin?" Dativ auf die Frage "Wo?"
in Ich fliege in die USA. Harry ist in Deutschland.
Ich gehe ins Kino. Ich bin im Kino.
an Ich gehe an die Tür. Bitte Vorsicht an der Bahnsteigkante!
auf Ich stelle die Teller auf den Tisch. Auf dem Schreibtisch steht mein Notebook.
Es gibt Flüge auf die Kanarischen Inseln.
über Harry hängt die Landkarte über den Schreibtisch. Über dem Schreibtisch hängt eine Landkarte.

hinter Die Sekretärin setzt sich hinter den Schreibtisch. Hinter dem Schreibtisch steht ein Pinguin.
vor Ich stelle mich vor den Schreibtisch. Vor dem Schreibtisch sitzt meine Sekretärin.
unter Ich lege die Brötchen unter den Schreibtisch. Unter dem Schreibtisch liegen drei Brötchen.
neben Ich lege das Messer neben den Teller. Neben mir steht Frau Meister.

Seite 5/5

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 054 – Grammar

1. Verbs with fixed prepositions: question words with "wo(r)"

Prepositions connect words and groups of words together. They express the relation between living beings, things or contexts. Verbs
with fixed prepositions, however, connect the verb with an object. So in this case, the prepositions don't provide a context for time or
location, but instead, are used idiomatically with the verb. Sometimes they can even change the meaning of the verb.

Verb Prepositional object


Ich freue mich über das Geschenk.
(= I received the present and I’m glad about it.)
Ich freue mich auf das Geschenk.
(= I have not received the present yet but I am looking forward to it.)

Question words with "wo(r)" + preposition


To inquire about the prepositional object, you say:

"wo" + preposition
Ich träume von einer eigenen Familie.
— Wovon träumst du?

Seite 1/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

If the preposition begins with a vowel:

"wo + r" + preposition


Erinnerst du dich an unseren ersten Kuss?
— Woran soll ich mich erinnern?
Ich muss über etwas sprechen.
— Worüber möchtest du sprechen?

More:

When asking about living beings, you use the preposition + "wen" or "wem". The preposition determines the case of the question word.

Examples:
Ich träume von Julia — Von wem träumst du?
Erinnerst du dich an Nick? — An wen soll ich mich erinnern?
Ich muss über den Pinguin sprechen. — Über wen möchtest du sprechen?

Seite 2/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Verbs with fixed prepositions: prepositional adverbs with "da(r)"

Prepositions connect words and groups of words together. They express the relation between living beings, things or contexts. Verbs
with fixed prepositions, however, connect the verb with an object. So in this case, the prepositions don't provide a context for time or
location but instead are used idiomatically with the verb. Sometimes they can even change the meaning of the verb.

Adverbs with "da(r)" + preposition


The object connected to a verb by a fixed preposition can be replaced by certain adverbs known as prepositional adverbs.

"da" + preposition or "dar" + preposition (when the preposition begins with a vowel) can be used when:

... the object or context was just mentioned and is therefore known.

Example:
Ich träume von einer eigenen Familie, Kinder, Haus, Hund!
Davon träume ich, Harry!
(= Julia has already told Harry about her dreams. That's why she can sum it all up in her second sentence.)

... when the object or context is explained immediately afterward.

Example:
Ich denke über etwas nach. — Worüber denkst du nach?
Ich denke darüber nach, dass ich mit Julia sprechen muss.

Seite 3/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

More:

"da(r)" + preposition can only be used for things, facts or circumstances. For living beings you have to use personal pronouns.

Example:
Ich träume von Julia – Ich träume von ihr.
Ich denke über Julia nach. – Ich denke über sie nach.

Seite 4/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 055 – Grammar

Adverbs to describe chronological order

Adverbs provide more information about when, where or how something happens. They refer to another word in the sentence (such as
the verb) or to the sentence as a whole. Temporal adverbs give more information about when something happens. They indicate a
point in time, a length of time, or frequency.

You've already learned temporal adverbs that express the day on which something happened:

gestern yesterday
heute today
morgen tomorrow
übermorgen the day after tomorrow

The following temporal adverbs give more information about points of time in a sequence.

Beginning Middle (after an action) End


zuerst dann schließlich
danach zuletzt
anschließend

Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Examples:
Zuerst bin ich aufgewacht, und du warst nicht da.
Dann habe ich deine SMS gelesen. Danach habe ich auf dich gewartet.
Und dann bin ich ins Bett gegangen.

The adverbs are usually placed at the beginning of a sentence to give them extra emphasis.

Ich habe dann deine SMS gelesen.

Dann habe ich deine SMS gelesen.

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 056 – Grammar

1. The subjunctive II forms of "haben" and "sein"

The subjunctive II is used to express wishful thinking or situations that are contrary to reality. It can also be used to make requests and
suggestions sound especially polite.

The verbs "haben" and "sein" have their own form in the subjunctive II.

sein haben
ich wäre hätte
du wärst hättest
er/sie/es wäre hätte
wir wären hätten
ihr wärt hättet
sie wären hätten

Examples:
Hätten Sie Zeit für mich?
Was wäre dir lieber: Tee oder Kaffee?

Seite 1/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Forming the subjunctive II using "würde" + the infinitive

Usually there is no way to differentiate between the past indicative and the subjunctive II forms of regular verbs. So frequently,
"würde" + the infinitive is simply used instead.

Infinitive Past indicative Subjunctive II würde + infinitive


sich lohnen es lohnte sich es lohnte sich  es würde sich lohnen
kaufen sie kauften sie kauften  sie würden kaufen

Examples:
Der Lotto-Jackpot würde sich lohnen.
Was würden Sie mit 10 Millionen Euro machen?
Ich würde einen Sportwagen kaufen.

The forms of "würde" are the same as the subjunctive II forms of "werden":

ich würde
du würdest
er/sie/es würde
wir würden
ihr würdet
sie würden

Seite 2/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

3. Hypothetical condition clauses with "wenn"

A subordinate clause introduced by the word "wenn" usually describes a condition for an action or the consequence described by the
independent clause. Such sentences are known as conditional sentences. Clauses that begin with "wenn" answer the question "Unter
welcher Bedingung?" (under what condition?). You've already learned about factual conditional clauses with "wenn", which are used
when the condition and resulting action are predictable. In those cases the present tense is used in both the independent clause and the
subordinate clause. Sometimes the future tense is used in the independent clause.

Example:
Wenn du die Karte nicht abstempelst, dann ist sie nicht gültig.
(= Unter welcher Bedingung ist die Karte nicht gültig? - Wenn du sie nicht abstempelst.)

A hypothetical condition clause describes a condition that may or may not be possible but is not factual. It exists only in the mind of
the speaker. It can refer to something in the past, present or future. These clauses are formed by using the subjunctive II or its
alternative, "würde" + the infinitive.

In a counterfactual conditional complex sentence, the subjunctive II is usually used in both the main and subordinate clauses. The
subordinate clause contains the condition and is introduced by the word "wenn". A comma separates it from the independent clause.

Examples:
Ich wäre glücklich, wenn du Deutsch lernen würdest!
Was würden Sie machen, wenn Sie das Geld hätten?
Wenn ich die 10 Millionen hätte, würde ich Bücher schreiben.

Seite 3/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 057 – Grammar

Intensifiers

Adjectives provide more information about something or someone, an occurrence or a condition. They can modify nouns and personal
pronouns.

To enhance or emphasize a certain quality, adjectives can be intensified. To do that, an intensifier is placed before the adjective.
Intensifiers are not inflected.

Quality Quality + intensifier


Ja, das ist ein gutes Orchester! Ja, das ist ein sehr gutes Orchester!
Tolle Musik! Echt tolle Musik! (umgangssprachlich)
Herr Walkott, Sie sind naiv. Herr Walkott, Sie sind so naiv.
Die Dreigroschenoper ist gesellschaftskritisch. Die Dreigroschenoper ist sehr gesellschaftskritisch.

Seite 1/1

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 058 – Grammar

Reflexive verbs in the accusative and dative cases (review)

You're already familiar with reflexive verbs.

Example:

Ich wasche mich.

Truly reflexive verbs cannot be used without their reflexive pronouns. Nor can the reflexive pronoun be replaced by another pronoun
or noun.

Examples:
Entspannen Sie sich!
Ich möchte mich entspannen.

For "false" reflexive verbs, the reflexive pronoun is an object. The pronoun can be replaced by another component. The verb "waschen"
(to wash), for example, requires an accusative object. But if you are washing yourself and not something or someone else, you use the
reflexive pronoun.

with a noun or a personal pronoun with a reflexive pronoun


Ich wasche den Pullover. Ich wasche mich.
Ich wasche ihn. Er wäscht sich.

Seite 1/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Reflexive verbs with two objects


For "false" reflexive verbs that also have an accusative object, the reflexive pronoun must be in the dative.

Reflexive verbs with one object:

Accusative object
Ich wasche mich.
Ich ziehe mich an.

Reflexive verbs with two objects:

Dative object Accusative object


Ich wasche mir das Gesicht.
Ich ziehe mir eine Badehose an.

Declension
The reflexive pronouns take the same forms as personal pronouns. The only exception is in the 3rd person singular and plural, which
has its own form: "sich".

Accusative Dative
Ich wasche mich. Ich wasche mir die Hände.
Du wäschst dich. Du wäschst dir die Hände.
Er/Sie/Es wäscht sich. Er/Sie/Es wäscht sich die Hände.
Wir waschen uns. Wir waschen uns die Hände.
Ihr wascht euch. Ihr wascht euch die Hände.
Sie waschen sich. Sie waschen sich die Hände.
Seite 2/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Mehr:

The reflexive pronouns of some reflexive verbs - both properly and non-exclusively reflexive ones - must always be in the dative. For
these verbs, the reflexive pronoun can never be in the accusative.

Examples:
Ich merke mir das Passwort.
Ich mache mir Sorgen.
Ich wünsche mir…
Ich kann mir denken/vorstellen, dass …
Ich gebe mir Mühe.

Seite 3/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 059 – Grammar

Relative clauses with prepositions

Relative clauses are subordinate clauses that provide more information about a noun or a pronoun in the main clause. In other words,
they refer to a word in the main clause - the antecedent.

Relative clauses are introduced by relative pronouns. The pronoun's number and gender are determined by the word it links back to in
the main clause. If a preposition must be used to connect the antecedent and verb in the subordinate clause, then the preposition must
precede the relative pronoun in the relative clause. The preposition determines the case of the relative pronoun.

Relative clauses that feature the preposition "mit" require the dative.

Examples:
Das ist eine Maschine. Der Bauer melkt die Kühe mit der Maschine.
Das ist eine Maschine, mit der der Bauer die Kühe melkt.

Das ist ein Pferd. Der Bauer redet gern mit dem Pferd.
Das ist ein Pferd, mit dem der Bauer gern redet.

Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

More:

Relative clauses can be constructed with other dative prepositions as well.

Example:
Ist das der Mann? Sie haben von dem Mann gesprochen.
Ist das der Mann, von dem Sie gesprochen haben?

They can also feature accusative prepositions.

Examples:
In dem Stall stehen viele Kühe. Harry und der Bauer gehen in den Stall.
In dem Stall, in den Harry und der Bauer gehen, stehen viele Kühe.

Julia ist Harrys Freundin. Er kann ohne sie nicht leben.


Julia ist Harrys Freundin, ohne die er nicht leben kann.

Die Zeitschleife ist ein Thema. Harry möchte gerne über das Thema sprechen.
Die Zeitschleife ist ein Thema, über das Harry gerne sprechen möchte.

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 060 – Grammar

The passive voice in the present tense to describe an action

The passive voice is a verb form that is used to describe actions or conditions. It changes the perspective of an action or event. While
the active sentence emphasizes the subject carrying out an action, a passive construction places emphasis on the action carried out.
The agent in a passive sentence is less important, perhaps not even named. The action itself is in the foreground. The subject of a
passive sentence is usually the person or thing to which the process is done or happens.

Example:
Harry wird operiert.
(= In this sentence, what is happening to Harry - an operation - is of essence. It is not important who is actually carrying out the
operation.)

Forming the passive voice


To form the passive, German uses the helping verb "werden" and a past participle. The helping verb is conjugated in the present tense.
The past participle remains unchanged. In a simple declarative sentence, the helping verb is in the second position and the past
participle goes to the end of the sentence.

Examples:
Sie werden gleich operiert.
Hilfe! Ich werde getötet!
Dr. Anderson wird ins Krankenzimmer gerufen.

Seite 1/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

To change an active sentence into a passive one, the object moves to the beginning of the sentence or follows the finite verb.

Active Dr. Anderson operiert Harry. Ich werde Sie gleich operieren.

Passive Harry wird operiert. Sie werden gleich operiert.


Gleich werden Sie operiert.

Including the agent in a passive sentence


If you want to include the actor, cause or agent in a passive construction, that can be done in conjunction with certain prepositions.

"von" + an actor (dative):


Harry wird von Dr. Anderson operiert.
Harrys Haare werden von der Krankenschwester geschnitten.

"durch" + a cause (accusative):


Harry wird durch die Operation getötet.

"mit" + an agent (dative):


Harry wird mit einer Spritze beruhigt.

Seite 2/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

More:

Most accusative verbs can be used in the passive voice. The accusative noun or pronoun in an active sentence becomes a nominative
noun in the passive sentence and determines the number and person of the verb. In a passive sentence it is the subject.

Nominative Accusative
Der Arzt operiert den Mann.

Der Mann wird (von dem Arzt) operiert.


Nominative

By contrast, the objects of dative verbs keep their dative form in a passive sentence. The word order is the same as for accusative verbs.
Passive sentence constructions like these have no subject.

Nominative Dative
Der Mann glaubt dem Arzt nicht.

Dem Arzt wird (von dem Mann) nicht geglaubt.


Dative

Seite 3/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 061 – Grammar

The dative as a form to ascribe opinion

Most German sentences contain at least a conjugated verb and a component in the nominative - a subject. But many verbs also require
another component - an object - in the accusative, dative or genitive. Accusative objects are the most common, but there are also verbs
that require the dative.

You've already learned about dative objects that indicate the target or recipient of an action.

Examples:
Wir möchten Ihnen gratulieren.
Ich wünsche dir einen schönen Tag.

To ascribe opinion in a sentence, the dative can be used to indicate whose opinion it is.

Example:
Das ist zu romantisch. – Wem ist das zu romantisch? (= Who thinks that it is too romantic?)
Das ist mir zu romantisch.

When the dative case is used in this way, the adjective is typically accompanied by the word "zu".

Example:
Das war mir plötzlich alles zu viel.
Das ist mir nicht zu schnell.

Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

More:

You'll also come across this way of using the dative case along with the word "genug". Such constructions are often colloquial and used
in spoken language.

Die Hochzeit ist nicht romantisch genug. – Wem? – Harry


Die Hochzeit ist ihm nicht romantisch genug. (= The wedding isn’t romantic enough for him.)
Die Hochzeit ist romantisch genug. – Wem? – Julia
Die Hochzeit ist ihr romantisch genug. (= The wedding is sufficiently romantic for her.)

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 062 – Grammar

1. Time clauses with "als" and "wenn"

Subordinate clauses are dependent upon main clauses or another dependent clause. They cannot stand on their own. Often they begin
with certain words (subordinating conjunctions, relative pronouns or question words) that connect them to the main or independent
clause.

"als" and "wenn" are conjunctions that introduce temporal subordinate clauses. They serve to give a time context to the message
conveyed in the clause to which they refer. Temporal clauses answer the question "Wann?" (when?). "als" and "wenn" indicate that the
actions described in both clauses happen at the same time, but there is a difference between the two conjunctions.

Use "als" to describe one-time events or actions in the past.

Example:
Was ist passiert? — Wann?
Was ist passiert, als du im Wald warst?
(= What happened at that particular point in time?)

Use "wenn" for events in the past and future (sometimes for events in the present, too). In the past tense, "wenn" subordinate clauses
refer to recurring events or processes. In the future tense they can refer to one-off or recurring events.

Example (past):
Anna hat gearbeitet. — Wann?
Anna hat gearbeitet, wenn sie Geburtstag hatte.
(= Anna didn't work on her birthday just once; she regularly works when it's her birthday.)

Seite 1/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Example (future):
Bringst du mir einen Kaffee mit? — Wann?
Bringst du mir einen Kaffee mit, wenn du in die Kantine gehst?
(= I'd like a coffee. Not right this minute, but at some point in the future when you go to the cafeteria.)

Immer wenn
Often the adverb "immer" is added to temporal clauses with "wenn" that refer to recurring events and actions. If the subordinate clause
precedes the independent clause, then "immer" directly precedes "wenn". But if the independent clause comes first, then the "immer"
has to be incorporated into the independent clause.

Examples:
Anna hat immer gearbeitet, wenn sie Geburtstag hatte.
Immer wenn sie Geburtstag hatte, hat Anna gearbeitet.
Auch: Wenn sie Geburtstag hatte, hat Anna immer gearbeitet.

Subordinate clauses with "als" and "wenn" are always separated from the independent clause by a comma.

Seite 2/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Placing a subordinate clause before a main clause in a sentence

A subordinate clause that begins with a subordinating conjunction can usually be placed either before or after the main clause it
modifies. That doesn't affect the word order of the subordinate clause. But if the subordinate clause comes first, then the verb in the
main clause moves to the beginning of that clause, right after the comma. Another way of looking at it is that the subordinate clause is
in the first position of the compound sentence. So the verb can still be considered to be in the second position.

Main clause Subordinate clause


Alle waren gut gelaunt, wenn Helmut ins Büro kam.

Wenn Helmut ins Büro kam, waren alle gut gelaunt.


Subordinate clause Main clause

Examples:
Obwohl sie Geburtstag hatte, hat Anna gearbeitet.
Warum sie so viel gearbeitet hat, weiß Anna nicht.
Damit sie ihre Ruhe hat, hat Anna nichts von ihrem Geburtstag erzählt.
Weil Anna keinen Kuchen mitgebracht hat, haben die Kollegen sie geärgert.

Seite 3/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 063 – Grammar

Expressing numerals

You've already learned about ordinal numbers that can be used to indicate the rank of an element in a sequence. They precede the
noun they modify and are inflected like adjectives.

Examples:
Sind Sie zum ersten Mal in unserer schönen Stadt?
Fahren Sie nach dem Tunnel die zweite Straße rechts.

To express an enumeration, "ens" is added to the end of the ordinal numbers. These words are adverbs and don't change. You'll often
see them at or near the beginning of the sentence.

Examples:
Also, erstens: Hier darf man kein Picknick machen!
Zweitens: Hier darf man nicht mit dem Auto fahren!
Drittens darf man im Wald nicht laut sprechen, es stört die Tiere!

These counting words can also be integrated into a sentence.

Example:
Das Auto ist erstens alt und zweitens laut, und drittens stinkt es.

To express them in numerals, they are written just like the ordinal numbers. The numbers are followed by a period.

Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Examples:
1. Hier darf man kein Picknick machen!
2. Hier darf man nicht mit dem Auto fahren!
3. Man darf im Wald nicht laut sprechen, es stört die Tiere!

The following chart provides an overview of how to write the ordinal numbers and the most common numbers used in an enumeration.

Grundzahl Ordinalzahl Aufzählungswort


eins der erste erstens
zwei der zweite zweitens
drei der dritte drittens
vier der vierte viertens
fünf der fünfte fünftens
sechs der sechste sechstens
sieben der siebte siebtens
acht der achte achtens
neun der neunte neuntens
zehn der zehnte zehntens
elf der elfte elftens
zwölf der zwölfte zwölftens
dreizehn der dreizehnte dreizehntens

… an so on.

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 064 – Grammar

Expressing suggestions and requests with "können" (subjunctive II)

Modal verbs usually accompany another verb in a sentence. They describe the subject in relation to the action expressed by the main
verb.

"können" (can, be able) describes an ability or option.

Examples:
Harry kann Deutsch sprechen.
Sie können gerne ein anderes Zimmer haben.

You can also use "können" to make suggestions or polite requests by using the subjunctive II verb form.

Examples:
Anna: Wir könnten nach Leipzig fahren und Andersons Büro durchsuchen.
(= Not only does Anna consider it an option to go to Leipzig. In fact she thinks it's a good idea and suggests it to Harry.)

Student: Herr Professor, könnte ich Sie kurz sprechen?


(= The student would like to talk to the professor. He asks if that would be possible and requests a conversation. He could also say:
"Kann ich Sie kurz sprechen?" But in the subjunctive II form it sounds more polite.)

Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

The subjunctive II form of "können" is similar to the indicative past tense, in other words, by affixing (e)te + the personal endings. But
in past tense the umlaut is omitted from the verb stem and in the subjunctive II it stays.

Preterite Subjunctive II
ich konnte könnte
du konntest könntest
er/sie/es konnte könnte
wir konnten könnten
ihr konntet könntet
sie konnten könnten

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 065 – Grammar

The passive voice with modal verbs

The passive voice is a verb form that is used to describe actions or conditions. It changes the perspective of an action or event. While
the active sentence emphasizes the subject carrying out an action, a passive construction places emphasis on the action carried out.
The agent in a passive sentence is less important, perhaps not even named. The action itself is in the foreground. The subject of a
passive sentence is usually the person or thing to which the process is done or happens.

Examples:
Active: Dr. Anderson operiert Harry.
Passive: Harry wird operiert.

Modal verbs can also be used to form passive constructions. They modify the meaning of the main verb just as they do in active
sentences. "müssen" is an example of a modal verb. In active and passive sentences it expresses a necessity.

Examples:
Active: Wir müssen den Rasen mähen.
Passive: Der Rasen muss gemäht werden.
(= The passive sentence indicates that the lawn must be mown. There's no mention of who will do it because that doesn't matter or is
not known.)

Forming the passive voice with modal verbs


To form the passive, German uses the helping verb "werden" and a past participle. To include a modal verb, it is conjugated and placed
in the second position of an independent clause. The past participle goes to the end of the sentence, followed by the helping verb in its
infinitive form.

Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Passive without a modal verb Passive with a modal verb


Die Bäume werden heute geschnitten. Die Bäume müssen heute geschnitten werden.
Heute müssen die Bäume geschnitten werden.
Kaffee wird gekocht. Kaffee muss gekocht werden.

As with all passive sentences, the accusative object from an active sentence becomes the subject and is placed at the beginning or
directly after the finite verb. The agent (person or thing carrying out the action) can be included by adding the preposition "von".

Active Sie müssen den Vertrag unterschreiben.

Passive Der Vertrag muss (von Ihnen) unterschrieben werden.

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 066 – Grammar

1. Indefinite pronouns

Indefinite pronouns are pronouns used for unspecified people and things. You can use them when you don't know who or what is
undertaking the action - "man" (one), "jemand" (someone), "etwas" (something), "jede(r/s)" (each), "nichts" (nothing), "niemand" (no-
one) - or when you can't or don't want to say exactly how many are involved - "alle" (everyone), "alles" (everything), "einige" (some),
"viele" (many).

Examples:
Jemand muss den Maibaum aufstellen.
Es ist alles fertig für die Feier!

Indefinite pronouns can refer to people, other living beings, or objects. Some can only be used for people. Others can only be used for
anything besides people.

Indefinite pronouns that refer to people


"niemand" (no-one) and "man" (one - which is comparable to the generic "you") are examples of indefinite pronouns that refer only to
people. They are used alone and take the place of a noun. They can only be used in the singular.

Examples:
Niemand isst Würstchen und Kartoffelsalat.
Auf der Landstraße darf man Fahrrad fahren.

Indefinite pronouns that refer to things, but not people


"etwas" (something), "nichts" (nothing) and "alles" (everything) are examples of indefinite pronouns that refer to things and concepts,
but not people. They are also singular pronouns. "etwas" and "nichts" can only be used in the
Seite 1/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

singular. The plural of "alles" is "alle" and can refer to people.

Examples:
Es ist nichts passiert.
Ich kann doch nicht alles alleine machen.

Indefinite pronouns that refer to people, other living beings, concepts or things
"jede/r/s" (everyone in the female, male and neuter forms respectively) and "alle" are examples of indefinite pronouns that can refer to
people, living beings or things. "jede/r/s" is a singular pronoun. "alle" is a plural pronoun.

Examples:
Das kann jeder sagen.
Alle feiern, auch der Präsident.

Seite 2/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Indefinite articles

Many indefinite pronouns can also be used as indefinite articles. Like their counterparts, definite articles, they appear in connection
with a noun.

Examples:
Wir feiern jedes Fest.
Es gibt ein Fest für alle Menschen aus Traponia am 8. August.

Declension pattern of indefinite pronouns/indefinite articles


"man", "nichts" and "etwas" are indefinite pronouns that do not change. The pronoun "man" can only be used in the nominative case.
For the accusative case, use "einen" and for the dative, use "einem". "jeder" and "alle" follow the same pattern of declension as for
definite articles.

Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural

Nominative jeder Mann Jede Frau jedes Kind alle Menschen


der Mann die Frau das Kind die Menschen

Accusative jeden Mann jede Frau jedes Kind alle Menschen


den Mann die Waffe das Haar die Menschen

Dative jedem Mann jeder Frau jedem Kind allen Menschen


dem Mann der Frau dem Kind den Menschen

Seite 3/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Genitive jedes Mannes jeder Frau jedes Kindes aller Menschen


des Mannes der Frau des Kindes der Menschen

"jeder" and "alle" are also inflected when they are used as pronouns.

Examples:
Das kann jeder sagen.
Das kann jedem passieren.

The indefinite pronouns "niemand" and "jemand" are also inflected. But in colloquial speech, the accusative and dative endings are
often ignored. The genitive is very rare.

niemand

Nominative niemand Niemand isst Würstchen und Kartoffelsalat.


Accusative niemand(en) Harry hat niemand(en) gesehen.
Dative niemand(em) Harry vertraut niemand(em).
Genitive niemandes Das ist niemandes Schuld.

Seite 4/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 067 – Grammar

Interrogative content clauses

Content clauses are subordinate clauses that may or may not begin with a conjunction. They serve as the object of the independent
clause, so in German they are also known as object clauses. Like all subordinate clauses, they are dependent upon the independent
clause or another dependent clause to which they refer and cannot stand on their own. You can easily recognize an object clause (and
also subject clauses, which are content clauses that serve as the subject of the main clause) by the fact that the superordinate clause
also cannot stand on its own; it requires the content (subordinate) clause to be complete.

Content clauses frequently begin with the conjunction "dass". They can also begin with question words, such as "wo", "wie", "was",
"wann", "womit" etc. These clauses are called interrogative content clauses. In German, they're also known as "W-Sätze" (W object
clauses) because all the German question words begin with the letter "w".

Examples:
Wir wissen, wo wir Ostrowski finden.
Das Orakel hat ihm gesagt, was er tun muss. (Das Orakel hat es ihm gesagt.)
Sie sehen ja, wie wir hier wohnen. (Sie sehen es ja.)

Seite 1/1

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 068 – Grammar

Impersonal passive constructions

The passive voice is a verb form that is used to describe actions or conditions. It changes the perspective of an action or event. While
the active sentence emphasizes the subject carrying out an action, a passive construction places emphasis on the action carried out.
The agent in a passive sentence is less important, perhaps not even named. The action itself is in the foreground. To form the passive,
German uses the helping verb "werden" and a past participle. The helping verb is conjugated and the past participle remains
unchanged. In an simple declarative sentence, the helping verb is in the second position and the past participle goes to the end of the
sentence.

Example:
Harry wird operiert.

The personal passive voice


When a passive sentence includes the person or thing to which the action is being done it is called a personal passive statement. The
subject of a passive sentence is the accusative object in the corresponding active sentence.

Examples:
Active: Dr. Anderson operiert Harry.
Passive: Harry wird operiert. - Wer oder was wird operiert? - Harry.

Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

The impersonal passive voice


If no-one or no-one in particular is named as the subject in a passive sentence, then it is called an impersonal passive statement. Such
sentences frequently begin with the word "es" in place of a noun or personal pronoun. An impersonal passive statement can also begin
with a different part of the sentence, in which case the "es" is omitted. Impersonal passive constructions are one of the rare instances in
which a German sentence has no subject.

Examples:
Active: Man arbeitet nicht mehr unter Tage. (oder: Wir/Sie arbeiten nicht mehr unter Tage.)
Passive: Es wird nicht mehr unter Tage gearbeitet.
Unter Tage wird nicht mehr gearbeitet.

Active: Wir suchen ein Bergwerk, in dem noch jemand arbeitet.


Passive: Wir suchen ein Bergwerk, in dem noch gearbeitet wird.

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 069 – Grammar

Posing "W" questions as indirect questions

Indirect questions - also called interrogative content clauses - are subordinate clauses that serve as the object in a main clause. Usually
they are the object of a verb of telling, knowing or questioning. As a form of "W" questions, they begin with a question word.

Indirect questions can be turned into direct questions that also contain a question word. An indirect question using the subjunctive II
construction sounds more polite than a direct question.

Examples:
Indirect question: Könnten Sie mir sagen, wo Ostrowski arbeitet? (Könnten Sie es mir sagen.)
Direct question: Sagen Sie mir bitte: "Wo arbeitet Ostrowski?"

Indirect question: Ich möchte nur wissen, wo Ostrowski arbeitet. (Ich möchte es nur wissen.)
Direct question: Ich möchte wissen: "Wo arbeitet Ostrowski?"

Seite 1/1

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 070 – Grammar

Derivation of adjectives

In German, various words can be combined with other words or syllables to form new words. You've already learned some of the more
essential ways of word formation.

Combining individual words (compounds):

Examples:
der Wind + das Rad = das Windrad
rot + der Wein = der Rotwein

Adding prefixes to words:

Examples:
stehen  aufstehen
stehen  verstehen

Many nouns, verbs and adjectives can be turned into (other) adjectives by adding certain suffixes. Three of the most common suffixes
to form adjectives are -ig, -isch and -lich.

Seite 1/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Original word Suffix Adjective


der Freund -lich freundlich
das Glück glücklich
der Pessimist -isch pessimistisch
der Typ typisch
die Ruhe -ig ruhig
die Sonne sonnig

Deriving an adjective from another word may require the addition of an umlaut to the vowel, in other words it causes a vowel change.

Examples:
der Norden  nördlich
die Gefahr  gefährlich
der Hass  hässlich

Some other suffixes used to create adjectives include:


-los: arbeitslos
-bar: wunderbar
-haft: traumhaft
-sam: langsam

Seite 2/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Word families
Words derived from the same base word are said to belong to a word family. If you know the base word, you'll usually be able to infer
the meaning of related words. So word families can help you to understand unfamiliar words and expand your vocabulary. Here's an
example of a word family with the base word
kauf-.

Verb Noun Adjective


kaufen der Verkäufer ausverkauft
verkaufen das Kaufhaus verkäuflich
einkaufen der Einkaufszettel

Seite 3/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 071 – Grammar

Incomplete sentences

Sentences are complete grammatical units of language that assert a meaning. They can stand on their own or appear alongside other
sentences to create a body of text or form parts of dialog.

A German sentence usually has at least one conjugated verb and a subject in the nominative case. The verb may also require or permit
other sentence elements, such as objects.

But in some instances, sentences can be shortened if their meaning remains clear from the context. That's often the case in
conversations.

Example:
Arbeiter: Was wollen Sie?
Harry: Reden! Reden!

"Reden!" isn't really a complete sentence. It's short for "Ich will mit Ihnen reden!", in response to the question "Was wollen Sie?". But
the meaning is still clear from the context.

Incomplete sentences can take the place of declarative sentences, questions and imperative sentences.

 Declarative sentence:

Example:
Harry: Wir müssen mit Ihnen reden!
Arbeiter: Jetzt nicht. Ich muss arbeiten. (= I can't talk to you right now.)
Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

 Imperative sentence:

Example:
Arbeiter: Können Sie mir helfen? Den Schraubenzieher, bitte. (= Please hand me the screwdriver.)

 Questions:

Examples:
Da ist ein Mann. – Wo? (= Where is there a man?)
Kommen Sie hoch! – Was? (= What did you say?/What are we supposed to do?)
Die Leiter? (= Where is there a ladder?)

You are already familiar with dialog particles that can serve as replies or interjections in a conversation.

Examples:
Wir haben keine Zeit. – Genau!
Das ist nur ein kleiner Fehler. – Ja, klar.
Siehst du den Mann? – Nein.
Ich möchte mit Ihnen sprechen. – Gerne.

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 072 – Grammar

Tag questions

You've already learned the most common ways of constructing questions in German.

Forming questions with "W" question words

Examples:
Wo waren Sie gestern?
Was suchen Sie?

Yes/no questions, in which the verb is in the first position.

Examples:
Waren Sie gestern in Bochum?
Suchen Sie das Orakel?

You can also easily turn declarative sentences into questions by adding certain fragments of speech at the end, known as tags. They
tend to be used to encourage or elicit a positive response from the listener. Often the questioner is looking for confirmation to his or
her statement. These sorts of tag questions suggest that the speaker perceives the statement to be correct.

Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Examples:
Dr. Anderson:
Sie suchen Ostrowski, habe ich recht?
Sie waren gestern in Bochum, oder?
Sie suchen das Orakel, stimmt’s?

Other tags include "nicht wahr?", "nicht?" and "richtig?". In the examples above, Dr. Anderson uses tag questions to get Harry to
confirm his suspicions. He's convinced that he already knows the truth. So in this case he seems to be trying to provoke Harry more
than anything else.

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 073 – Grammar

The placement of reflexive pronouns in a sentence

The German reflexive pronoun "sich" can appear in different parts of a sentence. Usually it's close to the beginning, but in a main
clause it follows the conjugated verb.

If the subject comes first in a sentence, the reflexive pronoun directly follows the conjugated verb.

Example:
Max hat sich in die Hose gemacht.

If the subject comes after the verb, then the reflexive pronoun can be placed either after the subject or the verb.

Example:
Gestern hat sich Max in die Hose gemacht.
Gestern hat Max sich in die Hose gemacht.

Note:
If the subject is a personal pronoun, then the reflexive verb must come after the subject!

Examples:
Gestern hat er sich in die Hose gemacht.

In a dependent clause, the reflexive verb usually appears right after the conjugation. But it can also follow the subject.

Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Examples:
Harry weiß, dass sich Max in die Hose gemacht hat.
Harry weiß, dass Max sich in die Hose gemacht hat.

Note:
In a dependent clause, the reflexive verb usually appears right after the conjugation. But it can also follow the subject.

Examples:
Harry weiß, dass er sich in die Hose gemacht hat.

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 074 – Grammar

1. Adverbials

Most German sentences contain at least one conjugated verb and one component in the nominative - a subject. There may also be
other components that accompany the verbs, such as objects.

Adverbials are words or groups of words that provide more information about the circumstances surrounding the action or condition
described in the sentence. Adverbials can relate to location, time, manner or reason.

Words Was machen wir hier? (location)


Wir müssen Ostrowski schnell finden. (manner)

Groups of words Sie könnten bei den Pinguinen sein (location)


Ein Elefant frisst jeden Tag 150 Kilo Gras. (time)

Compulsory and non-compulsory adverbials


Adverbials can be compulsory components or non-compulsory additions in a German sentence. That depends on the predicate
(conjugated verb + (if present) the participle/infinitive, etc.). If the verb requires an object, then that's known as a compulsory
component. Without it, the sentence would make no sense. Non-compulsory adverbials can be omitted. They provide additional
information.

Seite 1/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Compulsory adverbials Non-compulsory adverbials

Ostrowski wohnt in Bochum. Siehst du irgendwo Ostrowski und seine Kinder?


Möglich: Siehst du Ostrowski und seine Kinder?

Er wollte in den Zoo gehen. Ich muss jetzt die Elefanten füttern.
Möglich: Ich muss die Elefanten füttern.

Seite 2/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. The placement of adverbials in a sentence

Compulsory adverbials are usually at the end of the sentence. With compound verbs, the adverbial directly precedes the second part of
the predicate, in other words the participle or infinitive.

Examples:
Ostrowski wohnt in Bochum.
Er wollte in den Zoo gehen.
Ich habe das Gras ins Elefantengehege gelegt.

For non-compulsory adverbials, the word order can vary. A basic rule of thumb is:

1. Non-compulsory adverbials usually precede compulsory adverbials.

Er wollte gerne in den Zoo gehen.


(non-compulsory) (compulsory)

2. For non-compulsory adverbials, the order is usually time-reason-place-manner.

Wir sehen zuerst bei den Elefanten nach.


(time) (place)

Harry wurde gestern aus wissenschaftlichen Gründen in Leipzig durch eine Operation getötet.
(time) (reason/cause) (place) (manner)

Seite 3/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

But often there are deviations from this when a sentence contains several non-compulsory adverbials.

For extra emphasis, all adverbials can be placed at the beginning of the sentence.

Examples:
Zuerst sehen wir bei den Elefanten nach.
Bei den Elefanten sehen wir zuerst nach.

Seite 4/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 075 – Grammar

Commands without using the imperative

When you want a person to do something, you use a sentence in the form of a command. Commands can be used to express a request,
advice, a warning or instructions. You've already learned all about commands using the formal and informal imperative.

Examples:
Informal: Pack die nassen Sachen in die Waschmaschine!
Formal: Nehmen Sie sich ein Handtuch.

But there are also various ways of expressing commands without using the imperative.

1. Using the infinitive to express a command


This is often the case in recipes, operating instructions and public announcements.

Examples:
Zuerst die Tür öffnen, Wäsche reinlegen, die Temperatur einstellen und dann die Waschmaschine anstellen.
Die Tomaten schneiden und mit dem Fleisch in einen Topf geben.
Türen bitte schließen.

2. Using modal verbs to express commands


"sollen" and "müssen" are modal verbs which also can be used to express instructions, advice and commands.

Examples:
Du musst die nassen Klamotten ausziehen.
Du sollst die Sachen in die Waschmaschine packen.

Seite 1/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

3. Declarative sentences
Perfectly normal declarative sentences can also have an imperative character depending on the situation, context and emphasis.

Example:
Du ziehst jetzt die nassen Sachen aus und packst sie in die Waschmaschine!

4. Interrogative sentences (questions) with the word "können" or in the subjunctive II


Commands can also be in the form of questions. That's much more polite than using the imperative. This usually requires using the
subjunctive II or "können".

Examples:
Anna, kannst du mal herkommen? (= Anna, bitte komm mal her.)
Könntest du mir bitte helfen? (= Bitte hilf mir.)
Würdest du mir zeigen, wie die Maschine funktioniert? (= Bitte zeig mir, wie die Maschine funktioniert.)

5. Passive sentences
Some verbs can be used in the passive to express the imperative. This also applies to verbs that otherwise wouldn't be used in the
passive because they take no accusative or dative objects. These types of passive sentences are impersonal, so they don't have a
subject.

Example:
Jetzt wird geduscht und danach wird geschlafen!

6. Past participles
Sometimes only the past participle of a verb is used to give strict commands, orders or instructions, for example in the military.

Seite 2/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Examples:
Aufgepasst!
Hingesetzt!

7. Adverbs, adjectives and nouns


Certain individual words and turns of phrase can be used on their own as commands. In most cases, these types of commands are
abbreviated, incomplete sentences.

Examples:
Los, Anna! – (Geh/Fahr) los, Anna!
Harry, raus mit der Sprache! – Harry, (rück jetzt) raus mit der Sprache!
Leise! – (Sei/Seid/Seien Sie) leise!
(zu) Hilfe! – (Komm/Kommt/Kommen Sie mir zu) Hilfe!

Seite 3/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 076 – Grammar

1. Punctuation in written forms of speech

Addressing someone
In conversation, you often mention the name of the person you are talking to. This form of addressing someone by name is separated
from the rest of the sentence by a comma. That can be at the beginning or end of the sentence or clause.

Examples:
Anna, was machen wir jetzt?
Worüber denkst du nach, Harry?
Gut, Anna, wir werden einen Plan machen.

In letters, too, the name of the person you are addressing is followed by a comma and the rest of the sentence is written without a
capital letter at the beginning. To express particular emphasis in the greeting, you can use an exclamation point instead of a comma.
The words that follow form a new sentence and therefore must begin with a capital letter.

Examples:
Sehr geehrter Herr Walkott, Lieber Harry!
wir laden Sie zu einem Vortrag über die Zeitschleife ein. Wie geht es dir?

Seite 1/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Exclamations
Exclamations, commentary and affirmations in sentences are also separated by a comma.

Examples:
Ja, wir haben Spaß.
Ah, genau, der Banküberfall!
Okay, also hier ist der Eingang der Bank.

Additions and afterthoughts


Additions and afterthoughts can be inserted into sentences to emphasize or provide more information about certain words or groups of
words. Such additions are separated by commas and appear next to the word(s) they refer to.

Examples:
Wir treffen uns dort, vor der Bank.
(The afterthought "vor der Bank" provides more information about the intended meaning of "dort".)

The insertion is also closed off by a comma if the sentences continues afterwards.

Example:
Wir treffen uns dort, vor der Bank, und gehen gemeinsam hinein.

If a word refers to a previous word or group of words, then it is separated by a single comma.

Example:
Du und dein Kollege Helmut, ihr seid zur Bank gefahren.
(The pronoun "ihr" provides particular emphasis by referring back to the phrase "Du und dein Kollege Helmut".)

Seite 2/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Punctuation in lists of words

Commas are used to separate a string of words - unless those words are joined by conjunctions such as "und" and "oder". Usually the
last word listed is preceded by "und". In that case, there is no comma in front of it.

Examples:
Nein, nein, nein!
Nein, nein und nochmals nein!
Ich brauche Stift, Papier und Informationen von dir.

The same applies to groups of words, clauses and to join two independent clauses of equal ranking.

Grammatical phrases:

Example:
Wo war der Mörder - vor der Bank, in der Bank oder im Hinterhof?

Dependent clauses:

Example:
Ich möchte auch wissen, wer das getan hat, wer mein Mörder ist.

Independent clauses:

Examples:
Ostrowski wird uns nicht helfen, Anderson wird uns nichts sagen.
Ostrowski wird uns nicht helfen und Anderson wird uns nichts sagen.

Seite 3/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Two independent clauses joined by the conjunction "und" do not require a comma. But a comma can be used nonetheless to make the
sequence of events in the sentence even more clear, especially if the two independent clauses have different subjects.

Example:
Ich erinnere mich an den Hinterhof, und dann war da der Schuss.

Exceptions
No comma is used before a cumulative adjective. A cumulative adjective is an adjective that directly precedes the noun and forms a
unit with it. The adjectives before that modify the unit as a whole. Inserting commas can change the meaning of the sentence.

Examples:
Ich möchte ein großes bayerisches Bier.
(= "Bayerisches Bier" forms a unit in this sentence. In other words, the Bavarian beer is a big one.)

Wirf deine hässliche eingelaufene Hose in den Müll.


(= The shrunken pants are ugly. In other words they are ugly because they shrank.)

Wirf deine hässliche, eingelaufene Hose in den Müll.


(= The pants are shrunken and ugly. In other words, they were ugly before they shrank.)

More:

In German, the following coordinating, subordinating and correlative conjunctions join together words, groups of words or clauses of
equal ranking, so they are usually not preceded by a comma: "und", "oder", "bzw."/"beziehungsweise", "sowie", "wie", "entweder ...
oder", "sowohl ... als auch", "weder ... noch".

A comma precedes the conjunctions "denn", "aber", "jedoch", "doch", and "sondern".
Seite 4/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 077 – Grammar

The passive voice in the future tense

The passive voice is a verb form that is used to describe actions or conditions. It changes the perspective of an action or event. While an
active sentence emphasizes the subject carrying out an action, a passive construction places emphasis on the action being carried out.
The agent in a passive sentence is less important, perhaps not even named. The action itself is in the foreground.

You've already learned about the passive voice in the present tense.

Examples:
Active
Dr. Anderson operiert Harry.
Passive
Harry wird von Dr. Anderson operiert.

Forming the passive voice in the future tense


Just like in the active voice, the passive voice can be used in different tenses. To form the future tense, you use a conjugated form of
"werden", the past participle of the verb and the infinitive "werden".

Examples:
Anna wird erschossen werden.
Sie wird in den Rücken getroffen werden.

Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

But because that's rather cumbersome, people usually use an abbreviated form in colloquial speech. Instead, they simply use the
passive voice in the present tense - but the context must make it clear that the sentence is referring to the future. The infinitive of
"werden" is left out.

Example:
Anna wird erschossen.

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 078 – Grammar

"lassen" as a main verb and as a helping verb

"lassen" is a verb that can serve different functions and have different meanings.

"lassen" as a main verb


As a main verb, "lassen" can often be used on its own and usually means to stop or to have stopped doing something. It can also be
defined as "to let be" or "to leave be".

Example:
Helmut: Alle mal herhören! Anna hat heute Geburtstag!
Anna: Helmut, lass es!
(= Anna doesn't want everyone to find out that it's her birthday. She wants Helmut to stop teasing her.)

"lassen" as a helping verb


As a helping verb, "lassen" is used in conjunction with another verb in the infinitive. This is similar to constructions with modal verbs.
In this case, "lassen" can have different meanings, such as

1. lassen = to let, to allow something

Example:
Helmut: Anna, bitte lass mich gehen!
(= Helmut wants Anna to let him go.)

Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. lassen = to cause, bring about something, to get something to happen


In this sense, "lassen" means to cause something to happen or to get something done.

Example:
Anna: Wenn ich aus der Zeitschleife rauskomme, dann lasse ich Helmut verhaften.
(= Anna will see to it that Helmut gets arrested.)

3. The imperative of "lassen" as a command for the 1st person plural


In German, there is no imperative form for "wir". To construct it you use either the formal imperative together with the personal
pronoun or "lassen" as a helping verb. For example, you'd say "Lass uns etwas tun!" when referring to yourself and another person,
and "Lasst uns etwas tun!" when you mean a group of people.

Declarative sentence Imperative


Du gehst. Geh!
Sie gehen. Gehen Sie!
Wir gehen. Gehen wir! Oder: Lass uns gehen!

4. sich … lassen = man kann


The phrase "sich ... lassen" is similar in meaning to the modal verb "können". It indicates a possibility and can be used as a
substitute for a passive sentence with "können". Whatever it is that can be done is described by the verb in the infinitive.

Active Die Werkstatt kann das Auto reparieren.


Passive Das Auto kann repariert werden.
Passive substitute Das Auto lässt sich reparieren.

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 079 – Grammar

The interrogative phrase "was für ein"

The phrase "was für ein" can introduce a question. It is used to inquire about the particular nature of someone or something. "was für
ein" is often used like an article before the noun in question.

Example:
Question: Was für ein Salat ist das? (= What kind of salad is it? What's in the salad/What's the salad made of?)
Answer: Fleischsalat ist ein Salat mit Wurst, Zwiebeln, Gurken und Mayonnaise.

When used as a question word, "was für ein" reflects the number, gender and case of the noun it refers to. It is inflected like the
indefinite article "ein". For the plural, you use only "was für" and omit the "ein".

Examples:
Was für einen Kaffee möchten Sie?
Was für eine Torte gibt es hier?
Was für Teesorten haben Sie?

This chart shows you the forms for each case and gender.

Masculine Feminine Neuter


Nominative was für ein was für eine was für ein
Accusative was für einen was für eine was für ein
Dative was für einem was für einer was für einem
Genitive was für eines was für einer was für eines

Seite 1/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

The phrase can be separated, especially when the noun in question is an accusative object.

Examples:
Was möchtest du für einen Kaffee?
Was isst du für eine Torte?

The difference between "was für ein" and "welcher"

Use "was für ein" to ask about something unknown or about a type of person or object. By contrast, "welcher" refers to something or
someone in particular from a larger group. In other words, questions with "welcher" are usually used to single out a person or an object
from a wider selection of people or things.

Example:
Harry: Was für eine Torte ist das?

With that question, Harry is asking the waitress to describe what kind of cake it is. The answer might be: "Das ist eine Schwarzwälder
Kirschtorte. Das ist eine Sahnetorte mit Kirschen."

Example:
Waitress: Welche Torte möchten Sie?

With that question, the waitress is asking Harry to choose which piece of cake he'd like. He could point to one and say, "Ich möchte
diese Torte mit Sahne und Kirschen. Die sieht lecker aus." In this second example the difference between "was für ein" and "welcher" is
very subtle. Even Germans mix the usage in colloquial speech.

Seite 2/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

More:

"was für ein" can also be used on its own as a pronoun. In this case it follows the same declension pattern as the pronouns "welcher"
and "dieser". For the plural, use "was für welche".

Examples:
Ich möchte einen Kuchen. - Was für einer gefällt dir?
Ich möchte Bonbons! - Was für welche magst du?

Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural


Nominative was für einer was für eine was für eines was für welche
Accusative was für einen was für eine was für eines was für welche
Dative was für einem was für einer was für einem was für welchen
Genitive was für eines was für einer was für eines was für welcher

Seite 3/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 080 – Grammar

Rules of thumb for forming the plural

Determining the plural form of nouns isn't always easy. Do you remember when Harry said the following?

Example:
Harry: Gibt es in Deutschland viele Staue?
Anna: Du meinst Staus? Ja, leider gibt es viele Staus in Deutschland.

Harry chose a plural form that was in fact wrong, but could be right in theory because most monosyllabic masculine nouns take an "e"
at the end to form the plural. You've already learned that there are five different ways of forming the plural of a noun. Three of those
ways include the additional possibility of adding an umlaut as well.

1. Plural ending –e or –e + Umlaut

Singular Plural -e Singular Plural -e + Umlaut


-e das Angebot die Angebote die Hand die Hände

2. Plural ending –en or –n (if the last letter of the noun is already an–e)

Singular Plural -en Singular Plural -n


(bei Substabtiven, die auf –e enden)
-en or - n die Meldung die Meldungen die Raststätte die Raststätten

Seite 1/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

3. Plural ending –er or –er + Umlaut

Singular Plural -er Singular Plural -er + Umlaut


-er das Kind die Kinder das Haus die Häuser

4. Plural ending –s

Singular Plural -s
-s das Auto die Autos

5. No ending in the plural or no ending + Umlaut

Singular Plural - Singular Plural - + Umlaut


- (endungslos) das Zimmer die Zimmer die Tochter die Töchter

So which endings to use for which nouns? There are a few general rules, but they don't apply in all cases. So there are many exceptions.
Nonetheless, they can help you to a certain extent:

The plural of monosyllabic nouns are frequently formed by adding


-e to the end of masculine nouns: der Mord – die Morde
-en to the end of feminine nouns: die Frau – die Frauen
-e or -er to the end of neuter nouns: das Jahr – die Jahre, das Schild – die Schilder

The plural of many loanwords is formed by adding an "s" to the end:


der Job – die Jobs
Seite 2/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

das Taxi – die Taxis

Nouns that end with "e" often get an "n" to form the plural:
der Name – die Namen
die Torte – die Torten

Nouns that end with "er", "el" and "en" frequently take
– no ending for masculine nouns: der Bankräuber – die Bankräuber
- n for feminine nouns: die Zwiebel – die Zwiebeln
– no ending for neuter nouns: das Zimmer – die Zimmer

Seite 3/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 081 – Grammar

Placement of direct and indirect objects in a sentence

In a German declarative sentence the subject is often at the beginning of the sentence, followed by the verb. If the sentence has an
object, it follows the verb.

Some sentences have just one object.

Examples:
Ich öffne den Umschlag. (accusative object)
Sie werden das Orakel nie finden! (accusative object)
Der Umschlag gehört mir. (dative object)

But some sentences can have more than one object.

Gib mir den Umschlag.

Dativobjekt Akkusativobjekt

The order of the objects in a sentence depends on whether the object is a noun, noun phrase (i.e. a noun + words that modify the noun,
such as an article or adjective) or a pronoun.

In this case, the following word order usually applies:

Seite 1/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

If both objects are nouns or noun phrases, then the dative object usually precedes the accusative object.

Harry gibt Anna den Umschlag.

dative object accusative object


noun noun phrase

Anderson gibt dem Mann die Informationen.

dative object accusative object


noun phrase noun phrase

If the object is replaced by a pronoun, then the pronoun precedes the noun or noun phrase.

Gib mir den Umschlag!

dative object accusative object


pronoun noun phrase

Seite 2/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Anderson hat Informationen. Er gibt sie Harry.

accusative object dative object


pronoun noun

If pronouns are used to replace both objects, then the accusative object precedes the dative object.

Examples:
Anderson hat Informationen.
Gib mir den Umschlag!

Er gibt sie dir.


Gib ihn mir!

accusative object dative object


pronoun pronoun

Seite 3/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 082 – Grammar

Past participles as adjectives

You're already familiar with past participles that don't change their form and are used as part of compound verbs in certain tenses,
such as the present perfect, and to construct the passive voice.

Examples:
Wir haben die Zahlen im Internet gesucht.
Die Zahlen werden im Internet gesucht.

The following chart gives you an overview of how to form past participles.

separable inseparable
regular verbs gesucht zugehört besucht
irregular verbs geholfen angefangen verstanden

Many participles can be used as adjectives to describe beings, things, actions and conditions. They provide more information about the
noun, giving details about the nature, circumstances or passive actions that happened in the past.

As an attributive, the participle precedes the noun it modifies and is inflected just like an adjective.

Examples:
Es geht um diese vier verfluchten Zahlen.
Wo genau ist der gesuchte Ort?

Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

A relative clause can be used in place of the past participle. In that case, the relative clause is often formulated in the past or present
tense.

Examples:
Es geht um diese vier Zahlen, die verflucht (worden) sind.
Wo genau ist der Ort, der gesucht wird?

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 083 – Grammar

1. Adjectival nouns

Adjectives provide more information about beings, things, events and conditions. They often describe a noun or a pronoun.

Adjectives can also function as nouns, in which case they are capitalized like all German nouns.

Examples:
Anna: Was hast du denn erwartet, Harry?
Harry: Na ja, keine Ahnung … Etwas Tolles, etwas Besonderes, etwas Magisches!

Adjectival nouns follow the same pattern of declension as an adjective that directly precedes the noun.

Examples:
Im Moor wurde ein toter Mann gefunden.
Im Moor wurde ein Toter gefunden.

Im Moor wurde eine tote Frau gefunden.


Im Moor wurde eine Tote gefunden.

Like most nouns, adjectival nouns often appear along with their articles. They might also be modified by other adjectives. In that case,
the adjectives are inflected.

Example:
Im Moor wurde ein unbekannter toter Mann gefunden.
Im Moor wurde ein unbekannter Toter gefunden.
Seite 1/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

In principle, any adjective can be turned into a noun. In most cases, adjectival nouns are used for people and abstractions. Abstractions
are usually accompanied by indefinite articles, such as "nichts", "etwas" and "wenig". If they follow uninflected indefinite pronouns,
adjectival nouns are usually in the neuter singular.

Examples:
Ich habe etwas Tolles erwartet.
Hier gibt es nichts Besonders.
Der Ort hat wenig Magisches.

Upper or lower case?

Adjectives are usually written in lower case letters when they describe a noun or pronoun. In other words, they are not capitalized -
even if the word they modify is not directly adjacent.

Examples:
Das ist ein langweiliges Dorf. (refers to: Dorf)
Bist du lebensmüde? (refers to: du)
Welchen Weg wollen wir nehmen, den sicheren oder den schnellen? (refers to: Weg)

But adjectives are capitalized in the following situations:

– when they function as nouns:


Das Sichere ist immer besser als das Schnelle!

Seite 2/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

– when they are part of a name:


Das Hotel heißt "Alte Post".

– when they are derived from names of places or countries and end with "er":
Die Bremer Fans freuten sich über den Sieg ihrer Mannschaft.

More:

Adjectives alter their form to reflect gender, case and number - and also whether they follow an indefinite or definite article. That's also
the case for adjectival nouns. This chart shows you the most important forms.

Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural


Nominative der Deutsche die Deutsche das Neue die Deutschen
ein Deutscher eine Deutsche ein Neues Deutsche
etwas Neues
Accusative den Deutschen die Deutsche das Neue die Deutschen
einen Deutschen eine Deutsche ein Neues Deutschen
etwas Neues
Dative dem Deutschen der Deutschen dem Neuen den Deutschen
einem Deutschen einer Deutschen einem Neuen Deutschen
etwas Neuem
Genitive des Deutschen der Deutschen des Neuen der Deutschen
eines Deutschen einer Deutschen eines Neuen Deutscher
etwas Neuem

Seite 3/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. The phrase "was für ein" in exclamatory statements

You've already learned that the phrase "was für ein"/"was für eine" can introduce a question to ask about the nature or type of
something or someone.

Example:
Was für ein Ort ist das?

"was für ein" can also be used in exclamations. As with questions, it precedes the noun like an article and emphasizes whatever is
special or unique about the noun. When used in exclamations, "was für ein" is always in the nominative. It can be used to express
enthusiasm, frustration, disappointment and the like.

Examples:
Was für ein langweiliger Ort!
Was für ein Zufall, dass wir uns hier treffen!

"was für ein" can also be used to express irony and sarcasm. That becomes clear from the context and emphasis.

Example:
Du willst mitten durchs Moor gehen? Was für eine gute Idee … wenn man sterben will!"
(= not at all a good idea!)

Seite 4/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 084 – Grammar

1. Adverbs with "irgend-"

Adverbs provide more information about the location, time, manner or reason why something is or happens.

Certain adverbs, such as "wo", "wann" and "wie" can be combined with the prefix "irgend-" to indicate a general, unspecified place,
time or manner.

Examples:
Das war irgendwann im 6. Jahrhundert vor Christus. (The exact time is undefined or unknown.)
Können Sie mir sagen, ob es hier irgendwo ein Orakel gibt? (The precise location is not known.)
Das ist irgendwie unheimlich. (What's "unheimlich" about it is not clearly specified.)

Seite 1/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Indefinitpronomen mit "irgend-"

You've already come across indefinite pronouns. They are a sub-group of pronouns and are used

– when it's not clear who or what is doing the action ("man", "jemand", "etwas", "jeder", "nichts", "niemand").
– when it's not clear how many are involved ("alle", "alles", "einige", "viele").

Examples:
Jemand muss den Maibaum aufstellen.
Es ist alles fertig für die Feier!

Indefinite pronouns can be used to indicate people or things. Some refer only to people and others refer only to objects.

Some of them can be combined with "irgend-" for enhancement: " irgendeiner", "irgendjemand", "irgendetwas". These pronouns
emphasize the fact that it doesn't matter which one or who is meant.

Examples:
Irgendjemand muss den Maibaum aufstellen.
Vielleicht weiß der Reiseleiter irgendetwas über das Orakel.

Seite 2/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

3. The various meanings of modal particles

Modal particles are words that don't have just one clear-cut and specific dictionary definition. But they play a very important part in
the meaning of a sentence. They're predominantly used in spoken language (discourse or dialog particles). They convey additional
meaning and signalize the speaker's point of view of what is being said. Some of the most common modal particles are "doch" and
"mal".

Examples:
Beeilen Sie sich doch!
Beeilen Sie sich mal!

The meaning of modal particles in a sentence depends very much on the context. "doch" can be used, for example, to express
frustration or impatience in an imperative. But depending on the emphasis, it can also make a command more indirect, mild and
polite. Such imperatives often include the word "bitte".

Examples:
Kommen Sie doch bitte! (polite)
Sei doch mal still! Mein Gott, Harry! (frustration)
Beeilen Sie sich doch! (impatience)
Frag doch mal nach dem Orakel! (suggestion)

Some modal particles can be combined with others.

Examples:
Seien Sie doch mal still!
Kommen Sie doch mal!

Seite 3/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 085 – Grammar

Noun clauses

You've already learned about object clauses that serve as the object in an independent clause. In the same way, subject clauses are
dependent clauses that function as the subject of the sentence. Like all dependent clauses, they need a main clause or another
dependent clause to complete their meaning and cannot stand on their own. You can recognize a subject clause (and also an object
clause) by the fact that the superordinate clause would be incomplete without it.

Examples:
Wer nicht hören will, muss fühlen.
Wer's glaubt, wird selig.

In each of the above sentences, the subject of the main clause is itself a dependent clause. Without it, the sentence would be incomplete
and have no subject.

Subject clauses often begin with interrogative pronouns, such as "wer" and "was".

Just like single-word subjects, subject clauses answer the question "who?" or "what?".

Example:
Wer's glaubt, wird selig. – Wer oder was wird selig? – Wer's glaubt.

Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

You can tell whether it's a subject clause if the entire clause can be replaced by a single word.

Example:
Wer's glaubt, wird selig.
Substitution test:
Wer oder was wird selig? – Der wird selig.

Subject clauses can also be introduced by the conjunctions "dass" and "ob".

Examples:
Ob er selig wird, ist unbekannt.
Dass der selig wird, ist sicher.

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 086 – Grammar

Subordinate clauses with "ob"

Subordinate clauses are dependent upon an independent clause or another superordinate depedent clause. They cannot stand on their
own. Often they begin with words (subordinating conjunctions, relative pronouns or question words) that connect them to the
independent or superordinate clause.

"ob" is one such conjunction that introduces a subordinate clause. Subordinate clauses with "ob" have the same meaning as an indirect
yes-no question.

Examples:
Ja/Nein-Frage: Gibt es hier ein Orakel?
Subordinate clause with "ob": Können Sie uns sagen, ob es hier ein Orakel gibt?

There are certain expressions that permit constructions like these, especially verbs that express questioning, pondering, doubt or
uncertainty.

Examples:
Ich weiß nicht,
Ich überlege,
ob es hier ein Orakel gibt.
Ich bin nicht sicher,
Ich frage den Pfarrer,

Seite 1/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Subordinate clauses with "ob" can serve as the subject or object in a main clause. In other words, they belong to the sub-group of
subject and object clauses. They answer the same questions that apply to subjects and objects. You can tell whether a clause is a
subject clause or an object clause by the fact that the superordinate clause would be incomplete without it.

Examples:

object

Können Sie uns etwas sagen?

object clause
Können Sie uns sagen, ob es hier ein Orakel gibt?

subject

Das Finden des Orakels ist nicht sicher.

subject clause
Es ist nicht sicher, ob wir das Orakel finden.

Seite 2/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

More:

Comparison of "ob" clauses

"ob" clauses are grammatically similar to "dass" clauses and object clauses with question words. But there are some key differences.

1. "ob" clauses represent yes-no questions while object clauses with question words represent questions with "W" question words.

Examples:
Yes-no question: Gibt es hier ein Orakel?
Subordinate clause with "ob": Können Sie uns sagen, ob es hier ein Orakel gibt?
Interrogative "W" word: Wo ist das Orakel?
Subordinate clause with a question word: Können Sie uns sagen, wo das Orakel ist?

2. Use the conjunction "dass" when you know or (don't) want something or when you are certain that your assertion is correct. Use
"ob" to ask about things that are unknown or when you are uncertain of your assertion.

Examples:
Dass-Satz: Ich weiß/bin sicher, dass es hier ein Orakel gibt.
Ob-Satz: Ich bin nicht sicher, ob es hier ein Orakel gibt.

Some verbs can accommodate both "dass" and "ob" clauses. Then the difference in meaning is essential.

Examples:
"dass" clause: Der Pfarrer sagt uns, dass es ein Orakel gibt. (= The pastor is sure that an oracle exists. So this sentence tells us that
there is an oracle and that the pastor believes it is real.)
"ob" clause: Der Pfarrer sagt uns, ob es hier ein Orakel gibt. (= We still don't know for sure whether an oracle exists. The pastor will
tell us whether it exists or not.)
Seite 3/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 087 – Grammar

Verbal nouns

Verbs usually convey an action, occurrence or a state of being.

Verbs can also be used as nouns by placing an article in front of the infinitive. Verbal nouns describe the actual action itself. Their
gender is neuter and like all German nouns, they are capitalized.

Example:
Vielen Dank fürs (= für das) Mitnehmen!

German verbal nouns are inflected like regular nouns. That means that they are given the ending "s" in the genitive case. Articles and
adjectives that precede verbal nouns reflect the gender, case and number.

Nominative Das lange Warten hat mich müde gemacht.


Accusative Ich mag das lange Warten nicht.
Dative Vom (von dem) langen Warten bin ich ganz müde.
Genitive Wegen des langen Wartens bin ich ganz müde.

Frequently, infinitive verbal nouns will be accompanied by prepositions, such as "zum" ("zu dem"), "beim" ("bei dem") and "vom"
("von dem").

Example:
Vielen Dank fürs Mitnehmen!
Das ist zum Heulen!

Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Vom langen Warten bin ich ganz müde.


Ich habe Angst vorm Fliegen.
Stör mich nicht beim Trinken!

Verbal nouns with prepositions can replace subordinate clauses.

Examples:
Vielen Dank, dass du mich mitgenommen hast!
Vielen Dank fürs Mitnehmen!
Ich bin ganz müde, weil ich lange gewartet habe.
Vom langen Warten bin ich ganz müde.

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 088 – Grammar

The passive voice in the present tense to describe a condition

The passive voice is a verb form that is used to describe actions or states of being. It changes the perspective of an action or event.
While an active sentence emphasizes the subject carrying out an action, a passive construction places emphasis on the action carried
out. The subject of a passive sentence is usually the person or thing to which the process is done or happens.

In contrast to the passive voice to describe an action, which you learned about previously, passive constructions that describe a
condition place more emphasis on the result of an action. So this type of formulation describes the state of being of the person(s) or
thing(s) after the action has taken place.

Example:
Die Gläser sind gespült.
(= In this sentence, the condition of the glasses is important. They are clean. It's not important how they got that way.)

How to form it
To form the passive voice to describe a state of being, German uses the helping verb "sein" and a past participle. The helping verb is
conjugated in the present tense. The past participle remains unchanged. In a declarative sentence, the helping verb is in the second
position and the past participle goes to the end of the sentence.

Examples:
Die Gläser sind fertig gespült.
Der Boden ist auch gewischt.
Wieso ist die Bar nicht aufgeräumt?

Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

To form a passive sentence, the object of the action moves to the beginning of the sentence or follows the finite verb.

Active: Jakob spült die Gläser. Wieso spülst du die Gläser nicht?

Passive voice to describe an action: Die Gläser werden gespült. Wieso werden die Gläser nicht gespült?
Passive voice to describe a condition: Die Gläser sind gespült. Wieso sind die Gläser nicht gespült?

Usually there is no indication of the person carrying out the action in passive sentences that describe a condition.

Present perfect or passive?

The passive voice to describe a condition has the same form as the present perfect tense when formed with the helping verb "sein".

conjugated helping verb + past participle

Present perfect with the helping verb "sein": Harry ist in die Disko gegangen.
Passive voice in the present tense to describe a condition: Die Disko ist aufgeräumt.

Here's how to tell the difference:


The present perfect conveys an action that happened in the past.
The passive voice to describe a condition expresses the result of an action.

The passive voice can be turned into an active sentence. To do that, you simply add information about who carried out the action:
Jakob hat die Disko aufgeräumt.

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 089 – Grammar

1. The subjunctive II in the past

The subjunctive II is used to express wishful thinking or situations that are contrary to reality. It can also be used to make requests and
suggestions sound especially polite.

You're already familiar with the subjunctive II forms of "haben" and "sein" in the present tense, and with the other way of forming the
subjunctive II by using "würde" + an infinitive.

Examples:
Wenn das Orakel funktionieren würde, wärst du nicht mehr in der Zeitschleife.
Wenn mir das Orakel helfen würde, hätte ich keine Sorgen mehr.

The subjunctive II can also be used in the past tense. To do that, you use the present perfect - with the helping verbs "haben" or "sein"
and the past participle. The helping verbs then take their subjunctive II forms.

haben sein
Present Ich treffe dich. Ich gehe zum Orakel.
Present perfect Ich habe dich getroffen. Ich bin zum Orakel gegangen.
Subjunctive II Ich hätte dich getroffen. Ich wäre zum Orakel gegangen.

Seite 1/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Here is an overview of all the forms used in subjunctive II in the past tense.

sein haben
ich wäre ich hätte
du wärst du hättest
er/sie/es wäre er/sie/es hätte
gegangen geholfen
wir wären wir hätten
ihr wärt ihr hättet
sie wären sie hätten

Seite 2/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Hypothetical condition clauses in the past

Hypothetical condition clauses in the past tense are parts of a complex sentence that allow you to play with thoughts and ideas. What
would have happened had the circumstances been different? In these complex sentences, both the independent and subordinate
clauses are in the subjunctive II form. The subordinate clause expresses the circumstance or condition. It is introduced by "wenn" or
"falls" and a comma separates it from the superordinate clause. The superordinate clause describes the potential outcome. In past-
tense hypothetical condition constructions, the subordinate clause is always in the past tense. But the main clause, which conveys the
potential outcome, can refer to the past, present or future.

Examples:
Wenn wir dich nicht getroffen hätten, hätten wir die Suche wahrscheinlich gestoppt. (main clause: past)
Wenn wir dich nicht getroffen hätten, hätten wir jetzt keine Hoffnung mehr. (main clause: present)

Seite 3/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 090 – Grammar

Negation with prefixes and suffixes

In German, words can be combined with other words or syllables to create new words. You've already learned how to change the
meanings of words by adding prefixes and suffixes, and how to derive new words from other words.

Examples:
stehen : aufstehen, verstehen
der Freund: freundlich

Certain prefixes and suffixes can be used to negate words. Negative prefixes and suffixes denote the opposite meaning of the word.

Examples:
ungefährlich: nicht gefährlich
missfallen: nicht gefallen
erfolglos: ohne Erfolg, nicht erfolgreich

The most common negative prefixes and suffixes in German are "un-", "miss-" and "-los". This chart shows you the kinds of words
that can be used with negative prefixes and suffixes.

Adjective Noun Verb


un- zahlungsunfähig das Unglück —
miss- missverständlich das Missverständnis missverstehen
-los rücksichtslos der Arbeitslose* —

Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

* "-los" is a suffix that creates only adjectives. Words like "der Arbeitslose" are adjectival nouns.

Loan words with Latin origin can also be given the prefix "in-" to negate the word.

Examples:
Insolvenz: insolvent (not solvent, unable to pay, broke, bankrupt)
indirekt: indirect (not direct)

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 091 – Grammar

1. Indirect speech

Indirect speech is used to report what someone has said without directly quoting that person.

Example:
Direct speech Anna: "Ich fahre zu meiner Mutter."
Indirect speech Anna hat gesagt, dass sie zu ihrer Mutter fährt.
Anna hat gesagt, sie fährt zu ihrer Mutter.

Indirect speech begins with an introduction indicating who has spoken. The statement they made in direct speech becomes a "dass"
subordinate clause in the indirect formulation or becomes a subordinate clause with no subordinating conjunction attached to the
introduction.

Indirect speech often entails a change in perspective, which causes the pronouns to change.

Example:
Anna: "Ich fahre zu meiner Mutter."
Anna sagt, dass sie zu ihrer Mutter fährt.

The conjugated verb also has to change to fit the sentence.

Example:
Anna: "Ich fahre zu meiner Mutter."
Anna sagt, dass sie zu ihrer Mutter fährt.

Seite 1/7

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Questions in indirect speech


You already know how to formulate indirect questions! "ob" clauses represent yes-no questions and object clauses are used in place of
interrogative W words (question words).

Yes-no question: "Gibt es hier ein Orakel?"


Subordinate clause with"ob": Er hat gefragt, ob es hier ein Orakel gibt.

Interrogative "W" word "Wo ist das Orakel?"


Subordinate clause with question word Er hat gefragt, wo das Orakel ist.

Imperatives in indirect speech


Usually, the modal verb "sollen" is used to report imperative statements in indirect speech. (Sometimes "müssen" is used instead. For
polite requests, "mögen" is another possibility.)

Direct speech: Orakel: "Verzeih deiner Mutter!"


Indirect speech: Anna: Das Orakel hat gesagt, dass ich meiner Mutter verzeihen soll.
Anna: Das Orakel hat gesagt, ich soll meiner Mutter verzeihen.

Seite 2/7

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. The subjunctive I

The subjunctive in indirect speech

In colloquial speech it's becoming more common to express indirect speech by using the indicative. In writing - such as newspaper
articles and literature - the subjunctive I form is still frequently used.

Examples:
Orakel: "Verzeih deiner Mutter!"
Anna: Das Orakel hat gesagt, ich solle meiner Mutter verzeihen.

Jakob: Jeder findet seinen Weg.


Harry: Jakob hat mir erklärt, dass jeder seinen Weg finde.

The subjunctive I is a verb form used for indirect speech. But it's actually used primarily for only the 3rd person singular - and for the
modal verbs in the 1st person singular - because its other forms hardly differ from the indicative in the present tense. So in those other
instances, the subjunctive II is used instead of the subjunctive I or by using the construction "würde" + the infinitive.

Example:
Anna: Wir fahren ins Seniorenheim.
Harry: Anna hat gesagt, dass wir ins Altenheim fahren würden.

The subjunctive I is formed by adding personal endings to the verb stem. "e" is a typical ending in the 3rd person singular. The other
forms don't differ, or differ only slightly, from the indicative in the present tense.

Seite 3/7

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

lernen
Indicative Subjunctive I
ich lern-e lern-e
du lern-st lern-est
er/sie/es lern-t lern-e
wir lern-en lern-en
ihr lern-t lern-et
sie lern-en lern-en

Example:
Jakob sagt, er lerne aus seinen Fehlern.

"sein" has its own distinct form in the subjunctive I. That's why "sein" is regularly used in the subjunctive I form for all persons.

sein
Indicative Subjunctive I
ich bin sei
du bist seist
er/sie/es ist sei
wir sind seien
ihr seid seiet
sie sind seien

Example:
Anna sagt, alles sei gut.

Seite 4/7

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

More:

haben
Indicative Subjunctive I
ich habe hab-e
du hast hab-e-st
er/sie/es hat hab-e
wir haben hab-e-n
ihr habt hab-e-t
sie haben hab-e-n

können
Indicative Subjunctive I
ich kann könn-e
du kannst könn-e-st
er/sie/es kann könn-e
wir können könn-e-n
ihr könnt könn-e-t
sie können könn-e-n

Seite 5/7

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

werden
Indicative Subjunctive I
ich werde werd-e
du wirst werd-e-st
er/sie/es wird werd-e
wir werden werd-e-n
ihr werdet werd-e-t
sie werden werd-e-n

müssen
Indicative Subjunctive I
ich muss müss-e
du musst müss-e-st
er/sie/es muss müss-e
wir müssen müss-e-n
ihr müsst müss-e-t
sie müssen müss-e-n

dürfen
Indicative Subjunctive I
ich darf dürf-e
du darfst dürf-e-st
er/sie/es darf dürf-e
wir dürfen dürf-e-n
ihr dürft dürf-e-t
sie dürfen dürf-e-n
Seite 6/7

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

sollen
Indicative Subjunctive I
ich soll soll-e
du sollst soll-e-st
er/sie/es soll soll-e
wir sollen soll-e-n
ihr sollt soll-e-t
sie sollen soll-e-n

wollen
Indicative Subjunctive I
ich will woll-e
du willst woll-e-st
er/sie/es will woll-e
wir wollen woll-e-n
ihr wollt woll-e-t
sie wollen woll-e-n

Seite 7/7

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 092 – Grammar

The past perfect

The past perfect is a grammatical tense to express the "pre-past". It is used to denote an occurrence that took place even further in the
past than another event that also happened in the past.

Pre-past  Past
Du hattest keine Ausbildung gemacht, und deswegen hast du mich zur Adoption freigegeben.
(= Anna's mother gave Anna up for adoption because she hadn't completed any vocational training previously.)

Past  Pre-past
Als der Pfleger ins Zimmer kam, hatte Harry schon das Bett gemacht.
(= Harry had made the bed before the caregiver came into the room.)

The past perfect is formed like the present perfect with the helping verbs "haben" or "sein" and a past participle. But for the past
perfect, the helping verbs are conjugated in the simple past tense. The past participle remains unchanged. In a typical declarative
sentence, the conjugated verb takes the second position and the past participle goes to the end of the sentence.

Examples:
Harry hatte auf Anna gewartet.
Harry war mit Anna ins Seniorenheim gefahren.

Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Overview of the past tenses:

Simple past Present perfect Past perfect


Harry wartete. Harry hat gewartet. Harry hatte gewartet.
Harry hatte Glück. Harry hat Glück gehabt. Harry hatte Glück gehabt.
Harry ging weg. Harry ist weggegangen. Harry war weggegangen.

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 093 – Grammar

1. The reciprocal pronoun "einander"

You're already familiar with reflexive pronouns.

Example: Ich wasche mich.

If the subject is plural, the reflexive pronoun can be reciprocal. In other words, it can express mutuality. This becomes even clearer if
you imagine inserting the word "gegenseitig" (mutually, reciprocally) into the sentence.

Examples:
Wir wollen uns (gegenseitig) nicht vergessen. = Anna will Harry nicht vergessen, und Harry will Anna nicht vergessen.
Wir werden uns (gegenseitig) nicht erkennen. = Anna wird Harry nicht erkennen, und Harry wird Anna nicht erkennen.

"einander" is a reciprocal pronoun which can be used instead of the reflexive pronoun. It conveys the same sense of reciprocity.

Examples:
Wir wollen einander nicht vergessen. = Anna will Harry nicht vergessen, und Harry will Anna nicht vergessen.
Wir werden einander nicht erkennen. = Anna wird Harry nicht erkennen, und Harry wird Anna nicht erkennen.

If the verb expressing a mutual relationship has a preposition, then the preposition can be attached to the front of the reciprocal
pronoun "einander".

Example:
Anna wartet auf Harry, und Harry wartet auf Anna: Anna und Harry warten aufeinander.

Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. "brauchen" + the infinitive

"brauchen" is a verb that can function like a modal verb, even though it isn't a modal verb, strictly speaking. It is used like one solely in
negated sentences and means "to not have to" or "to need not".

In standard speech, the word "zu" appears along with the infinitive of "brauchen".

Examples:
Du brauchst keine Angst zu haben.
Du brauchst den Kopf nicht hängenzulassen.

But in colloquial speech, the "zu" is often omitted.

Example:
Du brauchst keine Angst haben.

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 094 – Grammar

Predicate nominatives

In some sentences, the subject has a complement which is also in the nominative case. This component, the subject complement, is
also known as a predicate nominative. It provides more information about the subject.

Example:
Die Liebe ist dein Weg. - Wer oder was ist die Liebe? - Dein Weg.

Predicate nominatives follow verbs like "sein", "werden", "bleiben", "heißen" and "scheinen". These verbs connect the subject to a noun
in the nominative. Together with that noun they are known as the predicate. That's why these nouns are also known as predicate
nominatives.

More:

The subject and the predicate nominative usually reflect the same number. But sometimes one of the nominative components is
singular and the other is plural. In that case, the verb is always in the plural.

Examples:
Die größte Freude sind seine Kinder.
Die Kinder sind seine größte Freude.

Seite 1/1

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 095 – Grammar

Correlative conjunctions

Like all conjunctions, correlative conjunctions connect sentences, phrases or clauses to one another. They usually have two parts. The
first conjunction introduces the first phrase or clause, and the second one introduces the second phrase or clause. Correlative
conjunctions are used to connect clauses of equal weight or to join together two independent clauses or two subordinate clauses.

Examples:
Harry denkt sowohl über Julia als auch über das Orakel nach.
Das ist nicht nur gefährlich, sondern auch verboten.

Conjunctions with multiple components, such as "sowohl ... als auch" and "nicht nur ... sondern (auch)" are used to join words or
groups of words. The correlative conjunction "sowohl ... als auch" emphasizes the two separate elements (for instance "Julia" and "das
Orakel" in the above example) more strongly than if they were joined by a simple "und".
"Nicht nur ... sondern (auch)" often denotes more than just an even comparison. It gives the sense of a progression or escalation.

Example:
Julia ist nicht nur traurig, sondern verzweifelt.

You've already learned some other correlative conjunctions, such as "nicht/kein ... sondern" and "entweder ... oder". "nicht/kein ...
sondern" expresses a contrast between two elements and "entweder ... oder" poses them as alternative options.

Examples:
Harry ist nicht mutig, sondern feige.
Sie sind entweder verliebt oder verrückt! Oder beides.

Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

If the correlative conjunctions connect two clauses that share the same verb and/or subject, then it can be omitted from the second
clause. That's shorter.

Example:
Harry ist nicht mutig, sondern er ist feige.
Harry ist nicht mutig, sondern feige.

More:

This chart shows you the most common correlative conjunctions along with their meanings.

sowohl … als auch Aufzählung Ich denke sowohl über Julia als auch über das Orakel nach.
nicht nur … sondern Aufzählung Das ist nicht nur gefährlich, sondern auch verboten.
auch
weder … noch negative Aufzählung Ich will dich weder sehen noch mit dir sprechen!
nicht ... sondern Gegensatz Harry ist nicht mutig, sondern feige.
zwar … aber Einschränkung Die Fahrt mit dem Taxi ist zwar teuer, aber viel schneller.
entweder … oder Alternativen Sie sind entweder verliebt oder verrückt! Oder beides.

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 096 – Grammar

Present participles

You're already familiar with past participles in compound tenses and as adjectives.

Examples:
Julia hat Harry vor der Flugangst gerettet.
Der gerettete Pinguin wurde in den Zoo zurück gebracht.

Present participles are predominantly used as adjectives or adverbs.

Examples:
Der Pinguin spricht! -> Ja, das ist ein sprechender Pinguin.
Julia lacht. -> Julia hilft Harry lachend.

They are formed by adding "end" to the end of the verb stem.

Infinitive Present participle


sprechen sprech-end
lachen lach-end
retten rett-end

Present participles describe an activity or process that is happening at this very moment and hasn't ended. By contrast, past participles
used as adjectives usually describe a state of being or a passive condition that happened in the past. You can tell the difference by
replacing the participles by a relative clause.

Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Examples:
Julia hat die rettende Idee.
-> Julia hat die Idee, die (Harry) rettet.

Der gerettete Harry ist sehr glücklich.


-> Harry, der gerettet wurde, ist sehr glücklich.

When used as a modifier, the participle precedes the noun and is inflected like an adjective.

Examples:
Ja, das ist ein sprechender Pinguin.
Kann ich den sprechenden Pinguin mal sehen?

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 097 – Grammar

1. Prepositions requiring the genitive

Prepositions connect words and groups of words together. They also determine the grammatical case of the words or groups of words
that they precede in the sentence. In other words, they govern case.

Most German prepositions govern the accusative or dative cases.

Preposition Accusative
Julia interessiert sich für die traponische Sprache.

Preposition Dative
Er träumt von einem großen Stück Schokolade.

But there are also some prepositions that require the genitive.

Preposition Example
wegen Ich wollte Deutsch lernen, aber ich hatte keine Zeit wegen des Jobs.
trotz Trotz unserer Liebe hatten wir Probleme.
statt Statt des Kuchens möchte ich lieber ein Brötchen.
während Während der Zeit in Traponia war noch alles gut.

Seite 1/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

The genitive is becoming increasingly scarce!

For the prepositions listed above, it's becoming more and more common to use the dative instead of the genitive in colloquial speech.
That's especially noticeable with masculine and neuter nouns because the dative and genitive forms for feminine nouns in the singular
are the same.

Example:
Ich wollte Deutsch lernen, aber ich hatte keine Zeit wegen dem Job.
Statt dem Kuchen möchte ich lieber ein Brötchen.

Seite 2/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Time clauses with "während"

Subordinate clauses are dependent upon independent clauses or other superordinate clauses. They cannot stand on their own. Often
they begin with words (subordinating conjunctions, relative pronouns or question words) that connect them to the superordinate
clause to which they refer.

"während" is a conjunction that introduces a temporal clause. Temporal subordinate clauses provide a time context to the action
conveyed in the independent clause. They answer the question "Wann?" (when?). The conjunction "während" indicates that the
occurrences in the independent and dependent clauses happen at the same time. The subordinate clause describes the span of time in
which the independent-clause action takes place.

Example:
Julia hat Traponisch gelernt. — Wann?

Julia hat Traponisch gelernt, während ich gearbeitet habe.


(= While Harry was working, Julia did something else. She learned Traponian!)

Seite 3/3

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 098 – Grammar

Declension of adjectives in a sequence

German adjectives provide more information about something or someone, an occurrence or a condition. They often describe nouns
and personal pronouns.

You've already learned how to inflect an adjective that precedes a noun. If the adjective comes directly before the noun it modifies, then
its ending changes. The adjective is usually placed between the noun and its article.

If several adjectives precede a noun, they all get the same ending. In other words, they all follow the same pattern of declension.

Examples:
Ich hätte gern die großen roten Rosen.
Ich hätte gern 22 große rote Rosen.
Ich möchte einen großen, romantischen Blumenstrauß.

Comma placement
If all the adjectives modify the subsequent noun equally, then they share the same ranking. They're treated like a string of words and
are separated by commas.

Example:
Ich möchte einen großen, romantischen Blumenstrauß.

Seite 1/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

The word "und" could be inserted between adjectives of equal ranking.

Example:
Ich möchte einen großen und romantischen Blumenstrauß.

If the adjective directly adjacent to the noun forms a unit with the noun, then the adjectives are not equal. In this case they are not
separated by a comma because the first adjective modifies the subsequent word group, which comprises a noun and an adjective.

Example:
Ich hätte gern die großen roten Rosen. (I would like the red roses that are big.)

Whether two or more adjectives in a sentence need to be separated by commas usually depends on the intended meaning of that
particular sentence.

Example:
Er hat ein neues schnelles Auto. (= Sein altes Auto war auch schnell.)
Er hat ein neues, schnelles Auto. (= Sein altes Auto war vermutlich nicht so schnell.)

Seite 2/2

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 099 – Grammar

1. Adjectives that govern case

German adjectives provide more information about something or someone, an occurrence or a condition. They often describe nouns
and personal pronouns. Some adjectives can directly govern the grammatical case of the nouns or pronouns that follow them.

Accusative adjectives
Adjectives that describe size and length require the accusative.

Accusative Adjective
hoch: Der Berg ist 500 Meter hoch.
lang: Die Insel ist einen Kilometer lang.

There are other adjectives that govern the accusative case, too.

Accusative Adjective
wert: Es war einen Versuch wert.

Seite 1/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Dative adjectives
You already also know some adjectives that require the dative case.

Dative Adjective
wichtig: Das ist mir wichtig.
klar: Das ist ihm klar.
peinlich: Das ist mir peinlich.

Genitive adjectives
There are also adjectives that require the genitive. Some of them precede a genitive object.

Adjective Genitive
voll: Das Wattenmeer ist voll ekliger Würmer.

Sometimes, especially in colloquial speech, the inflected form "voller" is used instead of "voll". "voller" is the genitive plural form.

Adjectives with the genitive are often substituted by other constructions using a preposition + the dative.

Genitive Wattenmeer ist voller ekliger Würmer.


Preposition + dative Das Wattenmeer ist voll von ekligen Würmern.

Seite 2/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

2. Declension of adjectives in the genitive case

German adjectives describe something or someone, an occurrence or a condition. They often describe nouns and personal pronouns.

If an adjective precedes the noun it refers to, then its ending changes. The adjective is usually placed between the noun and its article.

There are three different patterns of adjective declension depending on whether there is a definite article, indefinite article or no
article.

Genitive adjective endings after a definite article


Following a definite article, adjectives in the genitive always end with "en".

Example:
Das war das Ende der guten Zeit.

Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural


des schönen Urlaubs der teuren Sonnencreme des berühmten Wattenmeers der ekligen Würmer

Genitive adjective endings after an indefinite article


After indefinite articles, possessive determiners ("mein", "dein", "ihr", etc.) and the negation article "kein", adjectives in the genitive
case also always take the ending "en". Since the indefinite article has no plural, the adjective ending is shown here using the example of
"kein".

Example:
Wir haben uns wegen eines langweiligen Urlaubs an der Nordsee gestritten.

Seite 3/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural


eines schönen Urlaubs einer teuren Sonnencreme eines berühmten Wattenmeers keiner ekligen Würmer

Genitive adjective endings after no article


This declension is common in the plural and relatively rare in the singular. It also applies after number words, with the exception of
"ein". Usually the adjectives take the same endings as for definite articles. But masculine and neuter genitive endings in the singular
are an exeption because the "s" at the end of the noun already indicates the case. So in those instances, the adjective endings are once
again "en".

Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural


schönen Urlaubs teurer Sonnencreme berühmten Wattenmeers ekliger Würmer

Seite 4/4

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle
Harry – gefangen in der Zeit
Begleitmaterialien

Episode 100 – Grammar

Subordinate clauses with no conjunction

Subordinate clauses are dependent upon an independent clause or another subordinate clause . They cannot stand on their own. Often
they begin with certain words (subordinating conjunctions, relative pronouns or question words) that connect them to the
superordinate clause. Such connecting words are also known as subordinators or complementizers.

But with some subordinate clauses, the complementizer (conjunction, relative pronoun, etc.) can be left out.

Examples:
Ich glaube, ich bleibe für immer hier.
Ich hoffe, du wirst die nächsten Jahre mit mir verbringen.

Such subordinate clauses are often subject or object clauses derived from "dass" clauses. The conjugated verb shifts from the end of the
sentence to the second position, making them look like independent clauses. These clauses often follow verbs relating to saying and
telling, thinking and believing, hoping and perceiving.

Examples:
With a complementizer: Ich glaube, dass ich für immer hier bleibe.
Without a complementizer: Ich glaube, ich bleibe für immer hier.

With a complementizer: Ich hoffe, dass du die nächsten 100 Jahre mit mir verbringen wirst.
Without a complementizer: Ich hoffe, du verbringst die nächsten 100 Jahre mit mir.

Seite 1/1

Deutsch zum Mitnehmen


www.dw.com/harry
 Deutsche Welle