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Cleanup Criteria for

Contaminated Soil
and Groundwater

Anthony J. Buonicore, Editor

ASTM Data Series: DS 64


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iv
Foreword
ASTM Committee E-50 on Environmental Assessment is the sponsor of Data Series
(DS) 64 on Cleanup Criteria for Contaminated Soil and Groundwater. Every attempt
has been made to insure the accuracy and timeliness of the information included in
this book. The general cut-off date for the information collected was 15 Aug., 1993.
Every effort has been made to ensure the data in the publication are accurate.
However, in a book containing so many numbers, there is a possibility some errors
may not have been caught and corrected in the quality control process. As such, if you
find an error, please let ASTM know so that the errors may be corrected in the next
update. Also, if you have any suggestions or comments, I would like to hear from you.
If you have any complaints about the subject matter, I will share the blame with Bill
Gulledge, Chairman of ASTM Subcommittee E50.04, who so freely volunteered me for
this undertaking.
No book of this magnitude can be completed without assistance from many capable
individuals. In particular, I would like to acknowledge Connie Marini of Environ-
mental Data Resources, Inc. who was responsible for collecting state cleanup criteria,
Tom Scelfo of Wehran who assisted me in collection of the cleanup criteria data, Kathy
Dernoga and Sue Gebremedhin of ASTM who were responsible for coordinating my
efforts, Kathleen A. Peters of ASTM who was responsible for the editing of text and
inputting numerical cleanup values into the software, and AGC Sedgwick of Prince-
ton, New Jersey who was responsible for developing the search software.

Anthony J. Buonicore, Editor

v
About the Editor

Anthony J. Buonicore, P.E., is Chief Executive Officer of Environmental Data


Resources, Inc., a national environmental information services company headquar-
tered in Southport, Connecticut. Mr. Buonicore received both his Bachelors and
Masters Degrees in Chemical Engineering from Manhattan College in New York and is
a nationally recognized expert on environmental risk management. He is a licensed
professional engineer and a Diplomate in the American Academy of Environmental
Engineers. He has more than 20 years experience dealing with environmental issues
from both a technical and business viewpoint and is currently a Fellow Member and
President of the Air & Waste Management Association. He is also Chairman of ASTM's
Phase I Standard sub-committee in E50.02. Mr. Buonicore's other affiliations include
membership in the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, the National Ground
Water Association, Tau Beta Pi and Sigma Xi.

vi
Contents
Chapter 1: Cleanup Criteria for Contaminated Soil and Groundwater 1
Table I: Representative Limits of Detection 5

Chapter 2: Risk-Based Cleanup Criteria 11


Table 2: Potential Exposure Pathways for Human Receptors 14
Table 3: Toxicity Data 16

Chapter 3: National Standards and Guidelines 21


Table 4: Action Levels Under RCRA Corrective Action 28
Table 5: Residue Concentration Limits for Nonmetallic Constituents 32
Table 6: EPA Toxicity Characteristic Regulatory Levels 35
Table 7: Universal Treatment Standards 36
Table 8: EPA Current and Proposed Drinking Water Standards 41
Table 9: Superfund Proposed Soil Screening Levels (SSLs) 44
Table 10: EPA PCB Contaminated Soil Cleanup Policy 47

Chapter 4: Background Concentrations 49


Table 11: Background Concentrations of Elements in Soils 51

Chapter 5: Cleanup Criteria Outside the United States 53


Table 12: Contaminant Indicator Criteria Used by The Netherlands 55
Table I 3: Maximum Allowable Concentrations (MAC) and Tentative
Allowable Concentrations (TAC) of Contaminants in Soil in the
Soviet Union (as of 1984) 59
Table 14: Alberta, Canada, Suggested Cleanup Guidelines for Inorganics
in Soils 62
Table I 5: Ontario, Canada, Cleanup Guidelines for Soils 63
Table I 6: Quebec, Canada, Groundwater and Soil Contamination
Indicators 65
Table 17: Tentative "Trigger Concentrations" for Selected Inorganics in
the United Kingdom 70
Table IS: Reference Thresholds for Soil Pollutants Used by France 72

Chapter 6: State Cleanup Standards and Guidelines 75


Alabama 77
Alaska 78
Arizona 81
Arkansas 87
California 88
Colorado 89
Connecticut 92
Delaware 95
District of Columbia 96
Florida 97
Georgia 99
Hawaii 100
Idaho 102

vii
Illinois 103
Indiana 105
Iowa 106
Kansas 107
Kentucky 117
Louisiana 118
Maine 119
Maryland 120
Massachusetts 121
Michigan 131
Minnesota 140
Mississippi 145
Missouri 146
Montana 147
Nebraska 148
Nevada 150
New Hampshire 151
New Jersey 152
New Mexico 158
New York 159
North Carolina 164
North Dakota 167
Ohio 168
Oklahoma 169
Oregon 171
Pennsylvania 177
Rhode Island 178
South Carolina 180
South Dakota 182
Tennessee 185
Texas 188
Utah 198
Vermont 199
Virginia 202
Washington 203
West Virginia 205
Wisconsin 206
Wyoming 210

Appendix A: Chemical Names, CAS Numbers, Synonyms 215

Appendix B: Hazardous Substances List (RCRA, CERCLA, SARA) 287

Appendix C: State Agency Addresses 311

Appendix D: User's Guide for Search Software 317


Introduction 319
Getting Started 319
Tutorial 320
Trouble Shooting 326
Technical Support 326

viii
Chapter 1: Cleanup Criteria for Contaminated Soil
and Groundwater
DS64-EB/Jan. 1995

Cleanup Criteria for l


Contaminated Soil
and Groundwater
Cleanup criteria for contaminated soil and groundwater ter quality, for example, in their revised 1988 "Statistical
have taken many different forms since the passage of the Re- Methods for Evaluating Groundwater Monitoring Data from
source Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) in 1976 and Hazardous Waste Facilities." EPA recognized groundwater
the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensa- quality measurements do not vary as a result of random oc-
tion and Liability Act (CERCLA) in 1980, also referred to as currences alone, nor are they due solely to the analyst's ability
the Superfund Act. These forms have included: to make the measurements. They recognized groundwater
( 1) cleanup to "background" levels; quality is a result of a dynamic natural system that behaves in
(2) cleanup to levels established by the limits of detection; a semi-predictable way. The possible predictable components
(3) cleanup to "non-detect" levels; of groundwater quality are associated with groundwater re-
(4) cleanup to levels established by the capability of the charge and differences related to the location of monitoring
best demonstrated available remediation technologies; wells. The 1988 statistical methods final rule recognizes a va-
(5) cleanup to levels established by precedent, for exam- riety of statistical techniques for dealing with site-specific
ple, Records of Decisions at Superfund Sites, decisions situations.
by regulatory authorities at similar sites, etc.; The characterization of background soil quality is just as
(6) cleanup to existing standards or guidelines, for exam- complex, if not more so, than the characterization of back-
ple, Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) estab- ground groundwater quality. This is true because groundwa-
lished in the Safe Drinking Water Act, Action Levels in ter samples taken close together (from the same well) are
the proposed RCRA Corrective Action Rule, etc.; more likely to be similar than soil samples taken far apart (in
(7) cleanup to levels protective of potentially exposed in- the upgradient area).
dividuals as established by a health risk assessment; Unfortunately, it is still unclear how best to characterize
and one particular area for making a comparison to another area.
(8) combinations of the above. However, the recent application of geostatistical techniques
to the mapping of environmental contamination shows
promise.
CLEANUP TO BACKGROUND LEVELS One popular way to characterize the conceptual population
of concentration measurements has been to estimate the aver-
The cleanup of contaminated groundwater or soil to the
age or mean concentration and measure the dispersion about
condition that existed before the contamination occurred is a
the mean, that is, the standard deviation. While this procedure
reasonable and often pursued goal. Background levels may
enjoys a lengthy statistical history, its adequacy relies on as-
range from those found in the immediate area, for example,
sumptions regarding the randomness of the sampling and the
upgradient of the contaminated site, to those that are found
underlying mathematical form of the statistical population
elsewhere in the country. Background levels of elements in
that is sampled.
soils throughout the U.S., for example, are regularly evalu-
ated by the U.S.G.S. (refer to Chapter 4). The specific defini-
tion of what constitutes background at a particular site is a
matter of policy. CLEANUP TO LIMITS OF DETECTION
Once "background" is identified, it must be decided Cleanup criteria for contaminants in soil or groundwater
whether an existing database (assuming one is available) will have frequently been set to the capability of analytical equip-
be used or a new database developed. In either case, back- ment to detect these contaminants. In fact, many states that
ground levels will probably be variable and further analysis have developed health-derived cleanup criteria permit the
necessary. detection limits to be used as cleanup criteria when the
•Should the highest background level found be used? health-based criteria are below the detection limits.
• Should the lowest background level found be used? Common detection limits for many hazardous substances
•Should the average background level found be used? in soil and groundwater are presented in Table 1. Since detec-
•Should the background level database be analyzed tion limits will be a function of the particular analytical equip-
statistically? ment used and analysis protocol, there may be considerable
The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has recog- variability in the capabilities of different laboratories. The val-
nized the difficulty in characterizing background groundwa- ues in Table 1 are meant only to be representative. Advance-

3
Copyright © 1995 by ASTM International www.astm.org
4 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

ments in the state-of-the-art of analytical instrumentation CLEANUP ESTABLISHED BY EXISTING


are being made regularly and may significantly improve STANDARDS AND GUlDELINES
(lower) detection limit capabilities.
Many federal and state agencies have developed guide-
lines or promulgated regulations defining acceptable levels of
CLEANUP TO NON-DETECT LEVELS contamination in soil and groundwater. This book attempts
to compile many of these regulations and guidelines.
Cleanup to non-detect levels implies that contaminated At the federal level, for example, there are:
soil and groundwater must be cleaned to a level below the ( 1) the MCLs (Maximum Contaminant Levels) established
limits of detection for the hazardous substances involved. under the Safe Drinking Water Act;
This has often been considered cleanup "until all contamina- (2) the Action Levels defined in the proposed RCRA Cor-
tion is removed." rective Action Rule;
(3) the Soil Screening Levels in the Superfund program;
TECHNOLOGY-BASED (4) PCB spill cleanup requirements in TSCA (Toxic Sub-
CLEANUP STANDARDS stances and Control Act); and
(5) toxicity characteristic regulatory levels under RCRA.
Standards based on the ability of available technology to de- Guidelines and regulations have also been established at
stroy or limit contamination can be used to quantify an achiev- the international level by many countries (refer to Chapter 5).
able level of cleanup. Technology-based standards, for example,
are the basis of the proposed (under RCRA) universal treatment
standards for hazardous wastes before land disposal. HEALTH-BASED CLEANUP CRITERIA
The most common technologies used for the cleanup of
Frequently, cleanup criteria are based on the specification
contaminated soil include:
of tolerable or acceptable health risks. Often these criteria
•soil vapor extraction (volatile organics) pertain to the risk to human health, but ecological risk also
•biological treatment (organics) may be a driving force. The specification of acceptable risk is a
•chemical extraction (organics) socio-political decision, and the translation of this risk into a
•dechlorination (chlorinated organics) specific cleanup level for a particular site is complex (refer to
•soil washing (organics and metals) Chapter 2).
• solidification/stabilization (metals) Conservative assumptions and expert opinions frequently
•thermal desorption (volatile organics) must be relied on when specifying the desired cleanup level
•incineration (organics) because factual evidence is often lacking. The result generally
•vitrification (organics and metals) is a concentration level that, if exposure occurs, will result in
The most common technologies used for the cleanup of a level of risk of adverse consequences that will be acceptable.
contaminated groundwater include:
•air stripping (volatile organics)
•carbon adsorption (organics)
•biological treatment (organics)
•oxidation (organics)
•physical/chemical treatment (organics and metals)
The capabilities of these technologies and others used for
the cleanup of hazardous waste sites are tracked by the EPA
and made available to the general public through their VISITT
(Vendor Information System for Innovative Treatment Tech-
nologies) database. This database is available on diskette from
EPA free of charge and may be obtained by calling the VISITT
Hotline at 800-245-4505 or 703-883-8448.

CLEANUP TO LEVELS ESTABLISHED


BY PRECEDENT
Similar to the usefulness of precedent in the legal comm u-
nity, precedent can be very helpful in negotiating specific
cleanup criteria at a contaminated site. The situation sur-
rounding the precedent must be analyzed carefully to be sure
that the situations are truly similar. The most common prece-
dent situations include:
( 1) similar cleanups in the same state;
(2) similar cleanups in other states; and
(3) Superfund site cleanup criteria as presented in the
Records of Decisions (RODs).
CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR CONTAMINATED SOIL AND GROUNDWATER 5

TABLE 1- REPRESENTATIVE LIMITS OF


DETECTION
NUMERICAL CRITERIA
Soil Groundwater

Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remarks mg/L Remorks

Acenapl'lthylenc 208-96-8 0.2 0.000 3


Acephale 30560-19· 1 0.6
•\cetone 67-64-1 0.1 O.Ql
Aero le in 107-02-8 0.005
Ac rylorlltr 1fe 107· 13· I 0.005
a·AHC 319·84·6 0.05 0.000 05
Alachlor 15972-60-8 1.0 0.01
Aldicarb 116-06-3 l.O 0.001
Aldicarb sulfone 1646-88-4 l.O
Aldicarb sulfoxide 1646-88·3 l.O
Aldrin
Alfy
Ametry11
Antl'lrac:ene
~!!t.i~~y
Arsenic 7440-38·2 0.10 0.004
Atrazine 1912-24-9 1.0 0.01
Azinphos· methyl 86-50-0 0.1 0.000 5
Barium 7440-39-3 0.5 0.01
Bayleton 43121·43·3 0.5 0.005
8entazo11
Benzene
Benzidine
8enio(a)anlhracene
~
8enzotalpyrene
Ben zo( b)fl uoran th en e 205-99-2 0.17 0.000 01
Benzo(k)fluoranthene 207-08-9 0.17 0.000 01
8enzyl alcol'lol 100-51·6 0,07 0.002
Beryllium 7440-41-7 0,3 0.000 5
Bis (2· elhylhexyl) adipate 103-23-1 1.0 o.oi
B is(L-chIoroethyl )ether lfl"'.44-:"4 0-:-17
B 1s(2-<: h1oro isopropy II
ether 39638-32-9 0,17
Boron (water· soluble) 7440-42-8 0.50 n
Bromac1I 314-40·9 0.33
Bromoform 75-25-2 0.01
8romomethane 74-83·9 0.01
Bromoxynil 1689-84-5 0.66
Butyl benzyl phi ha late 85·68· 7 0.17 0.005
8utylate 2008-41· 5 0.5 0.005
fCadmium 7440.·;f.3:"9 o.3 0.000 2
~Ca plan 133-06-2 0.05 0.03
Carbary! 63-25·2 0.33 0.001
~Carbofuran 1563-66·2 0.66 0.001
'carbon disulfide 75-15-0 0.05 0.01
Carbon tetrachloride 56-23-5 0.01 0.000 2
Carboxin 5234-68-4 l.O 0.01
Chloramben 133-90·4 0.66 0,001
Ch!ordane 57.74.9 D.DS D.0005
Clllorobenzene 108-90·7 0.01 0.000 2
6 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

Table 1 Cont'd.

Soil Groundwater

Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remarks mg/L Remorks

Chloroform 67-66·3 0.01 0.000 2


Chloromethane 74.37.3 0.01 0.000 2
2-Chlorophenol 95.57.g 0.3 0.005
Chlorothalonil 1897-45·6 0.05 0.001
Ch lor pyr if os 2921-88-2 0.05 0.01
Chromium 7440.47.3 0.5 0.01
Chrysene 218-01·9 0.17 0.000 02
Copper 7440· 50·8 0.5 0.01
Cyanazrne 21725·46·2 1.0 0.01
Cyanide 57-12·5 0.5 0.01
[cyrom azrne 66215-27·8 6.0
2,4·0 94. 75. 7 0.4 0.000 4
Daclhal 1861-32·1 1.0 0.010
Dalapon. sodium salt 75.99.0 3.3 0.004
I Dr( 2_:elhyl heryl) phi ha la Ie 117-81-7 0.17 0.01
Drazinon 333-41·5 0.1 0.000 5
Drbenzo[a,h Jani hracene 53.70.3 0.2 0.000 l
1,2· Oibromo-3-chloropropane 96· 12·8 0.003 0.000 005
Drbromochlorornel hane 124-48·1 0.01 0.000 2
1,2· Dibromoethane 106-93·4 0.002 0.000 005
Dib utyl ph th al ate 84.74.2 0.3 0.005
Oicamba 1918-00-9 0.04 0.000 5
1,4· Dic hlo robe nze ne 106-46·7 0.025 0.000 5
1,3· Oichlorobenzene 541-73·1 0.02 0.000 5
1,2·.Di ch lo ro benzene 95·50· 1 0.025 0.000 5
3,3'· Dichlorobenzidine 91·94·] 0.34 0.02
Dichlorobromomethane 75-27·4 0.01 0.000 2
D1chlorodrl luorornethane 75-71·8 0.01 0.000 2
l ,2· Drchloroethane 107-06·2 0.01 0.000 2
crs· l ,2· Dichloroethylene 156-59·2 0.01 0.000 2
trans· 1,2· Dichloroethylene 156·60·5 0.01 0,000 2
Dich\morn\'.tn~~ 75-09·2 0.05 0.000 5
2,4· Drchlorophenol 120-83·2 0.03 0.005
1,2-D>chloropropane 73.37.5 0.01 0.000 2
1,3· Oichloropropylene 542·75·6 O.Dl 0.000 2
Dicloran 99.30.9 2.0 0.01
Dicofol 115-32·2 2.0 0.02
Dieldrin 60-57· 1 0.01 0.000 1
Diethyl phthalate 84·66·2 0.3 0.01
Dimethoate 60-51·5 0.13 0.01
2.4· Dinrtrophenol 51-28·5 1.67 0.01
2 .4· Drnil rololuene 121-14-2 0.17 0.005
Dinoseb 88-85-7 0.05 0,000 2
Drphenamrd 957·51· 7 1.0 0.01
I, 2: Dip~enylhydrazr~e. 122-66·7 0.17 0.01
Disulfoton 298-04·4 0.1 0.000 5
Oiuron 330-54-1 0.17 0.02
Endosullan 115·29· 7 0.01 0.000 l
Endrin 72-20-8 0.01 0.000 l
S·Elhyl
dipropylt hiocarbamate 759.94.4 0.017 0.01
ElhYIbenzene lOQ.'414 0.025 0.000"5'
Ethylene glyco I 107·21· l 0.1 0.0l
Fenam1phos 22224-92·6 0.66 0.01
Fena1imo\ 60l6S..S8-9 1.0 0.01
Fluo met uro n 2164-17-2 3.0 O.Q3
CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR CONTAMlNATED SOIL AND GROUNDWATER 7

Soil Groundwater

Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remarks mg/L Remorks

Fluor anlhene 206-44-0 0.17 0.000 03


Fluorene 86-73· 7 0.17 0.000 04
Fluor 1ne (soluble lluoride) 7782-41·4 0.05
Fluridone 59756-60-4 1.0 O.Ql
Fluvalina\e 69409-94-5 1.0 O.Ql
-
Heptachlor 76-44·8 0.005 0.000 05
Heptachlor ep0xide 1024.57.3 0.005 0.000 05
Hexach loro· 1,3· buladlene 87-68·3 0.17 O.Ql
Hexa ch Ior obenzen e 118-74-1 0.17 0.005
r>· Hexachlorocyclohexane 319-85-7 0.05 0.000 05
Hexachlorocydopentadiene 77.47.4 0.17 0.01
Hex ach Ior oetha ne 57.n.1 0.17 O.Gl
Hexazmone 51235-04·2 5.0 0.005
lmazalll 35554-44-0 1.0 0.015
I ndeno(~,3· cd)~yrene 193-39·5 0.17 0.000 03
lsophorone 78-59-1 0.17 0.01
Lead 7439.92.1 0.50 0.002
Lmdane 58-89·9 0.005 0.000 05
Linu•on 330-55·2 0.17 0-05
Malathion 121-75-5 0.1 0.000 5
Manganese 7439.95.5 0.5 0.01
Mercury 7439-97--6 0.001 0.000 2
Metalaxyl 57837-19-1 0.5 0.005
Meth1ocarb 2032·65· 7 l.O 0.001
Met~o!!1yl 16752-77·5 0.83 0.001
Methoxychlo• 72-43·5 0.05 0.000 5
Methyl eth yI ketone 78-93-3 O.I O.Ql
Methyl parathion 298-00·0 0.03 0.000 5
Methyl tert. bu ty I
ether 1634-04-4 0.25 0.002 5
2· Methyl· 4-ch Ioroph enoxya cet le
acid 94-74-6 2.5 0.1
Melolachlor 51218-45-2 1.0 0.002
Metribuzin 21087-64-9 1.0 O.Dl
Molybdenum 7439-98-7 10 0.01
Monocrotophos 6923-22-4 0.17 0.04
n-Hexane 110-54·3 0.05 0.005
N-N itrosod i-n
propylamine 621-64-7 0,17 0.005
N-Nitrosodlmethylamine 62-75-9 0.17 0.005
N-Nilrosodlphenytamlne 86-30·6 0.17 0.005
N-N 1t1osopy1 rol i dine 930-55·2 0.17 0.01
•Naled 300· 75.5 0.1 0.000 5
1 Naphthalene 91-20-3 0.2 0.000 3
'.Napropa'!?_ide 15299:99] 1.0 0.01
Nickel 7440-02·0 0.5 0.02
Nitrate (as Nl 14797· 55·8 0.06
Nitr rte {as N) 14797-65-0 0.06
Nitrate/Nitrite (Total) 00-00-2 0.06
Nitrobenzene 98-95-3 0.17 0.005
'. Norflu ra i:on 27314:13-2 1.0 0:01
·o-Ch Iorotol uene 95.49.9 0.05 0.000 5
,Oryzalin 19044-88-3 0.8
;oxamyl (Vydate) 23135-22-0 0.83 0.001
.Parathion 56-38·2 0.03 0.000 5
~Pendimethalin 40487-42· 1 l.O O.Ql
8 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER
Tobie 1 Cont'd,

Soil Groundwater

Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remarks mg/L Remarks

Pe n1aclllorophe no I 87--86-5 2.0 0.01


Permethrln 52645·53·1 0.5 0.000 04
Phenol 108·95·2 0.3 0.005
Phorate 298.-02·2 0.1 0.000 5
Phosmet 732· 11·6 1.0 O.Q.l
Picloram 1918-02· l 0.000 4
Polychlorinated biphenyls 1336·36·3 0.2 0.000 5
p,p'-Dichlor
od i phenyl d ich loroetha ne 72·54-8 0.01 0.000 l
p,p'· Di chlor
odiphenyld1c loroe y ene 2~5~9 0-:-01 0.000 1
p,fi· Dich lorodiphen
yltrichloroethane 50·29·3 O.Dl 0.000 l
Profluralln 26399--36·0 0,5
Prometon 1610-18·0 0.1 0.003
Prometryn 7287· 19·6 1.0 0.002
Pronamide 23950·58·5 0.5 0.005
Propachlor 1918-16-7 0.005
Propazlne 139-40-2 0.1 0.0013
Propham 122-42-9 0.33
Propoxur 114·26·1 1.7 0.01
Pydrin 51630·58· l 1.0 0.01
Py!ene 129·00·0 0,17 0.000 04
Selenium na2.49.2 0.1 0.002
~~tl!_oxydi~ 74051·80·2 1.0 Q,,0_1
Silver 7440·22·4 0.5 0.001
Simazine 122-34-9 2.0 0.01
Styrene 100-42-5 0.05 0.000 5
Sulprofos 35400-43·2 O.D3 0.000 5
Systhane 88671-89·0 1.0 O.Dl
Tebuthiuron 34014· 18· I 3.0 0.015
Terbac1I 5902-51-2 2.0 O.Dl
Terbufos 13071· 79-9 1.3 0.005
Terbutryn 886·50·0 0.1 0,003
1~~·~·5-Tetrachlorebenzene 95.94.3 0.01
I, I, 1,2· Tetrachloroethane 630-20-6 0.05 0.000 5
I, 1,2,2·Tetrachloroethane 79-34·5 0.05 0.000 2
Tetrac hloroethy Iene 127· 18·4 O.Dl 0.000 2
Tetraeth yI Iead 78·00·2 1.0 0.05
Thallium 7440-28-0 0.5 0.001
Toluene 108-88.3 0.01 0.000 2
To~aphene 8001·35·2 0.05 0.000 5
1,2,4· Trichlorobenzene 120-82· I 0.17 0.001
1.1,l·Trichloroethane 71-55·6 0.01 0.000 2
l,!,2· ri~loroethane 79-00·5 0.0! 9,Q,00_2_
Trlc hloroet hyle ne 79-01-£ 0.01 0.000 2
Trich lo re flu orometha ne 75-69-4 O_Q25 0.000 5
2,4,6-Trichlorophenol 88·06·2 0.17 0.005
2,4. 5· Trichlorophenol 95.95.4 0.2 0.005
2(2 ,4,5· T rlchlorepheno~y)
prop ionic acid 93.72.1 0.02 0.000 2
2, 4, 5-T rich loroph enoxyllC etic
acid 93·76-5 0.02 0.000 2
1,2,3· Trichloroprepane 96-18-4 o_os 0.000 5
Trich lo re tr if luo roetha ne 76· 13-1 0.25 0.000 5
Trifluralin 1582-09-8 0.005 0.000 05
CLEANUPCRJTERIA FOR CONTAMINATED SOIL AND GROUNDWATER 9

Soil Groundwate r

Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remarks mg/L Remarks

Trihalomethanes (total) 00·00· l 0.004


l anadium (fume or dust) 7440-62·2 0.50 0.01
Vemam 1929-77-7 2.0 0.002
Vinclozolin 50471-44-8 0.5 0.005
Vi nyl~c_b_l_o_ride 75,:_0_!-4 0.05 0.000 5
Vi ny Iidene chloride 75.35.4 0.01 0.000 2
Xylenes (mixed isomers) 1330-20· 7 0.01 0.000 2
Zinc (I ume or d us!) 7440-55-6 0.025 0.000 5
Chapter 2: Risk-Based Cleanup Criteria
DS64-EB/Jan. 1995

Risk-Based Cleanup Criteria

Calculating cleanup levels based on the n:sults a f a site- The pathways listed in Table 2 should be evaluated to iden-
specific risk assessment can be detailed or simple depending ti.fy the contaminated media for which cleanup levels should
on the recp1irements at a partirnlar site. Jn either ca~e, 1heap- he devc loped. At some si 1e~, only a sin a II f ra ctiH n of pot entia 1
pm a ch rn he usc:d should be as simple as possible and familiar cx1H1surc pathways may bc relevant. At other sites, all path-
to the regulatory agencic:s 1hat will be: rc:vic:wing the dorn- ways li~tc:d may be important. Ckanup kvcls should be de1 er-
ment. A simple approach will usually be he: a Ith prntcctive and mined for a sped fie med i nm, such as soil, rather than for each
generally more acceptable to regulators than a mmplicated individual exposure pathway. For soils, it is important to con-
approach, but tnay he overly stringent. A more de1ailcd ap- sider the potential for cu ntaminants in soil to reach ground-
proach can prnduce values th at are somewhat less con~erva­ wa1er. Some comaminams are relatively immobile, such as
tive but may not he as re a di! y a ccc: 111 a bk. Rc:g11 latnry agencies certain inorganic contaminants (for cxample, !ead and cad-
generally have Jim itcd 1irn c: and resmircc:s and may not be mium) and may not be likely to pose a ~ignificant threat t(]
able to review and accept a complex novel a11prnach. groundwater quality. Other contaminants, such as the or-
The: mmt cri1ical components of a risk assessment arc 1he ganics ben7.ene and trichlurnethylene, are relatively soluble
expu~urc: assc:ssmcm and the toxicity evaluatiou. Critical fac- in water a11 d much more mu bile a11d likely to move from soil
tors influencing expnsure include: exposure pathways, po- to 1hc gmtmdwatcr. The cleanup level calculated for each me-
l entially expctst:d populations, frequency and duration of dium shuuld include considerati<m (]fall ]lathways 1hat con-
potential expos11re, tramport and fa1e of 1he chc:mical in the tribute to exJ1os11rc or risk. For cxampk, the cleanup kvcls
site's enviromnent, and site characteristics, such as paving or for soil should be developed using all possible exposme routes
fences and distance to potential receptor pop11lations. Toxic- fur soil that are appropria1c at a site (for example, ingestion,
ity valuc:s have been developed by regulatory agencies for a de nna ! cnn ta c1, in ha la ti on of su i l a~ dust particles, etc.).
large number of chc:mica ls and should be used if available (re- There arc three primary rolltes by which toxic agents can
fer to Tab le 3 ). If no toxici1 y cri1eria arc available, a value can enter the body:
be derived usiug siandard approaches but the value ~ho11!d be •ingestion of contaminated water and fond (e.g., fruits,
apprnvcd hy 1he appropriate regulatory agency prim tu use. vegetables, fish, shellfish), and incidental ingestion of soil;
•inhalation of vapors or dus1; and
• dc:rmal cunt.let with water or S(]il.
IDENTIFICATION OF For an c:xposure pathway to be cunsidcred imponam or
EXPOSURE PATHWAYS cmnplete at a site, there must be: a receptor that is expused to
It is i mport.111 t to identify all expos11re pathways and im- contamination via this pathway. A rcccptnr is any organism
portant receptors at a site so health-based cleanup levels tha1 that may be exposed to the contamination. !n this chapter, re-
are protective of all 11 me ntial receptors can be developed. ceptor refers w any human (for example, trespasser, school-
Table 2 summarizes potential exposure pathways for hu- child, area residem, c1 c.) whu m igh 1 be expused to
man receptors at a typical si1c. Expo~mc pathways are iden· siie-related contaminants by <me or more pa1hways.
tificd within each 11 crtinent exposure scenario. There are
several exposure scenarios that may be applicahle at a given DETERMINING ACTION LEVELS FROM
facility. Those most commonly evaluated arc the ind11s1rial TOXICOLOGICAL DATA
and residential exposure scenarios. The residential scenario is
1hc more cun~crv<Hive of the tW(] (1 hat is, results in more pro- Toxicological data fur chemicals liste{l in the proposed
tective cleanup levels). Agricultural and recrc:Jtional scenar- RCRA Corrective Ac1ion Rule (55 FR 30798, July 27, 1990)
io~ may be important dcpc:nding llJHlll facility location and are presented in Table 3 at the end of this cha pter.
idcntificatiou ol sensitive receptors. Most often the residential The ca rcinngenicity (or canccr-causing potential) of a
or industrial exposure scenario is used for developing cleanup chemical is evaluated qualitatively by the weight-of-evidence
levels. H(]wcvcr, if the individual subject to the greatest expo- classilicatinn. The wcigh1-of-evidencc scheme used by EPA is
sure: to site-related cumaminam sis 1he recreational user of a as follows:
nearby stream or lake:, thcn a rccrcational ~ccnario may be A Human carcinogen
sufficiently pruteetive. B Kn(]wn probable human carcinogcn

13
Copyright © 1995 by ASTM International www.astm.org
14 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

TABLE 2-Potcmial cx1msure pa1hways for h11ma11 n:ccpwr~.

Con1amina1ed Mediunt Expo,nre Scenario lmpon a111 for Callulatiou n! Cleannp Le1·el'?

Grnund1va1er re,idential/agricu h11 ral


n'e a' potable 11·a1er
inhalation <>f vnl.11iks
dermal ruman 1vi1h }"'- lor or~'rnil'
1vater lnntami11a1t1"i. of
l'.'-Olll'l'Ill

1ra11sl<.""r 10 lnnd crnp' site· s11 ccilic


or liw,tod. ant! dl'll'IlllillilllOll
s11 h seqn~nl inge,tion
indm1rial n~ a' inge"i.lion ol 1vat er
putal•ll' W-'lll'r
inhala1 inn ol 1·ulatiln <;i1 e-,pe<ifk
dl:'tl'nni11~tit1n

o.krmal rontan 1vi1h sitr· s11eei!ic


IV.lll:'I t.h:tl'rrni11 L1lio11

Surlacc 1va1er and re,iden1iallagrilnl1u1al in ge"\lion of 1vall:'r


wdiment or industrial ll'e a'
l"'table 1va1n inhalation n/ volatiles ye,, if volatile' 1ire>elll
de nnal e"' nan \V it It ye,. for organ k
\\'al er corn arninarn "i. nl
(Ol[({""rl[

tran,kr lo loot! crop$


or Jive" nlk and sit<.""· specilic
snh'"qnent ingestion de le rmina l io 11

recreational "'" or rn11q1 mr1 inn nl fi~h sit<.""· specilic


s11l"i'1enl" fishing and ~afomJ determination
r<.""creatinnal "'e or ill p;rMinn nl 1va1er site· 'pecilic
II e'p.:1sser determination
1km1al enman 1vi1h .Jte·>p1Tili1
wall:'r <leterminatiun
inp;t:"i.li••n 111 ..:;1·1~i1u r Ill .Jte·,pedlil
de1em1 ina1!011
dermal lonta<1 1vith .Jte·,pedlil
'edirnent de1em1 inatinu

Soil re,idemial or Jndt!mta 1wil ingestion


agriruhural
dermal rnn1ac1 1vi1h
'nil
inhala1io11 ol
panirnlate,/volati le>
rrmn :-:.11il
rnnsumplion nf ,; le· 'peei fie
pro1luce. m ~.11. milk t.il'tl'r111i11atio11

soil "' pntelllial IBn rle <>f 'ile· 'µedfie


lonta111ina1ion w gronnd1va1er determinati~m

soil i1111cs1ion
dermal cnntan 1vi1h
'°ii
inltalatiou of
panilnlates/vnlatiles
lrorn soil
'nil a' pmemial snmle of site· speeilic
rnn!a111ina1inn 10 11rnundwa1~r

Air rt·rr::id1·11liaJ tlf inhalation of 'i1e· 'pedlic


agrirnhnral 11anilnla1e,/v11la1ik~ <kl<.""nninatlnu
Ir01n srack or 0111 er
l:'llli"i-"i-iOll"i.

i11 hal<itiou of .Jte·spedlil


panirnla1evvul,11ile' de1em1i11a1ion
lrorn stalk or other
l'mi<.:"i-i011"i.
RISK-BASED CLEANUP CRlTERlA 15

BI Limited httman evidence bnt sufficient animal evi- daily ex1rnsurL' tn the human population (including sensitive
dence subgroups) chat is like Iy to be wi thn u t apprecia b1e ri:sk of de le-
112 Inadequate or no human evidence but sufficient an i· ceri:o us effects during a lifetime. The RfD is expressed in mil-
ma! l'vidl'ncl' ligrams per kilogram body weight per day (mg/kg/day). RfD
C Possible lwman carcinogen would normally mean chronic oral reference dose. Hnwever,
D Not classifiable as to lunnan carcinogenidty there are other RfDs, for example, inhalation RfDs (more re-
E Evidence of non-carcinogenicity i:n humans. cently called reference concentrations), and subchronic RfDs.
The carcinogenicity of a chemical ts evaluated qnantitively The RID ts a useful reference level from which to gage the
by a slope factor which is a measure of the relative cancer po· potential adverse health effects of the chem tea I at other dose
tency of a chl'mical. The sin pl' factor represents cbe dose· re- levels. Usually, doses below the RID will not likely cause ad·
SJHlllSe relationship of the carcinogen. SiclJil' factnrs were verse hea ltb eflects and those above the RfD could likely
dc.:rivcd by nsing one of several low dose extrapnlaticm me th· cause adverse health effects. However, it shnuld not be abso-
nds. These mathematical models and prncedun..·s are used tn lutely cnncluded thac all doses below the RfD will be Nrisk-
extrapolate the high doses used in Iahoracory or in freeM and that all doses in excess of the RfD will produce
epidemiologic studies to low doses which cannot be meas- adverse health effects.
ured directly. Usually, the EPA uses the li:nea ri7.ed m ul ti:stage The EPA has evaluated the stabi:li:ty of che RID. RIDs rated
mndel, which incnrpnratl's lnw-dnsl' linearity. There is con- as high conlidence will not likely change in the fiuure be·
siderable uncertainty in che extrapolation methods; therefore cause therl' is rnnsistency h1 the toxic effects observed i:n dif·
che upper 95% confidence li:mi:t of the slope of che resulting ferent animal species, sexes, and study designs, nr in the
dose-response curve is the value used as che slope factor. dose-response relationship, nr the reasons for existing differ·
The slnpe factor is defined as a plausible upper· bound es· ences are well-understood. RIDs rated as low confidence are
timate nf the prnbahility nf a respnme per unit intake of a based on li:mited data, and additinnal information could result
chemical nver a lifetime. In simpler terms the slnpe factor is in a change in the RID.
che excess cancer risk per unit of dose and is expressed as EPA-verifil'd RfDs and slope factors in che Integrated Risk
risk/mg/kg/day. Risk estimates which use slope factors de- lnformaticm System (IRIS) database are the preferred coxi:city
rived from che linearized mttltiscage model are upper-honnd valoes for nse in risk assessments.
estimates, thus the true risk is nm likely rn exceed chis esti· RfDs can he used to dee ermine the action level for non-car·
mate, and may, in faet, be less. The higher the value nf the ciHngrns (systemic toxi:cants) as follows
slnpe factor, the more potent the carcinogen is considered tu Cm= (RfD x W)l(lxA)
be. where
For chemica Is that prnduce health effects other chan can·
cer (i.e .. ncm-carcinogens or systemic tnxicants), there is a
c,,,= actinn level in medium, for exampll', sni:l or ground-
water, with units medium dependent, fnr example,
In w dose level, at which there is no observed adverse effect
soi:l in mg/kg, groundwater in mg/L,
(or NOAEL), i:.e., there is an assumed threshold. For these
chemicals chat cause systemic toxicity, ic is believed thac some RfD reference dose, mg/kg/day,
organic homeostatic, compensatory, nr adaptive mechanism w body weight, kg,
ex is ts that must be overcnme hefnre rnxici t y is manifested. I = intake assumptinn (units are medium dependent,
For example, it would take a lot of diseased liver cells before for example, 2 L/day for drinking water, or a solid
liver fcmction would be deranged. i:ncake of 0.2 g/day, and
The reference dose (RID), developed by che EPA, is che
toxicity value used co esti:mace non-carcinogenic effects. IC ts A absorption factor, dimensicmles<> (often assumed= I).
ba<>ically a subthreshnld dme. It is operationally derived from Slope factor {mg/kg/day)· 1 can be used co decermi:ne the
the NOAEL. che assumed threshold levd. by consistent appli- actinn level for carcinogens as follows
cation of generally order-of-magnirnde nncertainty factors C,. =(Rx Wx LT)/(CSF x!xA xED)
(UF) and modilytng factors (MF). The UFs renect varions where
types af data sets and range up to l 000 (!or example, a UF of
R == assumed risk level, for example, I 0·6 fnr Class A and
I O may he a ssoci:a ted with the use of a nima 1 data). The M Fs
Class B, I o· 5 for Class C carcinogens,
renect the completeness of the overall data ha se and the n um -
ber nf species tested. The M Fs typically range from l to l 0 LT = a ssullled lifeti:me, years,
with a default value nf I. Thus CSF = ca rcinogcnic slope factor, (mg/kg/day)· I, and
RID= NOAEL/(UF x MF) ED expos me dnration, years.
The NOAEL is definl'd as the highest experimentally de-
rived dose at which there is no statisckally or biologically sig· Examples
nifi:canc indication of the tm:ic effect of concern. A chemical
(I) Tolnene i:n groundwater
may however elicit mnre than ane toxic eflect (or adverse
health effect of toxic endpoint), in one test animal or in difler- C". == ((0.3 mg/kg/day) (70 kg adulc))/((2 L/day)( I))
ent tests and ch us will have several NOAELs. The RfD is liased = 10.5 mg/Lor ppmv (parts per million by volume)
on the to:..:ic effect exhiliiting the lowest NOAEL called the (2) Tnluene in soil
critical endpoint (or critical effect}. C, = ( (0. 3 mg/kg/day) ( 16 kg ftve year old child))/
The reference dose (RfD) i<> defined as an estima ce, wic h ((0.2 g/day)( I )(kg/ I 000 g))
uncertainty spanning perhaps an order-of-magnitltde, of the == 24, 000 mg/kg or ppm w (pans per mill ion by weight)
16 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

( 3) I, I, 2,2 Tetrachlorocthane in ground wa 1cr (4) I, I, 2, 2 Tctrach Ioroeth ane in soil


Cw ( ( l x I 0·5)(70 kg adult) (70 years) )I C, = ((l x I0·5)(70kg)(70years))/
( ( (0.2 mg/kg/Jay)· I) (2 LI day) (I) (70 years)) ( ( (0.2 mg/kg/Jay)· l)
"" 0.00175mg/Lorppmv (O. I g/day) (kg/ I 000 g) ( l) (70 years))
3 5 mg/ kg or ppmv

TABLE 3 - TOXICITY DATA


NUMERICAL CRITERIA
Noncon;inogenic Effects, Oral RfD•
Constituent CAS Number (mg/kg/d) Closs

Acetone 67-64·1 D.l 0


Aceton itri Ie 75-0S.8 D.006 0
Acetophe none 98-86·2 0.1 D
Acrylamide 79-06-1 0.000 2 82
Aldicarh 16_:()6) 0.001_3 0
Aldrin 309-00·2 0.000 03 82
Ally I aIcohol 107-18·6 0.005 D
Aluminum phosphide 20859-73-8 0.000 4 D
Antimony 7440-35·0 0.000 4 D
Arsenic 7440·38·2 0.001 A
Barium
Barium cyanide
Benzidine
Beryllium
Bromoform
Bromomethane 74.33.9 0.001 4 D
Butyl benzyl phthalate 85-68·7 0.2 c
Cadmium 7440-43·9 0.000 5 81
Calcium cyanide 592-01-8 0.04 D
Carbon di SU Ifide 75· lS.0 0.1 D
Carbon te trach tori de
Chloral
Chlordane
Ch lor inc cyanide [I

Chlorobenze~~
Chlorotorm 57.55.3 0.01 62
2-Ch Ior op he nol 95-57-8 0.005 D
Chromium (VI) 18540-29·9 0.005 A
Copper cyanide 544-92·3 0.005 D
Cyanide 57· 12·5 0.02 D
Cya~ - 1).1.
Cy~nogen bromide Ii
2,4·D [I

Di(2·ethyth eX)l IJ phtllalate


Dibutyl phthala_te I
Dichlorobromomethane 75.27.4 0.02 82
Dichlorodifluoromethane 75-71-8 0.2 D
Dic hlor om ethane 75-09·2 0.06 8
2.4· DichloropheMI 120·83·2 0.003 D
1.3· Dichloropropylene 542· 75.5 0.000 3 62
Dieldrin
Diethyl phtha late
Dimethoate [I

2,4· Dinitrophenol [I

Diphenylamine
RISK BASED CLEANUP CRITE R l A 17

Noncarcinogenic Effects, Oral RFD'


Co nstituent CAS Number (mg/kg/d) Class

Oisulfoton 298-04·4 0.000 04 D


Endosullan 115-29· 7 0.000 05 D
Endothall 145· 73-3 0.02 D
Endrin 72-20·8 0.000 3 D
E~~y _ d•_ __~__________.._
in ____________ 0.002
t06-89·8 82
Ethylbenzene 100-41-4 0.1 D
Formic acid 64-18-6 2.0 D
Glycidyaldehyde 755.34.4 0.000 4 D
Heptachlor 76-44·8 0.000 5 82
Heptachlo1 epoxlde 1024-57-3 o.ooo 013 82
H~chlo1 a-1,3..butadiene 87-68-3 0.002 c
Hexachlorocyclopenlad1ene 77.47.4 0.007 D
Hexach I01 oetha ne 67·72·1 0.001 c
Hexach Ior ophe ne 70-30-4 0.000 D
Hydrog~yanide 74.90.0 0.02 D
Hydrogen sull rde 7783-06-4 0.003 D
Iso butyl aIcoho I 78-83-t 0.3 D
lsopho1one 78-59·1 0.2 c
Lmdane 58-89·9 0.000 3 82/C
m-Cresol 108-39·4 0.05 D
m-Ornit1obenzene 99·65·0 0.(
m-Phe nylened ia mine 108·45·2 0.006
Malerc anhydride 108·31·6 0.1 0
Male re hydr azlde 123.33.1 0.5 0
Me_1_C_\!!)' 7_j39~~~ 0.000 3 D
Methacrylonit1 i le 126-98-7 d.000 1 D
Methomyl 16752-77-5 0.025 0
Methyl el hyl ketone 73.93.3 0.05 0
Methy I iso bu ty I ketone 108· 10· 1 0.05 0
Methyl para I hion 298-00-0 0.000 25 0
Nickel 7440-02-0 0.02 0
Nitric oxide 10102.43.9 0.1 D
N itrobenzene 93.95.3 0,000 5 0
N itroge n d lox rde 10102-44-0 1.0 D
~resol 95_:.1?·7 9.05 D
Osmium tet1oxide 20816-12-0 0.000 OJ D
p-Cresol 105.44.5 0.05 D
Parathion 56-38·2 0.006 c
Pentachlorobenzene 608-93-5 0.000 8 D
Pen ta Ch lor ophenol 87-86-5 O.D3 D
~Phenol 108-95-2 0.6 D
~Phenyl~ercuric acetate 62·38·4 0.00008 D
rhosphme 7803· 51·2 0.000 3 0
Phthalic anhydride 85-44·9 2.0 D
~ - . 151:50-:8 ___ 0.05
.!:_.o! a_ss1 um eya ~ ~ e D
Pol assi um srlve1 cyanide 506-61-6 0.2 D
p,p'· Dlchlorodiphenyl
trichloroethane 50-29·3 0.000 5 82
Pronamide 23950-58-5 0.075 D
Pyridine 110-86-1 0.001 D
'Ouintozene a2:ils~ 0,003 c
fS I . .
~ e enious acid 7783-00·8 0.003 D
Selenou1ea 630-10-4 0.005 D
1silver
,.
~S~ver
.
cyanide Ag(CN I
7440-22-4
506·64·9
0.003
0.1
D
D
Sodium cyanide Na(CN) 143.33.9 0.04 D
18 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER
Table 3-Cont'd.
_Nonca~inogenit Effet,s, Or~tRfD"
Constituent CAS Number (mg/kg/d) Class

Strychnin.:. & s;ilts 57.24.9 0.000 3 0


Sty1.:.ne 100·42·5 0.2 c
1,2 ,4,5· Tel iachlo1obenzene 95.-94·3 0.000 3 D
1.1, 1.2· Tell achlmoethane 630·20-6 0.03 c
Tetrachlo1oe1 hylene 127· 18·4 0.01 B2
2,3,4,6-Teti achlmophenol 58·90·2 0.03 D
Te I raet hyl lead 78·00·2 0.000 000 1 D
Tel 1ae I hyl d, I h iopy1 opl\osphat e 3689·24·5 0.000 5 D
Thalllc oxide 1314-32-5 0.000 07 D
Th all ium aceta I e 563·68--8 0.000 09 D
Thallium ca1 bonate 5533"'.'"i3-9 0.00008 D
Tha II i u m{l) ch I oride 7791· 12·0 0.000 08 D
Thallium(!) nill ate 10102·45· l 0.000 09 D
Thalllum(I) sulfate
!T12S04) 7446· 18-6 0.000 08 D
Thiosemica1 bazide 79.19.5 0.006 D
Th ham 137-26--8 0.000 5 D
Toluene 108-88-3 0.3 D
1,2,4· Trlchlmobenzene 120--82-1 0..02 D
1, 1.1· Tlicti!moettl<me 7Voi5·6 0.09 D
l, 1,2· T1 ichloroel hane 79-00·5 0.004 c
T1 ichlmolluo1 omel hane 75.594 0.3 0
2,4, 5· T1 ichlm ophenol 95-95-4 0.1 0
2,4,5· T1 lchlm ophenoxyacet ic acid 93.75_5 O.Ql
1,2 .3· Trichlo1op1opane 96·18·4 0.006 D
Vanadium pentoxide 1314-62· l 0.009 D
Vi nylidene chlmide 75-35-4 0.009 c
Xylenes (mixed isome1s) 1330-20-7 2.0 D
Zinc cyanide 557·2 l· l 0.05 D
Zinc phosphide 1314--84·7 0.000 3 D

Noncartinogenic Effects,
Inhalation RfD"
Constituent CAS Number (mg/kg/d) Class

Acetophenone 98--86·2 0.000 05 D


Barium 7440.39.3 0.000 I D
B1omomethane 74--83-9 0.008 D
Chlmobenzene 108-90·7 0.005 0
Dlchlo1odlfluo1omethane 75.71-3 0.05 D
H exac h 1m ocyc lope n I ad ien e 77.47.4 0.000 02 D
Methacrylonin ile 126-98-7 0.000 2 D
Methyl ethyl ketone 78·93·3 0.09 D
Methyl Iso butyl ketone 108-10· l 0.02 D
Nitiobenzene 98·95·3 0.000 6 D
Toluene loa--:-8a:s 2.0 D
1,2,4-Ti ichlo1obemene 120-82· l 0.003 D
l, l, l · T1 ichlo1oethane 71-55-6 0.3 D
T1 ichlmoflumomethane 75-69-4 0.2 D
Xylenes (mixed 1some1s) 1330·20·7 0.3 0
RISK-BASED CLEANUP CRITERIA 19

Carcinogenic Effects, Oral Carcinogenic Effeds,


Slope Fodor' lnhalatran Slape Fodor'

Constituent CAS Number ({mg/kg/d)·1 ) Class ((mg/kg/d)· 1 ) Class

IAery la mi de 79-06·1 4.5 B2 4.5 B2


Acrylon i tr~ e 107-13· 1 0.54 Bl 0.24 Bl
l· AHC 319-84-6 6.3 82 6.3 82
Aldrin 309.00-2 17 82 17 B2
I Aniline 62· 53.3 0.005 7 B
Arsenii: 7440-38-2 50 A
Asbestos 1332-21-4 0.23 A
Benz1drne 92-87-5 230 A 230 A
Beryllium 7440·41· 7 4.3 82 8.4 82
Bls(2-chlomethyl) ethe1 111-44-4 I.I B2 I.I B2
r cadrn1um 7440--43."g' 6.1 Bl
::arbon tetrachloride 56-23-5 0.13 82 0.13 82
Ichlordane 57. 74-9 1.3 82 1.3 82
Chloroform 67-66·3 0.0061 B2 0.081 B2
D1(2·ethylhexy.:!_phthalale 117·Bl·7 0.014 B2
1.2· Dibromoethane 106-93-4 85 B2 0,76 82
3.3"-D1chlorobenz1di ne 91-94-1 0.45 82
D1chlorob1omomethane 75-27-4 1.3 82
1,2-0ichloroelhane 107-06·2 0.091 B2 0.091 82
Oichloromethane 75-09·2 0.007 5 B 0.014 B
Oieldrin 60-57· 1 16 82 16 82
Din it1otoluene 25321-14-6 0.68 82
l ,4· Oroxane 123·91-1 O.Dll 82
1,2-0iphenyl hyd1azme 122-66· 7 0.80 B2 0.80 82
Epichlorohyd1 in 106-89-8 0 .009 9 82 0.004 2 82
Forma ldehyd e 50-00-0
-- --
0.045 Bl
Heplachlo1 76-44·8 4 .5 B2 t..5 B2
Heplachlor epoxide 1024-57-3 9.1 82 9.l 82
Hexachloro· 1,3· butadrene 87-68-3 0.078 c 0.078 c
~- Hexachlorocyclohexane 319-85· 7 1.8 c 1.8 c
Hexac hImod lbe nzo--p
-dioxin, mixture 19408-74-3 6 200 B2 6200 82
Hexachloroel hane 67-72-1 0.014 c 0.014 c
Hydrazine 302-01·2 3.0 82 17 B2
lsopho1one 78·59· l 0.004 1 c
Lrndane 58-89·9 1.3 B2/C
N-N itroso· n·
melhylethylamme 10595-95-6 22 B2
N-N 1\losod 1-n
-butyl am i ne 924-16·3 5.4 B2 5.4 82
N-N~rosodr·n
1
·pr\J\l'jlam1rie 621-£4-7 7.0 B2
N-N itros.od i ethano la rn me 1116· 54. 7 2.8 82
IN-N 1tros001e thy Iamine 55-18- 5 150 82 150 B2
. N~os~imethylamine 62· 75.9 51 B2 51 B2
N-N 1t1 osodrphenylamme 86-30-6 0.004 9 B2
N-N 1h oso pyr ro Iid me 930· 55·2 2.1 B2 2.1 82
Nickel Rel rnery dusl 00-00-24 0.84 A
Polych lonnated b1phenyls 1336-36-3 7.7 B2
p,p' -Oichlornd1 phenyl
dii:hloroethane 72-54-8 0.24 B2
p.p"-Oii:hlorodiphenyl
dichloroelhylene 72.55.9 0.34 82
p,p'· 01chlorodlphenyl
\r re hloroethan e 50·29·3 0.34 82 0.34 B2
20 CLEANUP CRTTERTA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER
Tobie 3-Cont'd.

Corcinogenk Effects, Orol Cor<inogenic Effects,


Slope Factor• lnholotion Slope Fodor•

Constituent CAS Number ((mg/kg/d)· 1 ) Class ((mg/kg/d)·l) Class

Oumtozene 82-68-8 0.25 c


Ll .1.2-Tetrachloroethane 630-20-6 0.026 c 0.026 c
1, 1,2,2· Tetrachloroethane 79.34.5 0.2 c 0.2 c
Tetrachloroethylene 127·18-4 0.051 82 0.003 3 62
Toxap'.:._en_e 8001-35·2 l l 82 l.1 82
I, 1,2· Trichloroelhane 79-00·5 0.057 c 0.057 c
Trichloroethylene 79-01 ·6 o.oi 1 82
2 ,4.6· Trichlorophenol 88-06-2 0.02 82 0.02 82
Vinylidene chloride 75-35-4 0.6 c 1.2 c

• EPA we ighl of n\dence scheme:


A Hum.an c.;orc h10ge n
B Koown probable human carci nogcn
Bl Limited human evidern:e but •llllicient anim.'.11 evidence
82 In.adequate°' ,., human evidence but sufficient animal O'lidern:e
C P<>$Slble human carcinogen
D Not class\liable as lo hum.an corclnogenicity
E Evidence ol non-carclnoeenlclty In humans
Chapter 3: National Standards and Guidelines
DS64-EB/Jan. 1995

National Standards
and Guidelines

The federal government has passed m1mero11s legislative • 70· year liktim e expos me periud.
initiatives direc1ed toward assessment of acceptable levels of In de riving a cl ion kve ls for haza rdo 11s con st it uc n ts in soi I,
contamination in the environment. These i'ncl11de the fol low- the following assumptions were made:
ing: ( 1 ) For hazardous constituents that are knuwn or sus-
• RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) peded to be carcinugens:
• Action Levels in the proposed Corrective Action Rule • snil intake of 0. 1 glday
• Resid11e Concentration Lim its in the BIF (Boiler and In- • 70-kg adnlt
dustrial Furna cc) R nlc • 70-year life1imc exposure period.
• Toxicity Characteristic regulatory levels (TCLP) (2) For hazardm1s constituents other than those that are
• Universal Treatment Standards in the propnscd LDR known or snspccted to be carcinogens:
(Land Disposal Restridion) Ruling • soil intake of 0.2 g/day
• Safe Drinking Water Ac1 • 16-kg child
• Maximum Contaminant Limits (MCLs) • 5 · year c xposu re pc riod for children (aged 1· 6).
• Superfnml Amendments Reauthorization Act (SARA)
•A RA Rs (Applicable or Relevant a nd Appropriate Re·
quircmcnts) RESIDUE CONCENTRATION LIMITS
• Soil Screening Levels (SSLs) UNDER THE RCRA BIFRRULE
•Toxic Substances Control Act Hazardous waste burned in boilers and industrial fmnaces
• PCB spill cleannp reqniremcms. (BI f's) is regulated umkr RCRA Subpart H, 266. 100 throngh
266. 11 2 (refer to 56 FR 7206, Feb. 21, 1991). Residue derived
Imm burning or processing of hazard ems waste in BlFs is not
ACTION LEVELS UNDER RCRA excluded from the dcfinitinn of hazardons waste unless a
CORRECTIVE ACTION number nf reqnircmcnts arc met. One of l hese requirements
Under EPA's propoScll Resource Conservation and Rccnv- is comparison uf tile waste-derived residue cuncen tratinn
ery Act Corrective Action Ruic (55 FR 30798, July 27, 1990), with health- based limits. For nonmetal constituc tllS, the con-
action levels were identified for constitncnts in cuntaminated centrations mnst not exceed the health· based levels specified
groundwater and soil. Action levels were established as the in Ta bk 5. If a health· based Jim it for a constitue nt of concern
maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) fornrnlated under the is n 01 listed in the tahle, then a Jim it of 0.000002 ppmw or the
Safe Drinking Water Act nr, for constitnems fm which MCLs Jim it of detection. whichever is h igher, shall be used. For met-
have not been promulgated, the concentrations presented in al constitucn ts, the concem rations in th c Toxicity Charac-
Table 4. For carcinogens, the actiun level represents an excess teristics Leaching Proccdu re (TC LP) must nm be exceeded.
up pe r bound lifetime cancer risk of one in one million fm
Class A (known) and Class B (probable) carcinogens or one in
one hundred thnusand for Class C (possible) human carcinn- TOXICITY CHARACTERISTICS LEACHING
ge n s d 11 c to conti nu ons com l ant 1i 1ct im<: exposure. Th is pro· PROCEDURE UNDER RCRA
posed rule also indicates that c1m111!a1 ivc risk pused by The final regulations implementing the To.-..:icity Charac-
m ultipk con 1aminan is shonld not exceed a one in ten thnu- teris1 ic (TC) and the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Proce·
sand cancer risk. For systemic mxicants, the action level rep- dnre (TCLP) were promulgated hy EPA in a final rnle
resents a conccmratiun to which the hum an population appearing in the March 29, 1990 Federal Register (pages
(including sensitive suhgnmps) con Id he exposed nn a daily 11 798-11 877). This rule added 25 organic chemicals to the
basis withotlt appreciable risk of deleterions effects dnring a list of w:..:ic constit11cnts nscd m idemify thmc wastes defined
lifetime. as ha za rdo us be ca use of toxicity an cl est a b!i shed rcgnla to ry
1n d crivin g a ct inn levels for hazardous rnn sti 1t1 ems in levels for thcsl' urganics.
gro11ndwa1er, the folluwing assumptions were made: Prior 10 the final mle, toxicity as defined by an Extraction
•water intake of 2 L/day Procednre (EP) test was one ol four characteristics by which
• 70-kg adnlt a waste conld he defined as ha1ardnns. The EP test, originally

23
Copyright © 1995 by ASTM International www.astm.org
24 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

found in Appendix II of 40 CFR Part 261, consistl'd of a leach- PROPOSED LAND DISPOSAL
ing protocol that sim ulatetl the leaching action that occurs in RESTRICTIONS RULE FOR HAZARDOUS
municipal landfills. Extract [rom the EP test would be com- SOIL UNDER RCRA
11arl'd to criteria (provided in 40 CFR Part 261.24) for 14 toxic
On September 14, 1993 the Environmental Protection
contaminants identified in thl' National Interim Primary
Agency proposed ( 58 FR 48092-48204) "universal treatment
Drinking Water Standards (NIPDWS) to detenninc if the
standards" to replacl' existing waste- and source -specific land
original wastl' was hazardous. The inil ial 14 constituents con-
disposal restriction (LDR) treatment standards for contami-
sisted of B heavy metals, 4 insecticides, and 2 herbicides. The
nated soils prior to land disposal.
regulatory levels for these contarninc;nts were I 00 times th e
In 1984 Congress essentially prohibited the land disposal
NIPDWS.
of untreated hazardous wastes. Over the years, EPA promul·
In the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984,
gated regulations implementing this prohibition as part of its
Congress directed EPA to examine and revist: the EP toxicity
LDR program, 40 C.F.R. Part 268. The LDR program requires
criteria and to identify additiona I haza rdons waste cha ra c-
that all hazardous waste be treated using "best demonstrated
teristics. In response to this requirement, EPA published pro-
avai!a ble 1ech n olo gy" ( BDAT) before the waste is dis posed of
posed regulations in the Federal Register on June 13, 1986,
on land. BDAT can be expressed as either a particular treat-
which would expaml the existing EP characteristics. This pro-
ment method (for example, incineration) or a constituent
posal identified 52 compounds (the existing 14 and 38 addi-
concentration (for example, no more than 5 ppmw or I
tional com pounds) that could ca use a wast<: in be hazardous
mg/L). Under the LDR program, a constituent regulatl'd un-
via toxicity. Additionally, the proposal included the TCLP, a
der the treatml'nt standard for one waste may also be a con-
new version of tile EP tl'St.
stitul'nt regnla ted under trcatml'nt standards for another
As with the original EP regulations, the TC final rule re-
waste. EPA's Septt:mher 14, 1993 proposal addresses this
quired comparison of the liquid waste extract obtained from
problem. The proposed treatment standards arc "universal"
leaching procedures with regulatory levels of specified con-
in that they would establish a concentration limit for each
st it uen 1s to determine if the origi na I waste is hazardous due to
constituent regardless of the hazardous waste in which the
toxicity. The TC constitul'lllS and regulatory levels containt:d
con st it uem is present.
in the final J 990 rule are provided in Table 6.
EPA 's proposal contains nniversa I standards for 200 or-
Tlle regulatory levels for the TC constituents were derived
ganic and mt:tal constiments: one set of standards for wastl'-
using llealth-hased concentration limits, and dilution and at ·
wa ters and another Jor nonwastewaters. For organic
tenuation factors. The healtl1-based limits used in the calcu-
constitllents, the proposed universal standards are expressed
lations were chronic toxicity reference levels taken from one
as total concentration kvds for each constituent. For meta Is,
of three sources:
the proposed universal standards are expre~sed as a level
(I) maximu m contaminant kvels (MCLs) as definl'd in measured in thl' il'achate extract using the Toxicity Charac-
the Sak Drinking Watt:r Act regulations; t<:ristics Lea ch in g Procedure (TC LP).
(2) oral risk-specific doses (RSDs) for carcinogenic com- EPA's Septembl'r 14, 1993 notice also proposes three ap-
pounds using a specilic. risk level of 1 in I 00,000; and proaches for developing alternative LDR standards for con~
(3) reference doses (RIDs) for noncarcinogens. tatninatt:d soils. Each approach would apply to all hazardous
The EPA selt:ctt:d a generic dilution and attenuation factor soils rl'gardless of the type of contaminating hazardous waste
of 100 to calculate the TC regulatory levels. This means the and allow for treatment to kvds above the universal stand-
regulatory concentrations for constit Ul'llls listed in the final ards. The approaches differ primarily in tl1e extent of treat-
rule are I 00 timl's the chronic toxicity levels for these com- ment ea ch ffq uires. Under a11 three approaches, the univl'rsal
pounds. AIthough use of co nsti t ul'n t-specific atten u a ti on fac- treatment standards are proposed as "hase" standards. In the
tors was investigated, time constraints forced EPA to usl' the first a pp roach, EPA is proposing standards with a "ceiling"
generic factor which was considered to he sufficiently conser- one order of magnitudt: (ten times) above the universal
vative to bl' applicahle 10 all toxicity constituents. standard, provided 90% treatml'nt of each constituent sub-
Thl' final rule dekrrl'<l applicability of the TC tu one im11or- ject to treatment is achieved. The second approach is a vari-
tant type of waste and exemJ1tl'd another. First, the EPA Lie- ation of till' first in that EPA is proposing standards with a
fcrred applicability of the TC rt:gu!ations to petrnk um- "ceiling" ont: order magnitude above the universal standard;
comaminated media and debris at sites subjt'ct to the RCRA however, there is no requirement that 90% reduction occur.
Umlerground Storage Tank (UST) cleanup regulations under The third approach proposes an unlimited range of values
40 CFR Part 280. This exclusion is discussed in 40 CFR Part above the universal standard provided 90% treatm<:nt is at-
261.4(b)( I 0) . Secondly, EPA decided to exempt from the fi- tainl'd, unless 90% treatml'nt wouh.l result in a level below
nal ruk certain polych!orinated biphrnyl (PCB) wastes, the universal treatm<:nt standard. Under any of these ap-
which are fully regulated under the Toxic Substances Control proaches, the treated soil would remain hazardous waste.
Act (TSCA) and won!cl he identified as hazardous wastes un- However, satisfying the new LDR would mean the soil could
der the TC ruk (see 40 CFR Part 261.8). The principal reason he disposed of in a properly permitted land disposal unit.
for these two decisions was to avoid regulation of waste~ un- The un ivena I treatment standards for organic and rnl'tal
der m orl' than o 11 e set of rl'q uireme n ts. hazardous constituents are presented in Table 7. The stand-
ards are proposed for both nonwastewaters, for example,
contaminated soil. and wastewatcrs, for example, contami-
nated groundwater.
NATIONAL STANDARDS AND GU/DELTNES 25

N ATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER uf safety (usually 1O· fold) to account fur cancer effects or is
RE GULATION S based (!TI a cancer risk range of l O· 5 to l O·I> when noncancer
data arc inadequate for deriving an Rm. MCLGs for Category
The Safe Drinkh1g Water Act (SDWA}, as amended in
Ill contaminants are calculated using the RfDfDWEL/RSC ap-
1986, required EPA 10 publish Maximum Cornaminarn Level
proach.
Guals (MCLGs) fur rnntaminants which, in the jndgmelll of
The SDWA directs EPA to srt the MCL as close to the
the Administratur, may have any adverse affect on the health
MCLG as is kasiblc. Based on the statlltory directive Ior set-
of µersons and whiclt are known or amicipa trd tu uccur in
ting MCLs, EPA derives MCLs based on an evaluation ol ( l}
public water systems. MCLGs wnr tu br srt at a level that no
availability and performance of various technologies for re-
known or anticipated adverse health efkcts would orcur, al·
moving the contaminarn. (2) the rnsts of applying thrsc tr ch-
luwing fur an adequate margin of safety.
nu!ogies, and (3} the ab iii t y of laboratories to rneasurr
At the same time EPA 1111lllishrs an MCl.G, which is a
accnrately and consisternly the kvd uf the tontaminant with
nonenforceable hralth goal, it must also promulgate a Na-
available analytical metlrnds. Because compliance with the
tional Primary Drinking Water Regulation (NPDWR), whid1
MCL is determined by analysis with approved analytical tech-
includes either ( 1} a maximum cornaminant level (MCL) or
niques, the ability to analyze rnnsistcntly and accurately fur a
(2) a required treatmrnt trchnique. A treatment technique
cuntaminant at the MCL is important to enforce a regulatory
may \Jc set only if it is not econurnically ur tedrnologically fea-
standard. This factor is critica ll y important in determining the
sible to ascertain the level of comarninant. An MCL must be
MCL for contaminants for which EPA sets the MCLG at zero,
set as dose to the MCLG as feasible. Under the SDWA. "fea-
a n um \Jc r which by definition can n either be measured nor
sible" means kasihlc with the use of the best technology,
anained. Limits of analytical detection require that thr MCL
t rea tmcm 1echniq ues, and uther means that the Ad min is t ra -
be set at some level greater than the MCLG for these contami-
tor finds arr a vaila bk, a ftc r r xamina ti on for effectiveness un ·
nants.
der field conditions and not solely under lalmratory
EPA also cv alua t cs the h ea h h risks that arr associated with
conditions {taking cost into consideration). NPDWRs also in·
various contaminant levels in order to ensure that the MCL
dude monitoring, analytical, and quality assurance require·
adequately protects 1rnblic health. For drinking wain con-
ments, and sprcifically, criteria and prncedures 10 assure a
taminants, EPA sets as a g oa 1a risk range of Io· 4 to 10 ·I> excrss
supply of drinking water that dependably complies with such
individual ris k for carcinogens d nring a liktime exposure (ar-
MCLs.
senic is one cxce11 ti on tu this risk range). This policy is consis-
Establishment of a specific MCLG depends on the evidence
tent with other EPA regulatory p rograms that generally target
of carcinogenicity from drinking water exposure or the
this range using the comnvativc mudels that a re not likely to
Agency's noncarcinogcnic reference dose (RfD), which is cal-
undcre~timate the risk. Usually the MCLs fm noncarcino-
culated for each specific contaminarn. From the RID, a drink-
genic con tam i nan ts a re set at the MCLG. Since the un derl yi ng
ing water equivalent level (DWEL) is calculated hy
goal of the SDWA is tu protect the public from adverse effects
multiplying the RfD by an assumed adult body weight (gen-
due tu drinking water contaminants, EPA seeks to ensure that
erally 70 kg} a1 id then di vidi1 tg by an a vc ragr da ii y wa tc r co_n-
thr health risks associated with MCLs for all cmnaminams arc
s ump t ion of 2 Ltday. The DWEL assumrs thr total daily
not significa n 1.
exposure to a substance is from drinking water exposure. The
Part 143 of the Codr uf Federal Regulations (CFR) dis-
MCLG is determined by multiplying the DWEL by the per-
cusses EPA 's National Sec01 idary Drinking Water Reg nla tions
crmage uf thr total daily rxpusure rnntribmed by drinking
(NSDWRs). NSDWRs control contaminants in drinking water
water. called the relative source comri\Jution (RSC). Gener-
that primarily affect aesthetic qualities relating tu public ac-
ally, EPA assumes that the RSC from drinking wateris 20% ~f
cep tance of drinking water. At considera bly higher concen-
the total exposu re, unless other exposure data for the che1111-
trations of contaminants, health implications may also exist
cal are available.
as wdl as aesthetic degreda ti on. The rrgulatiuns are not fed·
For chemicals suspected as carcinogens, the assessment fnr
erall y euforcrable but arc intended as guiddinrs fur the
nonthreshold toxicams consists of the weight of evidence uf
States. The NSDWRs re11resent reasonable goals fur drinking
carcinogenicity in h nmans. The olljectives of the assessment
water q nality. Tile S tatrs may establish higher or !own kvds
are (I) to determine the level or strength of evidence that the
that may be a pp ropria te d epe nde nt u pun Ioca l conditions,
substance is a human or animal carcinogen and (2) to provide
such as unavailability of alternate suurcc waters or other
an upperbound estimate of the possible risk of human expo-
compelling facturs, provided that pulllic hralth and welfare
sure to th e substance in drinking water.
are not adversely affected.
Establishing the MCLG for a chemical is generally accom-
Table 8 provides a list of EPA's current MCLs and MCLGs,
plished in one of three ways depending (!TI its cate_gorizat_i~n.
along with EPA's pruposcd MCLs, MCLGs, and scrnndary
Each con tam ina n t is a 11al yzed for evidence of ca rcmoge nm t y
MC Ls.
via ingestion. In most cases, the Agency places Group A and
B contaminants into Category I, Group C into Category ll, and
Group D and E into Category Ill. However, where there is ad- ARAR s UNDERSARA
ditional infom1a1ion on cancer ris ks frnm drinking water in-
gestion, additiunal scrutiny is rnnductcd, which may result in The Superfuntl Amrndments and Rcaut horization Ari of
placing the contaminant into a different category. . 1986 (SARA} requires that remedia l actions rnmply with ap·
EPA's policy is to set MCLGs for Category I contammants plicable ur relevant and apprnpriate req nircmrnts (ARA Rs)
at zero. The MCLG for Category II contaminants is caiculated of federal laws and, where mure stringern, state laws. What
by using the RfD fD WELf RSC approach wi l h an added ma rgi 11 a re ARARs? Ap11licable requirements arc environmental pro-
26 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

tectiun rl'quirements, criteria, or limi1a1ions that specifically cern to warrant further site-specific study. Con cent rations in
addrrss a hazardous substance, pollutant, contaminant, re- soil above this screening level would not automatically des-
medial action, location, 01 other cirrnrnstancc at a CERCLA ignate a site as Ndi1 ty, Nnor triggcr a response action; SS Ls are
(Comprehensive Environmcntal Response. Compensation not national cleanup lcvds or standards. Rather, they suggest
and Liability Act) site. Relevant and app10pliatl' 1cquirc· thl' need for further eval nation of the 110tential risks that may
meuts add1 css probkms or sit nations so su lliciently simila1 to br posed by site contaminants. Generally, if contaminant
those cncountr1cd at the CERCLA site that thcir 11sc is wdl rnnren tratioDs in soil fall he low the screening level and the
suitcd to the particula1 site. site meets specific rcsidcntial usc conditions. no lurthcr study
An interim guidancl' ducurnent, llublished OD Aug. 27, or action is warramrd for that arr a undr1 CERCLA (Supcr-
1987 (52 FR 32496), provided a definition of ARARs, dc- f und). However. some States have developed screenb1g val-
scrihed thl' diffcrrnt types, and explained huw thry arr ap- ues that a re n10re stringent than the SS Ls. Further study may
plied to tbr rrmedial Jlrocess. For cxamplc, thr guidance be warranted under sn ch Sta 1e p10grams.
st at l's that, for water which is or may be usr d for d rinking, the The SS Ls p1escntl'd in Ta bk 9 have bccn developed using
maxbnnm contaminant ll'vds (MCLs) set under the Safe cxposu1c assumptions for residential land use and cunsider-
Drinking Water Act (SDWA) are generally the applicable ur ing thrrr pathways of exposure to the contaminants:
releva n 1 and a ppropria t c standard. •Ingestion ol soil
Specific ckanu11 criteria (ARA Rs) associated with S1111er- •Inhalation of volatiks and fugitivc dusts
fund sitrs are often developed with site-specific considera-
•Migration of contaminants through soil to an undrdy-
tions in mind including input from the local pop11lation. As ing po1al1le aquifer.
snch, he lore trying to use a specific cleannp level el~cwhcrc,
it is most impo1 tant to review the enti1 e Rec01d uf Drcision
Thrsc pathways have proven to be the most common routes
(ROD) associatrd with the Supe1 fund sitc. This infom1a1 im1 is
of h nman exposure to contaminants in the 1esidential setting
available from EPA 01 on-linl' from WESTLA W® (West Pub-
at haza rdo ns wast c si 1rs cv alu<i tcd by EPA. Also, suhsta n ti al
lish ing Cor]loration, 620 Opperman Drive, Eagen, MN
effort has been madc to devclop widely acccptablc methods to
55723-1308 at 800-328-9352). Once the RODs databasc is
mmkl thrsr particular path ways. The models and assump-
accessed, by sm1 chh1g using certain kcywurds such as the
tim1s used to develop the SSLs are representative of a Nreason-
name of the contaminant, fur cxampk, benzene, all of th e
able maximum exposurcN (RM E) in the residential setting.
RODs containing the keywo1d(s) will be idemified and avail-
SS Ls are generaly based cm a 1Q-6 risk for carcinogens or a
able for review. In tbis way, cleanup criteria can br reviewed
hazard q uotiem of 1 for noncarcinogens. SSLs for protrction
within the cumrxt of the ROD. of grou11dwa1er are based on nonzero maximum contami-
Da 11 t level goal~ ( MCLG~). If 1hese are nol available, maxi-
mnrn contaminant lcvds (NlCLs) a1c used: if MCLs a1c not
SOIL SCREENING LEVELS
availabk, thr risk-based 1argcts are used.
On June 19, 1991, thl' Administrator of the U.S. Environ- For 1he groundwater path way only, SS Ls are part of a four-
mental Protection Agency (EPA) cha1gcd thc Office of Emer- t iered ap1iroach to evaluating soil contaminants that may
gency and Rernedial Response (OERR) with conducting a Ieach 1o ground w atcr. Thc tk rs rdlcct inc1 casing lcve ls of site
30-day s1 udy to outline opt ions fo1 acccle1ating 1he rate of sprcificity and cost but gcnnally drcrrasing kvds of conse1-
dean ups at Nation<il Priorities Lisi (NPL) sites. The study vatisJ)). The first -tier SSLs rely heavily on concentration levels
found that the cu11 ent investigation /remedy selection prnc- derived from mathematical models and nationally based, ge-
ess takes over 3 yra1 s to complete heca nse each site is ti ratcd neric assumptions. 1f con tam in ant levels at a si tc do not ex-
as a unique 1uoblem, requiring thc prcpa1a1 ion of site-specific ceed the first-ticr SSLs and othn sitc cxpusme pathways are
risk asscssm cnts, cleanup levels, and tcchnical solutions. The accoun 1cd fm in the assumptions usrd tu dcrivc thr SS Ls,
study prnposed 1hat stai>dardizing the rrmedial i1 lanniug and 1hen 1he g1 oundw<11 c1 pathway for thl' arca or site is no longer
remedy se 1cct ion procc~s would signil i can 1ly reduce the t imc of concern under CERCLA remedial authority. 1f contami-
it takes to ~tart ckamq1s and would improvc cunsistrncy in nant levels ata sitc equal 01 cxcl'l'd the first-tier SSLs, or other
the approach to site remediation. One of the speci fie propos- pathways of conrnn arc present, a highr1 tkr snccning
als was fo1 OERR 1o NrxaDline the means to develop s1anda1ds analysis may be considered or a lull site investigation may be
01 g11idelinc<, fur contaminated soils.N initiated. The othe1 th1ee tiers arc distinguished by their ap-
On June 23, 1993, EPA announcl'd thc drvclopment of proach to rval uating the soil-10-groundwa1 c1 pathway. Tier 2
Soil Trigger Levels as one uf thc administrative imp10vernents allows sitc-sprcific valurs to replare 1hc gcncric ddaults in
10 the Superf1md p10gram. On September 28, 1993, EPA thr Tkr l partitioning equation, Tier 3 usrs a leach trst, <iml
completed a draft Fact Shcct p1cscnting Soil Screening Levels Ticr 4 involvrs full-scale, site-specific mudding.
(SSLs) (lormcrly known as trigger levels} for 30 chcmicals Table 9 contains draft SSLs for 30 chemicals. The first col-
(U.S. EPA, Draft Soil Screening Lrvcl Guidancc, Officc of umn to the right of the chl'mirnl namr p1 esents values based
Emergency and Rem ed ia l Respunse, PB93-963 SOS, 1993 ), on soil ingcstion. The second col urn n presents the lower of
representing OERR's fim step 1oward standardizing the twu valurs derived to protect for either in hal<ition of volatiles
evaluation and ckanup of coutaminatcd ~oils undrr tht.: or soil pa rt icu la tes. The third column presents the lowest
Comprehensivr Environmental Responsc, Compcnsation, num her of the fii st two culumns and may be used as the SSL
and Liability Act (CERCLA). fur surfacc suils under most rcsidcntial circum stances. For
An SSL is a chcmkal C0>1ce111 ration in soil that 1epresents ~itcs where migration to groundwater is a pathway uf cun-
a level of contamination above which th c1e is sufficicnt cun- cern, SSL values l'or the groundwater pathway apply.
NATIONAL STANDARDS AND CUJDElJNES 27

Three differclll SS Ls address migration of coutaminants to For spills 1hat involve lnw concentrations of PCHs, that is,
groundwater: the selection nf an appropriate SSL fm this less than I lb hy weight, 1h<: soil dca1111p req11ircmcnt is that
pathway depends on severnl site-specific conditions. The first all soil within the spill area mmt he excavated and hack-filled
column of grrnrndwater valne.~ reflects the levels cal Ciliated with clean soil, that is, containing less than I ppmw PCBs.
using a pa rt it ioni ng eq ua ti 011 wi 1h nn correction fact or a<l<l ed For spills that involve high conccntratinns of PCBs, that is,
for dilution and attenuation in the suhstuface (unadjusted). I lb or muri.: by weight, the soil ckanup req11ircments are as
The next two columns reflect 1he level~ adjus1 ed by factors of follnws:
IO and l 00. r<:spectively ( l 0 and l 00 OAF), to accuu nt for ( l ) decontaminating spills in nutdnor c!ectrical substations
such dil11tio11 and attenna1 ion. (restricted access areas}:
Metal partitioning in the mil/water system is significantly •soil clca1111p tn 2 5 pprnw PCBs or, at the option uf
affected by a variety of soil conditiom. 1he most significant of the rcsponsibk party, to 50 11pmw provided a label
which is pH. For this reason, SSLs fnr metals were dcvdnped ur no1ice is visibly placed in the area.
for three pH conditions: 4.9, 6.8, and 8.0, representative of
(2) dcamtaminatb1g spills in other rest rictcd access areas:
national groundwater conditions. Table 9 cnn1ains SSLs for
inorganics corresponding to a pH of 6.8, unkss noted other- • snil clean 11 p tn 2 5 ppm w PCBs
wise. For select in org.:m ics in th is table, S SLs currcspo n ding to (3) demntarninating spills in nonrestrkt<:d areas:
pH values of 4. 9 and 8.0 a re also identified. (Thi.:se prelirn i- •soi I clcan11p tn IO p11111w PCBs, pmvidcd the soil is
nary numhers fnr metals are curren1ly11nder review am! may cxcava1ed 10 a minimum depth nf JO in. (2.54 mm}
h<: revised.) If pH conditions at a site are not known, the SSL and back-filled with dean soil, that is, containing
corresponding to a pH of 6. 8 should be used. kss than I ppmw PCBs.
Spills 1ltat res11I1 in direct contamination of drinking water
so11rces a re excluded from 1he PCB cleanup policy. Th is is
CLEANUP OF PCB SPILLS UNDER
dnne became these sirnations involv<: significant factors that
THE TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL
may nm be adeq11atcly addressed by cka n11p standards based
ACT (TSCA)
upnn typical spill characteristics. EPA 's pnlicy s1a1 cs that sncl1
EPA reg11 Iat ions cont rolling the d isposa I of PCB s we re situations req11irc immediate action tn con1 ain the area of
promulgated 11nder the Toxic Sub~tances Contml Act (Fed- co11 tam ination, and eval u a ti nn of site· spi.:cific ci rc11 rns tances
eral R<:gistt:r, Fch. 7, ! 978, 43 FR 7150 and May 31, 1979. 44 to identify cleanup requirements.
FR 31514). Thi: term "disposal" encompasses accidental a~ A summary of the soil ckanup requirements i~ prl'scnted
well as intentional releases nf PCBs to the envinmment. Un- in Tah!e I 0.
der these reg11lations, rclca~es at or greati.:r than 50 ppmw are
considered to he irnpmpcr disposal of PCBs, and EPA has the
authority under TSCA 1n require action 10 rectify damage nr
cleanup contamination resulting from tile rdi.:asc or spill.
EPA standards for the clean11p of s11illed PCBs have heen
established at the.: EPA Regional offic<: lc\'cl since I 978. Each
region gcnernlly set PCB cleanu11 standards in the form of
guidelines and then applied the g11idelines nn a case-by-case
basis fm specific spill si1 ua1 inns. The general guilklincs and
their applica tiu n to s11ills often difkr<:d amnng Regions. In
certain ~pill sit11a1ions, some R<:ginns required clca1111p tn 50
ppmw. l n o ther s11il! sit 11ations. some Ri.:ginns required
cl eanup to preexisting backgrrn md levels or tht: limit of detec-
tion of PCBs.
A~ a result of an adminis1 rat iv<: decision (General Electric
versus EPA) 011 Jan. 27, 1984, EPA regions bq;an applying a
"lowest pract icahlc level" guideline. Un fort 11 natcly, many
problems were experienced in applying this approach, in-
cluding the fact that it is subject to varied i ntt: rprct a ti on s, can -
not he evenly applied hy the regulated co1111111mity wi 1ho11t
g11idance from EPA, and is snbject to disagreement with those
rcspnnsib!e for the PCB cleanup.
EPA recogni1.ed that setting a nationwide PCB ckan11p
policy was a di.:sirahle goal and in 1ht: winter of 1984, EPA
produced a draft Compliance Monitoring Prugram Policy cov-
ering PCB spill clea 1111p. Although never officially released,
the policy was acq11ired and reviewed by 111any individ11als
and organizatinns. On April 2, 1987 (Federal Register I 0688}
EPA publish<:d its final PCB spill cleanup 1ulicy establishing
requireme-nts for the cleanup of materials containing PCl3s a 1
concentrations of 50 ppmw or greater.
28 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

TABLE 4 - ACTION LEVELS UNDER RCRA


CORRECTIVE ACTION
NUMERICAL CRITERIA

Soil Groundwater

Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remarks mg/L Remarks

'Ice lone 67-64-1 8000 4.0


Acelonil rile 75;05·8 500 0.2
l\ce rophen one 98-86·2 8000 4.0
l\crylamlde 79-06· l 0.2 0.000 008
lAcrylonitr~e 107 13-1 1.0 0.000 06
tt·AHC 319-84-6 0.1 0.000 006
Aldlcarb l 16-06-3 100 0.05
Aldrin 309·00·2 0.04 0.000 002
Allyl alcohol 107-18·6 400 0.2
Aluminum phosphide 20859·73·8 30 0.01
,Aniline 62-53·3 100
rAntlmony 744()..36-0 30
Arsenic 7440-38·2 80
7440-39-3 4 000
542·62· l 6000 2.0
8enzidine 92·87·5 0.003 0.000 000 2
8erylllum 7440-41-7 0.2 0.000008
8is(2-<:hloroel hyl) ether 111-44-4 0.6 0.00003
Bromofarm 75-25-2 2 000 0.7
8 rornom ethane 74.53.9 100 0.05
Butyl benzyl phi halate 85-68·7 20000 7.0
ICadmium 7440-43-9 40
c alcium cyanide 592-01-8 3 000 1.0
1
fearbon d lsu I fide 75· l 5-0 8 000 4.0
I
Carbon tetr ac hlor ide 56·23·5 5.0 0,000 3
Chloral 75.37.5 200 0,07
Chlordane 57. 74-9 0.5 0.000 03
Chlorine cyanide 506-77-4 4 000 2.0
Ch Imo ben~ene 108·90·7 2 000 0.7
Chloroform 57.55.3 100 0.006
2·Ch loro phenol 95-57-8 400 0.2
JChromlum (VI) 1854()..29·9 400 MCL
Copper cyanide 544.92.3 400 0.2
'Cyanide 57-12·5 2000 0.7
;Cyanoge'.' 460-19-5 3000 1.0
Cyanogen bromide 506-68-3 7 000 3.0
2.4-0 94-75-7 800 0.4
Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalale 117·81·7 50 0.003
l ,2· D1bromoel hane 106·93-4 0.008 0.000000 4
O~b:!_IY I ph I ha la I e 54.74.2 8000 4.0
3,::J'-Dichlorobenz1d1ne 91·94-1 2.0 0.000 08
Oid;lorobromomethane 75.27.4 0.5 0.000 03
DichlofOdlfluoromethane 75-71-8 20 000 7.0
1,2-Dichloroethane 107·06-2 8.0
0 lch loromet ha ne 75·09·2 90 0.005
2.4· Olchlorophenol 120-83·2 200 0.1
l ,3-0tc hlaropropy Iene 542-75-6 20 0.01
Dreldrrn 60·57· 1 0.04 0.000 002
Diethyl phtha late 84·66·2 60000 30
NATIONAL STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 29

Soil Groundwater

Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remarks mg/L Remarks

Dimethoate 60-51· 5 2000 0.7


2,4-0in itrophenol 51-28-5 200 0.07
Din it101oluene 25321-14-6 1.0 0.000 05
,4-Dioxane 123-91· 1 60 0.003
D!P!!_~y~a~-i~e 122·39-4 2.000 0.9
1,2-Diphenylhydiazine 122-66-7 0.9 0.000 04
Disulfoton 298-04-4 3 .0 0.001
Endosullan 115·29· 7 4 .0 0 .002
Endothal! 145-73-3 2000 0 .7
Endrin 72-20-8 20 MCL
Epie h IOI ohyd1 in 106·89·8 70 0.004
Ethy Ibenzene 100.41-4 8000 4.0
Formic acid 64·18·6 200 000 70
Giyc id ya Id eh yd e 765·34-4 30 O.Ql
1Heptacl!!_OI 76-44-8 0.2 0.000 008
Hept ach Ioi ep0x ide 1024-57·3 0.08 0.000 004
Hexachlo1o·1,3· butadiene 87·68·3 90 0.004
Jl· Hexachlo1 ocyclohexane 319-85·7 4_Q 0 .000 2
Hexac hlorocyclopentad iene 77-47-4 600 02
Hexachlorodibenio· p-dic>xin,
m·1xlu1e 19408·74·3 0.000 l 0.000 000 OJ
He1tach loroet ha ne 67-72-1 80 0.03
Hexach1orophe ne 70-30-4 20 0.01
Hyd1azine 302-DJ.2 0.2 0.000 01
Hyd1ogen cyanide 74·90.8 2000 0.7
Hyd1ogc_llsulfide 7783·06·4 200 0.1
Isobutyl aIco hol 78·83·1 20 000 10
lsopho1one 78-59·1 2 000 0.09
Lead 7439.92.1 MCL
Lindane 58·89·9 0-5 MCL
m-C1esor 103.39.4 4 000 2.0
m-Oinitrobenzene 99-6$-0 8.0 0.004
m-Phenylenediamine 108-45·2 500 0.2
Maleic anhyd1 ide 108·31·6 8000 4.0
Male i c hyd 1azide 123-33-1 40000 20
Mercu ry 7_439:97:6 20 MCL
Methacrylonit1 ile 126·98·7 8.0 0.004
Methomyl 16752-77-5 2 000 0.9
Methyl ethyl ketone 78-93-3 4 000 2.0
Methyl isobutyl ketone 108-10-1 4000 2.0
Methyl pa1a1 hion 298·00-0 20 0 .009
N·Nilioso·n-
mel hy!ethy!amfne 10595·95~ II 0.000 002
N. Nitrosodi·n
butylamine 924·16·3 u 0.000 006
IN·N1trosodi· n
-propy la '!!0e 6~_1~-7 0.1 0.000 005
N· Nil 1osodiethanolami ne 1116·54· 7 0.3 0.000 01
N-Nil 1osod1ethylam 1ne 55· 18·5 0.005 0.000 000 2
N· Nil1osod1methylam ine 62· 75.9 0.01 0.000 000 7
N-N it 1osodiph enyla m in e 86·30·6 100 0.007
JV.Nillosopyrrolidine 930-55· 2 0 .3 0.000 02
Nickel 7440-02-0 o-:i
:N it1 ic oxide 10102-43·9 8000 4.0
Nit1obenzene 98-95--3 40 0.02

'N1l1ogen d1ox1de 10102-44·0 80000 40


NATIONAL STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 31

Soil Groundwater

Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remorks mg/L Remorks

Vinyl idene chloride 75-35-4 10 MCL


Xyle nes (mixed isomers) 1330-20-7 200 000 70
Zinc cya nide 557-21-1 4000 2.0
Zinc phosphi de 1314-84-7 20 O.DI
32 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

TABLE 5 - RESIDUE CONCENTRATION LIMITS


FOR NONMETALLIC CONSTITUENTS
NUMERICAL CRITERIA

Residue Concentrotion Limit

Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remarks

Acetonit1 ile 75-05-8 0.2


Aceto phe none 98-86-2 4.0
Acrole1n 107-02-8 0.5
'Acrylamlde 79-06· l 0.000 2
Acrylonit1 ile 107-13· l 0.000 7
Ald1in 309-00-2 0.000 02
Allyl alcohol 107-18-6 0.2
Aluminum phosphide 20859-73-8 0.01
An~lne 62-53-3 0-06
Barium cyanide 542-62-1 1.0
Benzene 71.f3"'.:2 0:065
Benzidine 92-87·5 0.000 001
Be nzo( a)a nth 1ace ne 56-55·3 0.000 1
Bis(2-chloroethyl) ether 111-44-4 0.000 3
Bis{chlo1omethyl) ethe1 542-88-1 0.000 002
. -
B1omoto1m 75-25-2 ci.7
Calcium cyanide 592-01-8 0.000 001
Cai bon disulfide 75-15-0 4.0
Cai bon tetrachloride 56-23·5 0.005
Chlo1dane 57-74-9 0.000 3
~ h101 obenze ne 108-90·7 1.0
Chlo1oform 67-66·3 0.06
Copper cyanide 544.92.3 0.2
Creso I (mixed isomers) 1319· 77.3 2.0
Cyan~ge_r: 460-19-5 1.0
01(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate 117-81-7 30
Dibenzo[ a,h lanth1acene 53-70-3 0.000 007
I ,2-Dib1 omo-3-chloropmpane 96-12·8 0.000 02
1,2· Dibromoethane 106-93-4 0.000 ODO 4
l ,4-Dlchlorobenzene 106-46· 7 0.075
Dichlo1odifluoromethane 75.71.a 7.0
Dichlo1omethane 75-09· 2 0.05
2 ,4 · Dkhlo1ophenol 120-83-2 O.l
l ,3· Dlchlorop1 opylene 542·75·6 0.001
Dieldrin 60-57: 1 0.000 02
Diethyl ph!halate 84-66·2 30
Diethyls1illbeste1ol 56-53· l 0.000 ODO 7
D1methoale 60-51-5 O.o3
2,4· Dlnlt1otoluene 121-14-2 o.ooo 5
Dlphenylam ine 122-39·4 0.9
1,2· Diphenylhydiazine 122-66-7 0.000 5
Endosulfan l 15"29-7 0.002
End1ln 72-20·8 0.000 2
Epichlorohyd11 n 106-89·8 0.04
Ethyle~e oxide 75-21·8 0.000 3
Fluo11ne (soluble II uoride) 7782-41-4 4.0
Formic acid 64-18·6 70
Heptachlor 76-44·8 0.000 08
Heptachlm epox1de 1024· 57.3 0.000 04
NA TJONAL STANDARDS AND GUIDEUNES 3 3

Residue Concentration Limi t

Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remarks

H~achlo10. I ,3· butadiene 87-68·3 0.005


H~achlo1oben:<ene 118-74· l 0.000 2
Hexac hIm oeyc Iopen tad ie ne 77-47-4 0.2
Hexac h101 ad i ben zo. p
·dioxin, mixtu1 e 19408-74·3 0.000 000 06
Hexachloroethane 67-72-1 O.Q3
Hydrazine 302-01-2 0.000 l
Hyd1 ogen cyanide 74-90·8 0.000 07
Hyd1 ogen su lfld e 7783-06·4 0.000 001
I sotmtyl alcohol 78-83-1 10
Methomyl 16752-77-5 l~O
Me'i~ch101 72-43..S O.l
Methyl ethyl ~elone 78-93·3 2.0
Methyl hyd1aiine 60-34·4 0.000 3
Met~yl pa1athio~ 298-00-0 0.02
3· Methylchloranth1ene 56-49-5 0.000 04
4 ,4 '.Methylene-bis
(2-chlo1 oaniline) 101-14-4 0.002
N-N 1t1oso-N-methylu1ea 684-93·5 0.000 000 I
N-Nilrosodi· n · butylamine 924-16·3 0.000 06
N-N1lrosodlethylamine 55-18·5 0.000002
N-Nill OSOPYI 1olidine 930-55-2 0.000 2
Nap ht ha lene 91-20·3 10
Nic~el cyanide 557.19.7 0.7
Nitric oxide 10102.43.9 4.0
Nil 1obenzene 98-95-3 0.02
Pe ntac h101 oben ze ne 608-93-5 0.03
Pentachlo1ophenol 87-86·5 1.0
Pheno.I 108-95·2 1.0
Phenylme1curic acelate 62-38-4 0.003
'Phosphine 7803-51-2 0.01
Polych 101 i natcd bi ph enyls 1336-36·3 0.000 05
Potassium cyanide 151-50·8 2.0
Potassium si l~e 1 cyanide 506-61-6 7.0
p,p · Dic'.n\01 <Xliphenyl
t11chlo1oethane 50-29-3 0.001
Pion amide 23950-58·5 3.0
Py1 idine 110-86· l 0.04
Quintozene 82-68-8 O.l
Rese1pine 50-55-5 0.000 03
Selenouiea 630-10-4 0.2
Silve1 cyanide Ag{CN) 506-64·9 4.0
Sodium cyanide Na(CN) 143.33.9 1.0
Strychnine & sa Its 57-24-9 O.QI
1, 2 ,4, 5· Tet1 ac hlorobenze ne 95.94_3 0.01
1
_l, l,2,?-Tet1~chlo1oethane 79-34·5 0.002
Tet 1achi oroethy len e 127-18·4 0.7
2,3 ,4 ,6· Tet1achlo1ophenol 58-90-2 0.01
Tetiaethyl lead 78-00-2 0.000 004
Thlou1ea (9C J) 62-56·6 0.000 2
Toluene 108-88-3 10
>nxaphene BOOl-35·2 0.005
.I, l ,2-Trichlo1 oethane 79-00-5 0.006
T1 ichlo1 oelhylene 79-01-6 0.005
T1 lchlo1ofluo1omelhane 75-69-4 10
·2,4,6-Ti 1chlo1ophenol 88-06·2 4.0
34 CLEANUP CR!TERJA FOR SOJLAND GROUNDWATER
Table 5 - Cont'd.

Residue Concentration limit

Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remarks

2 ,4,5-Trichlmophenol 95-95-4 4.0


Vanadium pentoxlde 1314-62-1 0.7
Vinyl chloride 75-01-4 0.002
Vinyl Iden e chloride 75.35.4 0.005
NATIONAL STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 35

TABLE 6 - EPA TOXICITY CHARACTERISTIC


REGULATORY LEVELS
NUMERICAL CRITERIA
Extract

TCLP Regulatory Level

Constituent CAS Number mg/L Remarks

I11.1\\imCl\1 7440-36-<l l.<l Basis Rfll


~rsenic 7440-38·2 5.0 Basis MCL

IBa1ium
Benzene
B:_ryllium
7440-39·3
71-43·2
7440-41· 7
100.0
0.5
0.007
Basis MCL
Basis MCL
Basts RSD
Cadmium 7440-43-9 1.0 Basis MCL
Cai oon tet1achlo1 ide 56-23-5 0 .5 Basts MCL
Chlo1dane 57. 74-9 0 .03 Basis RSD
Ch lo 1obenzene 108-90·7 100.0 Basis RFD
Chlo1olo1m 67-66·3 6.0 Basis RSD
[ch1omiurn 7440.47:3 5.0 Basis MCL
, C1 esol (Total) OO-OO·B7 200 Basis RFD
2,4·0 94.75. 7 10.0 Basis MCL
1.4· Dichlo1ob.enzene 106-46· 7 7.5 Basis MCL
1,2· Dichlo1oethane 107--06·2 0.5 Basis MCL
~·~--~ -
2.4-0initi otoluene l 21-14-2 0.13 Basis RSD
End1in 72-20·8 0.02 Basis MCL
Heptachlor 76-44·8 0.008 Basis RSD
Hexachlo10· 1,3· butadiene 87-68-3 0.5 Basis RSD
Hexachlo1obenzene 118-74-1 0.13 Basis RSD
IHexach Ioroetha ne 67-72-1 3.0 BasisRSD
.ead 7439.92.1 5.0 Basis MCL
ILindane
m-C1esol
58-89-9
HIB-39-4
0.4
200.0
Basis MCL
Basis RFD
1
~Mercury 7439.97.5 0.2 Basis MCL
- -
Methoxychlo1 72.43.5 10.0 Basis MCL
Methyl ethyl ketone 78-93-3 200.0 Basis RFD
Nickel 7440-02--0 70 Basis RFD
N it1 obe nze ne 98-95-3 2.0 Basis RFD
o--Cresol 95-48-7 200.0 Basis RFD
rp:c,fi5o1 105.44.5 200.0 Basis RFD
tPentachlo1ophenol 87--86·5 100.0 Basis RFD
Py1idine l!0--86-1 5.0 Basis RFD
~Selenium 77B2-49·2 LO Basis MCL
,Silvei 7440-22-4 5.0 Basis MCL
Tet1achlo1oethylene 127-18-4 0.7 Basis RSD
Thallium 7440-28-0 7.0 Basis RFD
Toxaphene 8001-35·2 0.5 Basis MCL
T1 ichloroethylene 79-01-6 0.5 Basis MCL
2.4 ,6· T1 ichloi ophenol 88-06·2 2.0 Basis RSD
:2,4 ,5· T1 ichlo1ophenol 95-95-4 400.0 Basis RFD
:2(2 ,4,5-T1ichlo1ophenoicy)
propion i c ac1 d 93.72.1 1.0 Basis MCL
'Vinyl chlo1 ide 75-01·4 0.2 Basis MCL
Vinylidene chlo1 ide 75-35-4 0.7 Basts MCL

TCLP i< Toxic II)' Characterlsllc leaching Procedu1e.


MCL I• m.. imum contaminant le•el In drinking water starnJa1ds.
RFD rs ~fe-rence- dM:ll!- for noric..a rci nogens.
RSD I• ri<k •pecl!lc do5e for carcinoc~n•.
36 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

TABLE 7 - UNIVERSAL TREATMENT


STANDARDS
NUMERICAL CRITERIA

Nonwostewater Concentrotion Wostewater Concentrotion


Totol Composition Total Composition

Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remorks m g/l Remorks

Ace naphth ene '03-32-9 3.4 0.059


Acenaph thy le ne ?.08-95-8 3.4 0.059
Acetone 67--64-1 160 0.28
Aceton it 1i le 75-05-8 0.17
Acetophen one 98-86-2 9.7 a.or
2·Acetylaminofluo1ene 53-96-3 140 0.059
Ac1oleln 107-02·8 0.29
Acrylonit1 i le 107-13·1 84 0.24
t<·AHC 319-84·6 0.066 0.000 14
Aldrin 309-00·2 0.066 4 0.021
Allyl chlo1 ide 107-05· l 30 0.036
4-A mi no bi ph eny I 92-67-1 0.13

~,;;;,, 62-53-3 14 0.81


Anth1acene 120-12-7 3.4 0.059
Antimony _ 7440-36·0 2.1 mg/L T~LP 1.9
Aramite 140-57-8 0.36
A1oclo1 1016 12674· 11·2 0.92 0.013
A1oclo1 1221 11104-28·2 0.92 0.014
Aroclo1 1232 111141-16-5 0.92 0.013
Aroclor 1242 53469-21-9 0.92 0.017
-Aroclor 1248 12672-29·6 0-:-92 01>13
A1oclo1 1254 11097-69· I 1.8 0.014
A1oclo1 1260 11096-82·5 1.8 0.014
Arsenic 7440-38-2 5.0 mglL TCLP 1.4
Barium 7440-39-3 ~.6 _mg/L !CLP 1.2
8enzal ch!o1 ide 98-87·3 6.0 0.055
Benzene 71-43·2 IO 0.14
Be nzo( a)a nthra cene 55.55.3 3.4 0.059
Se nzo[ alpy 1ene 50-32-8 3.4 0.061
8enzo(b)fluo1anthene 205-99·2 6.8 0.11
8enzo(gt)1foerylene 191-24:2 1.8 0.0055
Benzo( k)f Iuo1 an I he ne 207-08·9 6.8 0.11
Beryllium 7440-41· 7 0.014 mgll TCLP 0.82
Bi s(2 <h Ioroethoxy)m ethane 111.91.1 7.2 0.036
Bi~(2<h.l_~~~t\~I) ~~~~ 11144-4 6,0 0.033
Bls(2-chloro1sop1opyl) ethe1 39638-32·9 7.2 0.055
B1omoform 75-25·2 15 0.53
8romomelhane 74.93.9 15 0.11
Butyl benzyl phthalate 85-68-7 28 0.017
Cadmium 744043-9 0.19 mg/L TCLP 0.20
farbon dlsull ide 75-15·0 4.81 0.014
Carbon tetr achlo11de 56-23·5 6.0 0.057
;
.Chlordane 57. 74.9 0.26 0.003 3
1
Ch lorobenzene 108-90-7 6.0 0.057
'Chlo1obenz~ate 510-15·6 0.10
2· Chlo1 o· 1,3· buladiene 126-99-8 0.057
Ch lor°"\hane 75-00·3 6.0 0.27
2 <h Io roe! hyl v1 nyl et he 1 110· 75-8 0.062
NATIONAL STANDARDS AND GUJDEUNES 37

Nonwostewoter Concentrotion Wostewater Concentrotion


Totol Composition Totol Composition
------ --------~

Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remorks mg/L Remarks

Chloroform 67-66·3 6.0 0.046


Ch lorom ct han e 74-87·3 30 0.19
2· Chloronaphlhalene 91·58-7 5.6 0.055
2· Chlorophenol 95-57·8 5.7 0.044
Ch loroprene 126-99·8 0.057
-~-
3-Chloropropylene 107-05· l 30 0.036
Chromium 7440-47-3 0.33 mg/L TCLP 0.37
Chrysene 218-01-9 3.4 0.059
Cresols 00-00-87 3.2 0.77
Cyanide 57-12·5 590130 total/amenable
mgll TCLP 1.9
Cyclo hexanon e fo-$:94.1 0.75 0.36
2.4·0 94-75. 7 10 0.72
Di(2--elhylhexyl) phlhalate 117-81-7 28 0.28
Dlben zola ,e Jpyrene 192-65-4 0.061
Dlbe~o[a,_hlanl hracene 53.70.3 8.2 0.055
1, 2 · Di bro mo-3-c hIoropropan e 9& 12-8 15 0.11
Di bromocM Icreme I ha ne 124-48· l 15 0.057
1,2-Di bromoethane 106-93·4 15 0.028
Dibutyl phthalate 84-74-2 28 0.057
Dic hlorobromomet ha ne 75-27-4 15 0.35
DichlorodilluoromethaM 75-71-8 7.2 0.23
1,2· Dichloroethane 107-06-2 6.0 0.21
J, 1-Dichlowelhane 75.34.3 6.0 0.059
Ir ans- I ,2-Dic hloroelhylene 156-60·5 30 0.054
[ Dfch lorom elhane 75-09-2 30 0.089
2 .4· Di ch Icrop he nol 120-83-2 14 0.044
2 ,6-Dic hi crop he nol 87-65·0 14 0.044
1,2· Dich!oroproparte 78-87·5 18 0.85
cis· l ,3· D1chloropropylene 10061-01-5 18 0.036
trans· 1.3· Dichloropropylene 10061-02-6 18 0.036
Dieldrin 60·57· l 0.13 0.Ql7
Diethyl phthalale 84-66·2 28 0.20
Dimethyl phthalale 131· 11·3 28 0.047
4-D• methyl am InO<lzabenzen e 60-11-7 0.13
,?.4· Dimet~ylp~e~o~ 105·67-9 14 0.036
4.6· Din itro· o-cresol 534.52.1 160 0.28
2 .4-Din itrophencl 51-28· 5 160 0.12
2 ,4-Din itrotoluene 121·14·2 140 0.32
2 ,6· Dinitrotoluene 606-20·2 28 0.55
Dinoseb 88-85-7 2.5 0.066
"I ,4-Dioxa ne 123-91· l 170 0.12
Diphenylamine 122.39.4 13 0.92
' 1,2· Oiphenylhydraiine 122-66· 7 0.087
Disulfoton 298-04-4 6.2 0.017
~-E ndosu llan 33213-65-9 0.13 0.029
Endosullan I 959-98-8 0.066 0.023
Endosultan su Ifate 1031-07-8 0_13 0.029
Endrin 72-20·8 0.13 0.002 8
Endrin aldehyde 7421-93-4 0.13 0.025
EI hyl acetate 141-78·6 33 0.34
E\1"rj\ e\hei 60·2'3-7 160 0:12
Ethyl methacrylale 97·63·2 160 0.14
Ethyl benzene 100-41·4 10 0.057
38 CLEANUP CRTTERIA FOR SOIL ANlJ GROUNDWATER
Tobie 7 - Cont'd.

Nonwostewoter Concentrotion Wastewater Concentrotion


Totol Composition Toto! Composition

Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remarks mg/L Remari<s

Ethylene oxide 75-21-8 0.12


Famphur 52-85· 7 15 0.017
Fluoranthene 206-44·0 3.4 0.068
Fluorene 86-73·7 3.4 0.059
Heplachlor 76-44-8 0.066 0.0012
Heplachlor epoxide 1024-57·3 0.066 0.016
Hexachloro-1,3· bu tad 1ene 87-68-3 5.6 0..055
Hexach lo robe nze ne 118-74-1 10 0.055
P-H exac h Ioroc ye Io hexane 319-85-7 0.066 0.000 14
I.I-He xac hI orocycl oh exane 319-86·8 0.066 0.023
· Hexach Io rocyc Io pen tad i ene 77-47·4 2.4 0.057
Hexachlorodibenzcrp.d1ox1n,
mixture 19408-74·3 0.001 0.000 063
Hexach Io rod ibe nzcr p-<j; ox Ins 00-00-30 0.001 0.000 063
Hexachlorodibenzofurans 00-00-29 0.001 0.000 063
Hexachloroethane 67· 72-1 30 0.055
Hexachloropropytene 1888-71· 7 30 0..035
I ndeno(2.3·cd)pyrene 193-39-5 3.4 0.005 5
lodomethane 74-88·4 65 0.19
lsobulyl alcohol 78-83·1 170 5.6
lsodrin 455.73.5 o~ci66 0-:--021
lsoS<Jfrole 120-58-1 2.6 0.081
Ke pone 143-50-8 0.13 0.001 l
Lead 7439-92-1 0.37 m€1L TCLP 0.28
Llndane 58-89·9 0.066 0.001 7
Mercury 7439.97.5 0..009 mg/L TCLP 0.15
Methacrytonitrrle 126-98·7 84 0.24
Methanol 67-56-1 0.75 5.6
Methopyrilene 91-80-5 1.5 0.081
Met hoxyc hlo r 72-43-5 0.18 0.25
-
3· Methyl chloanthrene 56-49-5 15 0.0055
Methyl ethyl ketone 73.93.3 36 0.28
Methyl 1od1de 74-88-4 65 0.19
Methyl isobutyl ketone 108-10-1 33 0.14
1
Methyl methacr:ylate 80-62-6 160 0 . 14
Methyl methansulfonale 66·27·3 O.Q18
Methyl parathion 298-00-0 4.6 0.014
3-Methylchtoranthrene 56-49-5 15 0 .005 5
Methylene bromide 74-95·3 15 0.11
4 ,4 '·Methylene· bis
(2-<:hloroanil 1ne) 101· 14·4 30 0.50
1r>-B utyl alcoho I 'i1~5-:3 2.6 5.6
r>-Dloclyl phthalate 117-84·0 28 0.017
N-N itroso-r>-methyl ethylamlne 10595-95-6 2.3 0.40
N-N itrosod i-r>-bu ty Iamine 924· 16·3 17 0.40
N- N itrosod f. r>-propy ta '!1 'n e 621·64· 7 14 0.40
N-N itrosodiethylamine 55-18-5 28 0.40
N-N 1trosodimethylamine 62-75-9 2.3 040
N· N itrosodiphenylamme 86-30-6 13 0.92
N-N1trosomorpholine 59-89· 2 2.3 0.40
N-N1trosopyrrolldlne 930-55·2 35 0.013
N-N itrosopl~ridfne 100-75-4 35 p.013
Naphthalene 91-20-3 5.6 0.059
P-Naphthylam1ne 91-59-8 0.52
NATIONAL STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 39

Nonwostewoter Concentration Wastewoter Concentrotion


Totol Composition_ _ Totol C~mposition

Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remorks mg/L Remorks

Nrcxel 7440-02·0 5.0 mgll TCLP 0.55


5-N itro-0-1 ol urd rn e 99-55-8 28 0.32
2-Nitroanili ne aa.74.4 14
Nit robenzen e 98-95-3 14 0.068
4 · Nrtrophen ol 100-02-7 29 0.12
2 · Nit rophenol 88-75-5 13
o-Cresol 95-48-7 5.6 0.11
o,p"·DDD 53-19-0 0.087 0.023
o.p"·DDE 3424-82-6 0.087 0.031
o.p'·ODT 789-02·6 0.087 0.003 9
p-8romodrphenylet her 101-55-3 15 o:-655
p-Ch loroan Ill n e 105-47·8 16 0.45
p-C hloro· m-cr eso I 59-50-7 14 0.018
p-Oinitrobenzene 100-25-4 2.3 0.32
p-Hilroani\ine 100-01-f> 28 0.0
Parathion 55.33.2 4.6 0.014
Pentac hloroben ze ne 608-93·5 10 0.055
Pentac hlorod i ben zo-p-d rox rns 00-00-26 0.001 0.000 063
PentachlOlodibenzofurans 00-00-25 0.001 0.000 035
Pen ta ch lor oe thane 76-01· 7 6.0
Pent ach Torophe nol 87-86-5 7.4 0.089
Phenacetin 62-44·2 16 0.081
Phe nant hr ene 85-01-8 5.6 0.059
Phenol 108-95·2 5.2 0.039
Ph orate 298-02-2 4.5 0.021
--
Phthalrc anhydride 35.44.9 28 0.055
Pol ye hlorlnat ed brphe nyl s 1336-36-3 10 a.to
p,p'· Drchlorodrphenyl
dlchloroethane 72.54.3 0.087 0.023
p.p"·Dlchloro
diphenyldfehlor0ethylene 72· 55-9 0.087 0.031
' p, p' · Oichlrn'od iph'!rtyl
trf<;hloroetMne 50-29·3 0.087 0.003 9
Pronamide 23950-58·5 1.5 0.093
Prol)<l n ernt rile 107-1?·0 360 0.24
Pyrene 129-00·0 8.2 0.067
Pyrrdrne 110-85-1 16 0.014
Qv1ntozene 82-58·8 4.8 0.055
Sat role 94.59. 7 22 0.081
Selenium 7782-49·2 0.16 mg/L TCLP 0.82
Srlver 7440-22-4 0.30 mg/L TCLP 0.29
Terephthalic (!Cid 100-21·0 28 0.055
1,2,4,5.TetrachlOlobenzene 95-94-3 14 0.055
Tet rac hlorod i t>en zo-p-d iox Ins 00-00-28 0.001 0.000 063
Tetr ac hlo rod rt>eu zof ur ans 00-00-27 0.001 0.000 063
-
I, l, l ,2· Tetrachloroethane 630-20-6 6.0 0.057
l, l ,2,2· Tetr achloroethane 79-34-5 6.0 0.057
Tet rac hIo met hylen e 127-18·4 6.0 0.056
2,3,4 ,6-Tetrachlorophenol 58-90·2 7.4 0.030
Thallium 7440-28-0 0.078 mg/L TCLP l.4
Toluene 108-88-3 10 0.080
Toxaphene 8001-35·2 2.6 0.009 5
1.2 .4· Trichlo<obenzcne 120-82· l 19 0.055
1, 1, 1. Tr 1ch!o<oethane 71- 55.5 6.0 0.054
40 CLEAN UP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER
Tobie 7- Cont'd.

Nonwostewoter Concentrotion Wostewoter Concentration


Totol Composition Toto! Composition

Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remarks mg/L Remark s

1, 1,2· T1 ich lo1oeth ane 79-00·5 6.0 0.054


T1ic h101 oelh yle ne 79-01·6 6.0 0.054
T1ic h101oflu01 ometha ne 75.59.4 30 0.020
12.4.6· Trichlo<0phenol 88·06·2 7.4 0.035
2.4,5· Tri_chtorophenol 95.95.4 7.4 0.18
2(2,4,5· T1 ichlo1ophenoxy)
p1 opioni c ac 1d 93.72.1 7.9 0.72
2, 4 ,5· T1ich I01oph ene>;yacet1 c acid 93. 76·5 7.9 0.72
1,2 .3.T1 ichlorop1opane 96-18·4 30 0.85
Trich lorotri f Iuoroet ha ne 76-13·1 30 0.057
T1 is(2,3· Oibromopropyl)
phosphate 125.72.7 0.11
Vanadium (fume or dust) 7440-62·2 0.23 mgll TCLP 0.042
Vinyl chloride 75-01-4 6.0 0.27
Vi ~y I~e ne chloride 75-35·4 6.0 O.Q25
Xylenes (mixed isomers) 1330-20· 7 30 0.32
Zinc (fume 01 dust) 7440-66-6 5.3 mg/L TCLP 1.0
NATIONAL STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 41

TABLE 8 - EPA CURRENT AND PROPOSED


DRINKING WATER STANDARDS
COMMENTS

11/85: 50 Federal Register (FR), November 13, 1985 7/91: 56 FR, July 1, 1991 - NPDWRs; Final Rule
4186: 51 F R, April 2, 1986 - Final MCLs and SMCLs 7/91: 56 FR, July 18, 1991 - NPDWRs for Radionuclides in
7/87: 52 FR, July 8, 1987 - Final MCLs and MCLGs Drinking Water (proposed)
5/89: 54 FR, May 22, 1989 - Proposed SMCLs 5/92: 57 FR, May 27, 1992 - Drinking Water
6/89: 54 FR, June 29, 1989 - Final MCLs and MCLGs 7/92: 57 FR, July 1 7, 1992 · Final MCLs and MCLGs
6/90: Action level for lead in drinking water, June 21, 1990, MCL: Maximum Contaminant Level
Memorandum from the Office of Emergency and Remedial MCLG: Maximum Contaminant Level Goal
Response and th e Office of Waste Program Enforcement NPDWR: National Primary Drinking Water Regulation
7/90: 55 FR, July 25, 1990 - Proposed MCLs, MCLGs, and NSDWR: Nation al Secondary Drinking Water Regulation
SMC Ls
SMCL: Secondary Maximum Contaminant Level
1191: 56 FR, January 30, 1991 · Final MCLs, MCLGs, and
Proposed SMCLs IT: Treatment Technique
6/91: 56 FR, June 7, 1991 - l\1CLGs & NPDWRs · for Lead &
Copper (Action levels establlshed for lead (0.015 ppm) and
copper (1.3 ppm)

NUMERICAL CRITERIA
Groundwater Groundwater

(Drink ing Water) MCL (Drinking Water) MCLG

Constituent CAS Number m g/L Remarks mg/L Remarks

Acrylam1de 79-06-1 TT (l/91) 0


Alachlor 15972-6(}-8 0.002 (1191) 0
Aldicarb 116-06·3 Deferred (5192)
Aldicarb sulfoxide 1646-87·3 Oefer1ed (5192)
Aldicarb sulfo•ne 1646-88·4 Oeferred (5!_92)
-
Antimony 7440-36·0 0.006 (7/92) 0.006
Arsenrc 7440-38-2 0.050 (NPOWRJ
Asbestos 1332-21-4 7 mi 11 ion fibers per I tier
{> 10 microns 1/9 ll
Atra.iine 1912·24·9 0.003 (l/91) 0.003
Barium 7440-39·3 2 (7191) 2
Benzene 71-43-2 0.005 (7/87) 0
BenzofaJpyrene 50-32·8 0.000 2 (7/92) 0
Beryllium 7440·41·7 0.004 (7192) 0.004
8 is ( 2-e I hyl hexyl) ad Ipale 103-23-1 0.4 (7192) 0.4
Cadmium 7440-43-9 0.005 0191) 0.005
Corbofuran 1563-66·2 0.04 (1191) 0.04
Corban tetrachloride 56-23·5 0.005 (7187) 0
Chlordane 57. 74.9 0.002 (1191) 0
Ch lorobe n ze ne 108-90· 7 0.1 (1191) 0.1
..-Chrnmium 744()..47-3 0.1 ( 1191) 0.1

lCop~< 7440-50-B
57· 12·5 0.2
TI (7191)
(7192)
1.3
0.2
Cyanide
2,4-0 94.75.7 0.07 (1191) 0.07
Oala(!On ._sodium salt 75-99-0 0.2 (7192) 0.2
Oi(2~thylhexyl) phthalate 117-81-7 0.006 (7/92) 0
42 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GRO UNTJWA TER
Table 8 - Cont'd.

Groundwoter Groundwah:!r

(Drinking Woter) MCL (Drinking Water) MCLG

Constituent CAS Number mg/L Remarks mg/L Remarks

1,2· Di bromo-3-chloropropane 96· 12-8 0.000 2 (1191) D


1.2· Di bromoethane 106·93-4 D.DOO 05 (l/91) D
1,4· Dichlorobeniene 106-46.7 D.075 (7187) 0.075
1,2-Dichlorobcnzene 95.50.1 D.6 (1191, 5189) D.6
1.2-Dichloroethane 107·06·2 D.005 (7/87) D
cis-1,2-Dichloroethylene 156·59·2 D.07 (l/91) D.07
trans· 1.2· Dichloroethyl~ne 156·60·5 D.l (1/91) D.I
Dic hlor om ethane 75·09-2 0.005 (7/92) 0
l ,2-Dichloropropanc 78-87-5 D.005 (l/91) 0
Dinoseb 88-85-7 D.007 (7/92) D.007
Diquat bromrde 85·00·7 D.02 (7192) 0.02
Endothall 145· 73.3 0.1 (7192) 0.1
Endrin 72-20-8 0.002 (7/92) D.002
Epichlorohydrin 106-89-8 TI (1/91) 0
Ethyl benzene 100·4 l-4 0.7 (1191 5189) 0.7
fluorine (soluble fluoride) 7782·4 l-4 4.0 (4/86)
Glyphosate 1071-83-6 0.7 (7/92) 0.7
Heptachlor 76-44-8 D.DOO 4 (1191) 0
Heptac/tlor epo~icte 1024.57.3 a.aao 2 (1191) 0
Hexachlorobenzene 118·74· l 0.001 (7/92) 0
Hexac hlorocyclope ntadi;ne 77.47.4 0~05 (7/92) 0.05
Lead 7439.92.1 TI/0.015 Action Level
(6/91 · 6190) 0
Lindane 58-89·9 0.000:.? (1/91) 0.000 2
M~rcury 7439-97-6 0.002 (1/91) 0.002
Met hoxye h Ior 72-43-5 0.04 (1191) 0.04
Nickel 7440-02-0 0.1 (7/92) 0.1
Nitrate (as Nl 14797·55·8 10 {1/91) 10
Nitrite (as Nl 14797·65· 0 l (1/91)
Oxamyl (Vydate) 23135·22·0 0.2 (7/92) 0.2
Pentactilorop-henol 87::S6~5 0~001 (7/9t 5/89) 0
Picloram 1918-02· I 0.5 (7/92) D.5
Polychlorinated biphenyls 1336·36·3 D.OOD 5 (1/91) 0
Selenium 7782·49·2 0.05 (1191) 0.05
Slmazfne 122.34-9 D.004 (7192) 0.004
-
Styrene 100·42·5 D.l (1191, 5/89) D.l
Sulfate 14808·79·8 400/500 ( 7190) proposed 400/500 (7/9 0) pro posed
2,3, 7 ,8-Tetrachlorod1benzo
dioxin 1746-01 ·6 D.000 ODD 03 {7/92) D
Tetrachloroethylene 127· 18·4 D.005 (1191) D
Thatlwm 7440-28·0 D..002 (7f92i D.000 5
Toluene 108·88·3 I (lf9 l, 5/89)
Total Nitrate/Nitrite 00-00-2 10 (1191) 10
Toxaphene 8001·35·2 0.003 (l/91) D
1,2,4· Trichlorobenzene 120·82· l D.07 (7/92) 0.07
l, I, l-Tr1chloroethane 71·55·6 D.20 (7/871 D.20
l, l ,2-Trichloroethane 79·00·5 0.005 (7/92) 0.003
Tr 1c hIoroet hylene 79-01-6 D.005 (7187) 0
2(2,4, 5-T richlorophenoxy)
propionic acid 93.72.1 0.05 (l/91) 0.05
Trihalomethanes (total) DD-OD-1 D.l CNPDWR)
Vinyl chloride 75.Ql-4 D,002 (7/87) 0
Vinyl 1dene chloride 75.35.4 0.007 (7/87) 0.007
Xylenes Cmi1ed Isomers) 1330·20· 7 10.00 (l/91, 5189) 10.00
NA TlONAL STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 43

Groundwoter

(Drinking Woter ) SMCL

Constituent CAS Number mg/L Remark$

Aluminum (fume or dust) 7429-90-5 0.05· 0.2 (1191)

!.
Chloride
4· Dlchlorobenzene
_ .. 2· Dic hlorobenze ne
00-Q0.18
106-46· 7
95-50·1
250
0.005
O.Ql
!NSOWR)
(1191, 5189)

':Et~y~~z_ene 100·41·4 0.03


Fluorine (soluble fluoride) 7782-41·4 2.0
Hexac hlorocye Iopen tad iene 77-47·4 0.008
Iron 7439-89-6 0.3 (NSOWR)
Mangane>e 7439-96-5 0.05 <NSOWRJ
Pentac hlorop hen oI 87-86-5 om
Silver 7440-22·4 0.1 (1191)
'Styrene 100-42·5 0.01
.Sulfate 14808-79-8 250 (NSDWRJ
Toluene 108·88·3 0.04
tTOta I Dissolved Solids ~00-00-34 500 (NSDWRJ
Xylenes (mixed isomers) 1330-20-7 0.02
Zinc (fume 01 dust) 7440-66-6 5 (NSDWRJ
44 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

TABLE 9 - SUPERFUND PROPOSED SOIL


SCREENING LEVELS (SSLs)
NUMERICAL CRITERIA
Soil Soil

Pathway Spedfk Values far Pathway Specific Values for


Surface So'1ls-ln9estian Surface Sails-lnhalatian

Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remarks ppmw Remarks

u-BHC 319-84·6 0,1 (3) 1.0 (3)


Arsenic 7440·38·2 0.37 (3) 2 600 (3)
Benzene 71-43·2 22 (3) 2.5 (3)
Be nzo[al pyre ne 50-32-8 0.11 (3) 13.3
Cadmium 7440-43-9 39 (4) 6 200 (3)
Carbon tetrachloride 56-23-5 4.9 (3) 1.5 (3)
Chlordane 57-74-9 0.49 (3) 0.6
Chlorobenzene 108-90-7 1 600 (4) 170
Chloroform 67-66·3 100 l3) 1.1 (3)
Chromrum (VI) 18540-29·9 390 (4) 930 (3)
Chrysene ff9""."01:9 iio (3) 0.38
1.4· Oich!orobenzene 106-46· 7 27 (3) BO
l , 1-Dich I oroet ha ne 75-34-3 7 800 (4) 450
Die hI or omel ha ne 75·09-2 B5 (3) 44 (3)
Dieldrin ?O_§!_:.l 0.04 (3) 5.1
Ethylbenzene 100-41-4 7 800 (4) 58
Mercury 7439-97-6 23 (4) 41
Naphthalene 91·20·3 3 100 (4) 52
Nickel 7440-02-0 1 600 (41 47 000
Pentachlorophenol 87-86-5 5.3 (3)
PCB-A1oclor 1260 11096-82-5 1.0
p,p'-Dichlorodlphenyl
I rrchloroethane 50-29·3 1.9 (3) 3.9
Tet rach Ioroet hyle ne 127-18·4 12 (3) 41 (3)

Toluene 108-SS-3 16000 (4) 150


1,2,4· Trichlorobenzene 120-82·1 7BO (4) 93
1.1, I· Trichloroethane 71-55·6 420
Trichloroethylene 79-01·6 58 (3) 13 (3)
Vinyl chic• ide 75-01-4 0.34 (3) 0.02 (3)
Vinylidene chloride 75.35.4 1.1 (3) 0.17 (3)
Xylenes (mixed isomers) 1330-20-7 160 000 (4) 97

Sail Sail

Surface Soil SSls Pathway Levels, Tier 1 ,


unadjusted

Constituent CAS Number (ppmw) Remarks (ppmw) Remarks

a-BHC 319-84-6 0.1 (3) 0.000 l


Ar-sen re 7440·3B·2 0.37 (3) 1.211.411 .6 pH of 4. 916.8/8.0
Benzene 71-43·2 2.5 (3) 0.001
8enzotaJpy1ene 50-32-8 0.11 (3) 0.71 (3)

Cadmium 7440-43-9 39 (4) 0.006 /0.81/ lO pH of 4.9~6.818 .0


Carbon tetrachloride 56-23-5 1.5 (3) 0.003
Chlordane 57. 74.9 0.49 (3) 0.2
Chlorobenzene lOB-90·7 170 0.05
Chloroform 67-66-3 1.1 (3) 0.02
NATlONAL STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 45

Sail Soil

Surfoce Sail SSL.s Groundwater Pathway Levels, Tier 1,


unadjusted
Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remi:irks ppmw Remarks

Chro mium (VIJ 18540 -29·9 390 (4) 3.111.911.4 pH of 4 ,916.818.0


Chrysene 218-01·9 0.38 0.04
l ,4-Dichlorobenzene 106-46-7 27 (3) 0.08
1, l-Oichlo1oethane 75.34.3 450 (3) 0.62
Oichlo1omethane 75--09 2 44 (3) 0.001
Oield1in 60-57·1 0.04 (3) 0.000 1
Ethyl benzene 100-41-4 58 0,33
Mercury 7439-97·6 23 (4) 0.000 210.3!0
.42
Naphthalene 91.20.3 52 2.5
Nickel 744o-02-0 1 600 (4) 0:321s:211 s)
Pe ntac h 101 oph enc I 87-86·5 0.01710,00110.0009 pH of 4.9/6.8/8.0
PCB·A1oclo1 1260 11096·82·5 0.82
p,f:I ·Oichlo1od1phenyl
11 ichloroethane 50-29·3 1.9 (3) 0.23
Tetrachlo1oethylene 127-18·4 12 (3) 0.003
Toluene 108-88-3 150 0.36
l .2 ,4· T1 ichlo1obenzene 120-.82· 1 93 0.23
1. I . I ·Tlic h101 oetha ne 71-55-6 420 0.07
T1ichl oroeth yle ne 79-01-6 13 (3) 0.001
Vinyl chlo1 ide 75-01~4. -0: 62 (3) o~cioo 2
Vi nylidene chlo1 ide 75.35.4 0.17 (3) 0.002
Xylenes (mixed isomers) 1330-20· 7 97 5.7

Soil Soil

Groundwoter Pathway Levels, Groundwater Pathway Levels,


Tier 1, with 10 OAF ( 1 ) Tier 1, with l 00 DAF (1 )

Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remarks ppmw Remarks

a-BHC 319-.84-6 0.001 (3) O.Ql t3)


Arsenic 7440-38-2 12.5/14115. 7 pH ol 4.916.818.0 125/140/157 pH of 4.9/6.818.0

Benzene 71-43·2 0.01 (3) 0.1


Benzo[alpy1ene 50-32·8 7.1 71
Cadmium 7440-43-9 0.818.1/100 pH of 4.916.818.0 0.81/81/ I 001 pH of 4.9/6.818.0
Carbon let1achlo11de 56-23·5 0.03 0.3
Chlordane 57.74.9 2.0 20
Chlorobenzene 108-90·7 0.5 5.0
Chloroform 67-66-3 0.2 2.0
:chromium {VI) 18540·29·9 31.4/19/13.6 pH of 4.916.818.0 314/190/136 pH of 4.9/6.8J8.0
Chrysene 218·01·9 0.4 4.0
1,4· 01chlorobenzene 106-46-7 0.8 8.0
l, I· Orchloroethane 75.34.3 6.2 62
: 01chlo1omethane 75-09-2 0.007 0.07
Oieldrin 60- 57-1 0.001 O.Ql
Ethy Ibenzene 100-41·4 3.3 33
Me1cury 7439.97.5 0.002 /3.014 0.02130/42.2 pH of 4.9/6.818.0
.2
Naphtha!ene 91·20·3 25 250
Nickel 744002-0 3.2182/ 157 31.7/82 011 5 pH of 4.916.8/8.0
73
Pe ntac hlo1 op he nol 87-86·5 0.17/0.009 /0.009 1. 7/0.09/ 0.09 pH of 4.9/6.818.0
46 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER
Table 9 - Cant'd.

Soil Soil

Groundwater Pathway Levels, Groundwater Pathway Levels,


Tier 1, with 10 DAF Tier 1, with 100 OAF

Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remarks ppmw Remarks

PCB-Arocl or 1260 11096-82·5 8.2 82 PCB-1260


p,p'-Dichlorodiphenyl
Ir ic hloroeth ane 50-29-3 2.3 23
Te trach Io roe I hylene 127-18-4 0.03 0.3
Toluene 108-88·3 3.6 36
1.2,4-Trlchlorobenzene 120-82· l 2.3 23
1.1, l-Trichloroethane 71-55·6 0.7 7.0
Trichloroethylene 79-01-6 0.01 0.1
Vinyl chloride 75-01-4 0.002 0.02
Vinylidene chloride 75.35.4 0.02 0.2
Xylenes (mixed isomers) 1330-20-7 57 570

( 11 OAF - dilution and at!e nuolion lacto1.

( 2J Surfaco sol I SS l• '"present tne Iowe r of inge •ti on and i nh• lation va Iues.

(31 Calculated values correspond to a cane or rfs~ level ol I In l 000 000.

(41 calculated value• coorespond to• h•L1<d quotient of I.

(51 SSL< 101 pH ol 6.8, uni"'' •Jll!<~ied otherwi•e.


NATIONAL STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 47

TABLE 1 0 - EPA PCB CONTAMINATED SOIL


CLEANUP POLICY
NUMERICAL CRITERIA
Soil
Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remarks

Polychlorinated biphenyls 25/50 /10 restricted access


areas outdoor electrical substations
(restricted access areas) with a
vi si bl e notice or Iabe IIno n·restr 1cted
ace ess areas
Chapter 4: Background Concentrations
DS64-EB/Jan. 1995

Background Concentrations

Back gro11 nd rnncen 1ra1 ions of e lemenl s in soi ls ha v<.: been


rnlk<.:t<.:tl and ana\yzl'd by the U.S. Grnlogical Survey {USGS).
The resuhs of soil samples iaken ai a dep1h o[ approxima1dy
8 in. (203.2 mm) ihroughom !he U.S. by !he USGS are pre-
semed in Table I l.

TABLE 1 1 - BACKGROUND CONCENTRATIONS


OF ELEMENTS IN SOILS
REFERENCE
I. Shackklle. 11.T .. Hamilton, .J.C .. Boerngcn, .l.G .. and Bowlt's, J.M., 2. Shackle11t:. !l.T. ant! lloungen. J.G., -Eiemt:lllal Conce111ra1ions in
"Ekrnt'•Hal Cornpnsi ti on of S 11 rficial ,\\,1 tc iia Is in tht: Com ermi rn >11s Soi I' and Suri icia I Ma1eri,1ls of 1he Com<'Tmi nnus U.S .. - USG S Prok s·
Uni1cd Stmes," USGS Prnkssional Pa11cr 574· D, U.S. Govt""m!llcnl si ona I Paper 12 70. U.S. G ovcn1111e 1u Priming Office. wa,h ing1 ou, DC,
l'rimini-: Office. Washington. DC, l 971. 1934.

NUMERICAL CRITERIA
Soil Soil

Averoge Range

Consf1tuent CAS Number ppmw Remarks ppmw Remarks

Aluminum (fume 01 dusl) 7429-90-5 66000 700·>100 000


Antimony 7440-36.{) 0.67 ·d·8.8
A1semc 7440·38·2 7.2 <0.1·97
Ba11um 7440-39·3 580 10·5 000
Beryllium 7440.41· 7 0.92 <l· 15
801 on (wate1 -soluble) 7440-42·8 34 <20-300
Cadmium 7440.43.9 0.06 0.01· 0.7
Calciu m 7440-70-2 24 000 <1 50-320 000
Cenurn 7440-45-1 86 <150-300
Chromium 74 40-47·3 54 l.0·2 000
' Cob<llt 7440-48·4 10 <3·70
Coppe1 7440-50-8 25 <1·700
Gallium 7440-55·3 19 <5-70
Iron 7439-89-6 25000 100·>100 000
Lanthanum 7439.91.0 41 <30·200

51
Copyright © 1995 by ASTM International www.astm.org
52 CLEANUP CRITERJA FOR SOJLAND GROUNDWATER
Tobie 11 - Cont'd.

Soil Soil

Ave rage Ro nge

Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remarks ppmw Remorks

ead 7439-92-1 19 <:10-700


Manganese 7439-96~5 560 <l-7 000
Mercury 7439.97.5 0.089 <:0.01-4.6
. Molybdenum 7439-98-7 <3·7.0
N1del 7440-02-0 19 <5-700
Phosphorus (yellow 01 white) 7723-14-0 420 20-6 000
Potassium 7440-09-7 23000 50-70 000
Selenium 7782-49-2 0.39 <0.1-4 .3
Sodium 7440-23-5 12000 <500-100 000
Strontium 7440-24-6 240 <:5-3 000
Vanadium(fume or dusll 7440-'62:2 76 <7-500
~Zinc (fume or dust) 7440-66-6 60 <:5-2 900
Chapter 5: Cleanup Criteria Outside the United States
Copyright © 1995 by ASTM International www.astm.org
56 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER
Table 12 - Cont'd.

Groundwater Groundwoter

A B
Constituent CAS Number mg/L Remark s mg/L Remarks

Chlo1 ophenols (indiv.) 00-00-39 0.000 01 0.000 3


Ch 101 op he nol s (Tota I) 00-00·40 0.000 01 0.000 5
Chromium 7440-47·3 0.02 0.05
Cobalt 7440-48-4 0.02 0.05
Copper 7440-50·8 0.02 0.05
Cyanide (free) 57· 12·5 0.005 0.03
Cyc Io hex anol 108·93·0 0.000 5 0.015
Ethylbenzene 100·41·4 0.000 5 0.02
Fluo1anthene 206-44-0 0.000 02 0.001
Fluorine (soluble fluoride) 7782-41-4 0.3 1.2
Gasoline 00-00.45 0.01 0.04
Lead 7439-92-1 0.02 0.05
Mercury 7439-97·6 0.000 2 0.000 5
Mineral oil 00-00-46 0.02 0.2
Molybdenum 7439-98-7 0.005 0.02
Na phi halene 91·20·3 0.0002 0.007
Nickel 7440·02·0 0.02 0.05
Plienanthrene 85-01-8 0.000 l 0.002
Phenol 108-95-2 0.000 5 O.Dl5
Polychlo1 inated b1plienyls 1336·36-3 0.000 01 0.000 2
Pyrene 129·00-0 0:000-02 o:ooi
Pyridine 110,q&.1 0.000 5 0.01
Styrene 100-42·5 0.000 5 0.02
Tetrahyd1ofuran 109-99-9 0.000 5 0.02
Tetr_a_hydrot ~i ~p~e_ne 110-01-0 0.000 5 0.02
Tin 7440-31-5 O.Dl 0.03
Toluene 108·88·3 0.000 5 0.015
Tolal A1omalics 00.00.47 0.001 0.03
Tota I ch lorina ted hydrocarbons 00-00-42 0.001 0.015
Tolal Pesticides 00·00-22 0..000 1 0.001
Tolal Polycycl•c A1oma1ic
Hyd1ocarbons (PAHJ 00-00·48 0.000 2 0.01
Xylenes (mixed Isomers) 1330-20-7 0.000 5 0.02
Zinc (fume or dust) 7440-66-6 0.05 0.2

Groundwoter Soil
c A
Constituent CAS Number mg/L Remarks ppmw Remoric:s

Ammonia 7664·41-7 3..0


Antliracene 120· 12-7 0.01 0.1
Arsenic 7440-38-2 0.1 20
8a1ium 7440.39.3 0.5 200
Benzene 71-43-2 0.005 0.01--
Benzo[aJpyrene 50-32-8 0.001 0.05
Cadmium 7440-43-9 O.Dl 1
Chlorinated aliphat ics (indv.) 00-00·35 0.05 0.1
Chlo1inated aliphatics (Total) 00-00-36 0.07 0.1
Chlo1 inated 01ganic pesticides
(lnd1v.) 00·00·43 0.001 0.1
Ch 101 in ated organic pes t1 cides
(Total) 00-00-44 0.002 0.1
Ch 101 i na t ed po lycyl ic hydrocarbons 00-00-41 0.001 0.05
CLEANUP CRITERIA OUTSIDE THE UNITED STATES 57

Groundw oter Soil


c A
Constituent CAS Number mg/L Remork s ppmw Remarks

Chlo1obenzenes (indiv.J 00·00·37 0.002_ 0.05


Ch 101 obenze ne (Tota I) 00·00·38 0.005 0.05
Chlo1ophenols (md1v. l 00·00·39 0.001 5 0.01
Chlorophenols (Total) 00.00-40 0.002 0.01
Ch1omium 744().47-3 0.2 100
Cobalt 7440-48-4 0 .2 20
Coppe1 7440-50-8 0. 2 50
Cyan 1de (heel 57·12-5 0.1 1.0
Cyc Iohexa no I 108-93·0 0.05 0.1
Ethy Ibenzene 100-41 -4 0.06 0.05
1 Fluoranthene 206-44-0 0.005 0.1
Fluo11ne (soluble fluoride] 7782·41·4 4.0
Gasoline 00-00-45 0.15 20
Lea<l 7439-92-1 0.2 50
M_~1cury ?.439-_97-6 0.002 0.5
Mineral oil 00-00·46 0.6 100
Molybdenum 7439 -98· 7 0. 1 10
N;,phlhalene 9 1-20·3 0 .03 Q.l
Nickel 7440-02·0 0 .2 50
Phenanth1ene 85-01-8 0.01 0.1
Phenol 108·95·2 0.05 0.02
Polychlo1 inated biphenyls 1336-36·3 0.001 0.05
'Pyrene 129-00·0 0.005 0.1
Py1 idine 110-86·1 0.03 0.1
Styrene 100-42-5 0.06 0.1
Tetra hydro! uran 109-99-9 0 .06 0. 1
Tet1ahydtothiophene 110-01 -0 0 .06 0.1
Tin 7440-31-5 0.15 20
To luene 108-88.-3 0.05 0.05
Total A1omatics 00-00-47 0,1 0.1
Total chlorinated hyd1ocarbons 00-00-42 O.D7 0.1
Tota I Pestle ides 00-00·22 0.005 0.1
Total Polycyclic A1omatic
Hyd1oca1 bons (PA H) 00.00-48 0.04 l.O
'.Xylenes (mixed isome1 s) 1330·_20-_7 0.06 0.05
Zinc (fume 01 dust) 7440-66·6 0.8 200

Soil Soil
B c
Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remarks ppmw Remarks

Anthracene 120·12·7 10 100


·Arsenic 7440-38-2 30 50
t
Ba1lum 7440-39-3 400 2000
Benzene 71-43·2 0.5 5
.Ben zo{a ]pyre ne 50-32-8 1 10
Cadmium 7440-43-9 5 20
Chlo11nated ahphatics
(mdv.l 00-00-35 5 50
Chlo1inated allpha tlcs (Total) 00-00·36 7 70
ChlCTinateo organic pestici~ 00-00-43 0.5 5
(indiv.)
58 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER
Tobie 12 - Cont'd.
Soil Soil

B c
Constituent CAS Number ppmw ppmw Remarks
/'
rChlorinated organic pest iddes
I (Total)
\ Chlorinated polycylic
~ hydrocarbom 111

\!
t ~h lor.Obf;l)zene~. .!!~ i~. l .. ,
Ch lorobe nzene (Tota I) 00·00·38 20
Chlorophenols {indiv.) 00-00-39 5
Ch lorophe nols CTota I) 00·00-40 J 10
Chromium 7440.47.3 800
Cobalt 7440·48-4 300
t• •••#1T1-'"""'th
1.Copper 7'4'4if'5?'.8:"
l Cyanide (free) 57-12· 5
lCyclohe~anol 108·93-0 [

l1. Ethylbeniene 100-41·4


\f.1.~.~.~.i:ith ei:i.~. , ,,~.?0~.-:1.4·q., ll'.LI
Gasoline 00-00-45
Lead 7439-92-1
Mercury 7439-97·6
Mineral o~ 00-00-46
Molybdenum 7439-98·7
fN:i'P'lll!la1e~e"' .''9I~20:·3·
{ Nickel 7440-02·0
) Phenanthrene 85-01-8
(Phenol 108·95·2 1n

(f..?!~~-~. ~?.~".'.~.'.~..~.i.P.~.~.'.'Y I~., nm...1. ~.~-~ ~36} ..


Pyrene 129·00·0
Pyrrdine 110·86·1 i1
Styrene 100-42·5 •
Telrahydrofuran 109-99-9 I
Telrahydrothiophene 110-01-0 5
{'iin '7'440".'.fl'.5
jToluene ioa.ss..3 1
(Total Aromatics 00-00-47
)Tota I chlorinated hydrocarbons 00·00-42
ldes .. u,
(Tota.1.. P.est,il,:_ ,,. .,,,•• ,... 0~:22 ..
Total Polycyclic Aromatic
Hydrocarbons (PA H) 00·00·48 20 200
Xylenes (mixed isomers) 1330·20· 7 5 50
Zmc (fume or dust) 7440-66-6 500 3 000
CLf.ANUP CRITERIA OUTSIDE THF. UNITED STATES 59

(2) SOVIET UNION


The Sovie! Union defines 1he maximum allowable concen-
tration of a suhs1ance in soil ag !he Nconcentra tion at which
1he sub~1ance docs not crncr !he plants, water. nr air in
amounts tha1 exceed 1he respec1ivc maximum allowable
conccmration for 1hosc media and has no adverse effects cm
the com position a ncl bio logica 1proper! ics of 1he soi 1. Maxi- ff

rn um a llowah le co IKClll rations i 11 soil a re prcsc n tcd in


Table 13.

TABLE 1 3 - MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE


CONCENTRATIONS IMACt AND TENTATIVE
ALLOWABLE CONCENTRATIONS ITACI OF
CONTAMINANTS IN SOIL IN THE' SOVIET
UNION ( 1984)
REFERENCE
USSR State Commiuec for Science and Technology. "Max'111mm Allow·
ahle Conce111ra1io11s (MAC) and Tc111a1ive Sak Exposure level.,. of
Ham1ful Sul>stancc5 in tilt' Environmemal Medi.1, • UN f:11vironmcn1<il
Programme. Center nf lntema1ional Projects, GKNT. 16, AVl'nue Jean·
Tr('mhlcy. Pel i1 · Sacun ncx, 1209 Geneva. Swil zcrl<in<l. t 14 pages. I 934.

NUMERICAL CRITERIA
Soil Soil

Tentotive Allowoble Moximum Allowoble


Concentrations Concentrotion s

Con.stihJent CAS Number ppmw Remarks ppmw Remarks

IAbale 3383-96·8 0.6


Ace ta Ide h~de 75.07.0 10
rAmiben 00-00-49 0.5
tAnlimony 7440-36-0 4.5
tArsenic 7440·38·2 2.0
At1azine 1912-24·9 0.5
Benzene 71-43-2 0 .3
BenzolaJpyrene 50-32-8 0 .02
Brompohos 00-00.50 0.4
Butylale 2008-41-5 0.6
'.carbophos 121.75.5 2
Carbaryl 63-25-2 0.05
Chloramp 1918-02·1 0.05
1
Chromium 7440.47.3 0.05
I
Copper 7440-50-8 3.0 ext1actable w1lh ammonium
acelale buffer
Cumene 98-.92-8 0.5
Cyanox 00-00-51 0 .4
Cycloate 00.00-52 0 .8
2,4·0 94.75.7 0.1
Daclhal 1861-32-1 0.1
Da!apon, sodium salt 75.99.() 0.5
Desmettyn 00·00·53 0.6
60 CLEANUPCRlTERlA FOR SOlL AND GROUNDWATER

Tobie 13 - Cont'd.

Soil

Moximum Allowoble
Tentotive Allowoble Con~entrotions

Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remarks ppmw Remorks

Dihydroheptach l()r 00-00-54


IG
... ,
01 melhoote 60·51-5 ......
D1nobuton 00-00-55 • .D
Diuron 330-54-1 0.6
Endosulfan 115-29-7 0.1
Etaphos 00:00:5-5 0~1
s-Ethyldipropyl t hiocarbamate 759.94.4 0.9
Fen uron 00-00-57 1.8
Fol pet 133-07-3 0.3
Formaldehyde 50-00-0 7.0
Gardon a 00-00-58 1.4
Glyph ClSa te 1071-83-6 0.5
Heptachlor 76-44-8 0.05
Herban 2163-80-6 0.7
Heter()phClS 00-00-59 0.05
Hexach\01 C>-l ,3-bu\aoiene 87-58-3 0.5
Hel\ilch !orocyl oh exane 58·89-9 0.1
Lead 7439-92-1 20.0
Lenacil 00-00-60 0.1
Lindane 58-89-9 0.1
Linur()n 330-55-2 LO
Malathion 121-75-5 2
Manganese 7439-96-5 I 500
Mercuty 7439-97-6 2.1
Metathi()ne 122-14-5 1.0
MethaphClS oO-o0-"6.i 0.1
Monot1nuron 1746-81-2 0.7
Monuron 150-68-5 0.6
Nickel 7440-02-0 4.0 extractable by ammonium
acetate buffer, pH=4.6
N~rate (as Nl 14797-55-8 130
N1trofor 00-00-62 0.2
Peb.ulale 1114-71-2 0.6
Permelhrin 52645-53-1 0.05
Phenawn 00-00-63 0.7
Phenthoate 2597-03-7 0.4
Ph=lone 23!0-17-0 0.5
Phosmet 732-11-6 0.1
Phosphor us pentox1de 1314-56-3 200
Picloram 1918-02-1 0.05
Pirimicarb 00-00-64 0.3
Pirim iphClS·mel hyl 29232-93-7 0.5/0.l 0.1 In. S()il tit pH=S.5
p,p' ·Di ch lo rod rp he nyl
I rrchloroe\h~ne 50-29-3 0.1
Polych loropinewe 00-00-66 0.5
:Polytria2in (mixl iire7>1
arazine. simJZ1ne. and propazinel 00-00-65 O.DI
trometryn 7287-[9-6 0.5
,Propanll 709-98-8 1.5


CLEANUP CRITERIA OUTSIDE THE UNITED STATES 61

Soil Soil

Maximum Allowable
Tentotive Allowoble Concentrotions

Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remarks ppmw Rema rks

Simazine 122·34·9 0.2


Solan 00-00-67 0.6
Tenarnn 00-00-68 0.4
Terbacil 5902-51-2 0.4
Toluene 108-88-3 0.3
Toxaphene 8001-35-2 0.5
Trichlorlon 52-68·6 0.5
Trifluralin 1582-09·8 0.1
Vanadium (I ume or dust) 7440-62-2 150
Ya Ian 00-00-69 0.9
Zinc (fume or dust) 7440-66·6 23 exlracta ble by amrnon i um
acetate buffer, pH~4.8

Zineb 12122-67· 7 1.8


62 CLEANUP CRJTERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

(3) CANADA humans thrn11gll dust and other ro111 es of exposnre would
no1 exceed the acceptable daily intake. Rdn HJ Richardson,
S ugges1 ed soil cl can up guide Ii n es in A!bcrta arc pn: scntc d
G.M., "Inventory of Cleanup Critcrial and Mc.:thods to Scl~c1
in Ta bk 14 for both acidic soils (less than a pH of 6.5) and soils
Criteria," Unpnblishc.:d Report, Comminee on lnd11strial Si1e
with a pH greater than 6.5.
Decommissioning, Industrial Programs Branch, Environ-
Ontario soil clcan11p guidelines arc presented in Table I 5.
ment Canada, Ottawa, Ontario KIA I G2, 1987, 46 pp.
Soil criteria for proposed redevelopment and for Texaco and
The groundwater and soil indicators in Q11ebcc are pre-
Shell Refinery sites are included. The Ontario Ministry of the
sented in Table 16. Canadian clea1111p criteria were 1aken
Environment rcq11ircd that Texaco Canda, Inc. and Shell
from CCME-TS/WM-TREOI 5, IP I 05, Vol. l: The Development
Canada. Ltd. set the soil cleanup criteria to be 11sed in disman ·
of Soil Cleanup Criteria in Canada, March 1990.
tling two oil refineries. Based on an exposure model for hu-
man health, the criteria were set to ensme that the intake by

TABLE 14 - ALBERTA CANADA


SUGGESTED CLEANUP GiJIDELINES ~OR
INORGANICS IN SOILS
REFERENCE
The Developme111 o[ Soil Ckanup Cri1cria in Canada. Volume t.
CCME-TSIWM·TREOl 5. tP· !05, March t990.

NUMERICAL CRITERIA
Soil Soil

Acidic pH < 6.5 pH> 6.5


Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remarks ppmw Remarks

Cadmium 7440-43·9 t.O 4_0


Chromium 7440.47.3 600 l 000
Cotlall 7440-48-4 100
Copper 7440·50-8 200 400
Lead 7439·92· l 800 I 000
Manganese 7439-96-5 NIA No limil recommended due to
high background levels
Mercury 7439-97-6 2.0
Nickel 7440-02·0 250 300
Tota I Hydrocarbons 00-00-14 20000
Zinc (fume or dusl) 7440-66·6 toonoo sheep diet/others 1 200
CLEANUP CRITERIA OUTSIDE THE UNITED STATES 63

TABLE 1 5 - ONTARIO CANADA


CLEANUP GUIDELINES ~OR SOILS
COMMENTS
(1) All units in ppmw unless otherwise stated. (6) Criteria for antimony, barium, beryllium, cobalt, and va-
(2) Agriculture criteria refer to Ontario's Guidelines for Sew- nadium are tentative, with the exception of the agricultural
age Sludge Utilization on Agricultural Lands, available from guideline; actual permissible levels of parameters in other
Min is try of the Environment. situations may vary aecordi ng to site· specific circumstances.
Further information on the application of these guidelines
(3) For residential/parkland and commercial/industial, may be obtained from the Phytotoxicology Section of Air Re-
cleanup critcrin recommended by Phytotoxicology Section, sources Branch, Ministry of the Environment. These provi·
Air Resources Branch, Ministry of the Environment. The cri- sional guideline.<; apply to soil of pH 6 to 8.
teria are based on phytoxicity except for cadmium, lead and
mercury, which are based on human health, and molybde- (7) Samples should be subjected to the Aqua-Regis Digestion
num and selenium, which are based on animal health. Procedure in order to obtain sample characteristics for com-
parison to the clean-up guidelines. Information on this pro-
(4) For residential/parkland and commercial/industrial: in cedure may be obtained from the Laboratory Services
coarse-textured (sandy) mineral soils the criterin for metal!! Branch of the Ontario Ministry of the Environment.
should be reduced by one-half.
(5) Criteria for oil and grease is for fresh oil; for weathered
oil, the criteria is 2% or 20,000 ppmw.

REFERENCE
Riclwnlson. G.M., "!nvcmory of Cleanup Criteria and Methods to Sc·
kct Criteria." Un1mhlishcd Rcpon. Commiuec on Industrial Si1e
Decommissioning. Industrial Programs Branch, !Onvironmcnt Canada.
011awa. Ontario KI A I G2. 4 6 11agcs, 1987.

NUMERICAL CRITERIA
Soil Soil

Ag riculture Residential I Parkland

Constituent CAS Number ppmw Rema rks ppmw Rema rk s

Anltmony 7440·36-0 10
Arsenic 7440-38-2 14 25
Barium 7440-39·3 1 000
Beryllium 7440-41·7 5
I
Cadmium 7440-43·9 1.0-6.0 4.0
Chromium 7440-47-3 120 l 000
Chromium (VI) 18540-29-9 10
Cobalt 7440-48·4 20 50
Copper 7440-50·8 100 300
lead 7439.92.1 60 500
Me1cury 7439.97.5 0.5 1.0
Molybdenum 7439.93. 7 4.0 5.0
Nickel 7440·02·0 32 200
Oil and grease 00-00-70 10000
Selenium 7782-49-2 1.6 5.0
Silver 7440-22·4 25
Vanadium (fume or dust) 7440-62·2 250
Zinc (fume or dust) 7440-66·6 220 800
64 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER
Table 1 S - Cont'd,

Soil Soil
Commerciol / Industrial Texaco/Shell Refinery Site s

Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remarks ppmw Remorks

Antimony 7440-36-0 25
Arsenic 7440-38-2 50
Barium 7440-39·3 2 000
Benzene 71-43·2 o.o~o .o. 13
Benzo[a]py1e~e 50-32-8 0.004 ·O. 005
Beryllium 7440-41-7 10
Cadmium 7440-43-9 8.0
Chromium 7440-47·3 I 000
Chromium (Vil 18540-29·9 10
Chrysene 218-01·9 470
Cobalt 7440-48-4 100
Copper 7440-50-8 300
Cresci (mixed isomers) 1319· 77.3 700
I
Di{2-et hyl hexy I) pht ha late 117-81-7 70·5 000
1,2· Dlbromoethane 106-93-4 0.000 05
1.4-D lox ane 123-91· I 5.80- 12. 2
Lead 7439.92.1 1000
Me~ury 7439-97-6 2.0
Methyl ethyl ketone 78-93·3 52
Molybdenum 7439-98· 7 40
Naphthalene 91.20.3 5400
Nickel 7440-02-0 200
Oil and grease 00-00-70 10 000
Phenanthrene 85·01·8 1870
Selenium 7782-49·2
Silve1 7440-22-4 50
Vanadium (fume 01 dust) 7440-62-2 250
Zinc (fume or dust) 7440-66·6 800
CLEANUP CRITERIA OUTSIDE THE UNITED STATES 65

TABLE I 6 - QUEBEC, CANADA


GROUNDWATER AND SOIL CONTAMINATION
INDICATORS
COMMENTS
A= contaminants present at the background, or at detection
limit for soil, or at drinking water quality for groundwater;
no further action required.
B = contaminants present at "moderate" levels; additional
study required, some remediation may be necessary.
C = contaminants present at "severe" levels; cleanup re-
quired.
N!D =Not Detectable.
PAH =polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

NUMERICAL CRITERIA
Sail Sail
A B
Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remarks ppmw Remarks

jAchloram D0-00-76
!Aldrin + D1eldrin DD-00-75
~Ammonia 7664..41-7
~Anthracene 120-12-7 NID 10
:Arsenic 7440-38-2 20 30
Barium 7440-39-3 200 400
Benzene 71-43-2 NID 0.5
Benzo (a )an th race ne 55.55.3 NIO
Benzo[a ]pyrene 50-32-8 NID
Cadmium 7440-43-9 l.5 5
"earbofucan 1563-66-2
Carbonyl 63-25-2
I
Chlordane 57-74-9
'Chlorinated allphat1cs (mdv.J 00-00-35 NID 5
Chlor[nated al!p_h~~ otal I _......._ -
___
00-00-36 NID 7
Chlorobenzene (Total) 108-90-7 NID 2
Chlorobenzene (indiv. except hexa-) 00-00-37 NID 1.0
Chlorophenols (indiv,) 00-00-39 0.5
Chlorophenols (Total) 00-00-40 1.0
Chromium 7440-4 7-3 100 250
Chromium (Vil 18540-29-9 5
Chrysene 218-01-9 NID 5
'Cobalt 7440-48-4 20 50
Copper 7440-50-8 50 100
'.~Yan id<> (free) 57-12-5 NID 10
Cyanide, complex (total) 00-00-71 5 50
2,4-D 94.75.7
Diaz1non 333-41-5
Dibenzo[a,hlanthracene 53-70-3 NID
D1benzo[a.hlpyrene 189-64-0 NID 1.0
rDimethYI benzo(al an th ra Ce ne 57.9·7:5· NID i:o
!Oiquat biomide 85-00-7
Endrin 72-20-8
66 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER
Table 16 - Cont'd.

Soil Soil

A B
Con5tituent CAS Number ppmw Remorks ppmw Remorks

Ethylbenzene 100-414 N/D 5


Fl uoi anthe ne 206-44-0 NID 10
~ Fluorine (soluble fluoride) 7782-41·4 200 400
·Gasoline 00-0045 20 100
Heplochlor ep<>xide 1024.57.3
Hexac h lorobenze ne 118· 74- 1 NIO
I ndeno(2,3-cd)py1ene 193-39·5 NIO 1
Lead 7439.92.1 50 200
Undane 58-89·9
Mercury 7439.97.5 a z
Metathione
Methoxychlo1

3· Methy lco! an th ren e
Methyl parathion
Mmeral_orl
Molybdenum 7439-98-7
Na phi ha Iene 91-20·3 \ I

Nick.el 7440-02-0 ~

01 ga noch lor i nated


pestiddes (ind1v.) llJ.«l.i'.il ~

Orga noch !or inated


pes t•c ides (Tota Il
p,p' · D1chloro di phenyl
!1 i ch oroet ha ne
Parathion
Paraquat
Phenanthrene
Pher.<JI
Po!ychlonnated bipheny!s
Py1ene l [i

r&.len;um
Silver ![I
Styrene
' ,3,7,8- Tetrachlorod10enzo
dioxin L
Tin
Toluene ~

Total Nitrate/Nitrite
Total Organic Halogens 8
Total PAH 20
l~xapl'leoo 8oo1-:-3:;2
2.4.5· T11chlorophl<n oxyace!ic ocid 93.75.5
Trich rornacetate pesticides 00-00-77 NID 2.0
Xylenes (mixed isomers) 1330-20-7 NID 5
Zme (fume or dust) 7440-66-6 150 500

Soil Groundwater

c A
Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remorks mg/L Remork.s

11.chlo<am 00-00-76 NID


Ald1in + Dield1in QQ.Q0-75 NID
Ammonia 7664·41·7 0.2
CLEANUP CRITERIA OUTSIDE Tl-/E UNITED STATES 67

Soil Groundwater

c A
Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remarks mg/L Remarks

120-12· 7 100 NID


Arsenic 7440-38-2 50 0.01

['"'"'"'"'
Barium
Benzene
7440-39-3
71-43-2
2 000
5
0.05
NIO
Be nzo(a )ant hr ace ne 56-55-3 10 NIO
. - --
Benzo[a]pyrene 50-32-8 10 NIO
Cadmium 7440-43·9 20 0.001
Carbary I 63-25·2 N/D
Carbofuran 1563-66-2 NID
Chlordane 57-74-9 N/D
Chlorinated aliphatics (indv.J 00·00-35 50 NID
Chlorinated ali phatics (Total) 00·00·36 70 N/D
~Ch lorobenze ne n ota I) 108·90·7 20 NID
Ch lorobenze ne (in div. except hex a- J 00-00-37 10 NID
, Chlorophenols (indiv.j 00-00-39 5
-- - - ·-
Chlorophenols (Total) 00-00-40 10
Chromium 7440-47-3 800
Chmmi1.1m (Vt\ 18540-29-9 20
Chrysene 218-01-9 50
Coball 7440-48·4 300
Copper
Cyanide (free) 57.12.5 100
Cyanide, complex (total) 00·00·71 500
2,4·0 94.75.7
Diazinon 333-41· 5
Di bemo[a, h la nth race ne
Dlb~n zo[a, h Jpyrnn e
53-70-3
189-64-0
57.97.5
..,
ID

Ill
DIm eth yIbe nzo(a) an th race ne
Olquat bromide 85-00·7
Endrln 72-20·8
Ethylbenzene
Flu or anth en e
Fluorine (soluble fluoride) ll l
Gas.oline
Heptachlor epoxide
Hexac hlore benzene 118-74-1 L!l
Indeno(2,3-cd)pyrene 193-39-5 I]
Lead 7439.92.1
lindane 58-89·9
Mercury 7439-97·5
~l'<tath\Drt!'<
iM ethoxyc hlor
i Methyl parathion
·3· Methylcolanthrene
I
' Mineral oil
Molybdenum 7439-98-7
Naphthalene 91-20-3
Nickel 7440-02·0
Orga noc hlor i na ted
pesticides (indiv.) oo.oo. 73 5
"o7ganocliforfnated
pesticides (Tolal) Il l

taraqua( 1910·42·5
Parathion 56-38·2
68 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER
Table 16 - Cant'd.

Sail Graundwater

c A
Canstituent CAS Number ppmw Remcirks mg/l Re mcirks

Phenanth1ene 85·01·8 50 NIO


Phenol 108-95-2 10 NIO
Polychlorinated biphenyls 1336-36-3 10 NID
p,p·· Dichlo1odlphenyl trrchloroethane 50-29-3 NIO
Pyrene 129-00-0 100 NID
Selenium 7782-4 9·2 10 0.001
S~ve1 7440-22·4 40 0.02
Styrene 100-42-5 50 NID
2,3, 7 ,8-Tet1 achlorodibenzo
dioxin 1746-01-6 0 .001 NID
Tin 7440-31-5 300 0.01
IToluene 108-88-3 30 NID
Tota I Nitrate/Nitrite 00-00-2 0.1
jTotal Organic Halogens 00-00· 78 80 NID
Total PAH QQ.Q0-72 200 N/D
Toxaphene 8001-35-2 NID
Tri ch 101 oace tale pest le Ides 00-00·82 20 NID
2,4.5-Trichloiophenoxyacetic
acid 93. 75.5 NID
Xylenes (mixed isome1s) 1330-20-7 50 NID
_Zinc (fume or dust) 7440-66-6 1 500 0.02

Groundwater Groundwater

B c
Constituent CAS Number mg/L Remcirks mg/L Remorks

Achlo1am 00-00·76 0.001 0.002


Ald1in + Oieldrin 00-00-75 0.000 7 0.002
IAmmonia 7664-41-7 1 3
tAnlh1 ace ne 120· 12· 7 0.007 0.03
A1senic 7440-38·2 0.05 0.1
Barium 7440-39-3 1.0 2.0
Benzene 71-43-2 0.001 0.005
Benzo( ala nth 1ace ne 56-55-3 0.000 5 0..002
Benzol al py1 en e 50-32-8 0.000 2 0.001
Cadmium 7440-43·9 0.005 0.02
Carbaryl 63-25·2 0.07 0.15
~Ca rbof ura n 1563-66·2 0.07 0.15
Chlordane 57.74.9 0.000 7 0.002
Chlorinated aliphalics(lndv.J 00-00-35 0.01 0.05
Chlor i na led aIiph at ic~IToia I) 00·00·36 0.015 0.07
Chlorobenzene 108-90· 7 0.04 0.06
Chlorobenzene (ind iv. except hexa·) 00-00-37 0.002 0.03
Chlorophenols (i ndlv.J 00-00-39 0.000 5 0.005
Chlorophenols (Total) 00-00-40 0.001 0 .01
Ch1omium 7440-47-3 0.05 0 .5
Ch1omium (VII 18540-29·9 0.02 0.05
Chrysene 218·01·9 0.001 0.002
•Cobalt 7440-48-4 0.05 0.2

! Copper 7440-50-8 0.5 1.0

I Cyanide (f1ee)
Cyanide, complex (total)
57-12-5
00-00-71
0.1
0.2
0.2
0.4
CLEANUP CRITERIA OUTSIDE THE UNITED STATES 69

Groundwater Groundwater

B c
Constituent CAS Number m g/L Remorks mg/L Remarks

2,4·D 94. 75.7 0.1 0.2


Diazrnon 333-41·5 0.014 0.03
Oibenzola,h)anlhracene 53·70·3 0000 2 0.000 5
Oibenzola,h Jpyrene 189·64·0 0.001 0.005
Oimethylbenzo(a)anl hracene 57:97:6 0.000 5 0.002
Diqual b1omide 85-00-7 0.05 0.1
End1ln 72-20·8 0.000 2 0.000 5
Ethy Ibenzene 100-41-4 0.05 0.15
Fluoianthene 206-44·0 0.002 0.01
Fluo1 ine (soluble fluoride) 7782·41·4 1.5 4.0
Gasoline 00·00·45 0.04 0.15
Heptach I01 epox ide 1024.57.3 0.003 0.005
Hexachlo1obenzene 118· 74. J 0.000 5 0.002
Ind eno( 2,3-cd)py1 ene 193·39·5 0.001 0.005
lead 743992·1 0.05 0.1
Lindane 58-89·9 0.004 0.01
Me1cury 7439·97·6 0.001 0.02
Meta\l\iooe lZZ·l4·S Q.007 0.002
Methoxychlo1 72.43.5 0.1 0.2
Methyl pa1athion 298·00-0 0.007 0.02
3. Melhylcolant h1en e 56-49·5 0.000 5 0.002
Mine1al 011 00.00-46 2.0 15.0
Molybdenum 7439·98· 7 0.02 0.1
Naphthalene 91.20.3 0.01 0.03
Nickel 74<10·02-0 0.25 1.0
Organochlorinaled
pesticides (rnd•v.J 00-00-73
01ganoclllo11nated
pesticides (Total I 00·00·74
Pa1aquat 1910·42·5 0.007 0.02
Paralhion 56-38·2 0.035 0.07
Phena nI hrene 85-01-8 0.001 0.005
Phenol 108-95·2 0.002 0.02
Polychl011nated biphenyfs 1336-36·3 0.000 2 0.001
p,p'· Dichlo1odiphenyl
t1 ichloroethane 5029·3 .0.03 0.06
Py1ene 129 00·0 0.007 0.03
Selenium 7782-~9 · 2 0 .01 0 .05
Salver 7440·22·4 0.05 0.2
Sty1ene 100-42·5 0 .04 0.12
2 ,3,7 ,s. Tetrachlomoiberrm 11tl6·01·6 lim'1t ol
dioxin Detectmn
Tin 7440·31·5 0.03 0.15
Toluene 108·88-3 0.03 0.10
Total Nitrale/N1t11le 00.00.2 10 30
Total 01gan1 c Halo~ens 00·00·78 0.015 0.02
Total PAH 00·00·72 0.01 0.05
Toxaphene 8001·35·2 0.005 0.01
T1 ichlo1oacetate pesticides 00·00· 77
2 .A. 5·Trichlmophenoxyaceric
<JC id 93 76·5 0 .01 0 .02
Xylenes (maxed isomers) 1330·20· 7 0.02 0.06
Zt nc (fume 01 dusl) 7440·66·6 5.0 10.0
70 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

(4) UNITED KINGDOM


Soil criteria in the Uni1ed Kingdom are presented in Ta-
ble 17. The criteria were extracted from the Development of
Soil Cleanup Criteria in Canada, Volume CCME-TS/WM-
TREO 15, IP 105, March 1 990. Concentrations are given in
ppmw air-dried soil.

11
TABLE 17 - TENTATIVE
11
TRIGGER
CONCENTRATIONS FOR SELECTED
INORGANICS IN THE
UNITED KINGDOM
COMMENTS
1. All values are for concentrations determined on "spot" 6. Boron determined by standard ADAS method (soluble in
samples based on an adequate site investigation carried out hot water).
before development. They do not apply to analysis of aver- 7. Copper, nickel, and zinc determined by standard ADAS
aged, bulked, or composited samples. methods (extractable by 0.05M EDTA).
2. Many of these values are preliminary and will require 8. The phytotoxic effects of copper, nickel and zinc may be
regular updating. They should not be applied without refer- additive. The trigger values given here are those applicable
ence to the AERE Report R-10366. to the ~worst-case": phytotoxic effects may occur at these
3. If all sample values are below the "trigger concentrations", conccn tra tions in acid, sandy soils. 1n soils of a neutral or al-
then the site may be regarded as uncontaminated as far as kaline nature, phytotoxic effects are unlikely at these con-
the hazards from these contaminants are concerned, and de- centrations.
velopment may proceed. Above these concentrations, reme- 9. Grass is more resistant to phytotoxic effects than are
dial action may be needed, especially ifthe contamination is most other plants, and its growth may not be adversely af-
still continuing. fected at the values specified for boron, copper, nickel and
4. Soluble hexavalent chromium extracted by O.lM HCl at zinc.
37°C; solution adjusted to pH 1.0 if alkaline substances pre- 10. Units are ppmw air· dried soil.
sent.
11. Coal tar values do not take into account the hazard to
5. For boron, copper, nickel, and zinc, the soil pH value is as- skin contact.
sumed to be about 6.5 and should be maintained at this
value. If the pH fall s, the toxic effects and the uptake of
these elements will be increased.

REFERENCE
The Development of Soil Ckannp Criteria in Canada, V"l. 1, CCME·
TS/W M-TREO 1 5, I I' I 0 5, MJ rch l 990,

NUMERICAL CRITERIA
Soil
Trigger Concentrotions•

Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remarks

Arsenic 7440-38-2 10140 Planned uses: domestic


gardens/parks, playing
fields, open space
Boron (water-soluble) 7440·42·8 3 Any uses whe1 e plan ts are to be grown
Cadmium 7440·43-9 3115 PI~ nned uses: domest1c
gardens/parks, playing fields,
open space
CLEANUP CRITERIA OUTS!DE TT-lE UNITED STATES 71

Soil
Trigger Concentrations•
Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remcirks

Sulfate 00-00-85 1001200 Residential, commercial and


industrial developments with no
Iandscapi nglaII other uses
Chromium 7440-47-3 600/1000 Planned uses, domestic
gardens/parks. p Iayi ng fie Ids.
open spa_ce
Chromium (VI) 18540-29·9 25 All uses
Coal tar emissions 8007-45·2 2001500/5 PI an ned uses: domestic
000 gardens, amenity areas/public
open space/industrial {no landscaping)
Copper 7440-50-8 50 Any uses where plants are lo
be grown
Cyanide (free) 57-12·5 501500 Planned uses: domestic
gardens. am en ity areas, open
space/industrial {no landscaping)
Cyanide, comple~ (total) 00-00·71 50 Any ur.es where plants are to
be grown
lead 7439-92· l 50012 000 PI an ned uses: domestic
gardens/parks, playing frelds,
open space
Mercury 7439.97.5 1120 PI an ned uses: domestic
gardens/parks, playing fields,
open space
Nickel 7440·02·0 !.I Any uses where plants are to
be grown
Ph enol 108-95-2 Planned uses, domest;c ga1dens
and al I ur.es with main water
se~ices/industrial (no landscaping)
Selenium 7782-49·2 3.016.0 PI an ned uses: domestic
gardens/parks, pIay Ing fie Ids, open space
Sulfur 7704-34·9 l 000 All uses
Sulphide 00-00-84 250 All uses
Thiocyanate 00-00-83 50 All uses
Zinc {fume or dust) 7440-66-6 130 Any ur.es where plants are to
be grown

• Refer lo Comme n! IC.


72 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

(5) FRANCE
Rc.:krc.:nce 1Ii resholds for soil con I aminanl s in France are
lllTScllletl in Table 18. The.: informalion was ex 1racted from
The Development of Soil Cleanup Crireria in Canada, Volume I,
CCME·TS/WM·THEOl 5, IP! 05, March 1990.

TABLE 1 8 - REFERENCE THRESHOLDS FOR


SOIL POLLUTANTS USED BY FRANCE
REFERENCE
The Dcvclopmcm of Soil Ch."anu11 Criteria in Canada, Vol. I. CCMF.-
TSIWM·TREOl 5, TC105, March 1990.

NUMERICAL CRITERIA
Soil Soil

Background Moximum lnvestigatian Threshold

Con.stitvent CAS Number ppmw Remark s ppmw Remarks

Arsenic 7440-38·2 20 40
Ba11um 7440-39-3 200 400
Boion (wate1-soluble) 7440-42-8 20 40
Bromine 7725.95.5 20 40
Cadmium 7440-43·9 2 4
Chromium 7440-47-3 150 300
Cobalt 7440-48-4 30 60
Copper 7440· 50·8 100 200
Cyanide (free) 57· 12·5 l 10
Cyanide (Total) 00·00-79 5 50
Fluo11ne ·(soluble fiuorfde) 1ia2-:-41.4 200 400
Lead 7439-921 100 200
Manganese 7439-96-5 1 000 2000
Mercury 7439.97.5 2
Molybdenum 7439.93.7 ~ 8
N;ckel 7440-02·0 50 100
Phenol 108-95-2 0,02
Polychlo11naled biphenyls 1336-36·3 0.05 l
Selenium 7782-49·2 10 20
Silver 7440-22-4 10 20
Sulfur 7704-34·9 2 20
Tin 7440-31-5 20 40
Vanadium (fume or dust) 7440-62·2 100 200
Zinc (fume 01 dust) 7440-66·6 300 600
CLEANUP CRITERIA OUTSIDE THE UNITED STATES 73

Soll Soi!
Treatment Threshold Emergency (lmmediote Action)
Threshold

Constituen t CAS Number ppmw Remark s ppmw Remarks

~
~Arsenic .,. ' 7440·38·2
~ Barium 7440·39-3
{ Boron (water-soluble) 7440-42-8
rBrom·rne 7720.95-6
f
t~~~!~~ 111'111111'" .4-1 •• /JJ~u j JJl.I 7440:::..~·~.
Ch<omium 7440-47·3
Cobalt 7440-48-4
Copper 7440-50.S
Cyanide (free) 57-12-5
Cyanide (Total) 00-00- 79
rr1~r;;r;;;;,is'Oiti'i>1e-·11~;;r:&ti> ·rum 'fl//J "778";?:41:4
~ Lead 7439·92· l
~ Manganes& 7439.95.5
~Mercury 7439-97-6
r~~!~~~?•~-~•N I 1111~/J, lu .11 •• r.uJ J.1~~,'~-~:?.
Nickel 7440·02-0
Phenol 108·95-2
Pol ye hlorina te<l b <phenyls l'.BG-36-3
Selenium 7782-49-2
Sil~er 7440-22-4
~·;7;{tur ~,,, 7'704:34._9
jTin 7440-31·5
(.Vanadium (fume or dust) 7440-62·2
{zi nc (fume or dust) 7440-65-6
Chapter 6: State Cleanup Standards and Guidelines
Copyright © 1995 by ASTM International www.astm.org
78 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

ALASKA
STATUS
D Regulation !SJ Guideline
D Exists !SJ Exists 09/26/90
D Proposed D Proposed
D In Development D Soil
D Expected Avai lability !SJ Groundwater
D Both Soil & Groundwater
D None D Other

COMMENTS
1. Groundwater to be cleaned up to levels not exceeding the 4. Alternative cleanup levels (ACLs) may be adapted for a
more stringent of the final state or federal mnximum con- site if an approved risk assessment is performed and cleanup
taminant levels (MCLs) for organic and inorganic chemicals. to the levels identified in (1) and (2) is not technically feasi-
2. Total petroleum hydrocarbons {TPH) should be cleaned up ble.
to nond!'.!tectable levels as measured by EPA Method 418.1. 5. Soil Clean up levels are determined on a site· specific basis.
3. For organic and inorganic contaminants that have not Cleanup levels for gasoline contamination may range from
been assigned a final or proposed MCL, cleanup levels 10 to 100 ppmw BTEX, 0.1 to 0.5 ppmw benzene, and 50 to
shou Id be based on criteria cited in EPA's Water Quality Cri- 1000 ppmw gnsoline hydrocarbons (EPA Manual 8015M).
teria 1986 using a health risk factor of 10·6 or one-in-one- Cleanup level for diesel contamination may range from 100
to 2000 ppmw diesel hydrocarbons (EPA Method 8100M).
million.
Cleanup levels for waste oil contamination arc all of th e
above plus 2000 ppmw TPH (EPA Method 418. 1).

REFERENCE
Alaska Depa 1emcm ol En vi ru11mc1 na I Conscrl'alion I nee ri 111 GniJancc
lor Surface and Gro11 ndwaec r Cleanup Levels. 26 Sepe. 1990.

C ontact: Richard Cormack


Office: Division of Spill Prevention and Response
Agency: Department of En vi ronmcn tal Conser vation
Address: 410 Willoughby Ave.
J uneau, AK 99801-1795
Phone: 907-465-5204

NUMERICAL CRITERIA
Graundwater Groundwater

Fede ral MCL State MCL


Con5tituent CAS Number mg /L Remarks mg/L Remarks

Alachloi 15972-60·8 0.002


Aldica1b 116·06·3 0.01 proposed
Aldica1 b sulfone 1646·88·4 0.04 proposed
Aldica1 b sullox1de 1646·88·3 O.Dl pm posed
Aniimony 7440-36-0 0.006
Arsenic 7440-38-2 0.05
Asbestos 1332·21·4 7 libers/L
(I onge r th an 10 m1c ronsJ
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 79

Groundwoter G roundwater

Federal MCL State M CL

Constituent CAS Number mg/l Remarks mg/l Remarks

Atra.zrne 1912·24-9 0.003


Barium 7440.39.3 2.0 1.0
Benzene 71-43·2 0.005
Benzo(a )ant hr ace ne 56-55·3 0.000 I proposed
B enzo( b)! Iuor an th en e 295:99:2 0.000 2 proposed
Benzo(a)pyrene 50-28-8 Q_OOO 2
Ben zo( k)flu or an th en e 207-08-9 0.000 2 proposed
Beryllium 7440-41-7 0.004
Brs (2-ethylhexyll adipaie 103-23· I 0.4
Cadmium 7440-43-9 0.005

Chrysene 218-01·9 0.000 2


Cyanrde 57-12·5 0.2
2,4-D 94-75-7 0.07
Da\apon, smli\1m sa\\ 75-99-C C.2
01(2-ethylhexyll phthalale 117-81·7 0.006
I .2 · Drbromo-3-ch Ioroprop<l ne 96-12·8 0.0002
1, 2-D i bromoet ha ne 106-93-4 0.000 05
1,4-Dichlorobenzene 106-46-7 0.075
1,2· Dichlorobenzene 95-50-1 0.6
1,2· D.1~h.IO:~!h'.1~e 107-06·2 0.005
ci5-l .2· D1chloroethylene 156-59-2 0.07
!ran S· I .2· D1ch Ioroet hyle ne 156-60·5 0.1
Di ch loromethane 75-09·2 0.005
1,2· Dichloropropane 78-87·5 0.005
rnnoseb 3.35.7 0.007

·~ ~

11
4
Glyphosate 1071-83-6 0.7
Heptachlm 76-<14-8 0.000 4
He ptac hlor epoxide 1024.57.3 0.000 2
Hexa ch Ior obe nzen e 118-74-1 0.001
Hexa ch Ior ocycl ope ntad ie ne 77-47·4 0.05
Lead

I
·-
N ilrate (as N) 14797-55·8 10.0
N rtrrle (as N) 14797-65·0 1.0
Oxarnyl (Vyda.tel 23135-22-0 02
Pen ta ch Ior op he nol 87-86·5 0.001
Picloram 1918-02· I 0.5
Polychlorinated b~phenyls fa315="3E;~ 0.000-5 PCBs as
decachloro· bi phenyl
Selenium 7782-49-2 0.05 O.Ql
SilVBr 7440.22·<1 0.05
80 CLEANUP CRJTERJA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

Alasko Cont'd.

Groundwater Groundwater

Federol MCL State MCL

Constituent CAS Number mg/L Remarks mg/L Remorks

Simazine 122.34.9 0.004 based on


Group C (possible human
carcinogen)
Sty;eoe 100-42·5 0.1
Sulfate 14808·79-8 400/500 proposed
2,3,7,8-Teltachlorodibeozo
dioxin 1746·01·6 0.00000003
Tetrachloroethylene 127·18·4 0.005
Thallium 7440·28·0 0.002
Toluene 108-88-3 1.0
Toxaphene 8001-35-2 0:003
1.2,4· Trichlorobenzene 120-82-1 0.07
I, I, I· Trichloroethane 71·55·6 0.2
l, l.2·Trichloroethane 79·00·5 0.005
Trichloroethylene 79·01-6 0.005
Vinyl chloride 75-01·4 0.002
Vinylidene chloride 75.35.4 0.007
Xylenes (mixed isomers) 1330·20·7 10.0
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUlDELINES 81

ARIZONA
STATUS
0 Regulation jg] Guideline
D Exists ~ Exists 06/01/92
D P roposed D Proposed

0 In Development OSoiI
D Expected Availability D Groundwater
igj Both Soil & Groundwater
ONone D Other

COMMENTS
I. These criteria are health· based guidance levels repre- 4. Guidance levels have not been subjected to Arizona's rule-
senting human ingestion levels that are unlikely to result in making process. They therefore have no official status with
adverse health effects during long-term exposure. respect to enforcement as cleanup standards.
2. Guidance levels are designed to protect against toxic doses 5. Divide soil ingestion health based guidance level (HBGL)
of systemic toxicants and to limit to one-in-one-million (10-fi) by 100 to obtain "worst possible case" involving an individual
the excess cancer risk level for carcinogenic compounds. prone to eating soil.
3. Guidance levels apply only to ingestion of drinking water 6. Site specific risk assessment. can be conducted to establish
and soil. They do not reflect inhalation or direct contact cleanup levels for petroleum contaminated soil. Cleanup
risks. In addition, the soil ingestion guidance levels do not level for TPH in soil is 100 ppmw. Cleanup level for TP H in
take into account each chemical's capability to leach to groundwater is 0.001 mg/L. For other constituents, refer to
groundwater. table.

REFERENCE
H11ma11 Hfa/tl1-Has1d Guidance LfVe/s for tlie /11gesn'o11 of Conta111i11a111s i11
Drinki11g IVataaudScil, Arizona Dcpanmcnl ul f:nviio11111cn1.1l Q11a!i1y,
June l 992.

Contact: Chuck Graf


. Office: Groundwater Hydrogeology Section
Agency: Department of Environmental Quality
Address: PO Box 600
Phoenix, AZ 85001-0600
Phone: 602-207-2300

NUMERICAL CRITERIA
Soil
Ingestion HBGL" Ingestion HBGL"
- - -- - ----~

Constituent CAS Number ppmw Re marks mg/L Remarks

Acenaphthylene 208-96·8 7 000 0.42


Acephate 30560-19-1 47 0.002 8
Acerone 67-64·1 12 000 0.7
Acrolein 107-02-8 1800 0.11
Acr>jlam fde 79-06·! 0.3 0.000 008
Acrylonitri!e 107-13-l 2.5 0.000 07
a·BHC 319-84·6 0-22 0.000 006
82 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

Arizona Cont'd.

Soil Groundwater

Ingestion HBGl • Ingestion HBGL"


Constituent CAS Number ppmw Re marks mg/L Remark s

Alachlor 15972·60-8 17 0.000 43


Aldicarb 116-06·3 150 0.009 I
Aid lea rb sul fone 1646-88-4 35 0.002 1
Aid rca rb su Ifox ide 1646·88·3 150 0.0091
Aldrin 309-00·2 0.08 0.000 002
Ametryn 834· 12·8 I 100 0.063
/l.mmomum su\famate 77B-O&O 23000 l.4
Anthracene 120-!2-7 35 000 2.1
Antimony 7440-36·0 47 0.002 8
Arsenic 7440-38-2 840 0.050
Asulam 3337. 71· I 5800 0.350
Alrazrne 1912·24·9 58 0.003 5
Ali nphos· methyl 86·50-0 290 0.018
Barium 7440·39·3 33000 2
8enomyl 17804-35·2 5800 0.35
Bentazon 25057-89·0 290 0.018
Benzene 71-43·2 47 0 .13 ppmw cleanup level 0.001 2 0.005 mg/L cleanup level
fo1 pet1oleum contamrnairon for pe!role um con I am ination
Benzrdrne 92·87-5 0.006 0.000 000 2
8enzo(a)anthracene 55. 55.3 0.11 0.000 003
8enzo(a) pyrene 50·32-8 0.11 0.000 003
Be nzo(b)fl uo1 ao ! hMe 205.99.2 0.11 0.000 003
Be nzo( klfl uo1 an I he ne 207·08·9 0.11 0.000 003
Se nzy I alcohol 100·51·6 35 000 2.1
Beryllium 7440-41· 7 0.32 0.000 008
Brs ( 2. ethyl heryll ad i pate 103-23· I 8 200 0.49
Brs(2·chloroethyl) ether 111-44·4 1.2 0.000 03
B1s(2-<:hloi oisopropyl)
ether 39638-32·9 4 700 0.28
Bo1on \wa\er·solub\e) 7440-42-8 ll 000 0.63
Bromacrl 314-40·9 I 500 0.091
8romoform 75·25·2 170 0,004 4
81omomethane 74-83·9 160 0.009 8
B1omoxynil 1689-84·5 2300 0.14
Bu ty I ben zyl phtha late 85-68-7 1_900 0.11
Bulylate 2008·41·5 5800 0.35
Cadmrum 7440-43-9 58 0.003 5
Cap tan 133-06·2 15 000 0.91
Carbary! 63-25·2 12 000 0.7
Carbofuran 1563·66·2 580 0.035
Carbon disulfrde 75· 15-0 12 000 0.700
iCarbon tetrat hlor ide 56-23· 5 10 0.000 27
.Carboxin 5234-68-4 12 000 0.7

'
.Chloramben
,ChlO!dane
133·90-4
57. 74.9
1800
1.0
0.11
0.00003
Chlordimetorm 6164-98-3 1.2 0.000 03
Chlorobenzene 108-90-7 2 300 0.14
Chloroform 67·66·3 220 0.005 7
Ch lorometha ne 74-87·3 47 0.002 8
2 ·Ch lorop hen ol 95-57·8 580 0.035
'.chlOrothalonil 1897·45.'.6 470' 0.012
1Chlorpyrrros 2921-88-2 350 0.021
~Chlorsull uron 54902·72-3 5800 0.35
'ch1omium 7440-47-3 l 700 0.1
I
Chrysene 218-01·9 0.11 0.000 003

STATE Cl.EANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 83

Soil Groundwater

Ingestion HGBL" Ingestion HBGL"

Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remarks mg/L Remarks

Coppe1 7440-50-8 22000 1.3


C1eo;ol (Total) 00·00·87 5800 0.35
Cyanazme 21725-46-2 230 0.014
Cyanide 57-12-5 2 600 0.15
Cy1omaz111e 66215-27-8 880 0.053
2.4-D 94.75.7 1 200 0.070
Daclhal 1861-32-1 58000 3.5
Dalapon. sodium 5all 75-99-0 3 500 021
DDTIOOEJOOD (Total) 00-00-03 4.0 0.000 10
c i s-1 ,2-D 1c hIm oeth yle ne 156-59·2 1200 0.07
Di(2·ethylhexyl) phthalale 117-81-7 97 0.002 5
D1azmon 333·41-5 110 0.006 3
Oibenzo(a. h)anth1 acene 53. 70·3 0.11 0.000 003
1,2· Dib1omo-3·chloropropane 96-12-8 1.2 0.000 03
D1b1omochloiomethane 124-48· 1 230 0.014
1,2· Dlbiomoethane 106-93-4 0.02 0.000 000 4
Dibutyl phthalate 84-74·2 12 000 0.7
Dicamba 1918-00·9 3 500 0.21
Dichlobenil 1194-65·6 58 0.003 5
Dichloran 99.30.9 2 900 0.18
I .4· Dic h101 obenze ne 106-46-7 1 200 0.07
1,3· Dlchlo1obenzene 541· 73-1 10000 0.62
I ,2. Ole h101 obenze ne 95-50-1 10000 0.62
3 ,3' -Dichloiobenz1d1ne 91-94-1 3.0 0.000 08
Dichloi obmmomethane 75-27·4 10 0.000 27
Dlchlo1od1l luo1omethane 75-71·8 23 000 1.4
1.2· Dichloroethane 107-06·2 15 0.000 38
trans-1,2-Dichlo1oe1 hylene 156-60·5 2 300 0.140
Dlchlo1omethane 75-09-2 180 0.004 7
2.4· D1chlorophenol 120-83·2 350 0.021
l .2· D>chlo1oprop;Jne 73.37.5 20 0.000 51
1,3· Dichloropropylene 542-75-6 7.6 0.000 19
D1cofol 115-32-2 3.1 0.000 08
Dield11n 60-57· 1 0.09 0.000 002
OJ~t~y~p~_ate 84-66·2 94 000 5.6
Oifenzocual 43222-48·6 9 400 0.56
Diisop1opyl
mel hylphosphonate 1445· 75-6 9 400 0.56
Dlmethoate 60-51-5 23 0.0014
2 .4-0 in itro phenol 51-28-5 230 0.014
2 .4-Dimr1ofoluene 121:·14.-2 2.0 0:000"05
Dinos.eh 88-85-7 120 0.007
1,4-Dioxane 123-91-l 120 0.003 2
Dlphenam1d 957.51.7 3 500 0210
1,2· ~ip!.':_nyl~y~1.azine 122-66·7 l.7 0.000 04
Diquat b1omide 85-00·7 260 O.Ql5
Disulfoton 298-04-4 4.7 0.000 28
Dlu1on 330-54-1 230 0.014
Endosullan 115-29·7 5.8 0.000 35
Endolhall 145· 73.3 2 300 0.14
End1111 72-20-8 35 0.002 1
Eplchlo1ohyd1 in 106-89-8 140 0.003 5
Ethephon 16672-87-0 580 0.035
s-Ethyl
dipiopyll hiocarbamate 759-94-4 2 900 0.180
El hyl benzene 100-41-4 12 000 68 ppmw cleanup level 0.7 0-7 mg/L Is I he cleanup level fo1
for pelro le um con tam in at ion petrnleum contamination
84 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER
Ari:z:ona Cont'd.

Soil Groundwoter

Ingestion HGBL' Ingestion HBGL •

Con5tituent CAS Number ppmw Remark5 mg/L Remork s

Ethylene glycol 107·21·1 230 000 14


Ethylene thiou rea 95.45. 7 38 0.000 97
n-ethyttoluene sullonamld 26914·52-3 290 O.ot8
Fenamiphos 22224·92-6 29 0.001 8
Fenarimol 60168·88·9 7 600 0.46
FI uomet uro n 2164·17-2 1500 0.091
FI uora nt he ne 206·44-0 4 700 0.28
Fluorene 86·73-7 4 700 0.28
Ftuori ne (soluble fluoride) 7782·41·4 7000 0.42
Fluridone 59756·60-4 9400 0.56
Fl uva Ii nate 69409-94-5 I 200 0.070
Fonolos 944·22-9 230 0.014
Form et ana te hydroc hlor ide 23422·53·9 180 0.011
Fosetyl·al 39148·24·8 35000 2.1
Glyp~osale 1071-83·6 12 000 0,7
Harmony 79277·27-3 l 500 0.091
Heptachlor 76·44-8 0.3 0.000 008
Hept ac hlor epox ide 1024·57-3 0,15 0.000 004
Hexac hIoro-1, 3. butad le ne 87·68·3 23 0.0014
Hexachlorobenzene 118· 74· l 0.85 0.000 02
~· Hexachlorocyclohexane 319-85-7 0.76 0~000'02
Hexac h lorocyc lopentad ier 1e 77-47-4 820 0.049
Hexachloroethane 67·72-1 12 0.000 7
Hexahydro· l ,3,5-trinil ro-
1,3,5· triazine 121·82-4 35 0.002 1
Hexazlnone 51235·04·2 3 900 0.23
lmazalil 35554.44.0 1500 0.091
lmazaquln 81335.37.7 29 000 1.8
lndeno(2,3·cd)pyrene 193·39-5 0.11 0.000 003
lsopllornne 78·59-1 2300 0,140
Lead 7439-:-92.1 84 0.005
Lindane 5&-89-9 3.5 0.000 21
linuron 330.55.2 23 0.0014
Malathion 121· 75-5 2300 0.14
Maleic hydrazide 123·33· l 58000 3.5
Mancozeb 8018·01· 7 3 500 0.21
Maneb 12427·38-2 580 0.035
Manganese 7439·96-5 12 000 0.7
Mepiquat chloride 24307·26·4 3 500 0.21
Mercury 7439.97.5 35 0.002 I
Metalaxyl 578·37:-f~t1 0.42
Mel hamidophos 10265--92· 6 0.000 35
Melhiocarb 2032·65· 7 0.008 8
Methomyl 16752-77-5 0.18
M~-t hoxych Ior 72-43-5 0.035
Mel hyl ethyl ketone 78-93-3 0.35
Methyl parathion 298-00·0 0.001 8
Methyl /elf· butyl
ether 1634·04-4 580 O.Q35
2· Methyl· 4·chlorophenoxy
acetic acid 94. 74·6 58 0.003 5
Meto!achlor 51218-45-2 1800 0.11
lk\1\b11zin 21087-64-9 2900 0.18
Metsulfuron· methyl 74223-64.Q 29000 l.8
Molybdenum 7439·98-7 120 0.007
STATE Cf,EANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 85

Soil Groundwater

Ingestion HGBL" Ingestion H_B_G_L


_"_ _ __ __

Constituen t CAS Number ppmw Remork s mg/L Remarks

rMomx:rolopl10s 6923-22-4 5.3 0.00032


Monuron 150-68·5 82 0.0049
MSMA (as arsenic) 2163-80·6 840 0.05
n-Hexa ne 110-54·3 7 000 0.42
N-Nitrosodi· n
·propylamine 621-64-7 0.19 0.000 005
N-Nitrosodimelhylamine 62-75-9 0.03 0.000 000 7
N- N 1trosod1 phe nylam ine 86-30·6 280 0.007 l
N-N 1trosopyrrol1dcne 930-55·2 0.65 0.000 02
Na led 300-76-5 230 0.014
Naphthalene 91-20-3 470 0.028
Napropamide 152"§"9. gg'..7 iiooo 0.7
Nickel 7440·02·0 2 300 0_14
N~rate (as N) 14797· 55-8 190 000 11
N~rate/N~rate (Tolal) 00-00-02 120 000 7.0
Nitrite (as NJ 14797-65-0 12 000 0.7
Ni trobe nzen e 98-95·3 58 0.003 5
Nitrogua nid i ne 556·88·7 12 000 0.7
N<:ITTl\l\"ai.oo 2Bl4-13-2 4 700 0.28
o-Chlorotoluene 95-49-B 2 300 0.14
Oclahydro-1.3, 5, 7 -tetranitro-
1,3 ,5, 7-!etrazocine 2691-41-0 5800 0,35
19044.:gg:3 580 -0.035
l°iyzalin
Oxamyl (Vydatel 23135-22-0 2 900 0.18
Oxydemeton· mel hyl 301· 12·2 58 0.003 5
L araquat 1910-42·5 53 0.003 2
Paralhion 56-38·2 70 0.004 2
Pe ndlmethalln 40487-42-1 4 700 0.28
Pe ntac hlorobenze ne 608-93·5 94 0.005 6
Pe ntac hloroph enol 87-86·5 11 0.000 29
Permelh1in 52645-53· l 5800 0.35
Phenol 108-95-2 70000 4.2
Phnrate 298-02-2 58
Phosmet 732· 11·6 2300
Phosphamidon 13171-21·6 20
Picloram 1918-02· l 8 200
Polychlorinated blphenyls 1336-36-3 0.18
p,p' -Dichlorodi phenyl
di ch lo roe I ha ne 72-54·8 5.7 0.000 15
p,p'· Dich lorodiphenyl
d1chlnroel hylene 72-55-9 4.0 0.000 10
p,p' ·D1chlomdipheny\
trlchloroethane 50·29·3 4.0 0.000 10
jp;QfeiiO"fos 4 f198~03.7 5.8 o:ooo 35
•Profluralrn 26399-36-0 700 0.042
!
fPrometon 1610· 18-0 1800 0.11
Prometryn 7287-19·6 470 0.028
IPronamide 23950-58-5 880 0.053
Prop;ichlor 1918-16-7 1 500 0.091
Proparglte 2312-35·8 2 300 0.14
Propaz1ne 139-40·2 230 0.014
Propham 122-42·9 2 300 0.14
P1opiconazole 60207-90· I l 500 0.091

r~,,. fl4~25:1 47 0~002 8


Pydrin 51630·58· l 2 900 0.18
Pyrene 129-00-0 3 500 0.21
86 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOJLAND GROUNDWATER

Arizona Cont'd.
Soil Groundwater
Ingestion HGBL • Ingestion HBGL •
Con5tituent CAS Numbe r ppmw Remarks mg/L Remorks

Se leni um 77 82-49·2 840 0.050


Selhoxydim 74051-80·2 11 000 0.63
Silver 7440-22-4 840 0.050
Simaz1ne 122-34-9 23 0.0014
Strontrum 7440-24·6 290 000 18
Styrene 100-42·5 2300 0.14
Sulfate 14808-79·8 6 700 000 400
Sulprofos 35400-43·2 290 O.D18
Sys thane 88671-89-0 2 900 0.18
Tebulhiuron 34014-18-1 8200 0.49
Terbac~ 5902· 51·2 1500 0.091
Terbulos 13071-79·9 12 0.000 7
Terbutryn 886-50-0 120 0.007
l ,2,4,5·Tetrachlorobenzene 95.94.3 35 0.0021
2 ,3, 7 ,8· Tetrachlorodibenzo 1746-01·6 0.000 009 0.000 000 000 2
dioxin
I, I, 1,2· Tetrachloroelhane 630·20·6 350 0.021
I, 1,2,2· Tetrachloroethane 79.34.5 6.8 0.000 18
Tetrac hloroethy Iene 127-18·4 27 0.000 7
Tetraet hyl lead 78·00·2 0.01 0.000 000 7
Thallium 7440-28-0 8 .2 0.000 49
Thiophanate· methyl 23564-05-8 9 400 0.56
Thrram 137-26-8 580 0.035
Toluene 108-88-3 23 000 200 ppmw cleanup level 1.4 1.0 mg/L cleanup level
lor petroleum contaminal ion for petroleum co ntam i nation
Toxaphene 8001·35·2 1.2 0.000 03
Triad imelon 43121-43·3 3 500 0.21
Trichl orion 52-68·6 150 0.008 8
1,2 ,4· Trichlorobenzene 120-82-1 150 0.009 I
l,1,1-Trichloroelhane 7J. 55.5 3 300 0.2
1.1,2-Trichloroethane 79-00·5 47 0.002 8
Trich Ioroel hylen e 79-01-6 120 0.003 2
Trich lorofl uorometha ne 75-69·4 35000 2.1
2,4.6· Trichtorophenol 88·06·2 120 0.003 2
2, 4, 5· Trrch 1orophe nol 95.95.4 12000 0.7
2<2 .4, 5· Trichlorophenoxy)
pr opioni c acid 93. 72-1 940 0.056
2, 4, 5· Trrch Iorophe noxyaceti c
acid 93.75.5 1200 0.070
1,2,3· Trichloropropane 96·18·4 700 0.042
Trichlorotril luoroel hane 76-13·1 3 500 000 210
Triclopyr 55335-06-3 290 O.D18
Trifluralin 15§2:""09~·8 88 0.005 3
Tritorine 26644-46·2 2 900 0.18
2,4.6· Trinilrotoluene 118-96-7 5.8 0.000 35
Uranium, natural 7440-61· 1 350 0.021
,vanadium {~ume or dust) 7440·62·2 820 0.049
Vernam 1929-77-7 120 0.007
Vinclozolin 50471-44·8 2900 0.18
Vmyl chloride 75-01·4 0.72 0.000 02
Vinyl id en e chloride 75.35.4 110 0.006 3
Xylenes (mixed isomers) 1330-20· 7 230 000 41\ ppmw cleanup level II\ 10 mg/L cleanup Ieve I
for petroleum contammal ron for petroleum contaminal ion
I z;nc (fume or dust) 7440-66:·5 23 000 1~4
~Zmeb 12122-67· 7 5800 0.35

' HBGL = K.. lth·Bas.ed Guidance Lnel


STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 87

ARKANSAS
STATUS

0 Ret,"Ulation ~Guideline
D Exists ~ Exists 00/00/88
D Proposed D Proposed

D In Development D Soil
D Expected Availability D Groundwater
~ Both Soil & Groundwater
O None D Other

COMMENTS
Arkansas uses site specific cleanup levels for soil and
groundwater.

REFERENCE
Personal Communi<'alion whh Mr. Jerry Delazan of Arkans,1~ Do:JMH-
mcn1 of Pol1111inn ConJrol and Ecology. 30 July, 1993.

Contact: Jerry ])elaznn


Agency: Department of Pollution Control and Ecology
Address: PO Box 8913
Little Rock, AR 72219
Phone: 501-562-6533

NUMERICAL CRITERIA
Groundwater Soil
Constituent CAS Number mg/L Remarks ppmw Remarks

Benzene 71-43·2 0.000 265 0.005 rngll ac11on level


BTEX 00-00-5 0 .1 rngll act ion IeveI 40 pprnw action level
Total Petroleum
Hydroca1bon~ (TPHJ 00-00-4 l 5 mfV'L acrion level LOO ppmw action level
88 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

CALIFORNIA
STATUS
D R e gulation D Guideline
D Exists D Exists
D Proposed D Proposed

D In Development OSoil
D Expected Availability D Groundwater
D Both Soil & Groundwater
!RI None D Other

COMMENTS
1. Comply with EPA guidelines for risk assessment at Super- 3. For hydrocarbon contaminanted soil, such as from gaso-
fund sites. line spills, cleanup levels typically range from 0.3 to 1 ppmw
2. Cleanup levels arc site-specific. California has 9 regional for benzene, 0.3 to 50 ppmw for toluene, 1 to 50 ppmw for
boards th roughout the state and 107 local agencies. Each ju- ethylbenzcne, and 1 to 50 ppmw for xylene (all by EPA
risdiction enforces site-specific cleanup levels for the re- Method 8020), und 10 to 10 000 ppmw for total petroleum
gional basins. hydrocarbons (TPH).
4. For hydrocarbon contaminated groundwater, cleanup lev-
els are typically set at the MCL.

REFERENCE

Contact: Fran Ande1\Son


Office: Site Mitigation
Agency: Dept. of Toxic Substance Control
Address: P.O. Dox806
Sacramento, CA 95812-0806
Phone: 916-255-3618
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 89

COLORADO
STATUS

{g] Regulation D Guideline


{g] Exists 09/19/91 D Exists
D Proposed D Proposed

D In Development OSoil
D Expected Availability {g] Groundwater
D Both Soil & Groundwater
O None D Other

COMMENTS
I. A compliance standard different from a listed standard 4. Groundwater standards are based on heallh risk assess-
and equal to the background level ofa constituent may be al- ment use a 10·6 incremenlal risk factor.
lowed. 5. Whenever the practical detection level is higher (less
2. lf no numericnl standard exists, regulntory nuthorities stringent) lhan the standard, the practical detection level is
will meet and attempt to reach a consensus. If consensus used ns the perfomrnnce standard.
cannot be reached, the Colorado Water Quality Control Divi- 6. A remedial action more or less stringent than would be
sion will determine the appropriate numerical protection achieved by compliance with these numcricnl stnndards can
level. In setting an appropriate protection level, existing and be selected, or alternative site-specific stnndnrds can be
any reasonably probable future beneficial uses of groundwa- adopted by the Commission, where a dcteimination is made
ter in the area will be considered. that such a variation is authorized pursuant to the applica-
3. The Water Quality Control Commission views remedia- ble provisions ofCERCLA or RCRA.
tion "lo the maximum degree technically and cconomicnlly
reason able" when public health or important environmenlal
resources are impncted. The Commission notes that even
very substantial expenditures may be "economically reason-
able."
REFERENCE
(I) Colorado Dcpamncnt of Hcahh Wal('r Q11ali1y Conuol Co111111b-
~ion,Basic S1andards for Groundwater, Rcgu!a1ion 3.1 1.0. 17 Oc1oher.
1991.
(2) Culura<lo Dcpamncnt of Health Wa!t'r Quali1y Crnnrol C.nmmh·
sion, Cl,,ssifica1iu11s and Water QttJli!y S1an<lMds lor Grn11nrlwa1cr.
Regulalion 3. I 2.0, 19 Sq11., 199 ! .

Contact~ George Moradec


Office~ Groundwater
Agency~ Department of Health
Address: WQCD-GWPS-B2
Denver, CO 80222-1530
Phone: 303-692-3584
90 CLEANUP Cl?ITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER
Calarada Cant'd.

NUMERICAL CRITERIA
Graundwater Graundwater

Standard POL (Practical Detectian Level)

Canstituent CAS Number mg/L Remarks mg/L Remarks

Acrylonitri le 107-13· 1 0.000 058 Rocky Flats Aquifer O.Dl5


u-SHC 319-84-6 0.000 009 2 Rocky Flats Aquifer/ 0.000 05
I0.000 006 elsewhere
Aldrcarb 116-06-3 O.Ql 0.01
Aldrrn 309-00·2 0.000 000 078 4 Rocky Flats Aqurfe1/ 0.000 l
I0.000 002 elsewhcro
Arsenic 7440-38-2 0.05
Atrazrne 1912·24·9 0.003 Rocky Flats Aquife1 0.001
Sar rum 7440-39·3 1.0
Benzene 71-43-2 0.001 0.001
Benzidine 92-87·5 0.000 000 12 Rocky Flats Aqurfer/ 0.01
10.000 002 elsewhere
Brs{2-chloroethyll ether 111-44-4 0.000 000 003 7 Rocky Flats Aqurferl O.Ql
10.000 03 elsewhere
Sromoform 75·25·2 0.004 0.001
Cadmrum 7440-43.9 O.Ql
Carbofuran 1563-66-2 0.036
Cai bon le tr ac hlor rcte 56-23-5 0.000 3 0.001
Chlo1dane 57. 74.9 0.000 000 46 Rocky Fla1s Aqurfer/ 0.000 I
10.000 03 elsewhere
Chlorobenzene 108-90·7 0.100 0.001
Chloroform 67-66·3 0.000 1910.006 Rocky Flats Aqurfer/elsewhe1 e 0.00 I
2.Chlorophenol 95.57.9 0.001
1Ch1omium 7440-47-3 0.05
Cyanrde 57-12·5 0.2
12,4·0 94-75-7 0.07 0.001
LD~~o~ochloromethane 124-48· I 0.014 0.001
I ,4-Dlc hI01 obe nzen e 106-46-7 O.Q75 0.001
l ,3-Dic hIor obenzen e 541-73-1 0.62 0.001
I . 2-0f<:: hIor obe nzene 95.50.1 0.62 0.001
3 ,3 '-Dlchlorobenzidine 91-94· I 0.000 01 Rock Flats Aquifer 0.0 I
Dlchlorobromomethane 75.27.4 0.000 3 0.001
1,2· Dichloroelhane 107--06-2 0.000 4 0.001
crs· l ,2· Dichloroethylene 156·59·2 0.07 0.001
t1ans-l ,2-Dichlo1oethylene 156·60·5 0.10 0.001
2 ,4-Di ch Ior op he nol 120·83·2 0,021 0.05
1,2· Dichl~P~?P_!lne 79.97. 5 0.000 56 0.001
Dieldrin 60-57-1 0.000 000 071 Rocky Flats Aquiler/ 0.000 1
/0.000 002 elsewhere
2 ,4· Olmt1ophenol 51-28·5 0.014 0.05
1,2-Diphenylhydrazine 122-66· 7 0.000 05
Endrin 72-20-8 0.000 2 0.000 l
Endr in aId ehyde 7421-93-4 0.000 2 0.0001
Ethy Ibenzene 100·41·4 0.680 0.001
Fluorlne {soluble fluoride) 7782-41-4 4.0
Heptachlor 76-44.S 0.000 000 28 Rock Flats Aqurfer/ 0.000 05
I0.000 008 elsewhe1e
Heptachlo1 epoxide 1024-57·3 0.000 09 0.000 05
Hexach loro· I ,3 ·butad iene 87-68-3 0.000 45/0.001 Rocky Flats Aquife1lelsewhere 0.00 I
Hexach lorobe nzene 118-74-1 0.000 000 72 Rocky Flats Aquifer/elsewhere 0.00 I
/0.006
!>· Hexach !01 ocycl ohexane 319-85-7 0.000 016 3 Rocky Flats Aquiler 0.000 05
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 91

Groundwoter Groundwater

Standard PDL (Practical Detection level)


Constituent CAS Number mg/L Remcirks mg/L Remcirks

Hexachloroethane 67·72-1 0.001 9 Rocky Flats Aquifer 0.001


sophorone 78-59· 1 1.05 O.ot
~e ad 7439.92.1 0.05
~i ndane 58-89·9 0.000 018 6 Rocky Fla ls Aquifer/ 0.000 05
10.000 2 elsewhere
Mercury 7439- 97-6 0.002
Methoxychlor 72-43-5 0.04 0 .000 5
N-N1trosod1·n
-butylamine 924· 16·3 0.000 006 4 Rcc ky Flat Aquifer 0.005
N Nitrosodiethylamine 55-18-5 0.000 000 8 Rocky Flats Aquifer/elsewhere 0.005
rN-Ni11osod.imethylamine 62-75-9 o.ooo 001 4 Rocky Flats Aquifer 0.005

!I<(. N11rosed1 ph eny lam in e

N· Nitrosop)rrolidine
~ itrate (as N)
86·30·6
930-55·2
14797-55·8
0.004 9
0.000 016
10
Rocky Flats Aquifer
Rocky Flats Aquifer
as N
0.01
0.01

' Nitrite (as N) 14797-65·0 as N


Nitrobenzene
--
98-95·3 0.003 5 0.01
Pentachlorobenzene 608-93·5 0.006 0.01
Pentachlorophenol 87 -86- 5 0.2 0.05
Phenol 108-95·2 0.001
Polyc hlo ri nated bi ph en yls 1335.35.3 0.000 000 079 Rocky Flats Aquifer/ 0.001
10.000 005 elsewhere
' Polyn uclear Arem atic
Hydrocarbons (PAH) 00·00·6 0.000 002 8 Rocky Flat Aquifer 0.001
p,p'.Dichloro
~diphenyldichloroethylene 72-55-9 0.000 1 0.000 1
p,p'· D1chlorodiphenyl
tr ic ~ Ioroe thane 50·29·3 0.000 000 024 Rocky Flat Aquifer/elsewhere 0.000 1
Radium 226,228 744.14 .4 5 p1C/L
Selenium 7782-49·2 0.01
Silver 7440-22-4 0.05
Simazme 122-34-9 0.004 Rocky Fla:s Aqu 1fer 0.001
1.2 . 4, 5 ·Tetrac hlorobenze ne 95-94 -3 0.002 o.oi
,.., ,3·. 7 ,8- Te trach lorod ibenzo 1746~01·6 o:ooo· 006000"0 i3. Roc.k.Y"F'la1-SAq'Uiier-1 6.b'oci"oi
dioxin 10.000 000 000 22 elsewhere
1, 1,2,2- Tetrachloroethane 79.34.5 0.000 17 Rocky Flats Aquifer 0.001
ITetrac hloroethylene 127-18·4 0.000 $10.005 Rocky Flals Aquifer/elsewhere 0.001
Toluene 108-88-3 i.o. --9.:..~
Toxaphene 8001 -35-2 0.000 03 0.005
1, 1, l·Trichloroethane 7155-6 0.2 0 .001
1.1,2-Trichloroethane 79-00-5 0.000 6/0.003 Rocky Flats Aquifer/elsewhere 0.001
Tr1chloroethylene 79-01- 6 0.005 0.001
2.4.6· Trichlorophenol 88-06·2 0.001 2/0.002 Rocky Flats Aqurfer/elsewhere 0,001
!2f2 ,4 .5· Tr ichloropheno)<)')
propoon i c acid 93.72.1 0.05 0.000 5
Trihalomethanes (Total) 00-00· 1 0.00019 Rocky Flats Aqu1fier 0.001
Vinyl chloride 75-01·4 0.002 0.002
92 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

CONNECTICUT
STATUS
D Regulation D Guideline
D E xists D Exists
D Proposed D Proposed

[ZJ In Development 0 Soil


[ZJ E xpected Availability (1994) 0 Groundwater
lS1 Both Soil & Groundwater
ONone 0 Other

COMMENTS
(1) Soil remediation standards being developed to: (e) If numeric criteria are lower than what can be reliably
(a) protect human health and the environment from direct and accurately analyzed, analyticnl limits of detection
exposure to pollutants in contaminated soil (Direct Ex- will serve as cleanup criteria.
posure Soil Cleanup Criteria} (D Excavated contaminated soil can ht!:
• residential land use criteria • treated on-site or off-site to met!t soil cleanup crite-
• industrial land use criteria ria and reused on· site
(b) protect groundwater quality from pollutants that mi- • treated on-site or off-site to background levels and
grate from the soil to the groundwater (Pollutant Mo- nRed on another nonresidential site
bility Soil Cleanup Criteria) (2) Groundwatt!r remediation goals:
• GAA, GAAs, GA areas criteria (a) GAA, GAAs, GA areas-restore to background or, if
• GB area criteria not technically feasible, to numeric criteria making it
suitable to drink without treatment; if below level that
• TCLP analytical test used as basis can be reliably and accurately analyzed, analytical lim-
• GAA, GAAs, GA areas-TCLP compared to drinking its of detection will be cleanup criteria
water criteria (b) GB art!as-site-specific standards will address surface
• GB~TCLP compared to ten times drinking water water protection criteria, health and safety risks, pro·
criteria tecting existing uses of groundwater.
(c) When more lhan one criteria apply, cleanup to more (c) potential surface water degradation due to polluted
stringent criteria would be required. groundwater must be evaluated.
(d) lfnumeric criteria are lower than natural background,
cleanup to less than background would not be re·
quired. ..
REFERENCE
(I ) Dcpan mt.""11 l or F.nvi ronme ma! Prolt""ction Propos('d Revisions w !ht"" (3) ReguJ;uion 19· 13-B l02 Safe Drinking Waler Maxi11111m Comami·
Gro1mdwalcr SCC!ion o[ !he Waler Q11.lli1y $1.1nd.1rds and Critni.l, narn Levels.
April 1993. (4) Drah Propn>cd Groundwa1er Pro1ec1ion Critnia, December 1993.
(2) OcparimcnI u[ 1: 11vironmcmal Protecii<>n Pmpns<i! for 1he Con·
necricu1 Cka n11 p S1.md.1 rd Regulations. April 199 3

Conta ct~ Richard Fil


Agency: Department of Environmental Protection
Address: 165 Capital Ave.
Hartford, CT 06106
Phone: 203-566-5486
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 9 3

NUMERICAL CRITERIA
Groundwater Groundwater

Risk-based Criteria ' Proposed GWP Criteria ..

Constituent CAS Number mg/L Remarks mg/L Remarks

Ace napht hylene 208-95-8 0.420 0.400


Acetone 67-64-1 0.7 0.7
Acrylonrtrile 107· 13· l 0.000 06
Alachloi 15972-60-8 0.000 44 0.002
Aldicarb 116--06-3 0.007 0.003
Anthracene 120· 12-7 2.0 2.0
Antimony 7440-36·0 0.002 8 0.006
Ar;enic 7440-38·2 0.000 02 0.050
Asbestos 1332-21·4 7 rni Ilion f1bers/L
Alrazrne 1912-24-9 0.000 16 0.003
Benzene 7C43~2 0.001 0:001
Be nzo( aJan th race ne 56-55-3 0.000 05 0.000 05
Be nzo[ aJpyr ene 50·32·8 0.000 005 0.000 2
Benzo(b)l luo1anthane 205-99·2 0.000 05 0.000 05
Benzo(klfluoranthene 207--08-9 0.000 5 0.000 5
Beryllium 7440-41· 7 0.000 000 8 0.004
Bis{2.ch loroethyl) ether 111-44-4 0.000 03 0.000 03
Bis(2.chlo1oisopro(lyll ether 39638-32·9 0.000 5 0.000 5
8is(2·ethylhe:<l)phthalala 177-81·7 0.002 5 0.002
Bromoform 75-25-2 0.004 0.004
Butyl benzyl phthalate 85=°68-:-i 1-:4 1.0
Cadmium 7440.43.9 0.018 0.005
Carbon tat1achlorrde 55.23.5 0.000 3
Chlorobenzane 108-90· 7 0.140 0.100
Chloroform 67-66-3 0.005 7 0.006
-
2-Chlorophenol 95-57-8 0.036 0.040
Chromium (Total) 7440-47-3 0.036 0.050
Chromium (VI) 18540-29-9 0.036 0.050
Copper 7440-50-8 0.2 60 0.250
Cyanide 57-12·5 0.140 0.200 amenable
94.75~7 0.070 0:016
r 2-4 D
01bromochloromethane 124-48-1 0.000 4 0.000 4
1, 2· Drbromoethane 106-93-4 0.000 000 4 0.000 05
Clrnulyl phthalate 84-74·2 0.700 0.700
.4· Orchlorobenzene 106-46·7 0.001 5
1,3· Orchlorobenzene 541-73· l 0.640 0.600
1,2-Drchlorobenzane 95-50· l 0.640 0.600
1,2· Oichloroethane 107-06-2 0.000 4
1.1 · Olchloroethane 75.34.3 0.070 0.070
cis-1,2-0.chlm oethylene 156· 59·2 0.070 0.070
,nm'S-- l ,Z-Oicfllo100\~~·1e1e 1ss:-w-s- o~(4o· 0.100
Oichloromethane 75·09-2 0.005
i2.4-0ichlorophenol
1,2· Oichloropropane
120-83·2
78-87-5
0.020
0.000 5
0.020
0.005
1.3· Oichlorop.~pylana 542-75-6 0.000 2
Oieldrin 60-57-1 0.000 002 0.000 002
Oi-octyl· pMhalate 117-81·7 0.14 0.1
Endrin 72-20·8 0.002
Ethylbenzene 100-41-4 0.700 0.700
Fluoranl hana 206-44-0 0.280 0.300
Fluorene 86-73~7 0.280 0.300
Hept ach IOI epox ide 1024-57-3 o.ooo 004 0.000 2
l
'H eptachlor 76-44·8 o.ouo 008 0.000 4
~ Hexac hI01 obenzen e 118-74-1 0.000 02 0.000 02
94 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SO/LAND GROUNDWATHR
Connecticut Cont'd.

Groundwater Groundwater

Risk-based Criterio• Proposed GWP Criterio ..

Constituent CAS Number mg/L Remarks mg/L Remarks

Hexa ch lo 1O!lt ha ne 67·72-1 0.002 5 0.000 2


Lead 7439.92.1 0.015
Llndane 53.39.9 0.000 2 0.000 2
Me1cury 7439.97.5 0.002 2 0.002
~ychlor 72-43-5 0.036 0.040
Methyl ethyl ketone 78-93·3
Methyl is.obutyl ketone 108-10-1
Methyl tert· butyl ethe1 1634-04-4
Naphthalene 91-20·3
N1c~el 7440-02-0 II

N1t1ate (as N) 1.:i


Nitrite (as N) I
t

1336-36·3 0.000 004 0.000 5


Pp; .. 129-00·0 0.22 0.20
7782-49·2 0.036
7440-22-4 0.036 0.050
100-42-5 0.140 0.100

Toxaphene 8001-35·2 iJ ta11D


l, l, l· Ti ichlo1oethane 71-55-6
I, l ,2-T1 ichlo1oethane 79-00-5 iJ [Uli.
Trichlo1oethylene 79-01·6
Vanadium (fume 01 dust) 7440-62·2
Vinyl ch Jo 11de 7s"'.'o'f4
Vinylidene chlo1 ide 75-35-4
Xylenes (mixed isomers) 1330-20·7
z; 2.2 2.0

• Risk based critorl.a !or rO<ldonllal di lnkln,c waloi. e~sis= 2 lJday wate1 Ingestion ralo, OXJ>O<Ulo lroquoncy
and drinking al 365 da'f'/yoar fo1 70 Y••"· 70 kg •dull l>My wefehl, ano-ln-<>n• mill Ion ta1~•l cancor 1i•k le.ol.
I. 0 hazard IndOl for ""'""""rd nogon<.

• ' GWP • Grnundwat~r PratKtion.


STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 95

DELAWARE
STATUS
D Regulation D Guideline
D Exists D Exists
D Proposed D Proposed

D In Development OSoil
D Expected Availability D Groundwater
D Both Soil & Groundwater
[gj None D Other

COMMENTS
1. Delaware uses a site-specific health-risk-based approach.
2. For gasoline-contaminated soil, cleanup levels generally
are less than or equal to 100 ppmw TPH and 10 ppmw
BTEX.
3. For diesel-contaminated soil, cleanup levels generally are
less than or equal to 1000 ppmw TPH.
4. For waste oil-contaminated soils, cleanup levels generally
are less than or equal to 1000 ppmw TPH and 10 ppmw
BTEX.

REFERENCE
P\'r~m1a I corn mu nicJ lion wi I h Mr. KJ rl KJ lbncher ol 1lw Dl·pan me111
of Natural Resources and Environmrnwl Coni rol. 14 July 1993,

Contact: Karl Kalbacher


Office: Superfund Branch
Agency: Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control
Address~ 715 Grantham Lane
New Castle, DE 19720
Phone~ 302-3 23-4540
96 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
STATUS
D Regulation D Guideline
D Exists D Exists
D Proposed D Proposed

12:1 In Development OSoil


12:1 Expected Availability Dec. 1994 D Groundwater
D Both Soil & Groundwater
D None D Other

COMMENTS
The table contains existing guidelines for leaking under-
ground storage tank sites.

REFERENCE
District al Columbia Depnnmcn1 of Con~umcrs and Rcgulatnry Affairs
LUST Remediation Policy (no date, not oflicially published).

Contact: Kyle Isakower


Office: Environmental Regula ti on Administration
Agency: Department of Consumers and Regulatory Affairs
Address: 2100 Martin Luther King, Jr. Ave., S.E.
Washington, DC 20020
Phone: 202-404-1167, Ext. 3008

NUMERICAL CRITERIA

Groundwater Soil

Canstituent CAS Number mg/L Remarks ppmw Remark$

Benzene 71·43·2 0.005


BTEX 00-00-5 10
Et hyIbenzene 100-41-4 0.700
Lead 7439-92-1 0.05
Toluene 108-88·3 1.0
Total Petroleum
Hydrocarbons (TPH) 100 BOISM, the California Method
XyIenes (mixed isomers) 1330-20-7 10.0
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 97

FLORIDA
STATUS
[Z] Regulation D Guideline
[Z] Exists 00/00/90 D Exists
D Proposed D Proposed

D In Development OSoil
D Expected Availability D Groundwater
[Z] Both Soil & Groundwater
O None D Other

COMMENTS
1. These regulations pertain to petroleum contaminated 3. For petroleum contamination other than gasoline, kero-
sites. sene, and mixed petroleum product analytical group con-
2. Groundwater contaminants in G·I and G-11 areas must be taminants, groundwater standards and minimum criteria in
reduced to, or below, numerical target levels in thi;:; table, or Chapter 17-3 apply.
naturally occurring background levels, or other such levels
determined appropriate based upon risk assessment. In G-
Iii groundwater areas, contaminants must be reduced to
background levels or meet the minimum criteria in Chapter
17-3.

REFERENCE
( J) DER Chapter 17· 770 Petrokuin Con!amination Site Ckan- Up Cri·
1eria. February 1'.l90.
(21 DER Cl1ap\("r 17 •775 Soil Thermal Treatment Facilitks, SCJllcmbcr
l'.l'.lO.
11) DER GuidC'lines for As~cs~rnem and Rernedia1ion of Peuolcum
Contamina1ed Soil. M~y 1992.

Contact: Couillermo Wibmer


Office: Bureau of Waste Site Cleanup
Agency~ Department of Environmental Regulation
Address: 2600 Blair Stone Rd.
Tallahassee, FL 32399-2400
Phone: 904-488-0190
98 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER
Florida Cont'd.

NUMERICAL CRITERIA
Soil Soil

TCLP (Toxdty Chorocteristic


Leoching Procedure)

Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remarks mg/L Remarks

Arsenic 7440-38·2 55 5
Barium 7440..39-3 2 750 100
Cadmium 7440-43-9 55 l.O
Chromium 7440·47·3 275 5.0
Lead 7:439-92:1 77 5.0
Mercury 7439.97.5 17 0.2
Selenium 7782-49·2 165 1.0
Silver 7440-22-4 165 5.0
Total Recoverable 00-00-8 10/50 Test Method 3 540/90731
Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TRPH) Provided total PAH,;; 6 ppmw and VOH
,,; 0.05 ppmw (PAH by 8100. 8250. 8270,
or 8310: VOH by 5030/80 I 0 or 5030/8021)
Total VolatileOrganic 00-00:1 o.·1 test-Method-503018026 or
Aromatics (VOAl 503018021

Groundwater

Canstituent CAS Number mg/L Remorks

Benzene 71-43·2 0.001 EPA Method 602


,2-0i brom o--3· ch loropropa ne 96-12-8 0.000 02
,2· Dibromoethane 106-93-4 0.000 02 EPA Method 601
1,2· Dichloroethane 107-06-2 0.003 EPA Method 601
Lead 743~92·1 0.050 EPA Method 239.?
~-- - ~- --
Methyl lett-b uty I ether 1634-04·4 0.050 EPA Method 602
Naphthalenes 91-20-3 0.100 Total of naphthalene and
methylnapthalenes. (EPA Method 610)
Polynuclear Aromatic 00-00·6 O.Dl excluding naphthalenes, 0.0 I rngll max.:
Hydrocarbons (PAHJ Detection Iim its of EPA Met hod
610, 8100, 625. 3510/8250, or 3510/8270,
or best achievable limit
Total Recoverable
Total Volatile Organic
Aromatics (VOA) 00·00·7 0.05 EPA Method 602
Pet roteum Hyd roe arbons 00-00-8 5.0 EPA Method 418. I
STATE CLEANUP STANDAJUJSAND GUIDELINES 99

GEORGIA
STATUS

D Regulation D Guideline
D Exists D Exists
D Proposed D Proposed

181 In Develo pment OSoil


D Expected Availability D Groundwater
D Both Soil & Groundwater
O None D Other

COMMENTS
1. Comply with EPA regulations in 40 CFR. 3. Georgia cleanup criteria for petroleum hydrocarbon con-
2. Georgia working on soil and groundwater concentrations tamination are site specific, but generally: soil-TPH (100 to
above which reporting is required under Georgia Hazardous 500 ppmw), BTEX (20 to 100 ppmw); groundwater-Benzene
Site Response Act (HSRA) as ammended in 1993. (0.005 to 0.071 mg/L), Toluene (1to200 mg/L), Ethylbenzene
(0.7 to 28.718 mg/L). Xylene (10 mg/L), Benzo(a)pyrene
(0.0000311 to 0.0002 mg/L), Anthracene (100 mg/L),
Chryscnc (0.000031 1 mg/L), Fluoranthene (0.37 mg/L),
Fluorene (14 mg/L), Pyrene (11 mg/L).

REFERENCE
Pcrsonal comm11nica1icn1 wi1 b Mr. Jim McNamara of Department of
Natnral Rt'~ourc~s (DNR), 2 Aug. 1993.

Contact: Jim McNamara


Offi ce: Hazardous Waste Management
Agency : Department of Natural Resources
Address : 205 Butler St., S.E.
Atlanta, GA 30334
Phone: 404-656-2833
100 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

HAWAII
STATUS
D Regulation IZl Guideline
D Exists IZl Exists 08/00/92
D Proposed D Proposed

D In Development D Soil
D Expected Availability D Groundwater
D Both Soil & Groundwater
DNone D Other

COMMENTS
1. For sites where it can be demonstrated by exposure path- 2. Guidelines pertain to LUST sites only.
way risk assessment that there are no existing contaminant
exposure pathways to human and nonhuman receptors, an
exposure prevention management plan for the site can be de-
veloped as an alternative to cleanup.

REFERENCE
Hawaii UST Technical Guidance Manual, DOH lmcrim Recommended
Clt:anup Criteria fnr Soil and Waler, August 1992, pp. 5· 7.

Contact~ Steve Armann


Office: Environmental Management Division
Agency: Department of Health
Address~ 500 Ala Moana Blvd.
Honolulu, Hl 96813
Phone~ 808-586-4249

NUMERICAL CRITERIA
Soil Soil
Drinking Woter Source Nondrinking Weter So urce
- ---
Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remarks ppmw Remarks

Ace naphth ene 83·32·9 470 470


Benzene 7J.43·2 0.05 1.7
Benzol aJpyrene 50·32"8 0.1 1.0
Cadmium 7440-43-9 2.0 or natu ra I bac kgm und 2.0 or natura I background
Ethyl~nzene 100·41-4 1.4 7.0
Fluaranthene 205.44-0 310 310
Lead 7439.92.1 400 400
Naphthalene 91-20·3 7.8 7.8
Polychlormated biphenyls 1336·36·3 1.0 1.0
Tetrac hloroethyl en e 127-18-4 0.05 0.145
Toluene i'o8:88·3 10 21
1,1,l·Trichloroethane 7J.55·6 2.0 10.4
STATE C/,EANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES IOI

Groundwater Groundwoter

Drinking Water Source Nondrinking Water Source

Constituent CAS Number mg/L Remorks mg/L Remarks

Ace nap ht hene 83-32-9 0.32


Benzene 7 l-43·2 0.005 1.7
Ben zo! aJpy'e ne 50-32-8 0.000 2
Cadmium 7440·43·9 0.005 0.009 3
Ethy Ibenzene 100-41-4 0.14 0.7
Fl uora nthene 206·44·0 0.013
lead 7439.92.1 0.05 0.14
Naphthalene 9!·20-·3 0.78
Polychlorlnated biphenyls 1336-36-3 0.000 5 0.01
Tetrac hlo roe t hyl ene 127-18-.<\ 0.005 0.145
'Toluene ioa.88~3 1.0 2.1
1.1. l· Trichloroethane 71-55·6 0.2 10.4
102 CLEANUP CRITER!A FOR SO!L AND GROUNDWATER

IDAHO
STATUS
D Regulation [Z] Guideline
D E xists [Z] Exists
D Propose d D Proposed

D In Development D Soil
D Expected Availability D Groundwater
[SJ Both Soil & Groundwater
D None D Other

COMMENTS
1. Comply with EPA regulations. 3. In general, Idaho uses drinking water standards as
2. Clean-up standmds for contaminated soil are established cleanup criteria for contaminated groundwater.
on a site-specific basis. For petroleum contami nated soil
cleanup levels generally are in the 40 to 200 ppmw range for
TP H (gasoline contamination), 100 to 2000 ppmw for TPH
(diesel contamination), 100 ppmw for TPH (waste oil con-
tamination).

REFERENCE
Personal commtmic<Jtirn1 with Mr. Clyde Cudy of th<.' Dl·partmc111 of
Environmcn1al Quality. 15 July l 993.

Cont act: Clyde Cody


Agency: Department of Envirnnmental Quality
Address: 1410 N. Hilton
Boise, ID 83706
Phone: 208-334-0556

NUMERICAL CRITERIA

Groundwater

Constituent CAS Number mg/L Remarks

Benzene 71-43·2 0.005


EI hyl benzene 100-41·4 0.700
Toluene 108-88-3 1.0
Xylenes (mixed isomers) 1330-20·7 10
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 103

ILLINOIS
STATUS

13] Regulation D Guideline


13] Exists 11/00/91 D Exists
D Proposed D Proposed

D In Development DSoil
D Expected Availability 13] Groundwater
D Both Soil & Groundwater
DNone D Other

COMMENTS
(1) Groundwater classifications: (3) In Class IV areas, standards are equal io the existing
Class I: Potable Resource Groundwater concentrations of constituents in the groundwater, except
when:
Class II: General Hesource Groundwater
(a) groundwater is within a zone of attenuation, then Class
Class III: Special Resource Groundwater II area standards apply, or
Class IV: Other Groundwater (b) groundwater is in a previously mined area, then Class II
(2) In Class Ill areas, standards for Class I areas must not area standards must not be exceeded, except for TDS, chlo-
be exceeded. rides, iron, manganese, sulfates, or pH (where the existing
concentrations are the standards).

REFERENCE
lllinnis E11vironmc111,1l Pro1cctinn Agency Rrg1il,1tiom, Tillt· 35: i!nvi-
rnnmcmal Prolrction, Subtitle F: Public Watn Supplies. Chaplcr I:
Pullutiuu Cnmrol Hoard. Pan 620, Groundwate r Qu,1!i1y, Novc•Hhn
1991.

Contact: Terri Myers


Office: Division of Land Pollution Control
Agency: Illinois Environmental Protection Agency
Address: 2200 Churchill Rd.
Springfield, IL 62794-9276
Phone: 217 -524-4863

NUMERICAL CRITERIA
Groundwoter Groundwoter
Closs I Class II
Constituent CAS Number mg/L Remarks mg/L Remarks

Acenaphthene 83·32·9 0.42


Alachlor 15972-60-8 0.002 0.01
Aldicarb l 16·06-3 0.003 0,015
IAnthracene 120-12· 7 2.1
/11senic 7440·38·2 0.05 0.2
Atraz1ne 1912·24·9 0.003 0.015
Ba1ium 7440-39-3 2.0 2.0
Benzene 7J.43·2 0.005 0.025
Boron (water· sol ubl c) 7440·42-8 2.0 2.0
BTEX 00-00·5 11.705 13.535
104 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOlL AND GROUNDWATER

Illinois Cont'd.

Groundwater Groundwater

Cla ss I Class II

Constituent CAS Number mg/L Remorks mg/L Remorks

Cadmium 7440-43-9 0.005 0.05


Carbofuran 1563-66·2 0.04 0.2
Ca roon tetrach Ion de 56-23·5 0.005 0.025
Chlordane 57. 74.9 0.002 0.01
Chlorobenzene 108-90-7 0.1 0.5
Chromium 7440·4 7.3 0.1 1.0
Cobalt 7440-48·4 1.0 1.0
Copper 7440-50-8 0.65 0.65
Cyanide 57-12-5 0.2 0.6
2.4·0 94. 75-7 0.07 0.35
I .4· Die hi orobe nzen e 106-46· 7 0,075 0.375
I, 2· Dlchlorobenzene 95.50.1 0.6 1.5
I ,2-0ic hloroeth ane 107-06-2 0.005 0.025
cis-1,2-Dichlo•oethylene 156-59-2 0.07 0.2
trans· 1,2· Dichloroethylene 156-60-5 0.1 0,5
1,2· Dichloropropane 78-87·5 0.005 0.025
End rm 72-20·8 0.002 0 .01
Ethyl benzene 100-41-4 0.7 1,0
Flumanthene 206-44-0 0.28
Fluorene 86-73-7 0,28
Fluorine (soluble fluoride) 7782-41-4 4.0 4.0
Heptachlor 76-44-8 0.000 4 0.002
He pt ac hlor epox ide 1024-57-3 0.000 2 0-001
Iron 7439·89·6 5,0 5.0
Lead 7439.92.1 0,007 5 O.l
Lindane 58-89·9 0.000 2 0.001
Manganese 7439-96-5 0.15 10
Mercury 7439-97-6 0,002 0.01
Methoxyc hlor 72-43·5 0.04 0.2
Naphthalene 91-20·3 0.025
INickel
Nitrate (as Nl
7440-02-0
14797-55-8
0.1
10
2.0
100
I Pen ta ch lo ro phenol 87-86-5 0,001 0.005
Phenol 108-95-2 0.1 0.1
Polyc hlori na !ed bi ph enyls 1336-36-3 0.005 0.025 as dec achl orobiphenyl
Pyrene 129-00-0 0 .2 1
Selenium 7782-49·2 0.05 0.05
Silver 7440-22-4 0.05
Styrene 100-42· 5 0.1 0 .5
Sulfate 14808-79-8 400 400
Tetrac hloroot hy Iene 127-18-4 0.005 0.025
To\\1e11e l08-B8·3 1.0 2.5
·Tota I PN A (ca rci noge ns) 00-00·9 0.000 2
Total PNA (non-carcinogens) 00-00-10 0.21
Toxaphene 8001·35·2 0.003 O.Q15
1. 1,1-Trichloroethane 71-55·6 0.2 1,0
Trich Ioroet hyle ne 79-01·6 0.005 0.025
2(2 ,4,5· Trichlorophenoiyl
propion i c acid 93-72-1 0.05 0.25
Vinyl chloride 75-01·4 0.002 O_Ql
'Vinylidene chforfoe 75:35.4 0:007 6535
Xylenes (mixed isomer.;) 1330-20· 7 10 10
·Zinc (fume or dust) 7440.£6-6 5.0 10
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUfDEUNES 105

IN DIANA
STATUS

D Regulation D Guideline
D Exists D Exi sts
D Proposed D Proposed

0 In Development O Soil
D E xpected Availability D Groundwater
0 Both Soil & Groundwater
18] None D Other

COMMENTS
1. Soil cleanup standards are site-specific and made on a 3. Cleanup levels for gasoline, kerosene, naptha, and diesel
case-by-case ba~is. contamination in soil generally are :;; 100 ppmw TPH (on-
2. Groundwater must meet EPA maximum contaminant lev- site) or nondetectable for off-site.
els (MCLs) or levels established by a health risk assessment.

REFERENCE
Pnsonal cummunkation with Ms. Margie Thomas of Dcpamnr:nt of
Ell vi rom!lt'ntal Man~gcmcm o n 2'1 A tog. 199 3.

Contact: Margie Thomas


Office: Office of Environmental Response
Agency: Department of Environmental Management
Address: P.O. Box 601 5
Indianapolis, IN 46204
Phone: 317-233-6455
106 Cl.EANUP CRITERIA FOR SOTL A ND GROUNDWATER

IOWA
STATUS
D Regulation D Guideline
D Exists D Exists
D Proposed D Proposed

D In Development DSoil
D Expected Availability D Groundwater
D Both Soil & Groundwater
lg] None D Other

COMMENTS
1. Comply with EPA drinking water standards for maximum 3. For petroleum hydrocarbon contamination action levels
contaminant levels (MCLs). are 100 ppmw TPH in soil and for groundwater: 0.005 mg/L
2. Soil and groundwater cleanup standards are site-specific. Benzene, 2.42 mg/L Toluene, 12 mg/L Xylenes, and 0.7 mg/L
cthylbenzene.

REFERENCE
PcrsonJI communirJtion with Mr. l'J ul Nl'l~on of llcpJr1mcrn of NJI 11-
ral Resources on 30 July 1993.

Contact Paul Nelson


Office: UST Section
Agency: Department of Natural Resources
Address: 900 E. Grande
Des Moines, IA 50319
Phone~ 515-281-8934
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND CUJDELINES 107

KANSAS
STATUS
0 Regulation lg] Guideline
D Exists lg] Exists
D Proposed D Proposed

D In Development 0 Soil
0 E xpected Availability D Groundwater
lg] Both Soil & Groundwater
D None D Other

COMMENTS
1. The Kansas Notification Level (KNL) or Alternate Kansa.'> 6. KAL values we1·e chosen with the following priorities in
Notification Level (AKNL) are used to constitute adminif;tra- mi nd:
tive confirmation that groundwater contamination exists. (a) promulgated drinking water standards,
2. The Kansas Action Level (KAL) and Allernative Kansas (b) proposed drinking water standards,
Action Level (AKAL) represent the level at which long-term
expo.<;ure to contaminant concentrations is unacceptable. (cl a lQ-5 can cer risk level, and
3. KNL and KAL apply to all fresh and usable water aqui· (d) human health risk other than carcinogenic.
fers. 7. KNL values are 1110 KAL values, except for triha-
4. AKNL and AKAL apply to a ll uvia! aquifer s and/or specific lomethane (THM) KNL values which are their respective
aquifers which sur face through springs or seeps to become quantification levels (detection limits).
contributors to the surface waters of the state. 8. Groundwater guidelines were implemented on 6 June
5. For metals and general physical/chemical parameters, 1988. Soil guidelines were implemented in Aug. 1993.
only a KAL value has been assigned.

REFERENCE
I. K,msa> Dcpanme m of Health and Environment, Division of finvi· 2. Depa rim eu t of l Iea lih and Environmem, Bureau of Environmemal
ronmem, Bureau of Waler Pro1enion. Mem,,randum, 6 JUrtl' 1988, Remediation, Interim Soll Cleanup Standards, A11g11~1 1993.
Fina I Gm u ud waler Comaminalll Targe1 Coneem ra1ions. Final Table of
Chemical Rekrenccs (amended 5 Dec. 1988).

Contact: Rachel Miller


Office: Division of Environment
Agency ~ Department of H ealth and Environment
Address~ Forbes Field, Bldg. 740
Topeka, KS 66620-7500
Phone~ 913-296-1684

NUMERICAL CRITERIA
Groundwoter Groundwoter

AKNL (Alternote Konsos


KNL {Konsas Natification Level) Notificotion Level)

Constituent CAS Number mg/L Remarks mg/L Remarks

Acenaphthylene 208-96-8 0,000 002 9


Aclfluorfen 5094-66-6 0.009
Acrolein 107-02·8 0.032 0.021
Aery Ion it rile 107-13·1 0.000 38
108 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

Kansas Cont'd.

Groundwoter Groundwoter

AKNL (Alternote Kon sos


KNL (Konsos N otificotion Level) Notificotion Level)

Constituent CAS Number mg/L Remorks mg/L Remarks

I Alachlor 15972-60-8 0.000 5 Lasso


Aldicarb 116-06·3 0.001 Temik
Aldrin 309-00·2 0.000 003 I
Aluminum (fume or dust) 7429-90·5 0.087
,Ametryo 13-?~12-8 0.006
Ammooia 7664-41· 7 0.07 as N
Ammonium wlfamate 7773-06·0 0.150 Ammate
Anthracene 120· 12· 7 0.000 002 9
Atrazine 1912·24·9 0.002 5
8entazon 25057-89·0 0.001 75 Basagran
Benzene
Benzidine
tBe nzo(a)an th racen e
!aenzo[aJpyrene
8enzo(b)fluor:anthene
Benzo(ghi)perylene 191·24·2 0.000 002 9
8enzo(k)l luoranthene 207-08·9 0.000 002 9
8 is( 2-c hloroethoxy) methane 111-91-1 0.001
Bis(2-chloroethylJ elher 111-44-4 0.000 42
8is(2-chloroisopropyl) ether 39638-32-9 0.003 47
,..8i~hloromelhyl) ether
t
8romacil
8romoforrn
8 romomethane
~-utyl benzyl phthalat~
Butylate 2008-41-5 0.046 7
Carbary! 63-25·2 0.067 2
Carbofuran 1563-66·2 0.003 6
Carbon tetrachloride 56-23·5 0.000 5
Carboxin 5234-£8-4 0.070
Chloramben

.
Chlordane
Ch I oro benze n<
'• II I

Ch 1oroet han e
2-ch Io roet hyl vinyl ether
Chloroform 67-66-3 0.000 5
Ch lore· m· cresol 59.50.7 0.3
Chloromethane 74-87·3 0.000 019
2.Chloronaphthalene 91-58-7 0.001 0.160
2·Chlorophenol 95-57·8 0.000 01
4·Ch lorophenyl phe ny I ether 7005· 72.3 0.001
Chlorothaton~ 1897-45·6 0.001 5
Chlorpyrifos 2921-88-2 0.0021 lorsban. Dursban 0.000 041 lorsb<l n. Du rsba n
Chrysene 218·01·9 0.000 002 9
~p~r 7440-50·8 0.026
Cyanazme 21725-46·2 0.000 87 Blad ex
Cyanide 57-12·5 0.005 2
2,4-D 94-75-7 0.010
Dacthal 1861·32· l 0.350
Dalapon, sodium salt 75.99-0 0.056
·Di(2~1-hylhexyl) phlhalate 117-81·7 0.420 0.003
Diazinon 333-41-5 0.000 063
Dibenzo{a,hlanl hracene 53-70-3 0.000002 9
1.2· Oibromo-3-chloropropane 96-12-8 0.000025
STA TE CLEANUP STANDA RDS AND GUIDELINES 109

Groundwoter Groun dwoter

AKNL (Alternote Kon sos


KNL (Konsos Notificotion level) Notificotion Level)

Constituent CAS Number mg/L Remork s mg/l Remorks

Dib1omochlo1omethane 124-48·1 0.000 7


.2· Dib1ornoethane 106-93-4 0.000 000 5
D1bulyl phthalate 84.74.2 0.077 0.003
D1carnba 1918-00-9 0.000 87 Banvel
,4_-Dlc h ~01 o~nze~ e 106-46-7 0.007 5
l .3· D!ctllo1 obenzene 541-73-l 0.062
1,2· Dlchlo1obenzene 95-50-1 0.062
3.3' · D1chlorobenzidine 91-94-1 0.000 021
Dichlorobromomethane 75.27.4 0.000 5
Dichlorodifluoromethane 75. 71·8 0.560
1,2· Dichto1oe1hane 107-06·2 0.0005
l, l· Dichloroethane 75.34.3 0.000 5
,els· 1,2· Dichlo1oethylenc 156-59·2 0.007
tians· 1,2· D1chlo1 oethylene 156-60·5 0.007
~ D1chlo1omethane 75-09-2 0.005
2 ,4· Dlchl01ophenol 120-83-2 0.070
2 .6· Dlchlo1ophenol 87-65-0 0.000 02
3.4-Dichloiophenol 95-77-2 0.000 03
1,2· D1chlo1op1op;me 78-87-5 0.000 6
1,3· D1chlo1op1opylene 542-75-6 0.000 2
Dre1d"1rn 60-57·1 ·o.ooo 002 19
piethyl phthalate 84-66·2 35 0.003
Dimethoate 60-51·5 0.014 Cygon
~
Dlmethrin 70-32-8 0.210
_Dimethyl P~!hala_te 131-11-3 31.3 0.003
2.4· Dimethylphenol 105-67-9 0.040
4,6-Dlnil 1o·o-c1 esol 534-52· l 0.001 34
2 ,4·OmiI1ophenol 51-28-5 O.Dl l
2 ,4 ·Dinit1otol uene 121-14-2 0.CrOO l \
2 .6· DInit• otol uene 606-20-2 0.000 004
Dlnoseb 88-85-7 o~ooo-35 DNBf'
1,4· Dioxa ne 123-91· l 0.007
Diphenamid 957. 51· 7 0.021
1,2· Diphenylhyd1azine 122-66· 7 0.000 045
D1sulfoton 298-04-4 0.000 03 Di·Syston
Druron 330-54-1 0.001 46 Ka1mex
Endosulfan 115-29·7 0.005 25 0.000 056
Endosu Ifan su Uate 1031-07·8 0.007 4 0.000 008 7
Endothall 145· 73.3 0.014
End11n 72-20-8 0.000 02 0-DOO 002 3
5.[\hyl
di p1 opy tt hioca 1ba mate 759.944 0.014 Eptom, E1ad1cane
Ethy lbe nzen e 100-414 0.068
Ethylene thiou1ea 95.45.7 0.000 24
Fenarn1phos 22??4-92·6 0.000 17 Nemaev1
Fluometu1on 2164-17·2 0.008 75
FluOI anthene 206-44-0 0.000 002 9
Fluo•ene 86-73-7 0.000 002 9
Fonofos 944-22-9 0.001 4 Dylonate
Glyphosate 1071-83·6 0.070 Roundup
Heptachlo1 75.44.3 0.000 076 0.000 003 8
Heptac h101 ePQxlde 1024.57.3 0.000 038
Hexachlorl).1.3· buladiene 87-68-3 0.000 45
Hexach IOI obenzen e 118-74·1 0.000 02
110 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SO/LAND GROUNDWATER

Kansas Cant'd.

G raun dwater Graundwater

A KN L (Alternate Kansas
KNL (Kansas Natificatian Level) Natification Level)

Constituent CAS Number mg /l Re ma rks mg/ L Rem ork s

Hexach lo 1ocyc Io pe ntad ien e 77-47-4 0.020 6 0.005 2


Hexac:h I01 oetha ne 67·72· l 0.000 19
Hexaiinone 51235-04·2 0.023 3 Velpa1
Ind eno(2 ,3-<:dlpy1 ene 193.39.5 0.000 002 9
lsophorone 78-59-1 0.520
p-Chklmplw.no\ 106-48-9 0.00003
Lindane 58-89·9 0.000 4 0.000 08
Malathion 121· 75.5 0.014
Maleic hyd1aiide 123-33· l 0.350
Me1cury 7439-97-Ei 0.000 012

[Moihomyl f5°Js2:'J1.5 o~oii ":I


Met hoxych Ior 72-43-5 0.010 0.000 03
\1el hyl ethyl ketone 79.93.3 0.017
Methyl pa1alhion 298-00-0 0.000 17
2· Methyl-4..::hloropheno~yacel ic
acid 94-74·6 0.000 35 W*done
Metol<1ch lor 51218-45-2 0.010 5 Dual
Metribuzin 21087-64-9 0.017 5 Senco1
n. 0 iocl yl phtha late 117-81-0 0.001 0.003
n.Hexane 110.54.3 1.4
N-Nitrosodi·n
621·64· 7 0.585
.· propylamine . 0.001
N Nitrosodimethylamine 6fi5.9 0.-060-660 Iii
N Nit1 osodiphenylamine 86-30·6 0.007 I
Naphthalene 91-20-3 0.014 3
Nit robe nzen e 98-95-3 0.000 5
4. Nill ophenol 100-02-7 0.029 0.023
2· Nill ophenol 88-75-5 0.029 0.079
Oryzalin 19044·"08·3 0.00658 Sm11an
Oxamyl {Vydate) 23135-22·0 0.017 5
~81omodiphenylethe1 101.55.3 0.001
Pa1aqual 1910-42·5 0.0031
~arathion s6:-§a-:-2 0:003 o:ooo 013

I
oentac hloroph en oI
Pei meth1 in
Phe nan I hrene
87-85-5
52645-53· I
85-01·8
0.022
0.035
0.000 002 9
Ambush
0.006 3

Phenol 108-95·2 0.030


Picloram 1918·02·1 0.049 Toi don
Polychlo1 inated biphenyls 1336-36·3 0.000 005 0.000 014
p,p'· Dichloro
diphenyl dichtoroethane 72.54.g 0.000 000 002 4
p,p'- Dichloro
di ph enyld ic hloroethyle ne ]2. 55.9 0.000 000 002 4
p,p·:--o;ctiioi ooipheny1
trichloioethane 50·29·3 0.000 042 0.000 001
·P1ometon 1610-18·0 0.0105 Pramitol
P1onamide 23950-58·5 0.052 5 Kerb
Propachlor 1918·16-7 0.009 3 Ramrod
P1opa1gite 2312-35-8 0.1575 Om1te, Comite
P1opazine 139-40·2 0.011 7 M1logard
Prop ham 122·42·9 O.ot I 7 IPC
Propoxur 114·26· l 0.025 8aygon
Pyd1in 51630·58· l 0.087 5
Py1ene 129-00·0 0.000 002 9
STATE CLEAN UP STANDARDS AND G UJDELINES 111

Groundwater Groundwater

AKNL (Alternate Konsos


KNL (Konsos Notification Level) Notification Level)

Constituent CAS Number mg/L Remarks mg/L Remarks


I
Selenium 7782-49-2 0.005
Srl~er 7440·22-4 0.000 12
S1mazme 122.34.9 0.003 5 Princep
Styrene 100-42-5 0.000 014
Tebuth1uron 34014-18-1 0.035 Spi~e
Terbac~ 5902-51-2 0.008 75 Sinbar
Terbufos 13071-79-9 0.000 017 Counter
2 .3, 7 .8-Tetrachlo1odi benzo
dioxin 1746-01 ·6 0.000 000 000 22 0.000 000 01
l, l ,2,2-Tetrach loroel hane 79.34.5 0.000 17
Tetrachloroethylene
2,3,4, 5· Tetrachlorophenol
2.3.4.6· Tetrachlorophenol

Toluene
Total Organic Volatiles (TOV) 00-00-23 0.01
Toxaphene 8001-35·2 0.000 5 0.000 000 2
1.2 ,4· Trrchlorobenzene 120-82-1 0.001 3
1, I, l ·Trrchloroethane 71-55-6 0.020
l. I .2·Trrchloroethane 79-00-5 0.000 61
Tnchloroel hylene
Trlc hIorofl uorometha ne
2,3,4· Trrchlorophenol
3,4,5-Trlch lorophenol
2 ,~ .6_).i:_rchlorop~e_~o!
2,4, 5· Tric hlorophenol 95-95-4 0.000 I
2(2.4, 5-Trichlorophenoxy)
propionic acid 93. 72-1 0.001
2 ,4, 5-Trrc hlorophenoxyacetic
acid 93. 76·5 0.002 1
TT~ifluralfn i58i"09·8 0.001 7 Tretlan
Vinyl chloride 75-01-4 0.000 2
Vinylidene chloride 75.35.4 0.000 7
Xylenes (mixed isomers} 1330-20· 7 0.044
Zinc (fume or dust) 7440-66-6 0.231

Groundwater Groundwater

KAL (Konsos Actiori Level) AKAL (Alternate Kansas Action Level)

Constituent CAS Number mg/L Remarks mg/L Remarks

Acenaphthylene 208·96·8 0.000 029


Acifluorlen 5094-66-6 0.09
Acroletn 107-02-8 0.32 0.068
Acrylonitrile 107-13-1 0.003 8
Alachlor 15972-60-8 0.005
Aldrcarb 116-06-3 0.010
Aid rm 309-00·2 0.000 031
Aluminum (fume or dusl) 7429-90·5 5.0 IH
Ametryn 834-12·8 0.060
Ammonia 7664-41-7 II ~

l\mmonrumsullamate 7773".o6~o'
Anthracene 120·12·7
112 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

Kansas Cant'd.

Graundwater Groundwater

KAL (Kansas Action level ) AKAL (Alternate Kansas Actian level)

Constituent CAS Number mg/l Rema rks mg/L Remarks"

AnHmony 7440-36·0 0.143


Arsenic 7440-38-2 0.050
Asbestos 1332-21-4 7. l million fibers.IL
Atrazrne 1912-24-9 0.025
Barium 7_440}9_:3 1.0
Bentazon 25057-89-0 0.017 5
Benzene 71-43-2 0.005
Benzidine 92-87-5 0.000 001 5
Benro(a)an th race ne 55.55.3 0.000 029
Benzo[a]py1 ene 50-32-B 0.000 03
Benzo(b)l luoranthene 205-99·2 0.000 029
Ben zo(ghil pe ryl en e 191·24·2 0.000 029
Benzo{k)fluoranthene 207-08·9 0.000 029
Beryllium 7440-41· 7 0.000 13
8~(2:<:hlo1oethyl)_ether 111-44-4 0.004 2
B is(2· chloroethoxy) methane 111-91-1 O.Dl
B rs(2-chloroisopropyllel her 39638-32-9 0.034 7
B fs(chloromethyll el her 542-88-1 0.000 000 003 8
Boron (water-soluble) 7440-42-8 50
Bromac~ 314-40-9 0.840
B1omoform 75-25·2 0.100
Bromomethane 74-83-9 o.ooo 19
Butyl benzyl phthalale 85-68·7 0.010 0.940
Butyl ate 2008-41·5 0.467 Sutan +
Cadmium 7440-43·9 0.005
Carbary! 63-25-2 0.672 Sevin
Carbofuran 1563-66-2 0.036 furadan
Carbon tetrachlorrde 56-23-5 0.005
Ca1boxin 5234-68·4 0.700
Chlo1amben 133-90-4 0.105 Amrben
Chlo1dane 57. 74.9 O.o00Z7 0.002 4
Ch lorobenze ne 108-90-7 0.060
Ch Ioroet han e 75·00·3 0.037
2 ..Ch I 01 oet hyl vinyl ether 110-75·8 0.360
Chtorafarm 67-66-3 0.100
Chi oro· m· c re sol 59-50-7 3.0
Chi or ome I ha ne 74.37.3 0.000 19
2..Chloronaphthalene 91-58-7 0.010 1.6
2..Chlorophenol 95-57-8 0.000 1
4 ·Ch loropen yI phe n elher 7005-72-3 O.DI
Ch\Q<o\l\a11111i\
--" --
1897-45-fi Q.Ql5
Chloi py1 ltos 2921-88·2 0.021 Lorshan, Ours ban 0.000 083 Lorsba n. Oursban
Chromium Nil 18540-29·9 0.050
Chromrum( 111) 16065-83-1 0.050
Chrysel!_e 218-01·9 0.000 029
Copper 7440-50·8 1.0 0.042
Cyanaz1ne 21725-46-2 0.008 7 Blad ex
Cyanrde 57-12"5 0.154 0.022
2,4-0 94-75-7 0.100
Oacthal 1861-32-1 3.5
Dalapcn, sodrum sail 75-99-0 0.560
Di(2-et hy Ihexyl) pht ha la I e 117-81·7 4.2 0.940
Dlazrnon 333-41·5 0.00063
0 ibenzol a, h]a nlh• ace• 1e 53-70-3 0.000 029
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GU!DELINES 113

Groundwater Groundwater

KAL (Kansas Action Level) A KAL (Alternote Kansas Action Level)


Constituent CAS Number mg/L Remarks mg/L Remork s

1,2· Dibromo-3-chloropropane 96· 12-8 0.000 25


D1bromochlo1 omet hane 124-48-1 0.100
1.2· Dmmmoel hane 105.93.4 0.000 005
D1butyl ph t halat e 84.74.2 0.770 0.94
Oicamba 1918-00-9 0.008 7
1, 4-D ic hloroblm ze ne 106-46-7 0.o75
1, 3· Die h101 obenze ne 541-73·1 0.620
1,2· Dichlo1obenzene 95.50.1 0.620
3,3"· Dichlo1obenz1dme 91-94-1 0.000 21
Dlchlo1ob1 omomel hane 75-27-4 0.100
Dichloi odi1luo1omethane

1,1
cis-1,2· D1chlo1oethylene
trans· 1,2· Dichloroethylene
D1chlo1omethane ftl·UY·L 0.050
2.4· Dlchlorophenol 120-83-2 0.700
2, 6-D le hlor oph enol 87-65-0 0.000 2
3 ,4-Dlchl orophe nol 95-72-2 0.000 3
1,2-Dichlo1op1opane 78-87-5 0.006

Dleld11n a; 1
Diet hyl p htha Iate D
Dimethoate II
Dimelhrin
Dime I hyl phthalate 131· I 1·3 313 0.940
2,4· Dime I hylphenol 105-67-9 0.400
4,6-0init10-o-c1esol 534-52·1 0.013 4
2,4· D1nit1ophenol 51-28·5 0.110
2.4· Din 1t1ololuene 121-14-2 0.001 I
2,6· Oinihololuene
Dinoseb D.
1,4· Dioxane II

Diphenamid ll
L
l ,_2-Diphenyl_hydrazi~.e
Disulloton 298-04·4 0.000 3 Di·Syslon
Diu1on 330-54·1 0.014 6 Karmex
Endosan 1031-078 0.074
Endosulfan 115-29-7 0.052 5 0.000 22
Endothall 145-73-3 0.140
End1in 72-20·8 0.000 2 0.000 18
s-Ethyl
d fp1 opyll h1ocai bamat e 759-94-4 0.140 Eptom, Eiadicane
Ethy Ibenzene 100·41-4 0.680
Ethylene thiou1ea 95.45.7 0.002 4
Fenamlphos 22224-92-6 0.001 7 Nemaev1
Fluome1 uron 2164· I 7-2 0.087 5
Fluo1 anthene 206-44-0 0.000 029
Fluo1ene 86-73· 7 0.000 029
Fluo1 lne (soluble fluoride) 7782-41·4 4
Fonolos 944-22·9 0.014 DYfonate
Glyphosale 1071-83·6 0.700 Roundup
Heptachlo1 76-44-8 0.000 76 0.000 52
Heptachlo1 epoxide 1024·57·3 0.000 38
114 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

Ko sos Cont'd.

Groundwater Groundwater
KAL (Konsos Action Level) AKAL (Alternate Kon sos Action Level)

Constituent CAS Number mg/L Remorks mg/L Remorks

Hexachloio-1,3· butadiene
Hexac h101 oben ze ne
Hexac h101 ocyc lo pen tad iene
Hexachlo1oethane
Hexazinone
I ndeno(2,3-<:d)Pyrene 193-39-5 0.000 029
Iron 7439-89·6 0.30
I sopho10 ne 78-59-1 5.2
Lead 7439-92-1 0.05
L"mdane 58-89-9 0.004
Malathion
Male ic hyd1 azide
Manganese
Mercury II ••
Methomyl
Methoxychlor 72-43-!'> 0 .100 Mar late 0.000 3
Methyl ethyl ketone 73.93.3 0.170
Methyl parathion 298-00·0 0.001 7
2 · M ethy 1-4-<: hlo 1oph enoxyac et1c

-- -
acid
M eto lac hi or
Met1ibuzin
94-74·6
5121S-4s-=-2
21087-64·9
0.003 5
0.105
0.175
Weedone
Dual
Senco1
rrDioclyl phthalate 117-81·0 0.010 0.940
1t-Hexane 110-54-3 14
N Nit1 osodi· n
pro py1a mine 621·64·7 0.010 5.85
N Nitrosodimethytamlne 62-75-9 0 .000 001 4
N-Nitrosodiphenylamine 86-30-6 0.071
Naphthalene 91-20-3 0.143
Nickel 7440-02·0 0.150
N1t1ate (as Nl 14797-55·8 10
Niiiite {as Nl
N~robenzene

4-Nilrophenol
2-Nili ophenol
, Oryzalin
Oxamyl (Vydale) 23135-22-0 0.175
p-8romod1phenylel her 101-55-3 0.010
Paraquat 1910-42-5 0.031
Pa1athion 56-38·2 0.030 0.000 065
Pentachlorophenol 87-86-5 0.220 0.010
1Pe1meth1in 5-264S:-53:"1 0.350 Ambush

I"'~'""'"
85-01-8 0.000 029
Phenol 108-95·2 0.300
1Piclo1am 1918-02· l 0.490 Tordon
P~ych lo ri na I ed bi ph c nyl s 1336-36-3 0.00005 0.002
p,p'· Olchlo1 o
dlphenyl dichlo1oethane 72-54-8 0.000 000 024
p,p'. Oichlo10
diphenytdichlmoelhylene 72-55·9 0.000 000 024
p,p'· Dichlorodfphenyl
trichloroelhane 50·29·3 0.000 42 0.001 l
p-C hlo 1ophen oI lo6-4&9 0.003
j P1omelon 1610-18-0 0.105 P1amitol
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES ll5

Groundwoter Groundwoter

KAL (Konsos Action Level) AKAL (Alternote Konsos Action Level)

Constituent CAS Number mg/L Re marks mg/L Remarks

P1onamide 23950-58·5 0.525 Keib


P1opachlm 1918-16-7 0.093 Ram1od
P1op;irg1te 2313-35-8 1.575 Omite, Comite
Pr opai•-ne 139-40·2 0.117 Milogard
P1opham
Piopoxu1
122-42-9
114-26-1
0.117
0.250
- -- .......... --- IPC
Baygon
?yd11n 5 1630-58· l 0 .87 5
Py1ene 129-00·0 0 .000 029
Selenium 7782-49-2 0 .045 0 .02 0
Silver 7440-22-4 0 .050 0.0198
Simaiine 122.34.9 0.035 P1incep
Styrene 100-42-5 0.000 14
Sulfate 14808-79-8 250
Tebuthiuron 34014· 18-l 0.350 Spike
Terbacil 5902-51-2 0~087_5 Sin bar
Terbufos 13071-79·9 D.000 17 Counter
2,3,7 ,8-Teuachlo1odibenw
dioxin 1746-01-6 0.000 ODO 00 2 2 0.001
1.1,2 ,2-Tetiac hlmoethane 79-34-5 0.001 7
Tetiachloroethylene 127-18-4 0.007
2,3.4 ,6-Tetrachlorophenol 53~90-:-2 o.263
2,3, 5,6-Tetiachlorophenol 935-95-5 0.04
2,3 ,4,5· Tetrachlo1ophenol 1901-51-3 0.04
Thallium 7440·28-0 0.013
Toluene 108-88·3 2.0
Total 01ganic Volatiles (TOVI 00-00-23 0.1
Toxaphene 8001-35-2 0.005 0.000 73
1,2.4-Trichlorobenzene 120-82· I 0.0 13
l, 1.1-Trichlm oethane 71-55-6 0.200
I, l ,2-111chlm oethane 79-00-5 0.006 l
Ti ichloroethylene 79-01·6 D.005
T11chlm ofluo1omethane 75-69-4 8.0
2, 3 .4· Trich 101 op he not 159-660 0.04
2.4,6-Trichloi ophenol 88·06·2 0.017
2,4, 5-Ti ichlo1ophenol 95.95.4 0.001
3,4, 5· T1 ichlo1ophenol 609-19-18 0.04
212,4,5-T11c!l lorophenoxyl
p1opionic acid 93.72.1 0.010
2 .4. 5-T richlorophenoxyacet1c
acid 93-76- 5 0.021
T1i!lu1alin 1582-09-8 0.017 Treflan
Vinyl chlo1 ide 75-01·4 0.002
Vin yllde ne ch lorlde 75.35.4 0.007
Xylenes (mixed isomers) 1330-20-7 0.440
Zinc (fume 01 dusl) 7440-66-6 5.0 D.255
116 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIT. AND GROUNDWATER
Kasas Cont'd.
Soil
ppmw_
Constituent CAS Number RemClrks

Benzene 71-43·2 1.4


~Chlordane 57-74-9 0.54
Ch1omium (Vil 18540-29·9 2001400 1esident ia I, rec ie aticnJ I a1eas/
other areas
Ch1omium(l II) 16065-83· I 50011 000 Residential, 1ecreational areas/
cthe1 areas
1,2· D1chl01 oethane 107-06·2 8
cis· 1,2· Dichl01 oel hylene 156-59-2 8
lead 7439-92-1 500
Me1cury 7439-97·6 :2120 1esidential, 1ecreal ion al areas/
othe1 a1eas
Methyl ethyl ketone 78-93·3 144
Nit1ate (as Nl 14797-55·8 851200125-50 U ppe1 8 in. of soil· nonvegetatec
a1 ea/Upper 8 in. ot soil· a1 ea sup·
port mg vegetat1 on/Below 8 in. in
depth
Toluene 108-88·3 288
Total Pel1oleum
Hyd1oca1 bons (T PH) 00-00-4 100
Xylenes (T otall 1330-20-7 63
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 117

KENTUCKY
STATUS
D Regulation 12.l Guideline
D E xists 12.l Exists 08/15/93
D Proposed D Proposed
D In Development D Soil
D Expected Availability D Groundwater
12.l Both Soil & Ground water
DNone D Other

COMMENTS
1. If contamination is not removed to 1 ppmw PAH, the site 3. Five samples collect.ed from background (upgradient)
must be closed as a residual landfill. must be analyzed separately to complete a background sam-
2. The general cleanup standard for petroleum-contaminated ple set. For statistical determinations, Kentucky uses 90%
soils is background or detection limits. upper confidence interval of the mean using a Student's t-
test. This method i.<i described in SW-846, Vol. II, Chap. 9.
4. Background level criteria are generally used when UST is
in an area considered to be already contaminated.

REFERENCE
I. DEP N01ice 10 UST Owners, Contractors, and Landfill Operators, 3. DEP New Siw 111vc~tigatin11 Om lint" for Dt"tt"rmining the Hmi1m11al
Closure of Heating Oil Tanks, 19 Jan. I 99 3. and Vcnical Ex1cm ol Co111amina1ion Resulting from a Release of a
2. Site Cht"ck Omlin!." for US Ts in KY, D EP, .I 11 \y I 991. Rcg11la1cd Substance from a UST in KY, 15 .Inly 1993, t"lit"c1ive 15 Aug.
1993.

Contact: Jerry O'Bryan


Office: UST Branch, Corrective Action Section, Div. of Waste Mgmt.
Agency: Department for Environmental Protection
Address: 14 Reilly Rd.
Frankfort, KY 40601-1190
Ph one: 502-564-6716

NUMERICAL CRITERIA

Soil Groundwater

Constituent CAS Number p pm w Remarks m g /L Remarks

BTEX 00·00-5 1.0 Delection limit 0.005 Deteclion limil


Lead 7439.92.1 1.0 Detection limil 0.050 Delection llmil
Oil/Grease 00-00-11 10.0 Delection limit 5 Delee I ion limil
Total Pet1oleum
Hydrocarbons <TPH) 00-00-4 10.0 Detection limil
Pol~nuclea1 A1omatic 00-00·6 1.0 For clean closure of heating 0.005 Detection limit
Hydrocarbons (PAHl oil lanks
118 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

LOUISIANA
STATUS
D Regulation D Guideline
D Exists D Exists
D Proposed D Proposed

D In Development OSoil
D Expected Availability D Groundwater
D Both Soil & Groundwater
IZl None D Other

COMMENTS
1. Site-specific cleanup standards arc used. 3. Groundwater typically has to be cleaned up to background
2. Louisianna is currently evaluating the use of cleanup lev- or non-detect levels.
els based on risk assessment. 4. Petroleum-contaminated soil typically has to be cleaned
up to less than 100 ppmw BTEX, and 300 ppmw TPH.

REFERENCE
Personal comm1111ic<11io11 wi1h Mr. Loni> Jolmsnn of 1l1c Dcpanmcm
ol En vi ronmemal Cun~c rv~ ti on on 30 July l 99 3.

C ontact~ Louis Johnson


Office ~ Groundwater P rotection Division
Agency~ Depa rt men t of Environmental Conscrva ti on
Address: PO Box 82215
Baton Rouge, LA 70884-2215
Phone~ 504-765-0585
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 119

MAINE
STATUS
D Regulation [21 Guideline
D Exists [21 Exists 03/00/92
D Proposed D Proposed

D In Development OSoil
D Expected Availability D Groundwater
[21 Both Soil & Groundwater
DNone D Other

COMMENTS
1. A decision tree is used to determine cle~nup criteria. 3. Intermediate cleanup goals add to the baseline standards
Three levels of remediation standards have been estab- the soil cleanup requirements identified in the table.
1ished. The first and most stringent is for areas of current or 4. Stringent cleanup goals add to the intermediate cleanup
future groundwater use as drinking water. Areas in close goals the groundwater cleanup goals identified in the table.
proximity to public and private drinking water supplies or
sand and gravel aquifers would fall under the most stringent 5. These guidelines apply to sites contaminated by gasoline,
standards. For sites where use of groundwater as drinking methyl tert butyl ether (MTBEJ, kerosene, #2 heating oil,
water is less likely because of its quality and quantity, inter- diesel fuel or other comparable petroleum products.
mediate standards are established. Lastly, baseline stand- 6. Sites contaminated by heavy oils require cleanup stand-
ards are established for all remaining sites, including those ards developed specifically for the site.
where groundwaler has already been contaminated beyond
use. 7. Sites contaminated by other hazardous substances will
also have cleanup standards developed on a case-by-case ba-
2. At a minimum, all sites must have free product. removed, sis using risk assessment.
along with oil "saturated~ soil. This represents baseline
standards and cleanup goal.<;.

REFERENCE
DF.P Pron· du ral G uiddin l"S for Es1a blishing S la m!J rd~ for Rcmc<lia 1io11
of Oil Cont.Jmiu;i)("d Soil ~nd Groundwater. Bm~~u of !1~1~1rdous Ma-
terials and Solid W;i ~!l' (0 111 m!. March 1992.

Contact~ Fred Lavallee, P.E.


Office~ Bureau of Hazardous Materials and Solid Waste Control
Agency~ Department of Environmental Protection
Address: Station #17, State House
Augusta, ME 04333
Phone: 207-289-2651

NUMERICAL CRITERIA

Groundwoter Soil
Constituent CAS Number mg/L Remarks ppmw Remarks

Benzene 71-43·2 0.005


Mel hyl /erl-butylel her 1634-04-4 0.050
Total Gasoline 00-00-13 5.0
To!al Hydrocarbons 00·00·14 0.050
To!al 01 I or Kerosene 00·00·12 10.0
120 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

MARYLAND
STATUS
0 Regulation 0 Guideline
D Exists 0 Exists
D Proposed 0 Proposed
!Zl In Development OSoil
!Zl Expected Availability (1995) 0 Groundwater
0 Both Soil & Groundwater
ONone 0 Other

COMMENTS
Cleanup standards are established on a casc-by-c:oisc basis.

RI FERENCE
Personal comm11nic.:11io11 wi1h T<1sti Oehghni, Dcpanmcm of f:uvimn·
mcm. 14 July 199 3.

Contact: Tasti Dehghni


Agency: Department of Environment
Address: 2500 Borcning Highway
Baltimore, MD 21224
Phone: 410-631-3462
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 121

MASSACHUSETIS
STATUS

D Regulation IZl Guideline


D Exists IZl Exists 04/09/91
D Proposed D Proposed

D In Development OSoil
D Expected Availability D Groundwater
D Both Soil & Groundwater
ONone D Other

COMMENTS

1. Site-specific risk-based standards are used wilh the intent (2) has a high frequency or intensity of use by children;
that cleanup result in no significant risk. Specifically, in all (3) has a high frequency and intensity ofu;;e by adults;
cases, remediation must be performed to a degree that elimi- or
nates a significant or otherwise unacceptable risk ofhann to
human health, safety, public welfare, and the environment. (b) Soil is potentially accessible and has a high frequency
and intensity of use by children.
2. To the extent feasible, remedial response measures should
attempt to restore environmental quality to those conditions 8 . Soil is classified as S-2 if either:
that would have existed if the release had not occurred. (a) Soil is accessible and
3. Groundwater Category GW-l appliefl: (1) Childs' frequency and use are both low;
(a) the groundwater is within a potentially productive (2) Children are not present at the disposal site and
aquifer (drinking water supply); either (but not both) the adult's frequency or intensity
(b) the groundwater is located within 500 fl. of a private of use is considered lo be high; or
water supply well; (b) Soil is potentially accessible and
(c) the groundwater is within an Interim Wellhead Pro- (1) either (but not both) a child's frequency or intensity
tection Area: of use is considered to be high; or
(d) the groundwater is within Zone A of a Clasfl A surface (2) Children are not present at the disposal site and an
water body; adult'5 frequency and intensity of URe are both consid-
(e) the groundwater is within Zone II; or ered to he high.
(f) the groundwater is located 500 ft or more from a public 9. Soil is classified as S-3 if either:
water system distribution pipeline. (a) Soil is accessible, and children are not present and an
4. Groundwater Category GW-2 applies if groundwater is lo- adult's frequency and intensity of use are both con-
cated within 30 ft of an occupied building or structure and sidred to be low; or
the average annual depth to groundwater in that area is 15 (b) Soil is potentially accessible, and
ft or less. Category GW-2 groundwater is considered to be a
(1) A child's frequency and intensity of use are both
potential source of vapors to indoor air.
considered to be low: or
5. Groundwater Category GW-3 is all other groundwater not
covered in Category GW-1 and GW-2. Groundwater at all (2) a demonstration has been made that children arc
disposal sites shall be considered a potential source of dis- not present at the site, and either an adult's frequency
charge to surface water and classified in Category GW-3. or intensity of use is considered to be low.
6. Category S-1 soils are associated with the highest poten- 10. Soil category S-1 must be selected whenever and wher-
tial for exposure and Category S-3 soils with the lowest po- ever reasonable doubts exi.'>t over lhe selection of appropri-
tential for exposure. The potential for exposure is described ate soil category.
by a quali ta ti ve analysis of the site-specific situation.
7. Soil is classified as S-1 if either:
(a) Soil is accessible, and either
(1) used or may be used for growing fruits or vegetables
for human consumption;
122 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SO//, AND GROUNDWATER

REFERENCE
1. D.EP Management Proced 11 rn for ExcJ va I ed Soils Contaminated 3. 310 CMR 40.09·40.09.33. Ammended 19 Nov. 1993 (MA Contin-
with Virgin Petrole um Oils. Policy No. WSC··100-89, 7 Aug. 1990. geucy Plan).
2, DEP Policy lnr the Ic1vPs1iga1ion, A~scsm1em, and Remccliatinn nl
Petroleum Releases, Interim Site Investigation. Protocol Document.
Policy No. WSC-401-91, 9 April 1991.

Contact: Matt Cogliano


Office: Bureau of Waste Site Cleanup
Agency: Department of Environmental Protection
Address: One Winter St.
Boston, MA 02108
Phone: 617-292-5990

NUMERICAL CRITERIA
Groundwater

GW· 1 Standard GW-2 Standard GW-3 Standard

LI 1

: IJ
iillk'.
[IJlJ2

[uJl)J
...
ll
[I II
ll..ll !;JI
ru»i! :..:.
tl.ll I a
u

u...

[llm
~ I
[I !l!l.I

l:IDllJ
u.

,..
I [I

~ II
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 12 3

Groundwater
GW-1 Standard GW-2 Standard GW-3 Stondard
Constituent CAS Number mg/l mg/L mg/L

1,2· Dlchlmoethane 107-06·2 0.005 0.020 50


1. l-Dichlo1oethane 75.34.3 0.070 9,0 50
. cis-1,2· Dfchlmoethylene 155· 59-2 0.070 50
11 ans· l .2-Dichlo1 oethylene 156-60-5 0.100 50
D1chlmomethane 75-09-2 0.005 50 50
2 ,4-Dichlorophenol 120-83·2 0.010 4.0
l ,2· Oich\01 op1 opane 78-87·5 0.005 0.009 30
1,3-Dichloi op1 opylene 542· 75·6 0.000 5 0.005 2.0
Dield1in 60-57-1 0.000 I 0.000 1
Diethyl phthalate 84-66-2 6.0 0.030
Dimethyijihthala!e 13IT1.3 50. 0.030
2 .4· D1methyl phenol 105.57.9 0.100 20
2 ,4-Dinitrophenol 51-28·5 0.200 2.0
2 .4· Dinitrotol uene 121-14·2 0.030 2.0 2.0
Endosulfan 115-29-7 0.000 4 o.ooo l
End1ln 72-20-8 0.002 0.005
Ethylbemene 100-41·4 0.70 30 4.0
Fluoranthene 206-44-0 0.10 0.100
Fluorene 86-73· 7 0.30 1.0
Heptachlo1 75.44.3 0.000 4 0.001
~ Heptachlo1 epoxide 1024-57-3 0.060 2 0.002
'"'exachlo10-1,3· but ad iene 87-68·3 0.000 6 0.001 0.090
-lexach lo1obenzene 118-74· l 0.001 0.040
exactJloroethane 57.72.1 0.008 0.010 5.0
rI ndeno( ?_,3-cd )py I en e 193-39-5 0.000 2 0.000 3
Lead 7439.92.1 0.015 0.030
Lindane 58-89·9 0.000 2 0.000 8
Me1cury 7439-97-6 0.002 0.001
Met hoxyc hIm 72-43-5 0.040 0.002
Met hy I ethyI ketone 78-93-3 0.35 50 50
:Methyl lsobutyl ketone 10S:-i0:1 0)5 50 50
I
rMethyl mercury 22967-92·6 0.002 0.000 l
2· Methylnaphthalene 91-57·6 0.010 3..0
iMethyI terl-bu tyl et her 1634-04·4 0,70 50 50
~phthalene 91-20-3 0.020 6.0 6.0
Nickel 7440-02-0 0.100 0.080
p-Chlo1oan~lne 106-47·8 0.030 50
Pentachlo1ophenol 87-86· 5 0.001 0.080
Phenanthrene 85-01·8 0.3 0.050
Phenol 108-95-2 4.0 50 30
1 Polychlm mated biphenyls 1336~3 0.000 5 6'.6003
lp,p'-Dichlo10
dlphenyl dlchlmoethane 72-54-8 0.000 I 0.006
p,p'·D1chlo10
diphenyldichloroethy~ ]2.55.9 0.000 1 0.020
p,p· Dichlmodlphenyl
11 lch lo1oethane 50-29-3 0,000 3 0.000 3
Pyrene 129-00-0 0,080 0.080
Selenium 7782-49-2 0.050 0.080
Silve1 7440-224 0.040 0.007
Sty1ene frfo.42.s 0.100 0.9 50
1
2,3, 7 ,8· Tetrachlmod1benzo
dioxin 1746-01-6 0.000 000 03 0.000 000 1
l, 1, 1,2· Teti achloroethane 630·20·6 0,005 0 .006 50
124 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER
Mossochusetts Cont'd.

G rou ndwoter

GW-1 Stondord GW·2 Stondord GW·3 Stonc;lord

Constituent CAS Number mg/L mg/L mg/L

JI, 1,2,2· Tetrachlo1oethane 79.34_5


Tet1 achl oroethylen e 127·18·4
Thall 111m 7440-28-0 II •
Toluene l08-88-3
!.?.t.~.1..~~.~~ ~ !~ ~~ ..f:IY.~.~ff:.~.r.'?!:,~.~ !TP~.! ., .~.~; ~?"~ ,
1,2 A· T1 ichloi obe~zene 120-82· I
1, I, I· T1 ichlomethane 71·55·6
I, 1,2· T11chloi oethane 79.00.5
Trich I01 oet hyle ne 79·01·6
2,4,6· Trichloiophenol 88-06·2
rf 4;5·.riicii1 iii aiifieniil''" '""111//l"' IJI! ' 9S.:95'.4 .,,

?vinyl chloride 75-01·4


j·vinylidene chloride 75-354,.
JXylenes (mixed i.some1 s) 1330·20· 7
r inc (fume or du&I) 7440..06·6

Soil

S·l Soil & GW · l S· 1 Soil & GW-2 S- 1 Soil & GW-3

Constituent CAS Number ppmw ppmw ppmw

!
Acenaphthyle ne
Acetone
, Aldiln
r. ~.\l,~~~ ~~~~.~,, '"'
Antimony llJ
A1semc
Benzene llJ
Be nzo(a)a nth ia ce ne l!
Benzol a]pyiene 11'
1•/• 11•1 1111-"'l lll - tJ. U{l/IJi/UJfJ/UJUI "'JJJJNIJ
I Benzo(b)fluoianthene
I.Benzo(ghi)peryl ene
IBenzo( k) fI1101 ant hene
f Beryllium
[ Biphenyl,
Bis(2-<:hloroe(hyl) ethe1
Bi s{2-<:h Io 1oisopropy I) eth e1
81ornofo1m
B1omomethane 11

Cadmium "· :IJ


<'"· ....,... ""' """"':""' 'l/lff/lff''"""1/lfll '"',:t" I
; Carbon tetiach londe W' So--<
(Chlordane 57.74_
rChlo1 obenwne 108· 90· 7
.IHU.1Ulf1

[ ch!o1ofo1m· 67·66-3 II 11
I
1, ~."f.~ !~.1.?P.~.~.ry.o! .................... - ..
Ch1omium 7440.47.3
Ch1om1um (VI) 18540·29· 9
Ch1om1um(lll) 16065·83· l
Chrysene 218·01·9 n) u 11
Cyanide 57.12.5 11 Ull Im
~oi(2~i~'ili-e',;yii'iiiiiiialaie ' "''If. r'"fOCt r111,11111
'f17 '.8'1~7'
,, I LJ
Di ben io[ a, h)an th rac ene 53·70·3 0··i".7,,,
~ n'i b1 omoc hImo methane 124·4il 0.09 "
z
STATF. CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDEUNES 125

Soil
S·l Soil & GW-1 S-1 SoH & GW-2 S· 1 Soil & GW-3
Constituent CAS Number ppmw ppmw

c
1 1,2-Dibromoethane I I J IJ
l ,4-0lch 101 obente'~ ~ ]

r. 1,3- Dichloro0eniene
~ 1,2· 0 ich I01 obenzen,e
?..~.'-~::~.i.~~!~.~~.~.~!~!~~""
D1ch I01 obi omome thane
l .2-Dichlamethane
1.1- Dichloroethane
cis- l ,2- Di ch to1oethylene
t1ans- l .2-Dichloioethylene
z·iS'icfiiO'foOi.i'ilia'rie"" 'II
2 ,4-Dichl oropheno I
1, 2-D1chlomp1opane
.3-Dichlorop1opylene
f1.~.i~~~!!.~."
Die thy I pht ha late
Dimethyl phthalate
2.4- Dimethyl phenol
2 ,4-Dinilrophenol
2 ,4-Dinit10',oluene
. 'f:iid'Cis~f?a
Endrin
~. £th_y\benzene
Fluoranthene
l.ff!-!R!~~~.,, ,,w .J ·'"'·~-~
Heptachlo1 Dl
He pta ch I01 epox 1de n
Hexachlo1 o-l .3-buladiene
Hexac h101 obenze ne [i
Hexachlo1 oethane
li'~'denl){2'.3~1pyrene'"'""'"" ,,..•• • 1

~ lead
·Undane
i Metcury
''-~-~~~-~y-~-~!~! .,,,,,,,.,
Methyl el hyl ketone
Methyl lsobutyl ketone
Methyl me1cury
2-Methyl naphthalene i'
Methyl tert- butyl ethe1
N'iiiih i'iiaiene •
'·Nickel
1~hlo1oani1'1ne
: Pentachlo1 ophenol
I Phe nan t h1ene
.. ................. •1.• 11 h 1nn11ni/JJ/Jlu.1 #

Phenol
Polychlorinated biphenyls
p,p'-D1chlo10
d•phenyl dichlo1oethane •
p,p'- Dichlo10
diphenytd1ch toroel hylene 72-55-9
-,ri:oiciiiiiiQ(JYiliien:ff'
~ II ichlo1oe!hane
rfyrene 1
.29-00-0
~
¥-~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~----=-~~~~------~~~~~~~~~~~~~---~~~~~-
126 CLEANUPCRITERfA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER
Mossochusetts Cont'd.
Soll
S-1 Soil & GW-1 S-1 Soil & GW·2 S-1 Soil & GW·3
Constitue nt CAS Number ppmw ppmw ppmw

·selenium 7782-49·2 300 300 300


< S~oer 7440-22-4 100 100 100
-;)ty1ene 100-42·5 2 20 20
t2,3, 7 ,8· Tel iachlo1od1benzo
dioxin 1J~6~0l~6 0.000_004 0.000 004 0.000 004
I, I, l ,2·Tel1 achlo1oethane 630-20-6 0.4 0.5 4
I, 1,2,2· Tel1 achlo1oethane 79-34-5 0.02 0.2 0.5
Tet1a<:hlo1oel hylene 127-18-4 0.5 200 200
Thallium 7440-28-0 8 8 8
Toluene 108-88·3 90 500 500
,.otai Pel iOleum H";d1oca1 bons ff PHl- 60--:'"c)().4 5-60 500 500
11 ,2.4· T1 ichlo1 obcnzenc 120-82· l 100 400 400
I. I, l-T1ichlo1oethanc 71-55-6 30 100 100
I, 1,2-Trichloioethane 79-00-5 0.3 2 2
T1 ichloioelhylene 79-01-6 0.4 20 70
2.4 ,6· T1 lchlo1 ophenol 88-06·2 3 40 40
2.4. 5. T1 ichJ01ophenol 95.95.4 3 I 000 2
Vinyl chlo1 ide 75-01-4 0.3 0.3 0.3
Vlnylidene chloride 75-35-4 0.7 0.1 1
Xylenes {mixed isome1s) 1330-20· 7 500 500 500
Zinc (fume or duslJ 7440-66-6 2 500 2 500 2 500

Soil
S·2 Soil & GW-1 S-2 Soil & GW·2 S-2 Soil & GW-3
Constituent CAS Number ppmw ppmw ppmw

Acena pht he ne 83-32·9 20 2 500 2000


Aeena phthylene 208-96·8 2 500 2 500 800
Acetone 67-64-1 3 60 60
Ald1in 309-00-2 0.04 0.04 0.04
Anth1acene 120· 12·7 I 000 2 500 1 000
-
Antimony
- 7440-36·0 40 40 40
Arsenic 7440-38-2 30 30 30
Benzene 71-43-2 10 60 60
Be nzo( a)ant h1ace ne 56-55-3 0.7 0.7 0.7
Be nzo! a ]py1 ene 50-32·8 0.7 0.7 0.7
\ Be nzo< b)fl uo1 anthe ne 205-99~2 0.7 0.7 0.7
Be nzolgh i) pcry le ne 191-24-2 100 2500 30
Be nzo(k)fl u 01 ant h ene 207-08·9 0.7 0.7 0.7
I .
Beryl hum 7440-41· 7 0.8 0.8 0.8
~phenyl 92-52-4 1 500 10
Bis(2-chlo1oel hylJ ethe1 111-44-4 0.7 0.7 0.7
Bis(2-chlo1oisop1 opyl)el he1 3963B-32-9 0.7 3 3
B1omofo1m 75-25·2 0.1 20 200
B1omomethane 74-83·9 10 3 200
Cadmium 7440-43-9 80 BO 80
Cai bon tet1 achlo11de 56-23-5 1 4 10
Chlo1dane 57-74-9 2 2 2
Ch 101 obenze ne 108-90· 7 8 80 40
Chlorofonn 67-66·3 0.1 10 200
_2-Ch!o1 ophe nol 95-57-B 0.7 200 20
Ch1omium 7440-47·3 2 500 2 500 2 500
Ch1omlum (VI) 18540-29-9 600 600 600
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 127

Soil
5·2 Soil & GW· 1 S-2 Soil & GW·2 S-2 Soil & GW-3
Constituent CAS Numbe r ppmw ppmw

• I

Dibromochloromel hane 124-48-1 20 20


l ,2-Dibromoel hane 106-93-4 0.02 0.02
1,4-Dichlorobenzene 106-46-7 60 60
1,3-Dichlorobenzene 541-73-1 500 500
1.2-Dichlorobenzene 95-50-1 500 500
3,3' .Q[chlorobenz1dme I
Dichlorob1omomethane I
l ,2-Dichloroethane II
l, 1-Dichloroethane
clsJ ,2:Di_chh~19ethylel)e 156-59-2 2 500 500
I rans-l ,2·0ichloroethylene 156-60-5 4 I 000 l 000
Drchloromethane 75-09-2 0.1 200 200
2,4-Dichlorophenol 120-83-2 10 90 90
l ,2 ·Die hloropropane 78-B7-5 0.1 0.2 10
l ,3-Dichloiopropylene 542-75-6 0.01 0.1 5
Q[eld1in
Diethyl pht ha Iate
Dimethyl phthalate
2,4-Dimethylphenol
2, 4·O_i_nit1_oph ef)O I
2,4-Di nitrotoluene 121-14-2 0.7 2 2
Endosulian 115-29-7 0.2 3 0.0
End1in 72-20-B 0.6 10 I
Ethyl benzene 100-41-4 80 I 000 500
FI uora nl hene 206-44-0 600 2 000 600
Fluorene
fieptachlor
He pt ac hlor epoxrd e I•
tHexachloro-1,3-butadiene
Hexac ~o~g~~~ze nc
Hexach loroet ha ne 67-72-1 10 10 10
Indeno(2,3·cd)pyrene 193-39-5 0.7 0.7 0.7
Lead 7439-92-1 600 600 600
Lindane 58-89-9 0.1 0.6 0.5
Mercury 7439-97-6 60 60 60
iMet ho~yc h 101 72.43.5 300 300 30
Methyl ethyl k<:lone 78-93-3 0.3 40 40
r
Methyl isobutyl ketone 108-10-1 0.5 70 70
Methyl mercury 22967-92-6 20 20 20
,2- MPthy~phthalene 91-57-6 0.7 20 7
Methyl ten-butyl
ether 1634-04-4 3 200 200
Na phi halene 91-20-3 4 I 000 I 000
Nickel 7440-02-0 700 700 700
p-Chlo1oaniline 106-47-8 I 400 30
Pentachloropheool 87-86-5 5 10 JO
Phenan1h1 ene 85-01-8 700 2 500 100
Phenol 108-95-2 60 800 500
Polychlonnated biphenyl5 1336-36-3 2 2 2
128 CLEANUP CRfTER!A FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER
Massochusetts Cont'd.

Soil

S-2 Soil & GW·l S-2 Soil & GW· 2 S-2 Soil & GW-3
Constituent CAS Number ppmw ppmw ppmw

p,p'· Dichiaro
d1phenyt dichloroethane 72- 54..S 3 3 3
p,p'· D1chloro
d1phenytdichloroethylene 72-55-9 2 2 2
p, p' · Diehl or od i phenyl
trichloroethane 50-29-3 2 2 2
Pyrene 129-00-0 500 2 000 500
Selenium 7782·49-2 2 500 2 500 2 500
Silver 7440-22·4 200 200 200
Styrene t00-42-5 2 20 30
2,3. 7 .8· Tetrachlorooibenzo
dioxin 1746-01·6 0.000 006 0.000 006 0.000 006
11,l, l,2-Tetrachloraethane 630-20·6 0.4 0.5 5
1, l ,2,2· Tetrachloroethane 79.34.5 0.02 0.2 0.6
F etrachloroethylene 127· 18·4 0.5 300 300
Thallium 7440-28·0 30 30 30
-Toluene 108-88-3 90 500 I 000
-
Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons {TPHJ 00-00·4 2 500 2 500 2 500
1,2,4· Trichlorobenzene 120·82· l 100 900 800
l, l, l· Trichloroethane 71-55-6 30 500 500
1, 1.2· Tr1chloraethilne 79-00-5 0.3 3 3
Trich Ioroe t hyle ne 79-01·6 0.4 20 too
2.4 ,6· Tr1chlorophenol 88-06 -2 3 60 60
2.4,5· Trichlorophenot 95.95.4 3 2 500 2
Vinyl chloride 75·01·4 0.4 0.3 0.5
Vinyl idene chloride 75-35-4 0.7 0.1 2
iXylenes (mixed isomers) 1330-20·7 800 500 1000
'Zinc (fume or dust) 7440-66-6 2 500 2 500 2 500

Soil

S-3 Soil & GW-1 S-3 Soil & GW-2 S-3 Soil & GW-3
Constituent CAS Number ppmw ppmw ppmw

Ace na ph t hene 83-32·9 20 5000 2 000


IAcenaphthylene 208-96·8 100 2 500 800
'Acetone 67-64-1 3 60 60
Aldrin 309-00-2 0.1 0.1 0.1
.Anthracene 120-12-7 1 000 5000 l 000
Antimony 7440-36-0 40 40 40
Arsenic 7440-38·2 30 30 30
Benzene 71-43·2 10 100 200
Benzo(a)anthracene 56-55-3 0.7 0.7 0.7
Be nzol aJpy re ne 50·32·B 0.7 0.7 0.7
Benzo(b)fluoranthene 205·99·2 0.7 0.7 0.7
~Be nzo(gh i)pery Iene 191·24·2 100 2500 30
Benzo( k) f Iuora nt he ne 207-08-9 0.7 0,7 0.7
:Beryllium 7440-41-7 3 3 3
~Biphenyl 92·52·4 3000 10
Bis(2-chloroethyl) ether 111.44.4 0.7 0.7 0.7
Bis(2·chloroisopropyl)ether 39638·32·9 0.7 4 9
Bromoform 75-25·2 0.1 20 700
Bromomethane 74.33.9 10 3 700
Cadmium 7440-43-9 80 80 80
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 12 9

Soil
5·3 Soil & GW· l 5·3 Soil & GW-2 S-3 Soil & GW-3
Constituent CAS Number ppmw ppmw p pmw

Ca1bon lei 1achlorlde 56-23.5 4 40


Chlordane 57.74.9 5 5 5
Chloi obenzene IOS.90·7 8 80 40
Chlo1oform 67·66·3 0.1 10 300
2·Chlo1ophenol 95.57.g 0.7 I 000 20
Chromium 7440.47.3 5000 5000 5 000
Chromium(\!\} \8540·29-9 l 000 l 000 I 000
Ch1omium(lllJ 16065-83-1 5 000 5000 5000
Chrysene 218·01·9 0.7 0.7 0.7
Cyanide 57·12·5 400 400 400
Di{2~1 hylhexyll phi ha late 117·81-7 100 1000 500
Di be nzo(a ,h la nth 1ace ne 53.70.3 0.8 0-8 0.8
Dib1 omochlo1omelhane 124-48-1 0.09 70 70
1,2-Dibiomoelhane 106·93·4 0.005 0.04 0.07
I ,4 .Oich I01 obe nzene 106-46·7 2 200 200
-
1,3-Dichlorobenzene 541·73·1 200 500 500
1,2· Dlchlo1obenzene 95.50.1 200 500 500
3,3 '. Dichlo1obenzidine 91·94· l 3 3 3
Die h101 obi om ome I ha ne 75.27.4 0.1 90 90
1,2· Dichlo1oel hane 107·06-2 0.05 0.2 60
1, 1"-0ie h101 oel hane is:}4.f 3 406 500
c is-1,2·Die hloroethyle ne 156·59·2 2 500 500
11ans·1,2· Di ch loroerhylene l 56·60-5 4 2 500 2000
Dichlo1omel hane 75·09·2 0.1 700 700
2,4· Dichlo1 ophen_ol 120·83·2 10 90 90
1,2-DichlOI OPI opane 78-87-5 O.l 0.2 40
1,3-Dichloropropylene 542-75-6 0.01 0.1 20
Dield1in 60·57· l 0.1 0.2 0.1
Diethyl phthalale 84-66· 2 100 5000 0.7
D"lmel hyl phlhalale 131· l 1·3 30 5000 0.7
2 .4- Dim el hyl phenol 105-67·9 0~7 4 000 lO
2,4· Dinil1ophenol 51·28·5 3 90 6
2.4-Dinitiolotuene 121· 14-2 0.7 7 7
Endosullan 115-29-7 0.2 6 0.05
End1in 72·20·8 0.6 10 1
Ethyl benzene 100-41-4 . 80 2 500 500
Fluo1an1 hene 206-44-0 600 5000 600
Fluorene 86-73-7 400 5 000 I 000
Heptachlo1 76-44-8 0 .7 0.7 0.7
Heptachlo1 epoxide 1024-57·3 0.3 0.3 0.3
, Hei<aehloco-1 .3· butadiene 87-68.J 3 3 40
-Hexachlo1obenzene 118·74·1 3 3 3
Hexachlo1oel hane 67·72·1 30 30 50
Ind eno<2. 3-<:d)pyi ene 193-39·5 0.7 0.7 0.7
Lead 7439-92· l 600 600 600
Lindane 58·89·9 0,1 2 0.5
Meicury 7439.97.5 60 60 60
Mel hoxych I01 72-43-5 300 300 30
Mel hyl el hyl kelone 78-93·3 0.3 40 40
Mel hyl lsobutyl ketone 108-10-1 0.5 70 70
Methyl me1cury 22967·92·6 20 20 20
2· Melhylnaphl halene 91·57·6 7
Mel hyl tert· butyl ethe1 1634·04·4 3 200 200
Naphthalene 91-20-3 4 1 000 1 000
130 GEA NUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER
MalisochulieHli Cont'd.

Soil

S-3 Soil & GW-1 S-3 Soil & GW-2 S-3 Soil & GW-3
Constituent CAS Number ppmw ppmw ppmw

Nickel 7440·02·0 700 700 700


p-Chloroani I1ne 106-47-8 l 400 30
Pen tac h lorop henol 87-86-5 5 40 40
Phen anth1 ene 85-01-8 700 2 500 100
Phenol 108·95·2 60 800 500
Polyc h101 i nat e<l bi phenyl s 1336-36·3 2 2 2
p.p"· Olchloro
di phenyl dichlo1 oethane 72.54.a IO IO 10
p,p'-Dichlo1 o
diphenyldichloioethylene 72-55-9 9 9 9
p, p' -Die hIorod iphenyl
tr ic hloroet han e 50-29·3 9 9 9
Py1ene 129-0Q.O 500 5000 500
Selernum 7782-49-2 2 500 2 500 2 500
S1lvei 7440-22-4 200 200 200
Styrene 100-42· 5 2 20 100
2 .3. 7 ,8-Tetrichlorodibenzo
dioxin 1746-01·6 0.00002 0.000 02 0.000 02
1, 1, 1,2· Teti achloroethane 630-20-6 0.4 0.5 20
1, 1,2 ,2· Tetrachloroethane 79-34-5 0.02 0.2 2
Tetracti Io roet hylen e f21~1n 0.5 300 500
Thallium 7440·28·0 100 100 100
Toluene 108·88·3 90 500 2 500
Total Petrnleum Hyd1ocarbons (TPHl 00-00-4 5 000 5000 5000
1,~.~.obenzene 120-82-1 100 900 800
1. 1, I· T1 ichloroethane 71-55·6 30 500 500
1, 1.2-Tiichloroethane 79-00·5 0.3 10 10
T' LC hloroethy le ne 79-01·6 0.4 20 500
2.4,6· T1 ichlo1ophenol 88-06-2 3 200 200
2 .4, 5· T11chlorophenol 95.95.4 3 5000 2
Vinyl chlo1 ide 75:-01.4 b:-4 0.3 2
Vinylidene chloride 75-35-4 0.7 0.1 9
'Xylenes (mixed isomers) 1330-20-7 800 500 2 500
Zinc (fume 01 dust) 7440-66-6 5 000 5000 5000
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 131

MICHIGAN
STATUS

[XI Regulation IZl Guideline


IZl Exists 07/12/90 IZl Exists 07/16/93
D Proposed D Proposed

D In Development D Soil
D Expected Availability D Groundwater
IZl Both Soil & Groundwater
ONone D Other

COMMENTS
1. Remediation is required to attain one or more of the fol- 4. Type B numerical cleanup criteria (listed in Table):
lowing degrees of eleanup: Type A, Type B, or Type C. The (al Soil:
degree ofeleanup detected is at the option of the person pro-
posing the remedial action, but it must be approved by the • 20 times the drinking water values are provided for
Department of Natural Resources (DNRl. The regulations convenience and are not mandatory if leachate tests
pertain to Type A and Type B criteria; guidelines for Type C support the use of a higher value.
criteria were implemented 16 July 1993. • For certain materials, such as PCBs, PNAs, and
2. Type A eleanup criteria: some pesticides, which strongly adsorb to soil and
are known not to leach at significant concentrations,
(al hazardous substance concentration not exceeding the direct contact value is acceptable as the soil
backb'Tound cleanup criteria without site-specific leachate tests.
(b) hazardous substance concentration not exceeding the • Rule 299.5711 allows for a value higher than 20
detcetion limit. times the groundwater cleanup criteria to be estab-
3. Type B eleanup criteria: lished as the soil cleanup criteria protective of
(a) Gronndwatcr---conccntrntion of hazardous substnnce groundwater throngh the use of a leach a tc test.
not exceeding (bl Groundwater:
• concentration representing an increased cancer risk • GSl=groundwater-surfacc water interface values.
of 1 in 1,000,000 (when substance is a cru·cinogcn), The GSI values arc the criteria used to judge compli-
• concentration that represents the humnn life cycle ance with Rule 299.5713 and represent groundwater
safe concentration (when substance is not a carcino- criteria that arc protective of surface wa tcr. The GSI
gen, teratogen or mutagen), values in the table are for surface waters not pro-
tected as a drinking water source. Rule 299.5713 re-
• secondary maximum contaminant level (MCL) quires the GSI value not be exceeded at a point
• \eve l that imparts ad verse aesthetic charaetcristics where groundwater naturnlly discharges to surface
to groundwater. water, Demonstration may be made by monitoring at
the interface or by predictive modeling. It is not nec-
(b) Soils---concentrations that: cssnry that the GSI value be achieved throughout
• proteet aquifers, the aquifer.
• protect surface water, • The 20 times GSl value is shown for cases in which
• pose acceptable risk through inhalation, soil is to be rcmediated to that level.
• pose ncceptable risk through direct human contact. 5. For cases in which Type B criteria are less than Type A
criteria, Type A criteria becomes the cleanup goal.
To assure soils do not pose a threat of aquifer contamination,
the concentration of the hazardous substance in soil must be 6. Type C criteria are developed on the basis of site-specific
below that which produces a concentration in leachate risk assessment.
{TCLP) that is equa 1to the higher of the background concen-
tration or detection limit, the groundwater criteria specified
in 3 (a) above, or the lenchate concentration generated by
background soil.
132 CLEAN UP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

REFERENCE
I. Michigan Environmental Res11011se An, i 982 Public Act 307 a~ 2. MIDNR. MERA Operational Memorandum #S, Revision 2 - Type B
amended a11d Administrative Rules, December 1992 (Part 7 Cleanup Criteria Rules 299.5709, 299.5 711 (2), 299. 571 l (5) am! 299. 571'3, 16
Criteria, R 299,5701-5727). July 1993.

Contact: Seg Norgbey, Ph.D.


Office: Environmental Response Division
Agency: Department of Natural Resources
Address: P.O. Box 30028
Lansing, MI 48909
Phone: 517-373-4808

NUMERICAL CRITERIA
Sail

20X Drinking Direct Cantact 20X GSI (Graundwater Surface


Value Value Water Interface Values)
- -- --
Canstituent CAS Number ppmw ppmw ppmw

AcenaphtheM 83·32-9 24 45000


Acenaphthylene 208·96-B 0.5 930
Acetone 67·64· l 14 7 800 10
Acetonitr~e 75·05·8 2.6 l 500 16
Ac role in 107-02·8 2.2 1200 0.050
Acrylamide 79-06-1 0.000 15 0.280 0_180
Aery I le add 79·10·7 12 6 400
Acrylon it ri Ie 107-13-1 0.001 3 0.70 0.044
CX·BHC 319-84-6 0.000 11 0.21
Alachlor 15972-60-8 0.008 4 16
Aldrin 309~00·2° 0.076
Aluminum \\ume ll'I' dll'.i\) 7429-90·5 1.0
Aniline 62·53·3 0.130 230 0.080
Anthracene 120-12·7 140 260 000 2 200
Antimony 7440-36-0 0.048 91 86
Arsenic 7440·38-2 3.6
Atrazine 1912· 24·9 0.003 2 5.8
Azobemene 103.33.3 0.006 4 12
Barium 7440-39-3 48 91 000
Benzene 71-43·2 0.024 13 12
'8eniidine 92-:-87·5 0.000 003 0.005 6 0.000 8
-Benzo{a}anthracene 56-55·3 0,18

roro[o]p""'
Benzo(b)l luor~nthene
50·32-8
205-99-2
0.180
0.180
Benzo{ghi)p€rylene 191·24·2 930
Benzorc acid 65·85·0 620 l 000 000
Benzo(k)fluornnthene 207·08·9 0.180
Benzy I alcohol 100-51·6 200 110 000 0.44
Ben zy I c \\\midf. l00-44-7 0.004 2 2.3
Bis(2-chloroethyl) ether 111·44·4 0.000 64 0.350 0.084
:Boron (wat~llitilef
I
744042.-B a:4 16 000
,Bromoform 75-25-2 0.092 50 1.3
: Bromomethane 74·83-9 0.200 110 0.220
~
: Butyl benzyl phthalate 85·68·7 22 41 000
~Cadmium 7440-43·9 0.070 130
Ca proIact am 105-60·2 120 220 000
Carbon disulfide 75· 15·0 15 8 600
Carbon tetrachloride 56·23-5 0.005 4 3.0 0.420
Chlordane 57. 74-9 0.000 54 1.0 0.000 011
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 133

So'1I

20X Drinking D'1rect Contoc t 20X GSI (Groundwate r Surface


Value Value Wa ter Interface V alues)

Constituent CAS Number ppm w ppmw ppmw

Chlorobe112ene 108-90·7 2.6 1 500 1.4


Ch loroethan e 75-00·3 0.180 150
Chloroform 67-66·3 0.110 62 0.860
Ch lore methane 74-87·3 0.054 30
2-Chloiophenol 95.57..a 0.860 480 0.200
Chlorpyrifos 2921-88·2 0.420 780
Chromium 7440-47-3 2.4 4 400 0 .086
Chrysene 218-01-9 0.180
Copper 7440-50·8 20 9800 0.370
Cyanazinc 21725-46·2 0.200 360
Cyanide 57:12.5 3.0 5 700 0.110
2.4·D 94.75.7 1.4 2600 0.940
Dacthal 1861·32· l 110 200 000
Di (2-ethyl hexy I) phtha la Ie 117..Sl-7 92
Diazinon 333-41-5 0.013 23
Dibenzo[a.hlanlh1acene 53.70..3 0.180
Dibromochloromethane 124-48· 1 0.008 4 4 .7 0.580
1,2· Dib1omoethane 106-93·4 0.000 008 4 0.004 7 0 .022
Di butyl phi ha Iate 34.74.2 17 31 000
1,4· Dichlo1obenzene 106-46· 7 0.030 16 0.3
1,3· Dichlorobenzene 541· 73-1 12 6 700 3.6
1,2· Dichlo1obenzene 95-50-1 12 6 700 0.14
3,3' · D1chlo1obenzidine 91.94.1 0.001 5 2.8 0.0013
Dic hloro1>1 om ometha ne 75-274 0.011 6.2 0.480
Dichlorodifluoromethane 75-71·8 32 18000
1.2· Dichloroer hane 107-06·2 0.007 6 4.3 11
l, 1· Dichloroelhane 75.34 .3 17 9 300
cis- 1,2· Dichloroethylene 156-59·2 1.5 860
trans-1,2· Dich loroel hylene 156-60-5 2 .4 1300 6.0
D•chloromethane 75-09·2 0.092 51 1.2
2,4· Dichl0tophenol 120..33-2 0.420 780 0.680
1,2· Dichloropropane 78-87·5 O.otO 5.8 1.3
1,3· D1chloropropylene 542-75-6 0.004 2.2 0.060
Dichlorvos 62-73-7 0.002 4 4.4
Dield1in 60-57·1 0.080
Diethyl phi ha late 84-66·2 100 190 000
Dimethyl phi ha late 131·11·3 1400 1000000
2.4· Oimethylphenol 10567-9 7.0 13000 0 .62
2 ,6· Dimethylphenol 576·26· 1 0.084 160
3,4· Dimethylphenol 95-65·8 0.200 360
4 ,6· Oini\lo·o-cresol 534-52·1 O.D48 91 0.012
.2 ,4-Dinitrotoluene 121-14·2 0.001 1.9
Dinoset> 88..SS-7 0.140 260 0.010
1 .4· Oio xa ne 123·91·1 0.064 35 40
·Endosurtan l l 5·29·7 69
Endrin 72-20-8 44
Epichlorohydrin 106-89·8 0.070 39
Ethylbenzene 100-41 ·4 1.5 7 500 0 .620
El hylene glycol 107-21 · l 280 520 000 1400
Fluoranthene 206-44·0 17 31 000 7.4
·Fluorene 86-73·7 17 31 000 280
Fluorine (soluble fluoride) 7782-41·4 42 78000 38
Fe rma Ide hyd e 50-00·0 26 14 000 3.4
I
Gentian Violel 00--00· 15 0.007 13
134 CLEANUP CRITERIA fOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER
M ichigon Cont'd.

Soil
20X Drinking Direct Contac t 20X GSI (Groundwater Surface
Value Volue Water lnterfoce Values)

Constituen t CAS Number ppm w ppmw ppmw

Heptachlo1 76-44-8 0.28


He pl ach lor epox rd e 1024.57.3 0.000 076 0.140
He:.abromobe nzene 87-82·1 0.400 730
'iexachloro-1,3· buladiene 87-68·3 0.009 2 17
i_J-lexachlerobenzene l 18: 7~4~1 0.000 44 0.800 0.000 036
ll-Hexachlo1ocyclohexane 319-85-7 0.000 4 0.72
Hexach 101 ocyt Iope ntad ien e 77-47-4 1.0 1800 0.011
Hexachloroethane 67-72-1 0.050 28 0.260
2-Hexanane 591· 78-6 20 11000
lndena(2 ,3-cd)py1 ene 193-39-5 0.180
Iron 7439-89-6 6.0
lsobul yl alcohol 78-83· 1 44 25000
lsophorone 78·59·1 0.760 430 17
lsopropyl aIcohol 67·63·0 9.0 5000 420
Lead 7439_:.9_2·.1 400
Lindane 58.39.9 0.000 54 1.0 0.0016
m-C1esol 108-39-4 7.0 13 000
Manganese 7439-96·5 1.0 6200
Meicmy 7439-97-6 0.042 78 0.000 026
Methanol 67·56-1 70 39 000 820
Met haxyc hIor 72-43·5 0.700 1 300
2· Mel haxye1 hanal 109-86-4 o.560 310
Methyl el hyl ketone 73.93.3 6.4 3600 82
Mel hyl isobulyl ketone 108-10· 1 7.0 3 900
Mel hyl tert· butyl el her 1634-04·4 4.6 2 600 7.6
2· Mel hyl· 4-chlorophenoxyacel ic
acid 94-74-6 0.140 260
Methylene b1 amide 74.95_3 1.5 860
4.4'- Metlly\eM- bis\2· cl\laroan\((nel 101· 14·4 1.3
2· Mel hylnaphl halene 00-00-16 0.22 410
Melolachlor 51218-45·2 32 60000
n-Oi octyl phi halal e 117-84-0 2.6 4 700
n.Heptane 142·82·5 620 340 000
n-Hexane 110·54·3 58 32 000
N:~ 1troSOd i- t>-p!EJPY lam in~ 621-64-7 0.000 098 0.054
N-N it1osodiphcnylamine 86-30·6 0.140 78 3.2
Naphl halene 91-20·3 5.0 9 300 0.580
Nickel 7440-02-0 11 20000 1.1
Ni11ate (as N) 14797-55-8 220 410 000
Nilril e {as N) 14797-65-0 20 26000
Nitrobenzene 98.""95·3 0.064 36 38
N.N·Dimethylan1line 121-69· 7 0.300 170
o--Cresol 95-48· 7 7.0 3900 0.760
p-Cresol 105.44.5 0.700 1300 0.480
Pendimethalin 40~_B7_j_2) 17 31_000
Pen I ach Io robe nze ne 608-93·5 0.120 220
Penlachlorophenol 87-86· 5 0.005 8 11 0.016
Phenanl hrene 85-01-8 0.500 930
Phenol 10895-2 84 47 000 22
Polybrominated biphenyls 67774-32·7 0.000 076 0.14
PolychtOiiriated blplienyls 1336-36·3 1.0
p,p ·Dich)oro
d iphe nyl d ic hloroet hM e 72-54-8 5.4
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 135

Soil

20X Drinkrng Direct Contact 20X GSI (Groundwoter Surface


Vcdue ___V_a_l_u_e_______w _ a_t_e_r_J_n_terfoce Volues)

Constituent CAS Number ppmw ppmw

.p,p'-Dichloro
diphenyld1chloroethylene 72.55.9 3.8
p, fl· 0 ic hlorod' phenyl
trichloroethane 50-29-3 3.8
Prom eton 1610-18-0 3.0 700
Propachlor 1918-16-7 1.8 3 400
Propazine 139-40-2 3.S 7 000
Propyl alcohol 71-23-8 26 15000
Propylene glycol 57-55-6 2 800 I 000 000
Pyrene 129-00-0 ID 19000
rpyridme 1fo~86-1 0.140 78
.Selenium 7782-49-2 0.700 1300
~S rlver 7440-22-4 0.660 l 200 II •~

~Styrene
,Sulfale
100-42 5
1~808:_7_9;8 5000
0-024 13
"
Tebuthiuron 34014-18-1 9.8 18 000
rert-Butyl alcohol 75-65-0 11 6100
l ,2,4,5-Teirachlorobenzene 95.94.3 48 88000 0.008
2 ,3. 7 .8-Tetr ac hlo rod 1t>enzo
dio~in 1746-01·6 POOll ~ 0.000 000 000 28
I, l, l,2-Tetrachlorocthane 630-20.6 I
1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroelhane 79.34.5
Tetrachloroethylene 127-18-4 n
e aa hyd rof uran 109-99-9
tlh ollrum 7440-280
Toluene 108-88-3
Toxaphene 8001-35-2 [I

Triallate 2303-17-5
l ,2,4- Trichlorobenzene 120-82-1
1.1.1· Trichloroethane 71-55-6
1,1,2· Trichloroethane 79-00..5 I I
~T rich Ioroethyle n e 79-01-6 IW I
V rrch IorofIu orome thane 75-69-4
·2.4.6-Trichlorophenol 88-05-2
~2 .4.5-Trichlorophenol
L. -· - -- -
95-95-4
2(2 ,4 ,5· Trrchlorophenoxy)
propion IC acid 93-72-1
1.2.3- Trichlo1op1opane 96-18-4
Trrchlorotritluoroelhane 76-13· l
Trilluralin 1582-09-8
T ris(2, 3-diblomopropy I)
phosphate 126-72-7
v anadium (fume or dustl 7440.62-2
1Vinyl chloride 75-01·4
~ylidene chloride 75-35--4
Xylenes (mrxed isomers) 1330-20-7
Zinc (fume or dust) 7440-66-6
136 CLEANUP CRITER!A FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER
Mic'1igan Cant'd.

Soil

Health· based Drinking Water GSI Value (Graundwater·Surface Aesthetic


Value Water Interface Values) Drinking Water Valu e

Canstituent CAS Number mg/L mg/L mg/L

Acenaphthene 83-32-9 1.2


Acenaphthylene 208-96-8 0.025
Acetone 67-64-1 0.7 0.5
Aceton it•i Te 75·05·8 0.130 0.810
Aero le in 107-02·8 0.110 0.002 5
Acrylamide 79-06·1 D.000 007 7 0.0091
Aery Iic acid 79-10-7 0.580
Acrylon IJ r ~e 107-13-1 0.000 063 0.002 2
o:-BHC 319-84·6 0.000 005 6
Alachlor 15972-60·8 0.000 42
Aldrin 309-00-2 0.000 002 I 0.000 001 4
Aluminum (fume or dust) 7429-90-5 0.050
Anmne 62-53-3 0.006 3 0.004
Anthracene 120·12·7 7.0 110
Antimony 7440-36-0 0.002 4 4.3
Arsenic 7440-38·2 0.000 02 0.180
Atrazine 1912-24-9 0.000 16
Alobenzene 103.33.3 0.000 32
Barium 7440-39·3 2.4
Benzene 71-43·2 0.0012 0.060
8enz1dine 92-87-5 0.000 000 15 0.00 4
aenzO(aJanl hracene 56-55·3 0.000 004 9 0.000 31
Benzo[alpyrene 50-32·8 0.000 004 9 0.000 31
8enzo{b)fluoranthene 205.99.2 0.000 004 9 0.000 31
Ben zo{gh IJ pe ryle ne 191-24-2 0.025
Benzoic acid 65-85·0 31
8enzo{k )flu or anth en e 207-08--9 0.000 004 9 0.000 31
8enzyl alcoh oI 100-51-6 9.8 0.022
Ben zyl chloride 100-44-7 0.000 21
81s(2--<:hloroethy1) ether 111-44-4 0.000 032 0.004 2
Boron {water-soluble} 7440-42·8 0.420
Bromoform 75-25·2 0.004 6 0.065
8romomethane 74-83-9 0.009 8 0.011
Butyl benzyl phlhalale 8 5-68-7 LI
_sadmrum ?._~0.:._43:9 0.003 5 0.000 54
Caprolactam 105·60·2 5.8
Carbon drsulflde 75-15-0 0.770
Ca roon tetrac hIor ide 56-23-5 0.000 27 0.021
Chlordane 57. 74.9 0.000 027 0.000 000 53
Ch lorobenzen e 108-90·7 0.130 0.071
Ch loroeth ane 75-00-3 0.0091
Chloroform 67-66-3 0.005 6 0.043
Ch lorometh ane 74-87·3 0.002 7
2.Chlorophenol 95.57.3 0.043 0.009 8
~pynfos 2921-88·2 0.021
Chromium 7440-47-3 0.120 0.004 3
Chrysene 218-01·9 0.000 004 9 0.000 31
Copper 7440-50·8 1.3 O.oJS 1.0
Cyanazlne 21725-46-2 0.009 8
Cyanide 57-12-5 0.150 0.005 5
2.4-D 94.75_7 0.070 0~047
Dacthal 1861-32-1 5.3
Oif2-ethylhexyl) phthaTate 117-81·7 0.002 5 0.059
Oiazlnon 333-41·5 0.000 63
STATE CLt:ANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 137

Soil

Heolth·bosed Drinking Woter G SI Volue (Groundwoter-Surfoce Aesthetic


Vo1ue Woter lnterfoce Volues) Drinking Woter Volue
----
Constituent CAS Number mg/L mg/L mg/L

Dlben zol a. h la nth 1acen e 53. 70·3 0.000 004 9 0.000 31


Di b1omochl01 ornet ha n e 124-48-1 0.000 42 0.029
1,2· Dib1omoethane 106-93-4 0.000 000 42 0.001 l
Di butyl phthal ate 84-74-2 0.84
1,4-Dic h101 oben ze ne 106·46·7 0.001 5 0.015
1,3· Die h101 oben ze ne 541·73·1 0.600 0.180
1,2· D1chlo1obenzene 95.50.1 0.600 0.007
3 ,3'· Die h101 oben zid Ine 91·94-1 0.000 077 0.000 063
Dichlo1ob1omomethane 75-27-4 0.000 56 0.024
Dichlo1odif luo1omethane 75-71-8 l.6
1,2· Dichlo1oethane 107-06·2 0.000 38 0.56
I, l · Dichlo1oethane 75.34.3 0.84 0.067
cis· l ,2· Dichlowethylene 156·59·2 0.077
ti an S· 1,2. Die h101 oethy le ne 156-60-5 0.120 0.300
Oich !orometh ane 75-09-2 0.004 6 0.059
2 .4· Dichl01ophenol 120-83-2 0.021 0.034
1 .2-Dic hlo1 op1 opane 78-87-5 0.000 52 0.064
1,3-Dic h101 op1 opy le ne 542·75·6 0.000 2 0.003
DichlOl'\los 62·73·7 0.000 12
Dield1ln 60·57·1 0.000 002 2 0.000 000 032
\ Diethyl phth aIate 84·66·2 5.2
I -
~ D1 ethylene e! he• ll 1-76-2 0.084
; Dim ethy I phth alate 131-11-3 70
12 .4-Di methyl phenol 105-67·9 0.35 0.031
I ,
t.?:,6· Dimethyl phenol 576· 26-J. 0.004 2
3, 4· Di me thy Iphenol 95·65·8 0.009 8
4 .6-Di nitro· o-<:1 esol 534-52-1 0.002 4 0.000 59
2,4-Dinitrotoluene 121·14-2 0.000 052
Dinoseb 88·85 ·7 0.007 0.000 5
I .4· Dioxa ne 123·91- I 0.003 2 2.0
·En dosu Ila n 115-29-7 0.001-6 0.000 056
End1in 72-20-8 0.0012 0.000 002 3
I
Epichlo1ot1yd1 In 106-89·8 0.003 5
Ethyl benzene 100.-41·4 0.680 0.031 0.074
~ylene glycol 107·21· l 14 68
FI uo1 anthen e 206·44·0 0.840 0.370
Flumene 86· 73.7 0.840 14
F!uOI ine {soluble fluo1 ide) 7782.-41·4 2.1 1.9 2.0
Fo1 maldehyde 50-00-0 1.3 0.170
Gent Ian Violet 00-00.15 0.000 35
Heptach!01 7644·8 o~ooo·oorr ci.OOo 001 '6
Hep1achlo1 epoxide 1024.57.3 0.000 003 8
Hex ab1 omoben ze ne 87·82·1 0.020
Hexachlo10. 1,3· butadiene 87. f>S-.3 0.000 46
Hexac h101 obenze ne 118-74-1 0.000 022 0.000 001 8
~-~· . ~~·

~-H exac hIorncyc lohexa ne 319·85· 7 0.000 02


Hexac h101 ocyc lopent ad iene 77-47·4 0.050 0.000 54
He xac h101 oet han e 67·72-1 0.002 5 0.013
2·Hexanone 591· 78-6 0.98
lndeno{2,3-<:dlpy1 ene 193-39-5 0.000 004 9 0.000 31
lsob utyl alcohol 78-83-1 2.2
Isop howne 78·59·1 0.038 0.860
lsopropyl alcohol 67-63-0 0.450 21
Lead 7439.92.1 0.004 0.008
138 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER
Michigan Cont'd.

Soil

Heolth·based Drinking Water GSI Value (Groundwater-Surface Aesthetic


Value Water Interface Values) Drinking Water Valu e
Constituent CAS Number mg/L mg/L mg/L

Lindan e 53.39.9 0.000 027 0.000 08


m-Cresol 108-39-4 0.350
Manganese 7439-96-5 0.170 0.050
Mercury 7439.97.5 0.002 l 0.000 001 3
Methanol 67-56· l 3.5 41
Methoxychloi 72-43-5 0.035
2-Methoxyethanol 109-86-4 0.028
Methyl ethyl ketone 78-93-3 0.32 4.1
Methyl i sobuty I ketone 108-10-1 0.350
Methyl tert· butyl ether 1634-04-4 0.230 0.380
i. Methy·1~··chlrnoph enoxyaceiic
acid 94·74-6 0.007
Methylene bromide 74.95.3 0.077
4 ,4' -Methylene-bis(2· chlo1oanillnel 101·14·4 0.000 035
2-Methylnaphthalene 00-00-16 0.011
Metolachlor 51218-45-2 1.6
n· Dioctyl phthalate 117-84-0 0.130
n-Heplane 142-82-5 31
n-Hexane 110-54-3 2.9
N-N itrosodi-n
-propylamine 621·64· 7 0.000 004 9
ii N itrosodiphenylamine a6~3o:fi 0~007 0.160
Naphthalene 91-20-3 0.250 0.029
Nickel 7440-02·0 0.530 0.057
Nitrate (as N) 14797-55-8 II
l 'lit1 ~le _(as_NJ 14797-65-0 1.0
Nit1otJ.enzene 98-95-3 0.003 2 1.9
N, N-Dimethylan~1ne 121-69· 7 O.Dl5
o-Cresol 95.43. 7 0.350 0.038
p-Cresol 105.44.5 0.035 0.024
Pendimethalln 40487·42-l 0.840
Pe ntac hIorotJ.enze ne 608-93-5 0,005 8
Pe ntac hloropheno I 87-86·5 0,000 29 0.000 8
Phenanthiene 85-01-8 0.025
Phenol 108-95·2 4.2 1.1
P_'.'ly~romi~~':d b1ph_eny!~ 67774-32·7 0,000 003 8
- -
Polychlorinated biphenyls 1336-36-3 0.000 018 0.000 000 02
p,p'-Dichloro
diphenyl dichloroethane 72-54·8 0.000 15 0.000 008 4
p,p'· Dichlo10
d 1phenyldlchloroethylene 72-55-9 0.000 1 0.000 005 9
p,p·. OlciliO'rodiphenyl
tric hlo roe thane 50-29·3 0.000 l 0.000 000 23
tP1ometon 1610-18·0 0.150
P1opachlo1 1918-16· 7 0.091
Propazl~e 139.:1_0;2 0.190
P1opyl alcohol 71-23-8 1.3 820
Propylene glycol 57-55-6 140 190
Pyrene 129-00·0 0.520 11
Py11dme 110-86· I 0.007 0.020
Selenium 7782-49·2 0.035 0.022
Silver 7440-22-4 0.033 0~0001 0.100
Styiene 100-42·5 0,001 2 0.019
Sulfate 14808· 79·8 250
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 139

Soil

HE!(31th·based Drinking Woter GSI Value (Graundwater·Surface Aesthetic


Value Water Interface Values) Drinking Water Value

Constituent CAS Number mg/L mg/L rng/L

Tebuthiuron 34014· 18· l 0.490


tert· Butyl a!cohoI 75-65-0 0.550
l ,2 ,4, 5. Tetrac hloroben ze ne 95-94-3 2.4 0.000 4
2 ,3, 7 ,8-Telrachlorod1benzo
dioxin 1746-01·6 0.000 000 000 46 0.000 000 000 014
1, 1.1,2· Tetrachloroetha11e 630-20·6 0.001 3
1, 1,2.2· Tetrachloroethane 79.34.5 o.ooo 18 0.032
Tet rac hloroet hy Iene 127-18-4 0.000 7 0.022
Tetrahydroiuran 109-99-9 0.230 3.3
Thallium 7440-28-0 0.000 58 0.0063
Toluene 108·88·3 1.5 6Ti0 0.790
Toxaphene 8001-35·2 0.000 032 0.000 000 24
Triallate 2303-17-5 0.091
1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene 120"82-l 0.110 0.022
l, l, 1-Trichloroel hane 71-55~ 0.200 0.120
1,1,2· Trichloroethane 7cUl0-5 o-:ono-63 0.000 65
Trichloroethylene 79-01·6 0.002 2 0.094
Trichlorol luoromethane 75.59.4 2.4
2,4,6· Tr1chlorophenol 88-06·2 0.003 2 0.001 5
2.4, 5-Trichlorophenol 95.95.4 0.7
2(2 ,4)"'..t ric.hiorophenoxy)
propionic acid 93-72-1 0.052
1, 2 ,3· Trich loropropa ne 96-18-4 0.040
Trich lorotrif Iuoroe thane 76-13-1 190
!Jri!l_u~alin 1582-09·8 0..000 18
Tris(2,3· Dibromopropyl)
phosphate 126-72-7 0.004 6
Vanadium (fume or dust) 7440-62·2 0.061 0.008
Vmyl c!Jlom!e 75-01·4 0.000 015 D.DD3 l
Vinylidene chloride 75-35-4 0.007 0.067
Xyl en es (mixed i r;om ers) 1330-:-20. 7 13 6.059 6~28
Zinc (fume or dust) 7440-66-6 2.3 0.081 5.0
140 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

MINNESOTA
STATUS
D Regulation !SJ Guideline
D Exists IS] Exists
D Proposed D P roposed
D In Development D SoiI
D Expected Availability D Groundwater
!SJ Both Soil & Groundwat er
DNone D Other

COMMENTS
1. Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) establishes (c) adjustment to levels such that groundwater contami-
groundwater cleanups goals based on a site-specific evalu· nants do not pose an unacceptable risk based on site-
ation of risks and the following: specific risk assessment.
(a) prevention of any further gronndwater degradation 2. Soil cleanup criteria are based on a site-specific risk as-
where recommended allowable limits (RALs) and sessment considering the following routes of exposure: inges-
maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) are not exceeded tion, dermal contact, inhalation, and migration of contami-
or risk is below 1 in 100,000 for carcinogens: nants in soil to groundwater.
(b) remediation to RALs and l in 100,000 cumulntive risk
for carcinogens, or to MCLs, whichever is mnre re;;tric-
tive, for si tes involving groundwater already exceeding
RALs or MCLs; or

REFERENCE
I . i\'\PCA Cu111 pil<J1io11 of G m11 nd water R nles and Rcg11l.ui<111~. S 11pn· 1. Recommended i\llowahk Li111its lor D1inking Wat<:r Curna1ninant~.
I 11 nd l'rngr.:i m. A pp mJ{"h ul Mi 1111c~uta S 11pcrl1111d l'wgra Ill 10 MN Dt""pt. ul llcahh, HeJhh Ris~ As~e~~mt""llt Senion, Release No. 3.
Gmundwa1cr. CleJllnp. 1990. J.:in. 1991.
2. MPCA Mt""murandmn, Site Rcpunse Soil Cka1111p Pmcedmt""s. 28
May 1992.
Contact: Gary Pulford
Office: Solid Waste Division
Agency: Pollution Control Agency
Address: 520 Lafayette Rd.
St. Paul, MN 55155-4194
Phone: 612-296-7290

NUMERICAL CRITERIA
Groundwater
Recommended Allowable Limits
Constituent CAS Number m g/L Remorks

Ace na pht hen e 83-32·9 4.0


Acetone 67-64·1 0.7
Adfluorfen. sodium 624 75.59.9 0.009
Acrylamide 79-06·1 0.000 08
Acrylonilri le 107-13· l 0.000 6
cx-BHC 319-84-6 0.000 06
Alachlor l 59 72- 6(}.8 0.004
Aldicarb 116-06-3 0.009
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 141

Groundwater

Recommended Allowable Limit5

Constituent CAS Number mg/L Remorks

'Ald11n 309-00-2 0.000 02


I Al lyl chlo11de 107-05· l 0.001
Ametryn 834·12·8 0.060
Ammonium sulfamale 7773-06-0 1.0
Anth1acene 120· 12·7 2.0
Antimony 7440-36-0 0.001
Arsenic 7440-38-2 D.000 2
Asbestos 1332-21-4 7 mrthon l1be1 sll
At1azme 1912·24·9 0.003
Bai ium. Ba1ium Sulfate/chlo11de 00-00-17 2.0
Bentazon
Benzene
Benzidine
Ben ZOIC ac od
Beryl!i~~
Biphenyl 92-52-4 0.300
81s{2<hlot0ethyll etheo 111.44.4 0.000 3
81S(2-chlofOISQ!lfO!l'fl le Iher 39638-32-9 0.300
Bis{chlo1omethyl) elheo 542-88· 1 0.000 002
Boo on {wateo -soluble) 7440-42-8 0.300
B1omacil 314-40-9 0.080
B1omofo1m 75-25·2 0.040
81omomethane 74-83·9 0.000 l
Butyl benzyl phthalate 85·68·7 0.100
Butylate 2008-41-5 0.400
Butyl phi halylbutyl
glycolate 85-70-l 7.0
Cadmium 7440-43-9 0.004
Caobaryl 63-25-2 0.700
Ca1boiu1an 1563-66-2 0.040
Caobon d1sulf1de
Caobon 1e11 achlo1 ide
Ca1box1n
Chlooamber
Chlo1dane
Chlo1obenzene 108-90·7 0.100
Chlo1ofo1m 67-66-3 0.060
2-Chlooophenol 95-57-8 0.030
Chlo1othalonil 1897-45-6 0.100
ch 101 py1 ifos 2921-88·2 0.020
Cruormum
Choorrnum(lll)
Co ball
Coppe1
Cumene
Cyanazine 21725-46·2 0.010
Cyanide 57-12·5 0.100
2.4-D 94-75-7 0.070
Dacthal 1861-32-l 3.0
Dalapon, sodium salt 75.99-0 0.200
Di(2~thylhe~I) phlhalate 117·81·7 01>20
Drazinon 333.41. 5 0.000 6
1.2· Oib1omo·J<hlo1op1opane 95-12-8 0.000 3
l ,4-Dib 1omoben ze ne 106-37-6 0.070
STATE CDEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 143

Groundwoter

Recommended Allowoble Limits

C cm st it uen t CAS Number mg/L Remarks

Hexach Ioroetha ne 67-72-1 0.001


HeJ(azinone 51235-04-2 0.200
lsophorone 78-59-1 0.100
lead 7439-92-1 0.020
lindane 58-89-9 0.000 :3
Linuron 330-55-2 0.001
m.Cresol 108-39-4 0.030
Maleic hydra21de 123-33-1 3.0
Manganese 7439-96-5 0.300
Mercury 7439-97-6 0.001
Methomyt l6:752:J7.5 0--:-200
Met hoxyc hlor 72.43.5 0.030
Methyl ethy I ketone 78-93-3 0.300
Methyl i sob utyl ketone 108-10-1 0.300
Methyl parathion 298-00-0 0.002
2- Methyt-4-chlorophenoxyacetic
acid 94-74-6 0.004
Metolachlor 51218-45-2 0.100
Metribuzon 21087-64-9 0.200
Molybdenum 7439-98-7 0.020
r>-ButYi alcohol
r>-Hexane
N--N itrosodi-r>-butylami ne
N-Notrosod iethylamine
N- Ni 1rcsod i m_ e!_h y_I~ _n;i ri_c
N-Nnrosodophenylamine
Naphthalene
Nickel
Nitrate (as N)
Nitrite (as N\
-N\ t robenze ne
<>-Cresol
Oxamyl (Vydate)
p-Cresol
Paraquat
Pent ac hlorobe nze ne
Pent ac h lorop he nol
Phenol
P1cloram
Poly Aromatic
Hydrocarbons (carcinogenic)
Poly Aromati"

p,p' · D1chlorod1phenyl

Prometon
Pron amide 23950-58-5 0.050
Propachlor 1918-16-7 0.090
Propazine 139-40-2 0.010
Prop ham 122-42-9 0.100
Propoxur 114-26-1 0.003
Pyrene
Selenium
Silver ,...
h
144 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOTL AND GROUNDWATER
Minnesota Co nt'd,

G rounclwoter

Recommended Allowable Lim its

Constituent CAS Number mg/L Remarks

Simazine 122.34.9 0.010


Slylene 100-42-5 0.010
Tebuthlu1on 34014-18· l 0.500
Te1bacil 5902· 51·2 0.100
Terbufos 13071-79·9 0.001
1,2,4, 5· Tetiachlo1obenzene 95.94.3 0.002
I .l ,1.2·Tetiachlo1oethane 630.20-5 0.020
I, l ,2,2· Tetiachlo1oethane 79-34-5 0.002
Teti achlo1oethylene 127-18-4 0.007
2 ,3,4,6-Tetiachloiophenol 58-90·2 0.200
iTet1 ah yd rof uian 109-99:9 0~100
Thallium 7440-28·0 0.000 3
Tin 7440-31- 5 2.0
Toluene 108-88·3 1.0
rox.aphene 8001·35·2 0.000 3
I, l, l · T11chlo1oethane 71· 55-6 0.600
I, l ,2· T1 ichlo1oethane 79-00-5 0.003
Ti le hi oroef hylene 79-01-6 0.030
T1lchl 01011 UOI ometha ne 75.59.4 2.0
2,4 ,6-T1 ichtoiophenol 88-06·2 0.030
2(2-:4.s-T11chto1ophenoxy)
p1 opion i c acid 93-72-1 0.060
2,4, 5-Ti lchlo1ophenoxyacetic
acid 93.75.5 0.070
1,2,3· T1 lchlo1op1opane 96-18·4 0.040
T11chlo1ot1 ifluo1 oethane 76-13-1 200
T11!1u1alln 1582-09-8 0.006
1,3, 5-Ti in~robenzene 99.35.4 0.000 3
Vanadium (fume 01 dust) 7440-52·2 0.020
Vmyl chlo1 Ide 75-01-4 0.000 I
'v1i1y11denechl0i ide 75-35-4 0.006
Xylenes (mixed 1s.omers) 1330-20·7 10
Zinc (fume 01 dusfl 7440-66·6 0.700
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GlJJDELINES 145

MISSISSIPPI
STATUS

D Regulation D Guideline
D Exists D Exists
D Proposed D Proposed

D In Development D Soil
D Expected Availability D Groundwater
D Both Soil & Groundwater
lg] None D Other

COMMENTS
1. Comply with U.S. Environ mental Protection Agency re-
quirements.
2, For petroleum-contaminated soil, the cleanup level typi-
cally is 100 ppmw TPH and 100 ppmw BTEX, assuming no
sem;itive environmental receptors are present.
3. For petroleum-contaminated groundwater, the cleanup
level typically is 18 mg/L TPH and 18 mg/L BTEX, assuming
no sensitive environmental receptors are present.

REFERENCE
Personal Cnmm1111ica1iun with Mr. Ken Whiucn ol 1hc Dqi.1nmcm of
Envirnnmcmal Qua lily un 3() J 11 ly 1993.

Contact: Ken Whitten


Agency: Department of Environmental Quality
Address: PO Box 10385
Jackson, MS 39289-0385
Phone: 601-961-5054
146 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

MISSOURI
STATUS
0 Regulation 0 Guideline
0 Exists 0 Exists
0 Proposed 0 Proposed
ISi In Development O Soil
ISi Expected Availability {1994) 0 Groundwater
0 Both Soil & Groundwater
ONone 0 Other

COMMENTS
1. Cleanup standards for contaminated 1,rroundwatcr are site 2. Cleanup standards for contaminated soil are site specific.
specific. For petroleum contamination, groundwater cleanup For petroleum contamination, soil cleanup levels are typi-
levels are typically 5-10 mg/L for TPH, 0.005-0.050 mg/L for cally a maximum of 500 ppmw for TPH, 2 ppmw for BTEX, 2
Benzene, a maxim um of 0.150 mg/L for Toluene, a maxim um ppmw for Benzene, 10 ppmw for Toluene, 50 ppmw for
of 0.320 mg/L for Ethylbenzene, a maximum of 0.320 mg/L Ethylbenzenl"!. and 50 ppmw for Xylene.
for Xylene, and a maximum of0.750 mg/L for total BTEX.

REFERENCE
Person~! rnmmunicJtion with Ms. Karen Northup of tile Dcpartmi::111
of Natural Rcsonrccs mi 2 All!<. 1993.

Contact: Karen Northup


Office: Hazardous Waste Program
Agency: Department of Natural R€sources
Address: PO Box 176
Jefferson City, MO 65102
Phone: 314-751-8333
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 147

MONTANA
STATUS

D Regulation ISi Guideline


D Exists ISi Exists 05/00/92
D P roposed D Proposed

D ln Development OSoil
D Expected Availability D Groundwater
ISi Both Soil & Groundwater
DNone D Ot her

COMMENTS
1. For non petroleum release to soil, the Agency makes a site- 4. In general, the cleanup goal for petroleum contaminated
specific determination of appropriate cleanup criteria. groundwater is the MCL (final or proposed) or background
2. For contaminated groundwater, the Agency follows U.S. concentrations. Background levels for petroleum constitu-
EPA requirements. ents generally will be below detection limits.
3. The following EPA standards apply to conectivc action as- 5. Acceptable TPH may be higher than 100 ppmw in soil for
sociated with releases from petroleum storage tanks: diesel or other heavier fuels.
(a) maximum contaminant levels (MCLs)
(b) toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP), if
the contaminant could be considered a hazardous
waslc.

REFERENCE
Ckanup Guidclinc:s Applicable for Petroleum Rc:k.iscs under 1lw
Mom.mJ UST Progr,1m. MJy 199 2.

Contact: Mike Trombetta/Carol Fox


Office: Solid and Hazardous Waste Bm·eau
Agency: Department of Health and Environmental Services
Address : Cogswell Bldg.
Helena, MT 59620
Phone: 406-4 49-406 7

NUMERICAL CRITERIA

Soil Groundwoter
Constitue nt CAS Numbe r ppmw Remorks mg/L Remorks

Benzene 71·43-2 1.0 0.005


BTEX 00.00.5 10
Ethylbenlene 100-41·4 0.700
Toluene 108-88·3 1.0
Total Peuoleum
Hydroca1bons (TPHJ 0000-4 100
Xylenes (mixed isomers) 1330-20·7 10
148 CLEANUP CRITERTA FOR SOTL AND GROUNDWATER

NEBRASKA
STATUS
IZl Regulation D Guideline
IZl Exists 03/03/91 D Exists
D Proposed D Proposed
D In Development DSoil
D Expected Avail ability IZl Groundwater
D Both Soil & Groundwater
D Nonc D Other

COMMENTS
L Pollutants introd uced directly or indirectly by human ac- 3. Nebraska considers a 1 in 1,000,000 excess cancer risk
tivity will not be a llowed to enter groundwater if the benefi- over a lifetime as; acceptable in health rii;k asllessments.
cial uses of groundwater would be impaired or public health 4. Petroleum contaminated soil cleanup levels are site- spe-
and welfare th reatened; or if beneficial uses of hydraulically cific. Typical cleanup levels are 0.005-50 ppmw for Benzene,
connected groundwaters or assigned uses of surface waters 1-10 000 ppmw for total BTEX, and 10-500 ppmw for TRPH.
would be impaired.
- 2. Numerical standards in the table apply to all groundwater
classes except GC (groundwater assigned to this class is not
being used and has little or no potential for being used as a
public or private drinking water supply). At a minimum in
GC areas, no further degradation is allowed and a site-spe-
cific evaluation is necessary to establish cleanup require-
ments.

REFERENCE
NDEC, Title l l8-Gro1111dwawr Quality S1andard~ and U,t. Cla~,ifirn·
Jion. l Sep!. 1991.

Contact: Joe Harris


Agency: Dcpartm cnt of Environmental Con tro I
Address: PO Box 98922
Lincoln, NE 68509
Phone: 402-4 71-4217

NUMERICAL CRITERIA

Groundwater

Constituent CAS Number m9/L Remorks

' Alachlor 15972-60-8 0.002


A1senic 7440-38·2 0.05
Asbestos 1332-21-4 7 million hbers
(g1eate1 than 10 mic1 ons)IL
Atrazine 1912-24·9 0.003
Ba1ium 7440-39-3 1.0
Benzene 71-43·2 0.005
Cadmium 7440.43.9 0.005
ca1bofu1an 1563-66·2 0.04
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDEUNF.S 149

Groundwoter

Constituent CAS Number mg/L Remarks

Carbon tetrachloride 56-23-5 0.005


Chlordane 57-74-9 0.002
Chlorobenzene 108 -90·7 0.1
Chromium 7440-47-3 0.01
Coppe! 7440-50·8 1.0
2.4·D 94-75-7 0 .07
1,2· Di bromo-3-chloropropane 96-12-8 0 .000 2
1,2· D1bromoethane 106-93-4 0.000 05
1,4-Dichlorobenlene 106·46·7 0.075
1,2-Dichlorobenzene 95.50.1 0.600
l'"'.2~biC: hlo roe I ha ne 101.06:-'2 0~005
cis-1,2· Dichloroethylene 156-59-2 0.07
lrans· 1,2· Dfchloroethylene 156-60-5 0.1
1,2 · Dic!Jloropropane 78-87-5 0.005
Endrin 72-20.S 0.002
Ethy Ibe nzeii e 100·41·4 0.700
Fluorine (soluble fluoride) 7782-41-4 4 .0
Heptachlor 76-44-8 0 .000 4
Heptachlor epoxide 1024-57-3 0 .000 2
Iron 7439-89·6 0 .3
~ LeaCt fiJ "' ,,•.,,.,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,... 743~.'92:'( '11''1/1/ll/' 0'..05" Pl'
1
Undane 58-89·9 0.000 2,
,, 11//(///fi
Manganese 7439-96-5 0.05
IMel'cury 7439-9,?-6 0.002

~~~.1.~.~i<Y~~.1~'.,,,, /)//J/11/J.J/I/.••, 72-43-5


'''''''"·•"···· ····''' k
0:04,,,,,j __
•••••

Nilrate (as N) 14797-55-8 10


Nitrite (as N) 14797-65-0 1.0
Polychlorinated biphenyls 1336-36-3 0 .000 5
Selenrum 7782-49-2 0.05
S~ver 7440-22·4 0 .05
"""lfl1flfl'flf111/Hlll"' ioo:4;r5· 'i)".'100' 1
r siyrene
ISullate 14808·79.S 250
Tetrachloroethylene r 127· 18-4 0.005
Toluene I I
Total Recoverable Pelro1eu

31..~~:~:.~?ns
Toxaphene
l, I, l·Tm:hloroethane
Trichloroethylene
2(2 ,4 ,5-Trichlorophenoxy)
propronic acid 93-72- l 0 .0 5
I. ri'iliaiometfia\ie5' Hofan ""' ,,r,,,.., -00-00-J. ''!//I' "0:10""
,,,~,,

) Vrnyl chloride 75-01-4 '1 0.002 .


lJinyl ide ne c'li lo r"1de 75..,3'54 ...0.007 ,
rXyle nes Cm ixe d Isome rs) 1330-20-7 lO"
fZfnc (fume or dust) 7440·66:6 5
~
150 CLEAN UP CRITERJA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

NEVADA
STATUS
[8J Regulation [8J Guideline
[8J Exists 10/09/90 [8J Exists 6/25/92
D P roposed D Proposed

D In Development DSoil
D Expected Availability D Groundwater
[8J Both Soil & Groundwater
DNon e D Other

COMMENTS
1. Existing regulations are for USTs. (c) apply a generic standard of 1 ppmw for Total Volatile
2. Remediation standards for contaminated soils in which Organic (TVO) compounds in soil and 10 ppmw for
groundwater contamination is the primary pathway of expo- base neutral compounds in soil.
sure are determined using the following criteria: 3. MCLs are pertinent remediation standards for contami-
(a) loxici ty characteristic regulatory limits (under RCRA); nated groundwater. However, standards established by
or if chemical is not regulated under this rule other states, EPA guidance, and the Integrated Risk Infor-
mation System ORIS) will be considered in conjunction with
(bl determine if there is a maximum contaminant level site-specific physical conditions.
(MCL) for the compound, and if so, multiply the MCL
by 100 to determine the soil remediation standard; or
if the chemical does not have on MCL, then

REFERENCE
N"DEP Cn111J111inJ1<:d Soil and Gro11ndwacn Remediation Policy. 25
June 1992.

Contact: Allen Biaggi


Agency: Nevada Division of Environmental Protection
Address: 333 W. Nye Lane, Capital Complex
Carson City, NV 89710
Phone: 702-68 7-58 72

NUMERICAL CRITERIA

Soil

Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remarks

Total Petioleum 00·00·4 100 Measured using EPA Method 8015


Hyd1ocarbons (TPH) modified for petroleum hydrocarbons
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 151

NEW HAMPSHIRE
STATUS
D Regulation [Zl Guideline
D Exists [Zl Exists 09/00/91
D Proposed D Proposed

D In Development D Soil
D Expected Availability D Groundwater
D Both Soil & Groundwater
DNon e D Other

COMMENTS
1. For groundwater contami nation, New Hampshire 1·el ics on 3. Virgin petroleum-contaminated soil site remediation goals
EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act Standards maximum con- were determined using the leaching potential analysis for
taminant levels (MCLs). gasoline, diesel, and other fuel oils adjusted for New Hamp-
2. For soil contamination (not related to virgin petroleum shire's hydrogeologic and meteorologic conditions (leaching
contamination), New Hampshiz"e relies on EPA's RCRA potential analysi.c; is described in California Leaking Under·
standards and action levels. ground Fuel Tanh Field Manual: Guidelines for Site Assess-
me11t, Cleanup, and Underground Storage Tanh Closure,
1990).

REFERENCE
New Hampshire Dcpanmem of Environnw111al St'rvkc~ lllll'rim Policy
fur Management of Soils Contaminated from Spills/Rcka":' of Virgin
Pctmkum Prodll<"l5 (Soils Policy), September 1991, as amended 6 Aug.
1993.

Contact: Bill Evans


Office: Water Supply Pollution Control Div./Groundwater Protection Bur.
Agency: Department of Environmental Services
Address: 6 Hazen Dr.
Concord, NH 03301
Phone: 603-271-2873

NUMERICAL CRITERIA

Soil
Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remorks

BTEX oo.oo-5 1.0


Total Petroleum 00-00-4 10/100 for gasoline/for all
Hydrocarbons ITPH) virgin petmleum products
exce pl gasol fne
152 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

NEW JERSEY
STATUS
lg] Regulation D Guideline
D Exists D Exists
lg] Proposed 02/03/92 D Proposed
D In Development OSoil
D Expected Availability D Groundwater
lg] Both Soil & Groundwater
D None D Other

COMMENTS
1. For contaminants not listed in the table, the New Jersey 6. The groundwater cleanup standards for any contaminant
Department of Environmental Protection (NJ DEPJ will de- in a Class llA groundwater area is the cleanup standard
termine soil cleanup standards on a site-specific basis. li.c;ted in the table.
2. Compliance with a soil cleanup standard is achieved when 7. For a contnminant in groundwater that has the potential
the arithmetic mean in a 11 samp Jes in the area of concern is to migrate to Class IIA groundwater where appropriate toxi-
less than or equal to the applicable soil cleanup standard, cological data and a cleanup standard do not exist, the
and no single snmple exceeds the applicnble soil cleanup cleanup stnndard in groundwater is 0.005 mg/L if there is
standard by a factor of more than ten (for a soil standard of sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity (with a to ta 1of such po-
less than or equal to 10 ppmw) or five (for a soil standard 10 tentially carcinogenic contaminants not to exceed 0.025
to 100 ppmw) or two (for a soil standard greater than 100 mg/L), or 0 .100 mg/L if there is no evidence of carcinogenic-
ppmw), and no more than 10% of the soil samples exceed the i ty (with a total not to exceed 0.500 mg/L), or the background
applicable soil cleanu p standard. groundwater concentration for an inorganic contaminant. lf
3. The b'TOundwater cleanup standard for a contaminant that appropriate toxicological data does exist, the Department
has the potential to discharge to FWl, PL, or Category 1 sur- will develop a cleanup standard.
face water is the natural background groundwater concen- 8. The groundwater cleanup standards for contaminants in
tration. all areas that do not have a cleanup standard as identified in
4. l f groundwater has potential to migrate to a sensitive eco- Notes 3 to 7 above are as follows: the standard for an indi-
system, such as wetlands or critical habitat, the cleanup vidual organic contaminant is 1.0 mg/L, the standard for the
standard will be developed by the DEP on a site-specific ba- total of all organic contaminants is 10 mg/L, and the stand-
sis. ard for inorganic contaminants is the background groundwa-
ter concentration for that contaminant.
5. For Class lA and 1-Pinelands (Preservation Aren) grnund-
water, the cleanup standard is the natural {background)
groundwater concentration of the con tam ina nt.

REFERENCE
1. NJ DEP Cleanup Swndi!rds lnr Cnmamina1cd Sites. l'mpos(·d New 2. N.l!JJ:l' Sil<' R,•111Miario11 Nen!, Vol. 5, No. l, April l 993.
Rule~: NJAC 7:260. 3 Fd>. 1992 {New Jcrsq• Register). wilh 1101cd rnr-
rec1 ions bast>d 11 p<111 c rrors iden t ilkd during t ht> \'0111111<·111 lH'rind. as
well as m:w wxicoloslca\ i11forma1iun nhtaincd sine<' the mle proposal
{la~! n:vi~iuu 8 MJrch ! 99 3).

Contact: Arnold Gray


Office: Divi sion of Responsible Party Site Remediation
Agency: Department of Environmental Protection
Address: 401 E. State St.
Trenton, NJ 08625-0029
Phone: 609-633-1179
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 153

NUMERICAL CRITERIA
Soil Soil
Residential - Direct Contact Nonresidential - Direct Cantact
Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remorks ppmw Remarks

Acenaphthene 83-32-9 3 400 10000


Acetone 67-64· 1 I 000 I 000
Ac ryl on it 1~e 107· 13· l 1.0 5.0
Ald1ln 309-00·2 0.04 0.17
Anthracene 120-12· 7 10000 10000
Antimony 7440-36-0 14 340
Arsenic 7440-38-2 2.0 2.0
Ba1ium 7440.39.3 700 47000
Benzene 71-43·2 3.0 13
Benzo(a)anth1acene 56-55-3 0.9 4.0
a
Ben zo[ Jpyre ne
Benzo(blfluoranl hene
Be nzo< k111 uo1 ant hen e
Ben zyl alcohol
Beryllium II
Bis(2-chlo1oethyll ether 111-44-4 0.66 3.0
BIs( 2-c hloroisopro pyl )et he 1 39638-32-9 2300 10000
Bmmoform 75-25-2 86 370
Bmmomethane 74.33.9 79 1 000
Butyl benzyl phthalate 85-68-7 1 100 10000
Cadmium
:!IJ •
Chlorn-m-cresol
Chlorobenzene ""'
Chloroform
Ch I oromet ha ne 74-87-3 520 1 000
2-Ch lo mphe no I 95.57.3 280 5 200
Chrysene 218-01·9 9.0 40
Coppe1 7440-50-S 600 600
Cyanide 57-12-5 1 100 21 000
Oil 2.:elhylhexyl) phthalale 117·81·7 49 210
Dibenzo[a,hlanth1ai:ene 53.70.3 0.66 0.66
Di b1 om oc hi oromet han e 124-4B· l 110 I 000
Di butyl p ht hal ate 84-74-2 5 700 10000
1,4· Dichlombenzene 106-46· 7 570 10000
I ,3 ·Dich I01 obe nzen e 541-73-1 5 100 10000
1,2· Dichlorobenzene 95-50-1 5 100 10 000
3 ,3 ·-Dich Iorobenzid in e 91-94-1 2.0 6.0
Dichlorobromomethane 75.27.4 5.0 22
I ,2-0ichloioethane 107-06·2 6.0 24
I~l :OiC h101 oeth a ne 75":.34:'3 576 i"ooo
cis· 1,2· Dichloroethylene 156-59-2 79 I 000
trans-1,2· Oichlo1oethylene 156-60·5 l 000 I 000
Die h Ioro methane 75-09·2 49 210
2 ,4· Dichloiophe_~ol 120·B3·2 170 3 100
1,2· Dlchloropropane 78-87-5 IO 43
I ,3-Di chi oropropy le ne 542· 75.5 4.0 5.0
Dield11n 60· 57· l 0.042 0.18
Di et hy I pht ha late 84-66-2 10000 10 000
Dimethyl phthalate 131-11·3 10 000 10 000
2 ,4~0i met hYI phenol 10S:67-9 I 100 10000
2 ,4-0i ni Irophe nol 51·28·5 110 2100
End"5ulfan 115-29· 7 3.0 52
154 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER
New Jersey Cont'd,

Sail Sail
Residential • Direct CanlGct Nonresidential · Direct Contact

Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remarks ppmw Remarks

Hexachloro-1,3· bu tad iene Jll - Ci


Hexachlorobeniene
Hexa ch Io rocycl ope ntad ien e
Hexa ch Ioroeth ane ltl:I
Ind eno (2 ,3· cd}py re ne
7,'1S'O;lfio~one "'
lead
Lindane
Mercury
t~.~.r~:-:Y?,hlo~. ,.
Methyl ethyl ketone
M ethy I iso buty I ketone
n-Dioctyl phthalate
N· Nitrosodi· n-propylarn 1ne
N Nitrosodiphenylamine
"f Nal"Phthaiene' 1
~ nJ UI WJ

Nlckel
Nitrobenzene
o-Cresol
,}';(:~~?r.".<'ni1ine , •.
p.Creso
Pen tac hlorophe no I
Phenol
Polychlorinated biphenyls I)

p, p'· D1chloro
diphenyl dichloroethane 72.54. I:'
~ p',p'~b-ich'fo'ro "'
di phe ny Id ich lo ioet hyl ene
p,fi· Dichlorodiphenyl
tr lch! oroe thane u
)' f'.Yrr:ne ttO
Selenium I
Silver • 100
Styrene
l, l ,l ,2- Tetrachloroethane
1, 1,2,2· Tel rachloroethane

..
fToluene
/ T()liJI Petroleum Hydrocarbons
~.!?~.~ !.~ rga~ !c ,~~!~ti!~~- q~~~
Toxaphene [I.

I, 2,4· Trichlorobeniene
1, 1, J. Trichlmoelhane ......
1, 1,2· Trichloroethane
Tr 1c hIoroet hyle ne
Ii
2:4:5. Trid11oroi:iheno1
2, 4, S-T1il:.h\~Qllheno(
Vanadium (fume or dust)
I /, 1., I~ / ,
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUJDELJNES 155

Soil Soil

Residentiol ·Di red Contcd Nonresidentiol • Direct Contact


--------
Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remarks ppmw Remarks

Vinyl chloride 75-01 -4 2.0 7 .0


Vinyl idene chloride 75-35-4 8.0 150
Xylenes (mixed isomers) 1330-20-7 410 l 000
Zinc (fume or dustl 7440·66 -6 I 500 1 500

Soil Groundwater
~~------------

Impact to Groundwater Cla.u. !IA


Con sti tu e nt CAS Number ppmw Remarks mg/L Remarks

~ Acena pfl( he ne 83·32-9


~ AC{!\On~ (;7,64· 1 II;'
, Acrylamfoe 79-06· 1
tAcf}'lonilri!e 1()7-13-1 100
).~.~~1-i.~ . .,,,............, . --~-l_9:84-6
Alachlor 159 72- 60-8
Aldrin 309-00-2 50
Anthra,ene 120-12-7 500
Antimony 7440-36--0
Asbestos 1332-21 -4 30 000 fibers/L (greater than
10 microns in length)

·~

L
156 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR son AND GROUNDWATER
New Jersey Cont'd.
Soil Groundwater

Impact ta Groundwater Class llA

Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remarks mg/L Rem arks

0i(2· ethylhexyl) phthelate 117·81· 7 100 0.03


Drbenzo[e, h] en th rec ene 53. 7D-3 500 0.02
Olbrom oc hlororn el han e 124-48-1 1.0 0.oJ
1,2-Drbromoethane 106-93-4 0.000 05
Dlbulyl phthalate 84·74·2 100 0.9
1,4-Di~hlorobenzene 106·46·7 100 O.D7
1,3-Dichlorobenzene 541·73·1 100 0.6
1, 2-Dic hlor obenie n e 95.50.1 50 0.6
3,3 '. Dichlo1obenzidine 91·94· l 100 0.06
Dre hI oro br omo me I he ne 75·27-4 1.0 0.001
1 ~2-Drchl0o0ethane 107-06·2 1.-0 0.002
l , 1-Dfc h101 oet h ene 75.34.3 1.0 O.Q7
ds-1,2· Drchloroethylene l 56·59-2 50 O.Ql
trens· 1.2· D1chloroethylene 156-60-5 50 0.1
Die hlorometh an e 75-09-2 10 O_OQ3
2,4-Dichlorophenol 120·83·2 10 0.02
1,2· Dichloropropane 78·87·5 0.001
1,3· Dichloropropylene 542·75-6
Dfeldrm 60-57-1 0.000 03
Diethyl phthe Iate 84-66-2 5.0
ofmethylpiithalate 13f 11:3 7.0
2. 4-Dimet hy 1phenol 105.57.9 0.1
2,4· Dfnrtrophenol 51·28-5 Ill 0.04
2, 4-Drn it rotol ue n e 121-14-2 O.Ql
2 ,5-D1nitrololuene 606·20·2 0.01
Dinoseb 88-85-7 0.007
1,2· Drphenylhydrez1ne 122-66-7 0.000 04
Diquet bromide 85·00·7 0.02
Endosullen 115·29-7 50 0.000 4
(l-Endosullen 33213·&5-9 0.000 4
rEndosullen I 959~98-8 0~000 4
~ndosulfen sulfete 1031·07·8 0.000 4
En dot hell 145·73·3 0.1

u ndrin 72-20-8 50 0.002


Epichlorohydrrn 106·89·8 0.004
EI hyl benzene 100·41-4 100 0,7
Flu ore nthe ne 206·44·0 500 0.3
fluorene 86-73-7 100 0.3
Heptachlo1 76-44-8 500 0.000 4
Heptechlor epoxrde 1024.57.3 0.000 2
Hexachloro-1.3."butad(ene 87·68-3 50 0.001
Hexach 101 oben ze ne 118·74-l 50 om
~ Hexach lorocyclohexa ne 319·85· 7 0.000 2
Hexach lorocyc Iopen I edren e 77.47.4 100 0.05
Hexech loroeihe ne &7·72· l 100 O.Ql
Hydrogen sull 1de 7783-06-4 0.02
I nde no( 2, 3 ·cd) pyrene 193-39-5 500 0.02
lsophorone 73.59.1 10 0,1
Leed 7439.92.1 O.Ql
Lrndene 58-89-9 1.0 0.000 2
Malathion 121-:-75-5 0~2-

Mercury 7439-97.Q 0.002


Methoxyc hlor 72-43·5 500 0.04
Methyl ethyl ketone 73.93.3 50 0.3
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 15 7

Sail G raundwater

Impact ta Graundwater Class llA


Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remcirks mg/L Remork s

Methyl lsobutyl ketone 108-10·1 50 0.4


Mlrex 2385-85-5 0.000 Ol
n-Oioctyl phthalate 117-84-0 tDD 0.1
· N· Nitrosodl· n-prop)llamlne 621·64· 7 1.0 0.02
!N· Nil!_o~l~et~yl~mlne 62-75·9 0.02
N· N ilrosod i pheny lam Ine 86-30-6 100 0.02
Naphthalene 91-20-3 100 0.03
Nickel 7440-02-0 0.1
N itrobenzen e 98-.95-3 SD O.Dl
Oxamyl (Vydatel 23135-22·0 0.2
[''""'7:h10ropho00i s?-86'.'5 100 0.001
Phenol 108-95·2 so 4.0
Do Iye hlori na !ed bi ph enyls 1336-36-3 100 0.000 5
p,p'· Dichiaro
od ri;henyl d1chloroethane 72-54-8 100 0.000 I
p,p'· Dichiaro
d iph enyld ic hloroethy le ne 72-55-9 100 0.000 I
p,p'-Dichlorodiphenyl
tr ic hlo roetha ne 50-29·3 100 0.000 I
Pyrene 129·00·0 500 0.2
j setenlum 7782-49-2 0.05
Sil~e r 7440-22-4 0.02
Styrene 100·42·5 100 0.1
i
2 ,3, 7 .B·Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin 1746-01·6 0.000 01
1, l, 1,2· Tetrachloroethane 630-20·6 1.0 O.Dl
I, l ,2.2· Tetrachloroethane 79-34-5 t.O 0.002
Tetrac hlo roe I hylen e 127-18-4 1.0 0.001
Thallium 7440-28·0 0.01
Toluene 108-88·3 500 1.0
Total Organic Volatiles !TOV) 00-00-23 1 000
Toxaptiene iioi:i1-f5~2 100 ((603
Tolal Petroleum
Hydrocarbons (T PH l 10000
1,2.4· Trichlorobenzene 120-82· I 100 0.009
I, 1.2_!richloroethane 71-55-6 50 0.03
1, 1,2. Trichloroethane 79-00-5 1.0 0.003
Tri ch lo roet hylen e 79-01·6 1.0 0.001
2 ,4,6· Trichlorophe~ol 88-06·2 50 0.02
2 ,4,5- Trichlorophenol 95-95-4 50 0.7
2(2,4 ,5· Trichlorophenoxy)
propionic acid 93-72-1 0.05
'Vinyl chloride 75-01-4 1.0 0.002
~Vinylidene chloride 75·35-4 10 0.002
Xylenes (mixed isomers) 1330-20·7 10 0.04
Zinc (f um e or dusl) 7440·66-6 5.0
158 CLEANUPCRJTERJA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

NEW MEXICO
STATUS
D Regulation IZ:I Guideline
D Exists IZ:I Exists
D Proposed D Proposed

D In Development O Soil
D Expected Availability D Groundwater
iZ:I Both Soil & Groundwater
D None D Other

COMMENTS
Comply with Environmental Protection Agency regulations.

REFERENCE
Pcr-m11al comm11nica1iun with Mr. J-:d Hm5t of the New Mexico Envi·
ronmcntal Dt'paTtrnt'nt Ha1ard,rns and Radioactive Ma1crials B11rt'au
on 15 July 1993,

Contact: Ed Horst
Office: Hazardous and Radioactive Materials Bureau
Agency~ New Mexico Environmental Department
Address: P.O. Box 26110
Santa Fe, NTv1 87502
Phone: 505-827-4038

NUMERICAL CRITERIA

Soil Groundwoter
Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remarks mg/L Remarks

Benzene 71-43-2 0.01


Benzo!a lpyrene 50-32-8 0.000 7
BTEX 00·00·5 50
1, 2· D1bromoethane 106-93-4 0.000 1
I ,2-Dic hI oroeth ane 107-06-2 0.01
Ethy Ibenzene 100-41-4 0.75
Methyl tert-butylether 1634-04-4 0.10
Naphthalene 91-20·3 0.03
Po Iynuc Iear Aromat ic
Hydrocarbons (PAHJ 00-00-6 50
Toluene 1oa.'ss.3
Total Petroleum
Hydrocarbons CT PH) 00-00-4 100
Xylenes (mixed isomers) 1330-20-7 0.62
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUJDELJNES 159

NEW YORK
STATUS

D Regulation ~Guideline
D Exists ~Exists 11/16/92
D Proposed D Proposed

D In Development D Soil
D Expected Availability D Groundwater
~ Both Soil & Groundwater
D None D Other

COMMENTS
1. The following alternative bases were used to determine Cleanup objective is based on the criteria that produces the
soil cleanup objectives: most stringent cleanup level using Criteria (a), (b), and (c)
(a) humnn health z·isk assessment using 1 in 100,000 cri- for organic chemicals and Criteria (a), (b), and (d) for heavy
teria for carcinogens; metals. If Criteria {a) and/or (b) a1·e below Criterion (d) for a
contaminant, its background value is the cleanup objective.
(b) human health· based levels for· systemic toxicants, cal- However, cleanup objectives must be, at a minimum, above
culated from Reference Doses (RFDs). An intake rate the detection limit.
of 0.2 g/day over a five-year exposure period for a 16-kg
child is assumed; 2. Soil cleanup objecti\'es calculated by the Department of
Environmental Conservation (DEC) arc based on a soil or-
(c) concentrations that are protective of grnundwa- ganic carbon content of 1%·and should be adjusted for actual
ter/drinking water quality; organic carbon content if known: (actual organic carbon con·
(d) background levels; and tent, %/1.0%) x (soil cleanup objective).
(e) detection limits. 3. Groundw<i.tcr cleanup criteria are a11plicable for dis-
charges to Class GA waters.

REFERENCE
l. New York $1Jtl' Dq1Jrtmcn1 ol Conservation (NYSDEC) llManluns 2. NYS DJ:C Dr ah Ckan11p Policy am! G11i<klincs. Vol. I and Vol. II. Oc·
Waste: Remediation Division Technical and Atlmini~trJtivc G11idJncc tober 199 l.
Mcmorand11m: D<:11·rmi11atiun ul So'1l Cleanup Objectives aud Cka1111p
Levels, JJWR · 92· 4(M 6, I (1 Nov. I 992.

Contact: Bruce Bentley


Office: Hazardous Waste Remediation Division
Agency: New York State Department of Conservation
Address: 50 Wolf Rd.
Albany, NY 12233
Phone: 518-4 85-8403

NUMERICAL CRITERIA

Soil Groundwater

Cc:111 .s ti tu e nt CAS Number ppmw' Remarks mg/L' Remarks

Acena ph t hyl en e 208-96·8 41 0.020


Acetone 67-64· l 0.2 0.050
160 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER
New York Cont'd,

Soil Groundwoter

Constituent CAS Number ppmw• Remarks mg/L* Remorks

~
1Ac1olein
/,
~Acrylamide
1Acrylon it rile
~
.a·BHC
I
t!~:.~!~L
Aldrin
AIlyl chloride
Aluminum (fume or dust)
Ametryn
Aniline
'iifiilirac;ile-"H/lllllllHHlll•
'Antimony
~rsenic lbt
'Atrazine
I .
~~~?..~~:!!'!~!
Barium Pl
Benzene
Benzidine
Be nzo( ala nth race ne
BenzolaJpyrene
:a enzo( f>jnil6r;;ith-en·e
j,

Be nzo( gh i) pe ryle ne
~Ben20ic ac;ll
,Be nzo( klfl uora nthen e
i
Beryllium
Eii·;i 2?i; ioroetll yI) ether
Boron (water -sol ub Ie)
Bromacil
Bromobenzene
Bro moch Ioro methane
·e:;;;n:iofi:iifii"' "H'f"'"' '
STA TE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 161

Soil Groundwater
Canstitue nt CAS Number ppmw• Re marks mg/L' Remarks

'24-D
I '
Dalapon, sod1um f.<111
1
Di(2· ethylhe~yl) phthalate
Diazinon
~Di benzo{a, hla nth1 acen e
Di ben zofuia n
Dib1omochloromel hane
1,2· Dib1omoethane
Dibromomethane
Dibutyl phthalate
'Dicamba
t· .4· Dichloi obenzene ..
~1 ,3·D1chlo1obenzene I Ir
· ,2· Dichlorobenzene
I
3 ,3'-D ic hloroben zid Ine
Di ch Iorn b1 omome thane
1,2· Dichlo1oethane
I, I· Dichlo1oethane
cis· I .2"Dichloroethylene
trans· l ,2-DichJO/m;lhyJene
·rncfilOr"omeliiane
2.4· Dichlo1ophenol
11 ,3· Dichlo1op1opane
11,l· D1chlo1opropene
2, 6-Dich I orotol uene
2,5· Dich 101otoluene
2.3· Dichlo1 otol uene
2.4· Dichlo1 otol uene
3.4 Dichlo1otoluene
Dieldrin
'o fiith'yf P"~ i"li'a; iiie · ~ I
I
Di mel hy\ ph t hal ate
I
2,4·Dinitrophenol
'2.4· Dinit1otolue11e
'
.,
2,6· Dinitrotol uene u
. . . . . . . . ......................... 1 .

Diph enamid
1,2· Di phenyl hydiazine
Endosu Ifan I
Endosulfan II
Endosu lf;m sulfate

,.'F_fld'1'(/.i'
Ethy Ibenie ne
'Fluomettll'Of1
'Fluo1anthem
'f_l_uo:~:i.e.
Fluorine (soluble fluo1 ide)
Heptachloi
He ptac hloi epox ide
Hexachloro· 1,3· bu tad iene
Hexachlo1obenzene
~- He~'ac t.iOi ocyi:'fofiexiiile" .
',_... Hexacmo1 ocyc!oh~xane
r
I
exaC hlorOCyc lopen tad I~ ne
Hexachlo1oethane
,,
Hexachlo1Qphene
,
'Hexazinohe
J62 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER
New York C1;1nt'd,

Soil Groundw1;1ter

Constituent CAS Number ppmw' ~emarks mg/l' ~emorks

r 1ndeno{2,:;i. cl;!)pyrene 193-39·~·.

1rnrJiv(rlual Semi. V"OCs 00.00.21 Ill


~ r6n 74l9-8.9-6
.sophorone 78·59-1
!,Lead .. 7.~~~;.92)
Lindane 53.39.9 [I ND
m-Chloroanal 1ne 108·42·9 0.005
m-Di n1trobenzene 99-65-0 0.005
Malathion 121-75-5 0.007
Maneb 12427-38·2 0.001 75
''lffffJ!f/'"f/1111" 'f!llflllll/f///l!l/l///////f(ll//lf"''f/////fl!
,,,, ,,,,,,,...•:•1/
~ M~ng~n~~ ·' ~ '!' 11r11nn1
'll ll •l'li
'It.' 1r1
7439·96·5 a 0.300
~ Mercury 743~·97-f:i O.l 0:'002
JMetllo:iycl11Qr 7243·5 £(),0 1).'035
rMethYI ethyl ketone ' I ' ~ o,o5o
(~~-~~.\'.1,,i~~~.~1 ..~~I~!} ufl/l///11/r .. 1fJlllJllllll/l/N1111u11J /fo111J.l
66 ,,.9:.9.?_g,11,
Methylene bromide 74.95.3 0.005
2- Methyfnaphalene 91· 57-6 36.4 0,050
Methyl tert bulyl ether 1634-04-4 0.050
Metribuzin 21087-64-9 0.050
n-S lltyl benzene 104·51·8 0.005
l'n· ola<:i)ii'iih'ihii1aie ' 1
'111.:a4:0 ' ··· ·o.o5o ' •tJ.•fjfJIJJJ{ J1
'" ,,,,,,,,,,~

!N. Nitrosodiphenylam'me 86·30·6 0.050 ~


{ .Propyl beniene 103·65- 0.005 ~
l Na111'Uia~l\e 91·20·3
1,,~ ickel UJJi/ I I ••• 1//1 74.4,0:92-P
2· Nirroaniline 88- '74-4 0.005
3. Nil roanihne 99-09-2 0.005
Nitrob!"n.ene 93.95.3 0.005
4. N itrophenol 100·02· 7 0.005
2· N rtrophenol 88-75-5 0.005
r~cMoroanafoie
I
ro-cMorotofuene
~o-Cresol
fo X1lrnyl (Vye!ate)
f~hloroanliine I
1
P:'c/~-Sol ,,,,, 10'(5: ;j",(5 .. ... """1i9 ... ····0:05'0"'
Paraquat 1910-42· 5 0.002 98
Parathion 56-382 1.2 0.001 5
Penlachlorobenzene 608-93-5 0.005
Pentachlm~tllane 76·01·7 0,005
:!>'~ ~laehl oro phenol '87'.Si;'.'5 o'.oo i''J 'fll/J.'l"""'''' '"'Jl'C'lllP'

;Phenanthrene 85·01-8 50 0.050
fPh1mcJ 108-95--2 0.03 0.001
~Pheriylhyd~zrne 100.63·0 0.005
\?hor~te 298·02·2. -~.?, "'" •.JJJ~1J/,,,..,mll/.'1JJl'fMll.
",. "· ,,. mlJJ1h/J,JJ;111J//J/hulfJ.,,;,n111,/JJ//IJJl/Jmwm'U/l/J m.
Plcloram I 918-02-1 0.050
Polyt:hforinated biphenyls 1336-36-3 1.0110 su rfa ce/su bsu rt ace 0.000 l
p,p'· Diehl mo
d•phenyl d1chloroethane 72-54·8 2..9
p,p'-Dichloro
diphenyldichloroethylene 72-55-9 2.1 ND
p,p ·Drchlor<idiphenyl
tricliloroet~ane 50·29-3 2.1 ND
Promeron 1610-18-0 0.050
, Propachlor 1918-16- 7 0.035
Propazine l39-4D·2 0.016
STATE Cf,EANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 163

Soil Groundwofer

Constituent CAS Number ppmw' Remarks mg/L" Remorks

Propham 122-42-9 0.050


P;irene 129·00·0 50 0.050
:sec- Butyl benzene 135·98·8 0.005
Selenium 7782-49·2 2.0 0.010
S~ver 7440-22-4 B 0.050
S1mazme 122-34-9 0.050
Sulfate \4808-79-8 250
Te bu th iuron 34014-18·1 0.050
Terbacil 5902-51·2 0.050
/ert-Butyl benzene 98-06·6 0.005
·2,3, 7 ,8- Tetrachlorndibenzodioxin 1746-01·6 0.000 000 035
1, l, l ,2-Tetrachloroelhane 630-20-6 0.005
l, 1,2,2·Tetrachloroethane 79-34·5 0.6 0.005
Tetrac hi oroel hylen e 127-18·4 1.4 0.005
;Thallium 7440-28-0 B 0.004
Th If am 137-26-8 0.001 75
Toluene 108-88·3 1.5 0.005
Total N<trate/Nltrite 00-00·2 10 as N
Total Pes!i c •des 00-00-22 10
Torat Semi-VOCs 00·00·20 500
~Trrhalomethanes (10131) 00-00-1 0.100
Total voes 00-00-19 10
Toxaphene 8001·35·2 ND
1 ,2, 4 ·Trich Iorob~ nzene 120-82· I 3.4 0.005
I, 1, l-Tnchloroethane 71-55·6 0.8 0.005
1, 1,2· Trichloroethane 79-00-5 0.005
Tr1chloroethylene 79-01·6 0.7 0.005
Tr le hI orot Iuorom ethane 75-69-4 0.005
2,4,5· Trlchlorophenol 95-95-4 0 .1 0.001
2(2 .4.5· Trichlorophenoxyl
proplom c ac1 d 93-72-1 0.7 0..000 26
2 .4. 5-Tr iCh Iorophe noxyacel ic
acrd 93.75.5 1.9 0.035
1.2.3· Trichloropropane 96-18-4 0.4 0.005
2,3,6· Trichlorotoluene 2077-46-5 D.005
2,4, ~T ric~orotol~ene 6639-30· 1 0.005
Trichlorotrifluoroelhane
- ---
76-13· 1 0.005
Tr1fluralm 1582-09-8 0.035
1,3.5· Trm11 re benzene 99-35-4 0.005
Vanadium (fume or dust) 7440-62·2 150
Vinyl chlorroe 75-01-4 0.2 0.002
Vmyi ide ne chloride l5-35-4 0.4 0.005
Xylenes {mixed isomers) 1330-20-7 1.2 0.005
Zinc (fume or dusl) 7440-66·6 20 0.300
[Zlneb 12122-67· 7 0.001 75

' 8 ~ 8,,]c kgn)u nd r~ Ii'~ I.

ND = Non-del cc\ I cvcl.


164 CLBANUPCRITHRJA POR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

NORTH CAROLINA
STATUS
!2J Regulation [Z1 Guideline
D Exists [Z1 Exists
[Z1 Proposed 07/02/93 D Proposed

D In Development O Soil
D Expected Availability D Groundwater
[Z1 Both Soil & Groundwater
DNone D Other

COMMENTS
1. The TPH and oil and grease soil cleanup levels are only 3. Groundwater slandards in the table are for Class GA and
applicable to petroleum-contnminated sites. Where grnund- GSA groundwaters (existing or potential source of d1inking
water has been contaminated or other special site conditions water). These standards apply except if the standard is less
exist, a lower cleanup level may be required by the Division than the suhslance's practical quantitation limit (PQL), in
of Environmental Management (DEM). which case the PQL serves as tht! standard, or where the
2. For non-petroleum contaminated site.-;, soil cleanup levels standard is above natural background levels, in which case
arc site specific. Cleanup is required to be either to back- the background level will serve as the cleanup standard.
ground levels, to a level based on groundwater standards 4. In Class GC groun dwater (usage for purposes other than
(leacha.ble toxicity characteristic leaching procedure [TCLP] drinking), cleanup is required to ensure no further degrada-
levels for contaminants in soils and sediment not exceeding tion of the area and no violations of groundwater or surface
the groundwater standards listed in the table), or to a water quality standards in adjoining waters of a d ifferent
health-based number (using a 1 in 1,000,000 maximum col- class.
lective cancer risk for carcinogens), unless it can be demon-
strated that the concentration of the contaminant in the soil
will not result in a violation of the groundwater standard.

REFERENCE
1. North Carolina Department u[ Enviwnmem. lkahh, and Nat11ral ~ . Pro11osed Am ended Rcg11la1'ton Title l 5A. Subchapter 2L, Groum.I·
Resources. Divi~ion of f:nvironmcn1al Managernen1. Groundwater Sec- water Classifica1ion and Standards, Dralt Ver~ion, 2 July 1993, Rules
tion Guidelines for the Investigation and Remediation of Soils and .0I01-.0202.
Groundwate'r. March 1993 (wl1h .Tnne 1993 Revisions incorpora1ed).

Contac t: Arthur Mouberry, P.E.


Office: Division of Environmental Management (DEM)
Agency: Department of Environmental, Health and Natural Resources
Address: 512 N. Salisbury St.
Raleigh, NC 27626-0535
Phone: 919-733-3221

NUMERICAL CRITERIA
Groundwater Soil

Closs GA/GSA

Constituent CAS Number mg/L Remarks ppmw Remarks

Acetone 67-64-1 0.7


Acrylamide 79-06-1 0.000 01
Arseni~ 7440-38-2 0.05
Barium 7440.39.3 2.0
Benzene 71-43-2 0.001
STA TE CLF.A NUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELJNES 165

----- --
Groundwater Soil

Class GA/GSA

Constituent CAS Number mg/L Remarks ppmw Remarks

Bromofonn 75-25-2 0.000 19


Cadmrum 7440-43-9 0.005
Carbofuran 1563-6&-2 0.036
Carbon tetrachlorfde 56-23-5 0.000 3
Chlordane 57-74-9 0.000 027
Chlorobenzene 108-90-7 0.05
Chloroform 67-66-3 0,000 19
2-Chlorophenol 95-57-8 0.000 I
Chromium 7440-47-3 0.05
Copper 7440-50-8 LO
rcyan<de 57-12-5 0.154
2.4 -D 94-75-7 0.07
~ 0112-el hylheX)ll) phthalate 117-Sl-7 0.003
I ,2-Omro mo-3-c hlo ro propane 96-12-8 0.000 025
1,2-Drbromoethane 106-93-4 0.000 000 4
Dibutyl phthalate 84-74-2 0.7
I , 4 -Dlch lor obe nze ne 106-46-7 0.075
1,3-Drchlorobenzene 541-73-1 0.62
1,2-Drchlorobenzene 95-50-1 0.62
Dichlorodifluoromethane 75-71-8 1.4
1.2-Drchloroethane 107-06,-2 0.000·38
1.1-Dichloroethane 75-34-3 0.7
ci!;-l .2-D1chloroel hylene 156-59-2 0.07
trans-1.2-Dichloroethylene 156-60-5 0.07
01 ch Io ro methane 75-09-2 0.005
I .2-Dichloropr opane 78-87-5 0.000 56
Diethyl phthalale 84-66-2 5.0
1,4-Dioxane 123-91-1 0.007
Endrin 72-20-8 0.002
Epichlorohydrin 106-89-8 0.003 54
Eth ylbe nzen e 100~41'.4 0.029
Ethylene glycol 107-21-1 7.0
Fluorine (soluble fluorrde) 7782..41-4 2.0
Heptachlor 76..44-8 0.000 008
Heptachlor epoxide 1024-57-3 0.000 004
Hexac hIoroben ze ne 118-74-1 0.000 02
Iron 7439-89-6 0.3
Lead 7439-92-1 O.Ql5
Undane 58-89-9 0.000 2
Manganese 7439-96-5 0.05
Mercury 7439-97-6 0.001 1
Me thoxych Io r 72..43-5 O.o35
M ethy I ethy I ketone 78-93-3 0.17
Methyl tert-butyl ether 1634-04-4 02
n-Heplane 142..S2-5 2.1
n-Hexane 1I0-54-3 0.42
Nickel 7440-02-0 0.1
Nitrate (as N) 14797-55-8 IO as N
N llrite {as N) 14797-65-0 LO as N
Oiland Grease 00-00-11 250-3 000 Oepending on Total Sile
Characterrstrcs score and site
category-usrng EPA Method 9071
oiamyl (Vydatel 23135-22-0 0.175
Pen ta ch Ior oph enol 87-86-5 0.000 3
166 CLJ:.'ANUP CRJTERlA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

North Corolino Cont'd.

Groundwoter Soil

Class GA/GSA

Constituent CAS Number mg/L Remarks ppmw Remarks

Selenium 7782-49·2 0_05


Silver 7440-22-4 0.01 8
Styrene 100-42· 5 0.1
Sufi ate 14808 -79-8 250
2 ,3, 7 ,8-Tetrachlorodillf!nzo
dioxin 1746-01-6 0.000 000 000 22
Tetrachloroethylene 127-18-4 0..000 7
Toluene 108-88-3 1.0
Total Petroleum
Hydrocarbons (TPH) 00-00-4 10· 300/40· 200 Depending on Total Site
Character ist 1cs score and site
catego:y-usi ng EPA Method 5030
lor low bo~ing point hydrocarbons!
using EPA Method 3 550 for high
bo1 hng po 1nt h_yd roe ar bo n s
Toxaphene 8001-35·2 0.000 031
1.1.1-Trichloroethane 71-55·6 0.2
Trichloroethylene 79-01-6 0.002 B
T richlorofluoromethane 75·69·4 2.1
2(2 ,4,5-TrfchlorophenoxyJ
propionfc acid 93-72-1 0.05
Vinyl ch lo ride 75·01·4 0.000 015
Vi nylidene chloride 75-35-4 0.007
Xylenes (mixed isomers) 1330-20·7 0.53
Z1 nc (fume or d usl) 7440-66-6 2.1
STA. TH CJ.b'ANUP STANDARDS AND GUJDJ:'LJN/iS 167

NORTH DAKOTA
STATUS
D Regulation lg] Guideline
D Exists !Zl Exists 01/31/92
D P roposed D Proposed

lg] In Development D Soil


D Expected Availability 0 Groundwater
lg] Both Soil & Groundwater
DNone 0 Other

COMMENTS
1. The existing guidelines are for UST-petroleum con lamina- 3. Th e limits in the table arc provided as guidance to
tion. cleanup requirements.
2. Under all circumstances, final cleanup decisions a1·e made
on a site-by-site basis and take into con:;ideration the nature
of the release and the site.

REFERENCE
:-:onh Dako1a Slate Ikpa rmwn1 of Heal!l1 and C:om<•lidalt'<I 1.ah"raW·
rit'~, Di"ision of Wa~tt' Managem t'nt, UST Program, Ckanup Action
Level G nidel i 11c,; for Gn 101 i llt' am! ol Ii t'r l't't ru Il' 11 n1 If rd roca rbons, 31
Jan. 1992.

Contact: Gary Berrett


Office: Division of Waste Management
Agency~ Department of Health and Consolidated Laboratories
Address: P.O. Box 5520
Bismarck, ND 58502-5520
Phone: 701-221-51 66

NUMERICAL CRITERIA

Groundwater Soil
Constituent CAS Number mg/L Remorks ppmw Remorks

Benzene 7143-2 0.005


fol a I Petroleum
Hydrocarbons (l PH) 00-00-4 0.500 100
168 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

OHIO
STATUS
D Regulation IZ! Guideline
D Exists IZ! E xists 07 /26/91
D Proposed D Propose d

D In Development O Soil
D Expected Availabili ty D Groundwater
IZl Both Soil & Groundwater
ONone D Other

COMMENTS
1. Contamination is considered present if concentrations of 4. For carcinogens, a 1 in 1,000,000 cumulative excess upper-
pollutants exceed background levels. bound lifetime cancer risk is considered acceptable.
2. If contaminant is not detected in background samples, any 5. For noncarcinogens, cumulative exposures that present a
finding greater than the measurement methods detection Hazard Index of less than 1.0 are considered acceptable.
limit is considered contamination.
3. Once it has been established that contamination exists, it
must be determined whether or not the contamination pre-
sents a threat to public health or the environment.

REFERENCE
Ohio EPA Policy DERR-00· RR-009, llow Clean is Ck.1n. 26 July 1991.

Contact: Gavin Armstrong


Office: Division of Emergency and Remedial Response
Agency: Ohio Environmental Protection Agency
Address~ P.O. Box 1049
Columbus, OH 43266-0149
Phone: 614-644-2329

NUMERICAL CRITERIA
Groundwater Soil

Constituent CASNumber mg/L Re marks ppmw Remarks

Benzene 71-43·2 0.005 Action level 0.006-0.500 Acllon level


Ethyl benzene 100-4l4 0.700 Action level 6-18 Ac lion level
Toluene 108-88·3 12 Act ion level 4-12 Action level
Total Petroleum
Hydrocarbons (T PH) 00-00·4 105-6001380· 1155 g~ so Ii ne/d iese I,
wasle oil
Xylenes (total} 1330-20-7 10 Ac tlon IeveI 28-85 Action level
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 169

OKLAHOMA
STATUS
IZl Regulatiqn IZl Guideline
IZl E xists 06/26/91 IZl Exists 05/27 /92
D Proposed D Proposed

D In Development 0Soil
D Expected Availability 0 Groundwater
!Zl Both Soil & Groundwater
D None D Other

COMMENTS
1. Groundwater standards are applicable to groundwater 3. Oklahoma uses a Remediation Index in determining
used as drinking water. cleanup standards on a site-by-site basis.
2. If soil lead concentration isg:r·eat.er than 100 ppmw, a tox-
icity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) test must be
performed. If the results of the TCLP test are 5.0 mg/L or
greater, the soil is considered hazardous.

REFERENCE
J. Oklahoma Depa rtmcnt ol Environmental Quality (OK DEQ) Regula-
tion 3 J 0:305 ·I· 3, Standards of Inorganic and Organir Chrmical.
Physical, Radiocflcrnical. and Mk1ol>inln~fcal Quallty, 26 June 1991.
2. OK DEQ Drafl Prnccdurc~ for the Disposal of Lead Cmuaminatt<rl
Media in Okla ho ma Sol id Waste Landfills. 27 Ma)' J 99 2.

Cont act: Dennis Datin


Office: Solid Waste Management Service
Agency: Department of Environmental Quality
Address: 1000 N.E. 10th St.
Oklahoma City, OK 73117-1212
Phone: 405-271- 7160

NUMERICAL CRITERIA
Groundwater Soil
Constituent CAS Numbe r mg/L Remorks ppmw Remarks

Arsenic 7440·38·2 0.05


Barium 7440-39-3 1.0
Benzene 7 l-43-2 0.005-0.5 0.5-10
Cadmium 7440·43-9 0.01
Cai bon tel1achlorlde 56-23·5 0.005
Chromium 7440-4 7-3 0.05
Copper 7440-50-8 1.0
2,4-D 94-75-7 O.l
1.4· D1chlo1obenzene 106-46· 7 0.075
J .2· D1chloroelhane 107-06·2 0.005
170 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER
Oklahoma Cont'd.

Groundwater Soil

Constituent CAS Number mg/L Remarks ppmw Remarks


r-
Endrin 72.20.a 0.000 2
Ethyl benzene 100-41·4 0.7-70 r:;. 1
., Fluorine (soluble fluoride) 77~2·41-4 4,0
· Lead 7439-92·1 0.05
Lindane 5&89·9 0.004
''"' Ill I ' '"'•U- 1•'4 • ...._ "' ••• -••__. ........ . , ,. , '

Manganese 7439-96-5 0.05


Mercury 7439.g7.5 0.002
Methoxychlor 72-43-5 0.1
Nitrate (as N) 14797· 55·8 10.0 as N
Selenium 7782-49·2 0.01
Y.sii~er"
11JU
7ii4o'.22:'..4''1' '6:65"' Ii "'Ull,,l .. ll'"I 'llJJ/IJJJJJ u

Sulfate 14808- 79·8 250


Toluene 108-88--3 1-100
i ota I Petroleum
1 ,,~ydr~carbll;.i.~ (TPHJ 00-004 2-25 I .
'····················" ;,,1111,,,,,,u,"'.1111111J.
Toxaphene 8001-35-2 0.005
1,1. l· Trichloroethane 71 -55-6 0.20
Trichloroethylene 79·01-6 0.005
2(2,4, 5·Triclllorophenoxy)
propionoc acid 93.72.1 0.01
TiThalomethanes (totail oodcf1 0.10
V1 nyl chloride 75-014 0.002
Vi nylidene chloride 75-35-4 0.007
Xylenes (mixed isomers) 1330-20-7 10-1 000 200-1 000
Zinc (fume or dust) 7440-66-6 5.0
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 171

O REGON
STATUS

lz:I Regulation D Gu ideline


lz:I Exists D Exists
D Proposed D Proposed
D I n De velopment DSoil
D Expected Availability D G round water
lz:I Both Soil & Groundwat er
DNon e D Other

COMMENTS
1. In the event of a release of a hazardous substance, the en- 5. At sites where drinking water supplies are threatened, the
vironment is to be restored to the specified numerical soil Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) may require
cleanup levels, if appropriate, or to the background level, un- the groundwater to be cleaned to Federal or state drinking
less remedial actions designed to attain background level are water quality standards (MCLs) or secondary MCLs, where
not feasible, in which case the environment is to be restored available.
to the lowest concentration level in accordance with 340-122- 6. For sites at which groundwater cleanup levels less strin-
090. gent than those listed are being proposed, a risk assessment
2, Background levels are defined as levels before contamina- justifying those levels is required demonstrating adequate
tion took place. protection of public health, safety, welfare, and the environ-
3. Risk assessment must demonstrate that total excess can- ment.
cer risk will not exceed 1 in 100,000. 7, Volatile aromatic hydrocarbons by EPA Method 8020 or
4. Soil cleanup levels must be achieved unless the responsi- 8240; polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons by EPA Method
ble party can demonstrate that groundwater will not be ad- 8310; ethylene dibromide (EDBl and ethylene dichloride
versely affected or that the cleanup level is below back- (EDC) by EPA Method 8010 or 8240; dissolved lead by EPA
ground or the practical quantitation level (PQL). Such Method 7421; total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in water
demonstrations would include: by EPA Method 418.1; and TPH in soil according to OAR
340-122-350.
(a) Soil Leachate Concentrations do not exceed levels in
the table (Note: for inorganic <;:om pounds, the responsi- 8. Total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPHl soil cleanup levels
ble party must always conduct a leaching test and generally range from 40-130 ppmw for gasoline contamina-
compare the results to the Soil Leachate Reference tion, and 100-1000 ppmw for diesel fuel oil contamination. A
Concentrations, which cannot be exceeded); or Matrix Score Evaluation must be performed to determine
more precise soil cleanup levels.
(b) Residual soil concentrations will not result in contami-
nant concentrations in the groundwater that exceed
Groundwater Reference Concentrations; or
(c) Soil cleanup level is below background levels; or
(d) Soil cleanup level is below PQL.

REFERENCE
( 1) Or<:gm1 Ad111i11b1ra1i,·o: Ruks, Chap1cr 340, Divi~iou 122, 0<:\1Mt- (2) Ort'gon Deparlmt'nt of Environmemal Quali1y UST Cleanup
mcnt of Environrncmal Quali1y, 340-122-040 1hro11gh 340-122-046, Manual: Cleanup Rule~ for Leaking PcHolrum UST Sys1ems, OAR 340-
Soil Ckan11p Swn<lar<l~. 9 Jnnc 1992. 122-205 through 340-122-260 and Numeric Soil Cleanup Levels for
Motor Fuel and Ht'ating Oil, OAR 340-122-305 1hrough 340-122· 360.
January 1993.
Contact: Jay Collins
Office: Environmental Cleanup Division
Agency: Department of Environmental Quality
Address: 811SW6th Ave.
Portland, OR 97204-1390
Phone: 503-229-6800
172 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

NUMERICAL CRITERIA
Soil Soil
If leaching ta graundwater Residen tial - If leaching ta groundwater
is the pathway af cancern is not the pathway_af cancern
-----
Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remarks ppmw Remarks
1.--....._,.,............,..,.-,_- ~~~~

~ Acena phthe ne
t, Acrylonitrile
r u·BHC
Aldrin
!Anthracene.~
Bw1we
Benzidine
Benzo(a)an thracen e
Benzo[alpyrene
Benzo(b)fluoranthene pJ ,

re;;;i;;{'1~Si f~Mnth"eneirt'''
Bis(2-.ehloroethyll eth-
jBromoform .
i Bromomethane
\.C~~bo~. 11;1.~.~'.?~.i.d~...
Chlo1dane
Ch lorobenzene
".
Chlorofoim
Chrysene
2.4-D
~-Oi('2'_j;thJ1h;Yi)'IP'h't'ha·i-ate~UH ····••j••·······''
ll 7·81-7 ''
Oibenw[a,h}anthmcene
j Oi bromochlo ro methane
) 3,3'-Dichlorobenzid.ine
~- o.i.c.~.1.?~.?.b.'. ?.'.11?.i:n.e~ ~.~.
1,2· Dichloroethane i'
ci s. I ,2· Di ch loroeth ylen e
ti ans· l ,2· Dichloroethylene
Dich\oromethane

i,..2,6.
Dieldrin
.... ... _.. ., .. ......... .
,. ,
Dinitrololuene
~ Endosulfan
?, Endrin
l Ethylbenzer.e
t~!~~~~nthe.ne_ ...
Fluorene
Fo1 rnaldehyde .I

Heptachlor
Heptachlor epoxide
Hexach lo robe nzene
Ci-iimtilOiae'ffiiine
I. In deno(2, 3-cdlpyre ne
~ '.mwne
~
: _j_

2· Methyl-4--c hloroph enozyacetlc acid


~ N.1,,.,
J ••
Nitrosodl· n.propylamlne
.. ,. ,., ..,, .... --- , ... ,1.1• 1•1/J r
62 I ·64· 7
l••-····1I,,.,1,.,,
ll
N· Nitrorodiphenylam ine 86-30-6
Naphthalene 91-20-3
Pentachtorophenol 87·86·5
Polyc hlormated bi ph enyls 1336·36·3 !l
p,p'·Dichlo10
dip heny I d1ch loroet han e n. !i
~ p:;ro\Cliioro"
d iphe nyl dicI1loroe thylene
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 173

Soil Soil

If leaching to groundwater Residential • If leaching to groundwater


is the pathway of concern is not the pathwoy of concern
---
Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remorks ppmw Remcirlcs

r~p,p'· Dichlonxtipheny\- ·
I trich loroothane '} ;-
OPyrene
~ Tetrac hIomethy Iene ...
~I~ 1.~ ~~~ omUN'''~ JIHJJ
Toxaphene II
1,1, I-Trichloroethane 1
1, 1,2· Trichloroethane llDJ
Trichloroethylene .ii)
Trichlorofluoromethane
'l 2;4:6-riiCh1ciioptieiiii1"''
, Vi ny! ch lor.ide
Viny!fdene chlor"i
Xyle nes (miMd isomers)
r~~~~...--e....~-~~~~~~~~~~~
Soil Soil
Leachote Reference Concentration
Industrial - (EPA Method 13 11 (TCLP)
If leaching to groundwater or 1312 (SPLP) or other
is not the pothwciy of concern DEQ·approved method)
Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remorks mg/L Remarks
1.
Acenaphthene 83-32-9
• Ac rylon it rile )07·13· l 'a ~
i «·BHC 319-BH.i
Aldrin 309·00·2
~..A. nt ~'~~~ ~~ 1 1 ,,,;, "" u JU1111 ..~.?.'.?·.~?:?..
Arsenic 7440-38·2
Barium 7440-39·3
Benzene 71-43·2
Benzidine 92-87·5
Benzofa)anthracene 56-55·3
f'0enzoiiiiPY'r'en e 1
so'.3'i~if
j Benzo{bJfluoranth~~e 205-99·2
Benzo(kJfluoranthene 207-08-9
IBeryllium 7440·41
~.~!.~\.2· c_ry.l.?ri::e.t.~Y!,l. e.t.~.~-~" , ,111111 ""
111·44-"
'•••••••••I.I.ti••••
Bromoform 75-25·2
Bmmomethane 74-83·9
Cadmium 7440.43.9
Carbon tetrachloride 56·23-5
Chlordane 57. 74.9 .
¥C:ii'iO'iO'iienze~e ,,, ' "' ··•11111""'' .,,. foififo'.'i •I

Chloroform 67-66-3 n
Chromium 7440-47·3
Chrysene 218-01"9
~.~?PP.'::.,, J#1
744a-5o.
hillfmulllllldl//J///OJJJmu. -, , ,•• ••. i.
Cyanide 57-12·5
2,4·D 94.75. 7 [I -
Dil2·ethyl hexyl) phthalate 117·81· 7 a
Di be nzol a, h]a nthr ace ne 53. 70·3 (I
Di bromochloromethane 124-48· l l)J

3,3' · D1chlorobenzid 1ne 91-94· l u


174 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER
Oregon Cont'd .

Soil Soil
Leochote Reference Concentrotion
JndustTiol · (EPA Method 1311 (TCLP)
If lec(hing to groundwater or 1312 (SPLP) or other
is not the pathwoy of (Oncern DEQ· op proved method)

Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remarks mg/l Remorks

Dichlerebromomettume 75.27.4 40
1,2· Oichleroeth anc 107 06--2 60
cis· l ,2·0ichlaroe1hylcnc 156·59·2 20000
lra11s· l,2·Dichlo1octh.ylcne 156·60·5 40000
.~!~.~.'.~'.'?~~~~~.~.~.~ J~:Q~.:?.u ~I///..__ ~, .... (141,,1, .. .,,,,lllllllU•
Dield1in 60·57·1 0.4 0.000 06
2, 6· Din itrotel uene 606·20·2 8 0.000 09
Endosulfan 115.29. 7 100 0.000 03
Endrin 72·20·8 600 0.002
Ethyl benzene 100-41-4 20 000 7
1'Fimthene 2Qi;~i4".'i)"' 'soooo'"
Fl uorene 86·73·7 80000
Fo1mal de h;t<le 50·00-0 200
Heptachlo1 76·44-8

fi:.PJ.~~~~~ 1024.57.3
m'1 ,.?.:~u_., Mfl • ,,,.unllll/ININ'JJIJJ"" 1,,'/,,,11u11111111; •••• 1Jl/l//JJJ/J, •"" o.ooo 02
,.,.,,,. .. ,, 111,n,1 I llJ/~11-IUllllllJJ. '/,
Hexachlorobeniene 118·74·1 4 0.008
Hexach !oroerha ne 67·72-1 2000 3
lndeno(2,3<d)pyrene 193.39.5 0.002
Lead 7439.92.1 2
Lindane 58-89·9 0.002
, M:~g .;rtese '7"faif'9'f(5'
Me1cury 7439.97.5
2-M ethyl-4 ·ch I010 phe noxyacetk add 9 4· 7 4-6 I -
N- Nit1osod i· 11-p10pyla mine 62 ~ · 64-7
K.~~.i.t.~!~~~~Y.1.~~.'!.'.~.."' ,.._ -~~:.~,~;~.
Naphthalene 91·20·3
Nickel 7 440--02-0
Pentac hlorophenot B7-86· 5
Polych.lorinated biphenyls 1336· 36·3
p,p'- Diehl ere
di phenyl di ch I01ee I ha ne
fP. P'· Diehloro
di ph.e nyld ich lo10cth.y len e ...
p,p. Dichle1od1phcnyl
trichloroethane
tr>x~~ne
Silve1
Tetrachleroethylene
Toluene
Toxaph.ene
l ,l.1-T1ichloioethane
"j , i ;2'. 't/;'Cilio"r'OOuia'ric

~ T1ic hloroeth yl ene


rIi ch lo1ofl uorom ethane
2,4,6· Trlchlorophenol

1~V~Y,~~~aw1m111n- "'"------------
Vi nylidene chlo1ide
Xylenes (mixed isomers)
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES l 75

Groundwoter Groundwoter

Reference Concentrotion Cleanup Levels


Cons ti.tue nt CAS Number Remarks mg/L Remorks

Acena~hlhene
Acrylonitrile
83-32·9
107-13· l

a:·BHC 31984-6
Aldrin 309.00·2
Anthracene
.. .. . ... u~ ••• ._••• 1 "" 12!))2·.!
Arsenic 7440-38-2
83•ium 7440-39·3 L
Benzene 7143-2 0.005
Benz1dine
Be nzo(a )a nth race ne
92-87·5
56-55·3
• 0.000 1
[Bl~l~/~~1';iPY/rl~rn;"1. '5ti'..'.32."8' '"II' IJIJ/' ..,,,if.ooo'2"'''"""'lf111111"'""Jll
~ Benzo(b)fluoranthene 205-99·2 0.000 2 '"'
~ Benzo(klfluoranthene 207-0S-9 0.000 2
~ )3eryllium 7440·111-7

r~.i,~!3_-:t:~ !.o:~~Y.1!..~.1.~~.r. ,, •·-'" ,.. "' 111-44-4


... ,,,.. ., • m= - m "'·"-•••••••••••JJ•••••••••••••·
Bromoform 75 25-2
Bromomethane 74-83-9
Cadmium 7440-43·9
Ca1bon tet1achlo1 ide 56-23·5
Chlo1dane 57.74.9
.,.
/Ch lo ro benzene 108-90·7
I
~Ch lo1ofo rm 67-66·3 0,01
?chromium 7440·47·3 O:l
Cniysene 218-01-9 0,00001 0,,0002
l,~~.P.~r 7440-. ~~:8 ~\. }...,.
Cyanide 57-12·5 0,2
2,4-0 94.75.7 0 .07
Oi(2·elhylhexyl) phthalate 117-81 -7 0 .004
01benzo[a ,h)anthracene 53. 70·3 0,000 0 1 0.000 3
0 1bnim1i1: l\\1)11>me\h a1W;
1:2".'""o;brom'Oeiiiane'
124-48· l
i'(j6'.'9f4 ...,. 0 .7
·trn01 · ,,.
3,3'- Oich!orobenzidine 91-94-1 0.000 2
Dichlorobromomethane 75,27.4 0,000 7 ,, -.
' 1,2· Dich!oroethane 107-06·2 0,000 9 'ff(,' 0.005'

.~!~) '.?:.R!~_h.!~.~~.t.~y!~~!l" ·" 'II. ,. §,&,-,?~:?,,, ,,,_?.,,g_?,,,,, n1F111l/trll/l!/IJJ/l////ll/llllnl/Jt],,,;,,, u" ..m,/1111111... ,


trans- 1,2· Dichlo1 oethylene 156-60·5 0 .1
Oichloromethane 75-09·2 0,00$
Oieldrin 60-57· l 0.000 00$
2 ,6· Dimtroto!uene 606-20·2 0.000 1
Endosullan 115-29- 7 0,002
Endrin 72-20-8 0.000 2
Ethy lbe nzen e 100-414 0,7 0,7
Fluoranthene 206-44-0 1 0.28
Fluorene 86·73·7 I 0.28
Formaldehyde 50-00·0 0.002
Heptacnlor 76-44-8 0,000 02
Heptachlor epox1de 1024.57.3 0.000 009
Hexach I orobe nze n e 118-74· l 0.000 05
H exac hI01 oeth ane 67-72· 1 0 .04
lndeno(2,3-cd)pyrene 193-39·5 0 ,000 01 0.000 4
Lead 7439'.92.1 O~Ol5 0.005
lindane 58-89·9 0.000 2
Manganese 7439-%-5 4
Mercury 7 439· 97. 6 0,002
2· Methyl· 4-chloropheno );)'acet1c acid 94· 7 4· 6 0.02
176 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

Grou ndwote r Grou ndwoter

Reference Concentrotion Cleonup Level s


-------
Constituent CAS Number mg /L Remorks mg/L Remorks

N- N rtrosod r-r>-propy Iamine 62 1·64· 7 0.000 0 1


N- N 1trosod [phenyl amine 86·30·6 0.02
Naphthalene 91-20·3 0.1 0.028
Nickel 7440-02-0 0.1
Pe ntac hI oroph en oI 87-86-5 0.000 7
Polych lorinated biphenyls 1336-36·3 0.000 01
p.p'-Oichloro
di phenyl dichloroethane 72-54-8 0.000 4
p,p'· Die hloro
diphenyld ichloroethylene 72.55.9 0.000 3
p,p'-Oichlorodiphenyl
\rich I oroethane 50-29-3 0.000 3
Pyrene 129-00-0 1.0 0.2 1
s~~er 7440-22-4 0.05
! elrac hlo roet hylen e 127-18-4 0.002
Toluene 108-88·3 1.0 1.0
To:raphene 8001-35-2 0.000 08
1. 1.1· Trichloroethane 71-55-6 0.2
1, 1,2-Trichloroethane 79-00·5 0.005
T rich I oroet hyle ne 79-01 · 6 0.005
T rich lorofIuo1 omelha ne 75-69-4 10
I 2,4,6· Trfc.hlorophenol 88-06-2 0.008
Vi nyl chloride 75-01 · 4 0.000 04
I Vinylidene chloride 75.35.4 0.000 1
Xylenes (mixed isomers) 1330..20-7 7 10
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUJDELJNES 177

PENNSYLVANIA
STATUS
D Regulation 1ZJ Guideline
D Exists l8J Exists 02/00/92
D Proposed D Proposed

D In Development 0Soil
D Expected Availability D Groundwater
IZI Both Soil & Groundwater
DNone D Other

COMMENTS
1. Goal of groundwater remediation is to reduce contamina- 4. For remediation activities, protection levels are based on
tion to background quality. the most stringent of promulgated maximum contaminant
2. If it is not possible to achieve background levels, the De- levels (M CLs), (SM CLs), or other environmentally based pro-
partment of Environmental Resources (DER) requires the tection le,·els. If such a level does not exist for a contami-
use of feasible technology that will achieve remediation lev- nant, the DER will develop one on the following basis: non-
els as close to background as possible. carcinogen-apply a margin of safety to the results of
toxicity testing, carcinogen-apply an acceptable risk level of
3. The DE R may also accept remediation to levels less re- one in one million over a 70-year lifetime.
strictive than background if it is not possible to achieve
background levels, but levels must be protective of human 5. The table presents soil cleanup guidance levels for petro-
health and the environment. leum contaminated soils.

REFERENCE
Dep.u1111cm of Environmcmal Resources Gro11!lrlw,11cr Quali1y Protec-
tion S1ra1c~y. Febmar1• 1'>'J2.

Contact: Don Killian


Office: Bureau of Waste Management, Division of Remediation
Agency: Departmcn t of Environmental Resources
Address: P.O. Rox 8471
Harrisburg, PA 17105-8471
Phone: 717-783-9475

NUMERICAL CRITERIA

Soil
Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remarks

Benzene 71-43·2 0.01


El hyl benzene 100-41-4 Q,02
Lead 7439-92· 1 2001600 Res1denlial/I ndustrial Areas
Toluene 108·88·3 0.02
Total Petroleum
Hydrocarbons (TPH) 00-00·4 JO
Xylenes (mixed isomers) 1330-20-7 0.07
178 Cl,EANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

RHODE ISLAND
STATUS
[2] Regulation D Guideline
[2] Exists 05/00/92 D Exists
D Proposed D P roposed

D In Development D Soil
D Expected Availability [2] Groundwater
D Both Soil & Groundwater
D None D Other

COMMENTS
1. Numerical groundwater quality standards and preventive 4. When preventive action limit (PAL) is exceeded, one must
action limits established only for Class GAA and Class GA (a) minimize the concentration of the contaminant in the
areas (where groundwater i>i suitable for public drinking groundwater where technically and economically
without ti·eatment). feasible;
2. Preventive action limits are set at 50% of the numerical (b) regain and maintain compliance with the PAL, unless
gronndwatcr quality standards. it is not technically or economically feas ible; and
3. In Class GB (groundwater designated as not suitable for (c) ensure that the groundwater quality standard is met.
drinking water use without treatment) and Class GC (suit-
able for certain waste disposal practices) areas, Rhode Island 5. When a groundwater quality standard is exceeded, one
Department of Environmental Management (RlDEM) will must take appropriate action to regain and maintain compli-
consider current and proposed future uses, actual and poten- ance.
tial routes for human exposure, persistence and mobility of
the contaminants in the subsurface, toxicity of the contami-
nants, surrounding groundwater quality, uses of surround-
ing property, and hydrogeologic charnctei;stics of the area.
In these areas, the threat to pnblic health and/or the envi-
ronment will be of paramount importance in establishing
clean up crit eria.

REFERENCE
RIDEM Rul"s <l!ld R\'g11JJ1ion~ for Groundwah'r Quality, Cod<." of
Rhod(' Island Rules No. 12-lOO· 006, a; promulgated May 1992 ilrHl
ammemkd July 1993.

Contact: Margaret Bradley


Office: Div. of Groundwater and Individual Sewage Disposal Systems
Agency: Departm ent of Environmental Management
Address: 291 Promenade St.
Providence, RI 02908-5 767
Phone: 401-277-2234
STAT/i CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDEUNES 179

NUMERICAL CRITERIA
Groundwoter Groundwoter

_ Quality Stondard Preventive Adion limit


Constituent CAS Number mg/L Remarks mg/L Remarks
I . ,,, m1mmm11 urpn WI
rAlachlor
iAldicarb
15972·60·8
116-06-3
0.002
O.ot Temil<
a~
~ Arsenic

~Asbestos
7440-38·2
1332-21-4
0.05
.
3. 5 million fibers.IL
4~
,_A_tra~~e 1912-24-9
111• . . . . . . . o.~3_ ,.,,, ......,,...,_ 0.001 5 J.
Barium 7440-39-3 2 l
Benzene 71-43·2 0.005 0.0025
Cadmium 7440-43-9 0.005 0.002 5
Carbofuoan 1563-66·2 0.04 0.02
Cao bo n le (1 ac hlor ide 56-23·5 0.005 0.002 5
fchiO"fda ;;e "cfb1W"'
.., ..
f;-;""
~hi 01 obe rtlen e JVO•':JV•/ 0.05
7440-47-3 0.1 0.05
94.75.7 0.07 0.035
I ,~~ibromo-~;.~ hlorol?.:?.~~ne
-'•
96·12·8
..... ·-··~
0.000 ~
"~·1-.••··-··' _, ,, ........
0.000 1
,... ,..}
12 ·Dibromoethane 106-93-4 0.00005 0.000 025
1,4 ·D1chlorobenzene 106-46·7 0.075 0.037 5
I .3· Oichloo obenzene 541-73· l 0.6 0.3
12· Dichlooobenzene 95-50-1 0.6 0.3
1,2-Dichloroethane 107-06-2 0.005 0.002 5
cis· l ,2· Dkhloioethylene 156-59-2 O.Q7 0..035
trans· 1 ;z. Dichloroethylene 156-60·5 0.1 0.05
1,2· D1chlo1oprop3ne 78-87·5 0.005 0.002 5
Endrin 72·20·8 0.000 2 0.000 1
Ethylbenzene 100-41-4 0.7 0.35
Fluoride 16964-48-S 4 2
Heptachloo 76-44-8 0.000 4 0.000 2
Heptachlor epox1de 1024-57-3 0.000 2 o.ooo l
Lead 7439-92-1 0.0!5 0.007 5
lmdane 58-89-9 0.000 2 0.000 1
Meocury 7439-97·6 0.002 0.001
Methoxychlor 72-43-5 0.04 0.02
Methy I tert. butyl ether 1634-04-4 0.04 0.02
Nitrate (as N) 14797-55-S 10 5
Nitrite {as N) 14797-65·0 0.5
Pentachlorophenol 87-86·5 0.001 0.000 5
Polychlo1 mated biphenyls 1336-36-3 0.000? 0.000 25
Selenium 7782-49-2 0.05 0.025
Styrene 100-42-5 0.1 0.05
Tet 1ach loo oethyle ne 127-18-4 0.005 0.002 5
Tohre11e 108-8&-3 1 0.5
Total Nitrate/Nitrite 00-00-2 lO 5
Toxaphene 8001·35·2 0.003 0.001 5
1, I. I· To ichloroethane 71.55.5 0.2 0.1
Trichloroethylene 79-01-6 0.005 0.002 5
2(2,4 ,5:TriChtoropheno~y)
propion ic acid 93. 72-1 0.05 0.025
Trohalomethanes (total) 00-00-1 0.1 0.05
Vinyl chlo11de 75-01-4 0.002 0.001
Vinylidene chloride 75-35-4 0.007 0.003 5
Xylenes {mixed isomeo s) 1330-20-7 10 5
180 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

SOUTH CAROLINA
STATUS
IZI Regulation D Guideline
1Z1 Exists 06/28/85 D Exists
D Proposed D Proposed
D In Development OSoil
D Expected Availability IZI Groundwater
D Both Soil & Groundwater
D None D Other

COMMENTS
1. Class GA-exceptionally valuable groundwater (either ir- 4. Class GC quality standards-no treated wastes, toxic
replaceable, in that no reasonable alternative source of wastes, deleterious substances, or constituents that interfere
drinking water is available, or ecologically vital); Class GB- with any existing use of an underground source of drinking
all groundwaters of the state, unless classified othenvise; water.
and Class GC-groundwaters not considered potential 5. Soil clea nup standards are developed on a site-specific
sources of drinking water and oflimited beneficial use. basis.
2. Class GA quality standards-no treated wastes, toxic
wastes, deleterious substances, or constituents allowed.
3. Class GB quality standards-state primary drinking
water regulations (61-58.5) maximum contaminant levels
(MCLs).

REFERENCE
South Carolina Dcpanmcni 0£ Hcahh and EnvironnH'lllal Control
W;:.ter Classilica1ions an<.1 S1a11dards. Regulation 61-68, and Classified
Waters. Regula1ion (, 1-69, incl nding all a meml1m::ms th rough 28 May
1993.

Contact: Tom Knight


Office: Division of Water Quality Assessment and Enforcement
Agency: South Carolina Dept. of Health and Environmental Control
Address: 2600 Bull St.
Columbia, SC 29201
Phone: 803·734~5227

NUMERICAL CRITERIA
Groundwater

Drinking

Can stTtu e nt CAS Number mg/L Remarks

Arsenic 7440-38-2 0.05


Barium 7440-39-3 1.0
Benzene 71-43·2 0.005
Cadmium 7440-43-9 0.010
Carbon tetrachloride 56-23-5 0.005
Chromium 7440-47-3 0.05
2.4-0 94.75.7 0.1
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 181

Groundwater

/Drinking)
Cons ti rue nt CAS Number rng/L !:l:emarks

1,4· Dlchlorobenzene 1()6:45. 7


, 1, 2, O'ochioroo!hane 107--06-2
1
Enclrin 72-20-8
Ethylbenze~e 100414
.,fl,u~_id,~ 1_6_9_\;~,~'~'~ "
Lead 7439-92-l 0.05
Lindane 58-89-9 0 .004
Mercury 7439-97-6 0 .()02
Melooxychlor 72-43-5 O. l
Nitrate (as N) 14797-55-8 10 as N
(S!ie'rljU01'iJ "778z/49~2
11111 .,?'.01 ''fl! t/l//flUlll'ff(f//IIlflrr,,1P;;;~11
'"'7,'J/!f!lf'f/J//lf/lllf!!f/JZ'lf//flfli't!!(l!!flf/ll/!!!!!l(l//l!I/
I fl/ I
Silver 74<\'022.4 0,()5 ,'
Toluene 108--88-3 l 0 H JJ

Toxaphene 800135-2 0,005


Q,-,~ '. \'. Tri~hloroetha~~ m ..h ..ilH....... 7 J/55<15
, ,, ,, ,,, ~ ,,. , ,, , ,, ,,J
o·~o

Trlchlor~thylene 19-01 ·6 0 .005


2(2 ,4, 5·Tric hlorophe noxy)
propionic acid 93-72-1 0 .01
Vinyl chlrmde 75-01-4 0 .002
Vinylidene chloride 75-35-4 0 .007
Xylenes (mixed 1somerol 1330-20· 7 10
182 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

SOUTH DAKOTA
STATUS

[g] Regulation D Guideline


[g] E xists 10/10/90 D Exists
D P roposed D Proposed

D In Development D Soil
0 Expected Availability 0 Groundwater
!XI Both Soil & Groundwater
D None D Other

COMMENTS
1. Numerical criteria are guidelines. 6. Nonvolatile petroleum products include diesel fuels, fuel
2. Remediation or removal of petroleum-contaminated soils oils, oils, and similar substances.
greater than numerical c1-itcria is required. 7. Groundwater notes:
3. If soils exceeding the numerical criteria are lefl i.n place, a (a) Groundwater with 10,000 mg/Lor less total dissolved
monitoring program must be established. solids (TDS) is potentially classifiable as suitable for
4. Total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) is determined by drinking water. The standards apply to ground wat er
California/USGS method published in ''Draft Method for To- at 10,000 mg/Lor less TDS.
tal Petroleum Hydrocarbons and Total Organic Lead," Feb- (b) Where total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) are less
ruary 1988. than or equal to 10 mg/L and greater than 0.1 mg/L,
5. Volati.le petroleum product.c; include gasolines, kerose n e, and are within the radius of influence of a well or
jet fnel, and similar substances. within a delineated wellh ead protection area, cleanup
must continue until 0.1 m g/Lis met, unless a variance
can be obtained.

REFERENCE
I. Chap1er 74:03:32, Remediaiion Criieria for r~1roll0 1im· Conwmi- 3. Cha[ller 74:03: 15. Groundwa1er Quali1y S1andards, Sornh Dakota
na1ed Soils, IO On. I 990; revi~ed I 0 On. 1991. Dcparc111cn1 ol F.nvirunmenI and Na1ural Resources, revised 1hrough
2. · Drah Mtlhod for Toca I Pe1rolcuni Hydrocarbons iln<l Turn! 01ga11ic 11 Feb. 1992.
Lead,• Fehmary 1988, Hazardous Ma1crials Laboratory, Ciililorni<i De-
pa r1men1 of Heahh 5 ervices, 2151 Berke ky W Jy, Berkeley. CA 90704
(405-540-3003).

Contact: Kim Kurtenbach


Agency: Department of Environment and Natural Resources
Address: 523 E. Capitol Ave.
Pierre, SD 57501-3181
Phone~ 605-773-3296

NUMERICAL CRITERIA

Groundwater Soil
Co"5titue"t CAS Numbe r mg/L Remarks ppmw Remarks

Acetone 67-64· l
Acrylamide 79-06·1
Alachlor 15972-60·8 0.002
Aldicarb 116-06·3 0.003
Aldicarb sulfone 1646-SS-4 0.003
Aldicarb sulfoxide 1646-88-3 0.004
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 183

Gro undwater Soil


Constituent CASNumber mg/L Remarks ppmw Remorks

~
('rsenlc 7440·38·
At1azine 1912-24·9
;Barium 7440·39-3
I
Benzene 7J.43·2
'Btomoben;zene 108-86· 1
·.. ····~············•·•J J••·•-UJJtttJJ•

Bromomethane 74-83-9
Cadmium 744043·9 0.005
Ca1bofu1an 1563·66·2 0.04
Cai ban le tr ach lo r1de 56·23·5 0.005
Chlo1amben 133-90-4
JJ- •••... ,.,...
.Chlordane
I
Ch I01ober1Zen e II
~
,Chi 01 eel hane
1
Chloromethane 74·87·3
/.
.~~!?~!up 74~~.?.:3 . . 0.1 ..
Copper 7440·50-8 L3
Cyanide 57-12-5 0.75
2A·D 94- 75.7 0.07
Dacthal 1861·32· l
Dalapon, sodium sa1t 75.99.0
~ 2:·oii>r-Omo:3·~·ii1e>;c;;;r-opa'ne ·9&:r2:;r'"' 'o:ooo·f
11,2. DJbrcm0€thane !Of>.93·4 0.000 05
~
'Dicamba 1918·00·9
/1I .4-Dichlorobenzene 106-46· 7
11,3. Dic hlo re benzene
............ •.• J t • • • ' ......... J .. ...~~.~~~; 1
1,2-Dichlorobenzene 95-50· l 0.6
l ,2·Dichlor0€thane 107-06-2 0.005
1, 1· Dichlor0€thane 75-34-3
cis· 1,2· 0Jchloroethylen& 156-59-2 0.07
ti ans· 1,2 · DJ ch lo r0€t hyl ene 156-60·5 0.1
,.ofC:iifo'romei~aiie~
r1 ,3.Qichloropropanc 142·28
~2,2· Dichloropropane 594-20·
! , 2· Die hloropropane 78-87-5
p..i :.~~~~.lor?pr~pene ,, 663·58·6
1,3· Oichlo1op1opylene 542· 75·6
DinoSEb 88-85- 7
Diquat bromide 85-00·7
Endothall 145· 73.3
Endrin 72-20-8 0.000 2
~·-4.1 . JJJJ...,_

1
Epichlorohydrin
.,JJtJJJ•
·rn&.sifa·
·Ethylt>enzene 100·41-4 II

'.Fluoride 16964-48-8 ...


.'.fooofos 944-22-9
I
/~_lyp~~te.. . ., 1071·83.0 ,,
Heptachlor 76-44-8 "6:606'4'
Heptachlor epoxide 1024-57-3 0.000 2
Hexachlorocyclopentadi~ne 77-47-4
Lead 7439.92.1 I
Lindane 58-89-9 DJDJ
~ercury 7439-97·6
,Met hoxychI01 72.43.5
!'1ethyl ethyl ketone 7g.93.3
/"e!hylene b1omioe 74.95.3
Metc lac hlor 51218-45·2
184 CLEANUP CRITF.R!A FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

Sauth Oakata Cant'd.

Groundwater Sail

Constituent CAS Number mg/L Remorks ppmw Remorks

'
'I
Metribuzin 21087·64·9 ·.
Naphthalene 91·20-3
'.Nitrate (as N) 14797·55·8 10.0
Nrtrite (as NI 14797-65·0 I.
I
-~~1~~~~!~7~. ..?.~. ~~:.~..
p-Chlorotoluene 106-43·4
Parathion 56-38·2
Pentachlorophenol 87-86-5 0.001
Phenol 108-95-2
Phorate 298-02-2
Picioram 'i"9'iifo'2'.'i"
Polychlormated bi°pllenyls 1336·36·3 II
0

Polyn uclear Aro mallc


i Hydrocarbons (PA H) 00-00-6
s,e,lenru.rn.. !..782;;4,9-2
Silver 7440-22-4
Slmazme 122.34.9
Styrene 100-42-5 0 .1
2,3,7.8· Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin 1746-01·6
1, 1, 1,2· Telrachloroethane 630-20-6
:i·;1:2;2:1~1r~clii~r;;ih~n~ ' 79~34:·5•/
I
;Tetrach Io roethylene 127· 18-4
?oluene 108-88·3
,Total Petroleum 00·00·4
Hyd roe arbons CTP HJ

Toxaphene 8001-35-2
1, 2 .4· Tr1chlorobenzene 120-82·1
l, 1,1-Trichloroelhane 71-55-6 0.200
1, 1,2· Trichloroethane 79-00-5
Trich Ioroet hylen e 79-01·6 0.005
"2('2';4'.5'.'friC'ilio:ophenoxyl
lpropionic acid
:1,2,3· Trichloropropane
'
.Trifluralin
I ,,
1582·09-8
,!ri~-~.l.~.~e.t.~a.n~s _(!otalL_. ~--"'" ..... 9.~:9.~: .l
V1 nyl chloride 75-01 -4 0.002
Vinylidene chloride 75-35-4 0.007
Xylenes (mixed Isomers) 1330-20-7 10.0

• Non-<letect.obl e In groundwoler or maxim"m contaminant le.al (MCU II establfsMd ny EPA.


STATE CU!ANUP STANDARDS AND GUJDb'llNES 185

TENNESSEE
STATUS
D Regulation fZl Guideline
D Exists D Exists
D Proposed fZl Prnposed 10/21191

0 In Development O Soil
D Expected Availability 0 Groundwater
fZl Both Soil & Groundwater
ONonc 0 Other

COMMENTS
1. The draft criteria nre the work product of n committee 3. If background levels exceed cleanup criteria, then cleanup
consisting of representatives of the Division.<; of Superfund, to background levels permitted.
Water Pollution Control. Water Supply, Solid Waste Man- 4. Site-specific :-;tandards can be requested.
agement, nnd Underground Storage Tanks. They were pro-
posed with the goal of establishing unifom1 soil and water S. For petroleum releases from USTs, the soil cleanup level
cleanup standnrds. ranges from 10-100 ppmw BTX for drinking water aquifers,
or 50-500 ppm w BTX for nondrinking wn tcr aquifers; and for
2. Guidance levels are not meant to be action levels which 100-500ppmw1'PH for d1·inking water aquifers, or 250-1000
would automatically require cleanup at a site with higher ppmw TPH for nondrink.ing water aquifers.
values.

REFERENCE
( I ) l.t'Ut'r 1l.1t1·rl 2 I o,·t. 1991 Irum Dr. Ralph Sinclair uf the Tcnncs~cc R 11 h·~ nl the Depa n mcni ol Hca Ith a nrl t: r1vi1r>r1111cnt. Division ol
( 2)
Dcp.1rt111cnt nl E11vi1011mt.'.nt and Cum.-rvati1111 tu Mr. Caner Will, Undc1g1r111rul Storni:c Tanks, Cha1ucr l 200· I · I 5, Unrlcrgrunnd Smragt·
Prcsidcnl of Tennessee As~ocia1ion of Bnsinc-;~. Dral1 Snil and Wa1.-r Tank Prn~r<im. Augn't 199 I (r.-visccl).
Ckan1rp S1amlanb.

Contact: Ralph M. Sinclair, Ph.D., Director


Office: Division of Superfund
Agency: Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation
Address: 706 Church St. (Doctors Bldg.)
Nashville, TN 37243
Phone: 615-7 41-4081

NUMERICAL CRITERIA
Groundwater Soil
Required Detection Level

Constituent CAS Number mg/L Remarks ppmw Remarks


,Alachlo1
'llldica1b fl 'I
1Aldica1 b sulfone
'Aldicarb sulfO
'.Arsenic
Asbestos 1332-21·4 7 million f1bers/L
Atrazine 1912·24·9 0.003
Barium 7440-39·3 2.0
Benzene 71·43·2 0.005/0.070 Dnn~ing wate1/nondrink1ng waler aqurfer 0.05
Cadmium 7440.43.9 0.005 2
186 Cl.F.ANUPCRITERJA FOR SOJLAND GROUNDWATER

Tennessee Cont'd.

Groundwater Soil

Required Detection Level

Constituent CAS Number mg/L Remarks ppmw Remarks


,-~-

fCarbaluran " 1'


rearbon letrachloride 55.23.5 0.005
fohlordane 57-74-9 0.002
I
ICh Iorobenzene 108-90·7 0,1

r.~.~.r.?.i:1.i.~.T.••• ,,, ,_ .?..~.4.~;~ ?.:.~ ., 0,1


JN~ ..... ~ •.

2.4-0 94.75. 7 0.07


I ,2-01 b rom o-3..:: hloropropan e 96-12-8 0.000 2
I, 2· Dibromoethane 106-93-4 0.000 05
1,4· D1chlorobenzene 106-46-7 0.075
l, 2· Dlchlorobemene 95.50.1 0.6
f :z:o¥c r; ioroeii ane-'"''
1cis-1.2-0ichloroethylen e
111 ., •. , .••• , •••• ,, .• ,1
107·06·2
156·59·2
a·.aoti"'' 111'
0.07
,
11111n11111g1nm1111111111111111111111(111
II IJIJJ 11

II lrans. 1,2· Dichloroothylene 156-60-5


0

0.1
fDich Iorome l ha ne 75-09-2
~"'· 1,
·- Z·...............
Dichloropropane
···-·· ~··'' ..~ .. '
78-87-5 ,..............
0.005 ,, •• ,,,1111111111;1t//,,,,;JJlllJl//IJIM111/JN1////;,,
''·· ········"~''''j
~,

Ethylbenzene 100-41-4 0.7 [I

Fluoi ide 16964·48·8 4.0


Heptachlor 76-44·8 0.000 4
Hep!ach lor epoxide 1024-57·3 0.000 2
Lead 7439-92-l 0.05
{Lr;d;n~ "5if'8'9'~9 rc;:oorr2 "Q

'
/ 'v1ercury 7439-97·6 0.002
VI ethoxych lor 72-43-5 0.04
i Nrtrate {as Nl 14797-55·8 10
'\.t:'!.l.t~.i.!7. -~~-~- -~ ~.
'
14797·65·0
.0.001
!. "'"""'
Pen tac hIo rop he nol
······················'
87-86-5
.11 • •Jiii'

Polychlorinated biphenyls 1336-36-3 0.000 5


Polynuclear A•omatic
Hyd1ocarbons (PAH) 00-00-6 0,33
p,p'-Dich lorod iphenyl
I r re hloroethan e 50-29-3 0.02
Selenium 7732.*49:2 0:05
S~ver 7440-22·4 0.05
Styrene 100-42· 5 0.1
Tetrachloroethylene 127-18-4 0.005 0.05
Toluene 108·88·3 0.5
Total N1\1ate/Nitrite 00-00·2 10 as N
Total Petroleum Onnking water/
Hydroca1 bons rTPH) 00-00-4 nondrrnking water aquifer 1.0
Toxaphene 8001-35-2
1, l, l-T1ichloroethane 71-55·6
Tr ic hloroethyle ne 79-01-6
2(2,4,5· T richlorophenoxy)
proplon ic acld 93-72-1
Trihalomethanes (total) 00-00·1
lVln_yl..£ti.!?~ de 75-01·4
Vinylidene chloride 75.35.4 D.iJJT
Xylenes (mixe<J isome1 sl 1330-20· 7 I•
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDEUNES 187

Soil Soi-I

(Industrial Area ) (Res'1dential Area )

Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remarks ppmw Remarks

7440--38·2. (I
''•'
enzene 71·43·2 II
\coomium 7440·43-9
rCarbon tetrac lllorid e 56·23·5
r~.~!ord~~~.wu u ,,, _, 5!.:Z~.~~--
Chromium 7440-47-3
Dic hIorom ethane 75.09.2 II
Ethyl benzene 100-41·4
Lead 7439-92· l
Lindane 58-89·9
I ~Xe~~ry" 7439.'~;/j'.'6'" '11
I
~Pentachlorophenol 87--86-5
fPolych Iori nated bl p~e ny Is 1336-36-3
JPolyn ucl ear Aromatic ,.
H.Y~~?~~~-~-~~!. 00-0Q;G . lf~i."':
p,p'-Dichlorodiphenyl
tr ich lo roe lha ne 50-29-3 5
Te trac hloroethy le ne 127-1 8-4 0.5 0.5
Toluene l08.S8-3 40 10
Total Petroleum
Hydrocarbons fTPH) 00-00·4 250 100
r C'i::friChTffiocthane
I ,
)Trichloroethyle
};i !!)'I ch Ior(de
1
Xylenes (mixed Isomers)
~
188 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND CROUNDWATF.R

TEXAS
STATUS

l8J Regulation D Guideline


18J Exists 06/15/93 D Exists
D Proposed D Proposed

D In Development 0 Soil
D Expected Availability D Groundwater
181 Both Soil & Groundwater
DNone O Other

COMMENTS
1. Cleanup must meet one or more of the following risk re- 3. For residential and nonresidential exposure, if groundwa-
duction standards: ter has a naturally occurring Total Dissolved Solids concen-
(a) background levels, tration greater than 10,000 mg/L, the cleanup level for a con-
taminant dissolved in this groundwater may be adjusted by
(b) health-based standards, multiplying by 100.
(c) such levels lhat any substantial present 01· future 4. Health risk assessment for known or suspect carcinogens
threat to human health or the environment is elimi· is based upon an excess upperbound lifetime risk of between
natetl or reduced to the maximum exlent practicable. one-in-10,000 and one-in-one-million, with one-in·one-mil-
2. Numerical criteria arc health-based standards (mcdia- 1ion as a goa I. Cumulative excess risk to exposed populations
specific concentrations). must not be greater than one in 10,000.

REFERENCE
1ndus1rial So!id Wa,lc and Municipal llazardon~ Waste in General. 31
TAC 335. 551 · 335.569 (S11bschap11:r S: Risk lkduction S1,111dan.h),
frxas Re,qim7, 15 June I<)<) 3.

Contact: Philip Winsburough


Agency~ Texas Water Commission
Address: P.O. Box 13087
Austin, 'l'X 78711-3087
Phone~ 512-4 63- 7829

NUMERICAL CRITERIA
Soil Soi-I
(Residentiol - protective of (lndustriol • protective of
groundwater) groundwoter)

Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remorks ppmw Remarks

Ace na ph th en e 83-32"9 219.0 613.0


Acetone 67-ti4· I 365.0 1020.0
Acetonil1i le 75-05·8 21.9 61.3
Acelop hen one 98·86·2 365.0 1020.0
Aero le in 107-02-8 73.0 204.0
Acrylamide 79-06· I 0.001 89 0.006 36
Aery Ion illi Ie 107·13·1 O.Ql 5 8 0.053
n·BHC 319·84·6 0.001 35 0.004 54
Alachlor 15972-60-8 0.2 0.2
Aldicarb 116·06·3 0,3 0.3
STA TE CLHANUP STANDARDS AND GUTDELINES 189

Soil Soil

(Residentiol • protective of (l ndustr'1ol • protective of


g roundwoter) groundwoter)

Constituenf CAS Numbe r Remarks ppmw Remc:irks

~/\ld1ca1 b s.uiton~ ..
lAldicarb sulfo~lde
.
~!d1in
1

A)umtnum phosph'1de
.
1111

~Aniline
' " ' " ""'"' ,,//11
62-53-3
It ,,, ,1 , 1JITl
• • ;-,11 /l,n,,. ,., , .JHllllllJwullllllhn ##llll•U 111111,u•ll

Anth1acene 120-12-7 1100.0 3070.0


Antimony 7440-36-0 0.6 0.6
A1senic 7440-38-2 5.0 5.0
Atiazme 1912-24-9 0.3 0.3
Ba11um 7440.39.3 200.0 200.0
~11 "1' ''!/IJ

I' ·'
o.~,,
0,000 12'1
"''
0.4
Bi phenyl I ~ 511.0 ''!//,
1
'si'i (2..etl1• 50 I
j •• ,. .... . , , , , . , •• · h l.U.11..-hln,,,,..11111u/JJ.u1J}}}IJ 'lu11,,.JJJ1. I-l1 .. }}l111•• u111/11.·,.1
B1s(2-<:hlo1oethyl) ethe1 111-44-4 0.007 74
Bis(2-<:hlo1oisop1opyllethe1 39638-32-9 1.22
B1omofo1m
B1omomethane
Cadmium
fll i/ li /1U •II .,
,Ca1bo!ur11n
I
Cai bon disulfide
';ca1 bon tet1achlo1.ide
'.Chlo1dane
I,
17;1.1
(,
...
1'.:hlorobenzene
'················ ···· '· "' ).0~:~9: . ··'' fl ,, ,'-:_~,, I. • ,,,,~,,,, m1t11mt111ffllll.mm1111n1111ff/111mm1111/J
Chlorobenzilate 510-15·6 73.0 204.0
Chlo1octhanc 75-00-3 73.0 204.0
Chlo1ofo1m 67·66-3 1.0 1.0
2· Ch!o1 onaphthalene 91-58-7 292.0 818.0
2· Chlo1ophenol 95-57-8 18.3 51.1
111
"''~''-'-' A.4(}.47', 3
1
111111
i'cl':
1
.Ch1omium ]

Ch1omium Nil 18540-29.g 10


;Cyanide 57 · l?· 5 20
,2.4·0 94-75-7' 7 11
ti.1":".ii:~1y1p1it.~<1r'!t.!?,,, 1111/J111n""· ,,1,n ~:tP 73 11/ 111/llJ tsul1JIlfl•" IJIJ1.1.!rrrl.lhrr ...UllJIJ/111/1a-m1.1111/"
Di(2-ethyl hexyll phthalate 117- 81·7 0.608 2.04
1,2-Di bromo- 3-<:hloropropane 96-12· 8 0.02 0.02
Oibromoch\Dt<>methami l24·48· l lG.G 10.0
1,2· Dib1omoethane 106-93-4 0.005 0.005
Dibutyl phthalate 84· 74·2 365.0 1020.0
1,4:-Dichi orobe nzen e 106-46-7 7.5 7.5
1,3 · Dich I01 oben2 en e 541·73·1 60 60
1,2· D1ch!orobe112ene 95.50.1 60 60
Dich Iore b1 om om ethane 75-27-4 10.0 10.0
Die hIoro<! ifIuo1 ometh ane 75, 71-8 730.0 2040.0
1,2· Dichlo1oethane 107·06·2 0 .5 0.5
1, l·Dichlo1oethane 75.34.3 365 1 020
cis-1 ,2· D1ch101oethylene 156-59·2 7 7
tians· 1,2· Dichloroeihylene 156-60· 5 10 10
Dichlo1omethane 75-09-2 0 .5 0.5
2,4:0ichloropheno! i2o::a3:2 11.0. 30.7
1,2· Dichloropropane 78-87·5 0.5 0.5
Dleld1in 60·57· l 0.000 532 0.001 79
Diethyl phthalate 84·66-2 2 920 8 180
I
190 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER
Texos Cont'd.
Soil Soil
(Residential • protedive of (lndustriol • pratective of
groundwoter) groundwater)
Canstituent CAS Number ppmw Remarks ppmw Remarks

Dimethoate Q i!
2,4-Dimethylphenol
2. 4-0 in itrophenol "
Dinoseb
; 1,4-D ioxa ne ' .. ,
Diphenylamlne 91.3 256
1,2· Diphenylhyd1azme 122·66· 7 0.0106 0.035 8
D1sulloton 298--04-4 0.146 0.409
Endosulfan 115-29-7 0.183 0.511
Endothall 145· 73.3 10 10
End1in
2· Elhoxyethanol II
2· Ethoxyethanol acetate II I 1(11
Eth ylbenie ne 100....111
Ethylene glyco ~
Ethylene oxide 75·21·8 0.008 35 0.028
flu om nt he ne 206·44-0 146 409
Fluotene 86-73-7 146 409
Fluotide 16964·48-8 400 400
Fo1maldehyde 50-00-0 730 2040
,Heptachlor
Heptachlor epoxide ;!
Hei1ach loro· l .3 · butad ie ne
Hexachlo1 obeniene
ll~~hl~~yc_l~ex'.l~e
Hexachloroethane 67-72-1 6.08 20.4
lsobutyl alcohol 78·83· l l 100 3070
lead 7439.92.1 1.5 1.5
lindane 55.59.9 0.02 0.02
m-C1esol 108·394 183.0 511.0
'ffi.mnih obenzene
Mercury 11 'i! ti 2
~Methomyl I .
,Methoxychlo1 IL

·2. Methoxyethanol
Methoxyethanol acetate 110-49-6 7.3 20.4
Methyl ethyl ketone 75.93.3 183 511
Meth yI isobuty I ketone 108· 10· l 183 511
Methyl me th acry late 80-62-6 292 818
n-Dioctyl phthalate 117-84·0 73 204
'N Nitloso-n-meihyliiitiYIITTiiine 10595~95~6 0.000'387 o:ooC3
!N·Nitrosodi· n-p1 opylamine 621·&4·7 0.001 22 0.004 09
rNNit1 osodiethylamine 55-18-5 0.000 056 8 0.000 191
'N-Nit1 osodimethylamine 62-75-9 0.000 167 0.000 561
:N-!} itrosopY'!_o~ dine 930·55·2 0.004 06 0.013 6
Naphthalene 91-20·3 146 409
Nickel 7440-02·0 10 10
Nitrate (as Nl 14797-55-8 I 000 l 000
Nit1ite (as Nl 14797-65·0 100 100
N1trobe nzen e 98-95-3 1.83 5.11
'O'.Ciesol If-
ip--Chl()r()<lnillne
rp--e1esol ~I
.Pe ntach I01 oph eno I
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 191

Soll Soil

(Residential - protedive of (lndustr'1al • protedive of


groundwater) groundwater)
- --------'

Constituen t CAS Number ppmw Remorks ppmw Remorks

I
'Phenol 108-95-2 2 190
fPhlhalic anhydrid- 85-4 4-9 7 300
rPo lych Iorimrted bi phe nyts 1336-36-3 0.05 II

"n•~nm• <~h~~J1uu ~J
tp,p' · Oichloro
diphenyl,..,,dichlo1oethane
iii..,, _ , .... , ,,,
,_,,/,/" ,,,.,...,.Hf
1~ •.
72-54-8
~-- ....... ..._
0-035 5 'ltlUIJldJJI...,..,.
0. 119
flilltilil" ,, I q - - •
p,p'- Dichloro
d 1phenyldichloroethylene 72-55-9 0.025 0.084 I
p,p'- D1ch lorod iphenyl
trichloroethane
Pron amide
r.--
/Pyrene
Pyridine
buintozene
'
·Selenlum
I_
~-1·~~.er
Strychnine & sails
Styrene ID
1,2A, 5-Tetrn<:hl'Jfobeniene
1, 1, 1,2-Tel rachloroethane
1, 1,2,2-Tel rachloroethane
feii'a'Chi0ioeHl;a1:-ne
p,3 ,4, 6-Tetrac hlorophenol
IT etraethyld ith i opyrophosphate
iToluene
I
I ,
[_?~~~,e-~~-.-d"u.JMJl~N ~ ..,
1,2 ,4-Trichlorobenzene
l, l, 1-Trichloroelhane
1, 1,2-Trichloroethane
Tr1c hloroethy Iene
Trich lorofl uorom ethane
2-:4~6".'friciiioroph eiloi'
2, 4, 5-Trich loroph enol
~(2 ,4 ,5-Trichforopheno.<r)
Jp1op'1onic acid
2,4,5-Trichlorophenoxyacetic
~ add
l _ ,rnJHNN/dll.H /1'1/fN1n,
1, 1,2-Trich loropropane
1,2,3-Trich loropropane
1,3,5-Trinilrobenlene J
Vinyl acelate 1(1 ~
'-lmyl c\1\mirle
Ni'ii;;1·1il'e~e"Cli10'11ae"'
~ylenl!'S (mixeo isomers) 1330-20-7 l 000 l 000

Soil Soil

(Residentiol ·protective of (lndustriol • protective of


humon health considering humon heolth considering
inholation & ingestion pothways) inholotion & ingestion pothwoys)
'---------

Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remorks ppmw Remorks

Ac en aphthen e 83-32-9 13 400.0 44 300.0


Acetone 67-64-l 3820.0 4160.0
Acetonil rile 75-05-8 1 650.0 12 300_0
192 CLEANUP CRITERJA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER
Texas Cont'd.

Sail Sail

(Residentral - protecti ve af (Industria l • pratective af


human health considering human health considering
inhalation & ingestion pathways) inhalation & ingestion pathways)

Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remark s ppmw Remarks


6
~ i\cetophenone
I Acrolein
Ac rylamide
~ ACl)'lon i tri le
tu·AHC ....
Alachlor
Aldicarb
Aldicarb sulfone
Aid icarb su Ifoxide
Aldrin
p:rl:r;;1;;1i-m·ii·tio'Si>illcie'
Aniline
Antllraceni
I Antlmon;·
I Arsenic
Atrazme
Barium
Benzene
Benzidine
Beryllium
t ai'pi1en-Y1 ·11,..,,,,1,"'
~ Bis {2~thylhexyl) adi'
I Bis(2-chloroethyl) ether
IBis(2-chloroisopropyl)ether
1Bromoform
' · ........ ~~'
···-··· ... • -N-N ,~
81 omomethane
Cadmium
Carbofuran
Carbon disulfide
Carbon te trac hlor ide
lciiioriiaiie"
~Ch l~robe nzen e
1Ch 101 obe nzllate
k hloroethane
(_chloroform.,
2· Chloronaphthalene
2· Chlorophenol
Chromium
Chromium (VI)
Cyanide
lf2"'4."[i""fm
)'"
(D~" IH>Ctylph tha I
~ D•(2· ethylhexyl) phthalate
~ 1,2· Dibromo.3-chloropropane .1 Q?

[~!~;~~~l~.om~~-ne
1,2· Di bromoethane
Dibutyl phthalate
1,4· Dichlo1 obenzene
1,3· Diehloroaenzene ~ r.ii:v:i
I ,2. Die hi oi oben zen e • I LI
!oi ctihiio6lomorniit hiiiie· [I 'PL

~Die hlornd if luo1 <;1metha ne ~

f1,2· Di ch lornethane 107;06·2 Li'


STAT/i CLliANUP STANDARDS AND GUlDELlNES l93

Soil Soil
(Re sidentiol - protective of (I ndustrial - protective of
humon he<:1lth considering human health cons"1dering
inhalation & ingestion pathways_ ) __ inhololion & ingestion pathwa y s)
- ----
Constituen t GAS Number ppmw Remark s ppmw Remarks

1, 1, 1. Dichloroethane
~ cis· l, 2-0ichlo•oethylene
i trans· 1,2· Dlcnloroethylene
Die hlorornet hane
/ 2,4:_Dich10!".?P~.~ ~.ol. ,""'
1,2-Dichl(l{op1opane
Dieldrin
Die th~ t phthalate
Dimethoate
2 .4· Dim ethyl ph eno<
(." """" ....... •• .... .. Ifill
f2, 4-0i nitroph enol
' Dinoseb
1,4· Dioxane
1Diphenylamine 1:-
1.2 ·h~_i.P_~e~Y.! ~Y.?. ~ az i ne
Disulfoton LL
Endosulfan
Endothall
Endrin
2· Ethoxyelhanol
"2:Eiii ox;;e"itiaiioTac:"e t"a i~
1EI hyl benzene
( Ethylene glyco I
Et11ylene oxide
i, .fl.1!.~.~ -~ .t.~.~"-~ ..
Fluorene
Fluoride
f 01 maldehydc
Heptachlo1
Heplachlo1 epoxide a
;w,;~.;cii"loio: ·1 :3:.truiaii ;,;rie
fHex ~ch Iorobe nzcn e
f' ll Hexach Iorocyc1oh exa ne
~ Hexac hI01 oet ttane
'~.?,;'~Y.1 a lea h~! . I I 1~111 111
Lead
Lindane
m-Cresol
m-Dinit1oben,ene
Mercury

11~
194 CLEANUP CRITERFA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER
Texas Cant'd,
Soil
(Residentiol • protective of (lndustriol • protedive of
humon heolth considering humon heolth considering
inholotion & ingestion pcithwoys) inholotion & ingestion pothwoysl
Constituent CAS Number ppmw Remorks ppmw Remorks

Nap ht ha lene 91-20-3 4 910 7 720


Ni ckel 7440-02--0 1560 20400
Nitrate (as Nl 14797-55-8 439 000
Nitrite (as NJ 14797-65--0 27 400 204000
Nil!O~lll<.'.l\e qa..95.3 64.8 106
0-Cresol 95-48·7 3 910,0 51 100.0
p-Chloroaniline 106-47·8 I 100.0 8 180.0
p-Cresol 106-44·5 3 910.0 51 100.0
Pen tac hlo ro phenol 87-86·5 5.34 47.7
Phenol 108-95·2 165 000
Phthalic anhydride 85-44-9 549 000
Polychlorinated biphenyls 1336-36·3 10 25
p,p'· Dichiaro
di ph eny I d ich loroetha ne 72-54-8 2.67 23.8
p,p · Oichloro
diphe_:iyldichlo~thylene 72-55·9 1.88 16.8
p,(/· Dichlorodiphenyl
!rich loroetha ne 50-29·3 LBS 16.8
Pronamide 23950-58·5 20 600 153 000
Pyrene 129-00·0 8 200 61000
Pyridine 110-86· I 274 2040
·auriifu'i:'e'riit' fflll '/I.If.I
,,,,,,,,,,,, .,82:!1;s:if"",.,, , utf1''2"4 'Jl'"'""'"'fll'
Sele nium 7782-49-2 1 370 Ill
Silver 7440-22·4 1 370 ID
Strychnine & 57·24·9 82,3 I t
Styrene 100-42·5 21,3 .~.

l'.2:4:S:reir~h1orobentene
''' ',., •.t•······ ...JTU•
95.94.3
~ .........82.3
~····•'' ''/. 1Jllllll.
613
l,1, l ,2·"1e\1ach1oroclnane 630-20-6 45,9 62.9
l , l ,2 ,2· Tetrachl oroet ha ne 79.34.5 8.0 11.7
Tet rac hloroethy le ne 127· 18·4 79,3 207
2, 3, 4, 6· Tetrac hlorophe nol 58-90·2 8 230 61 300
rre\raeiiiyii!ilfllopyr0phospiiaie 3589:24:5 '137
i Toluene 108·88-3 3 580
Toxaphene 8001-35·2 0,582
I , 2 ,4-Trl ch lorobe nzene 120-8 2· l 678
~:}:.~:T~!-~!!.!~!.~.~~~!!~..,,,,,, ,,, ,, 71 -55-6
'h •••••••••• ,,,_....:...:r:;
9630
-·-· ·.Jli•'"
l, 1,2· Trichloroethane 79-00.5 12.7 16.2
Tric hi 01oet hyle ne 79--01·6 2A 2.85
Trichl orolIuoromethaoe 75.59.4 8.73 8.36
2 ,4, 6-Trich!010ph encl 88--06-2 58,2 520
2,4, 5· Trichlorophenol 95.95.4 8 080 10400
f2<2:4;S:rriC:iiioroil'lienoZYi
propion i c acid 93.7.
2, 4,S.Trichloropherioxy~cet ic
acid 93-7 6·
I I
..!_.!:2-Tfichl~~~OP_'.!,'.!;...,.,,,,,.., 1 (/Jn..~-~-~:~_?; .. I

I ,2, 3. Trie hlorop ropa ne 96-18-4 I 650 12 300


1,3,S.Trinitrobenzene 99-35-4 13,7 102
Vinyl acetate 108--05-4 274 000 2040 000
Vinyl ch 101ide 75--01·4 0,0199 0.024 l
Vmylidene chloi'1de 75·35-4 0.715 0.872
Xy!enes (mixed Isomers) 1330-20-7 5470 5800
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 195

Groundwater

Residential
Constituent CAS Number mg/l Remarks

;Acenaphthene 83·32-9 2.19


!Acetone 67·64·1 3,65
tAceton i ti i fe 75--05.S 0.219
i
Acetoph en one 98·86-2 3.65
~~~.?I~!." 107.02.S
-···~•••·•N. ...~:!.~...
Acryla rn id e 79.06· 1 0.000 018 9
Acrylon i 11 i Ie 107.13.1 0.000 158
a·BHC 319·84·6 0.000 013 5
Alachlo1 15972-60·8 0.002
Aldica1b 116·06·3 0.003
TA'1diC3ibS~ii;;~e 'i646$4"' ''cl:Oof"
sulfo~ide
1
Aldlca1 b 1646·88·3 0.004
\Aldrin 309·00·2 0.00000501
1A1uminum phosphida 20859·73-8 0.014 6
~Aniline
1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . '1~'"" ,_§2.:~~}- 0.014 9·
.. ··'··'~
Anthiacene 120.12.7 11.0
Antimony 7440·36·0 0.006
Arsenic 7440·38·2 0.05
Atrai:ine 1912.24·9 0.003
Barium 7440.39.3 2.0

f
~Benzene'' ''if'43~i ·o'.oos·
·Benzidine 92·87·5 0.000 000 37
): .
,Beryllium 7440-41· 7 0.004
~8{phenyl
~Bis (2·- ethylhexyl)
~.... . . ......................
~
adipate ,
Bis(2-<:hlo1oethyO e1he1
___ 92·52-4
,.., 103·23·1
l 11·44-4
1.83

?.:
//i,, .. ~ '"""' '"'
0.000 077 4 ~·-
B1s(2-chlo1oisop1opy1Jethe1 39638·32·9 0.012 2
Bromoform 75·25·2 0.1
Bromomethane 74-S3·9 0.051 l
Cadmium 7440.43.9 0.005
,, •• _...., .... ' f
,cartiof u1 an T563i'6~2·· ·a:t14·
,Ca1bon disulfide 75· ls.-O 3.65
' .
rarbon ieuachloride 5623·5 0.005

______
~Chlordane
,Ch!crobenzene..,.
57· 74--9
100.90.z....
0.002
..~L.
Chlorobenzilate 510· 15·6 0.73
Ch I 01 oetha ne 75.00-3 0.73
Chlo1ofo1m 67·66·3 0.l
2·Chlo1onaphthalene 91·58·7 2.92
2-Chlorophenol 95.57.s 0.183
:d11omium
I

~
Chromium (Vf)
Cyanide ".
y2 4·0 I

~;. n-octylphthala!e
,,,,,,,,, .......... - - . , ..
Di(2· ethylhexyl) phthalale 117·81·7 0.006 08
1,2· Di b1omcr3-<:hlo1op1opane 96· 12·8 0.000 2
Oib1omochlo1 om ethane 124·48·1 0.1
1,2· D1b1 omoethane 106·93·4 0.000 05
Dibutyl phlhalate 84·74·2 3.65
i~ii.'ol'C'1il0i0iieiiierie" 1 10s::r5.f 0:·075~

l .3·0ichlo1obenzene 541· 73· l 0.6


1, 2· Die hlo1 obenze ne 95.50.J 0.6
,, Dich!o1 ob1omomethane 75-27-4 0.1
lDichlo1odifluoiomelhane 75·71·8 7.3
196 CLEANUP CRITERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER
Texos Cont'd.

Groundwoter

Residentiol

Constituent CAS Number Remarks

f't. 2· Di ch loroet ha ne 107-06·2


l, I· Dic:hloroethane 75.34.3
cis· 1,2· Dichloroethylene 156-59 2
trans-.1.2· Dlchloroethylene 156·60-5
,[)i<;~.1.0!0.1)11!! ~.an.e.. ,,, ........... ,,..
,,,,,,75-09·2
2 .4 ·Dkh lorophe nol 120-83·2
1,2· Dich1cropiopan-e 76-87·5
Oieldrin 60-57· l
Diel hyl phthalate 84-66-2
Dimethoate 60-51· 5
rf :roiiiieiti'Yiiii1ei-iol'"" ~JI/I

W1
11' ' ' 1Ut
i0'5'.'ffj:'9''''
!2, 4· Dinilrophenol 51-28-5
Din05eb 88-85·7
1. 4- Dioxane 123· 91-l
IDiphenylamine
/., ... , ............ ..... , .. ,,J,JJ.Unn
1:?2·39·4
/J,,,,,,,,,,,,.,
1,2· Diphenylhydrazine 122.55.7
Disulfolon 298-04·4
Endosulfan I 15·29-7
Endothall 145.73.3
Endiin 72·20·8
r.::tfi'liiiicY'etii'ariOi"" "" " .,, •· ' • 110:'.8a:s"'"
i2. Etho•yethanol acetate 111-15--9

l Ethylben~ene
Ethylene glycol

1, ~:.~Y!~~~-~~ ~.~-"~'"'''"'J-.uu..,,,
Fluoranthene
Fluorene
1
100-41-4
107-21-1
75-21·8
"''····••'4·······
206-44- 0
86-73-7
Fluoride
Fo1 maldehyde
16964-48-8
50-00-0

Heplachlor 76-44·8
fttelliir'Cii107iii>Qxide '• ·1 o2ii:'51'.:.3'"
1 Hexac hloro-1,3· bul ad! ene 87-683
Hexac h loroben1ene 118-74-1
:J.-H exach lorocycl ohexane 31 9-85-7
1He~achloroe!~. an~....... 67·72-1
J**n' '"'-•··'"•·•· •·•·
lsobutyl alcohol 78-83-1
Lead 7439-92-1
lindane 58-89·9
m-C1esal 108-39·4
m-Dinitrabenzene 99·65-0
~ ~A-eiCU~ 7439~97.5 ''
f Methomyl 16752-77-5
fMel hoxychlor 72-43·5
f '.· Methoxyel hanol 109-86-4 O.lll6
~~-~~~~~~':!.~~!..~~~(! ~
II b/11//1 1 1' I //),

J /lllll/i
110-49·6
·······"''"''' ''':.J./'"J ...~:.~.?.~.m rl/111/JJJJJ/f/lflflflfJ//JJJJflflflflflflflf//JJJJJ11//JJIJ,!!!!.. 111111/ll////ll///J11111/ll/l/l,..,11111//ll/l//l1111/1J/l/mmlllll/l/JJ/l/.,1/lll/l/.,/fl/l/1!t
Methyl el hyl ketone 78-93-3 1.83
Methyl isobulyl ~elone 108-10-l 1.83
Mel hyl merhacrylate 80-62·6 2.92
n-Oioctyl phi ha la le 117-84-0 0.73
N Nitioso-n-methylethylam1 ne 10595.95.5 0.000 003 87
f'N-N'i i'r.lSOd 1: n:pioiYYiam1ne '62'f.'6if.'i cfoocfo12.. 2··1 ""''"'"""~
N-N i1uisod iethyla mine 55-18·5 0.000 000 568
62-75-9 0.000001 o7
~
111-Nitrosodirnethylarnlne l
~ N· Ni Irosopy1ro1 idine 930-55·2 0.0000406
t.
STATE CLEANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELJNF.S 197

G roundwote r

Resldential

Constituent CAS Number mg/L Remorks


rm DW WliHJ/W ·fH11/P
, . 91·20~3
im

~ Naphthalene " 1.46


~Nickel 7440-02"0 0.1
1N1trate {as NJ 14797·55-8 10
I
I Nitiile (a5 N) 14797.'65-0 l
f'"'""'/"
Ni llobenze ne '
"'I " • '••• I• ~J,. 1-ou•
9S-.95-3
'•·---···---···· ·,. ~~?.'..~.}
a-Cresol 95-48-7 1.83
p-Chlm aaniline l06-47-8 0.146
p-C1esat 106·44-5 1.83
Pentachloiaphenal 87-86·5 0.001
Phenol 108-95-2 21.9
Ip'!i'ifialiC';; iifiYiiif~e''ff1111r '8'5'.44'.'9'" i 3'' 111rt.'l'/ll""'''''~~"l//f!/Wfl/IJ////ll.fl!l1!!!//lf!//l///l/lll!/l/Jlllf///?IJl!lffl'''' ·11&;:,'ljtff/f,"~ll''ff/l"'' "'lflt1111•1· 1//.'PI(//
~
IPalychlm'inaled biphenyls 1336·36-3 0.000 5 f111
'

Ip,p' · Oichla10 ~i/Jh ' 71 ! ~


diphenyl dichlo1oethane 72-54-8 0.000 355
. r,, Ill/
'
I
I II Ill
~
! p,p'.Oichlorn
2
i-,.~.i P~.~~.Y!~.1.c~.f.?'.~.'.~x.1.~.~::·
p ,p' · 01chl01 adi phenyl
0 .000 25
'.11.4 ,, ",,//~
trichlaraethane 50·29·3 0 .000 25
P1anam1de 23950·58·5 2.74
Pyrene 129·00·0 1.1
Pyridine 110-86. l 0.036 5

,,~ai'.ifil1oze1
;Selen!um
'
'ifa.:'.68~''''
7782·49·2
'i:i'.'d63"2i3'""
0.05
;sliver 7440·22-4
fstrychnine & salts '57-24·9
~
~~.'.~! .~P,~..,,,,,,,,,,,,m.,, II~· lflr, l/lilth ,,,,, I ~P;;~~;,~
1,2.4. 5· Tetiachlo1obenzene 95-94-3
I, 1, 1,2· Tetrachloroethane
I, 1,2,2-Teti achtaroethane
Tetrn~ hlarcethy\ene
2.3 .4 ,6· Tetiachlmophenal
:reli"a'eui\.'ftiifli'lfiiiii1'cip'fios'pti'<i'it - M

I .
v aluene
fToxaphene
·, , 2 .4· T rich Im ob eniene
f1,1, l-T1ichlo1o-ethane
'··11•-• •-•··-•••·•• · ·-··•""·· •••· 1liff.n1111.
1, 1.2-Ti ich laroethan e
T11chlmac\hylene
Trjch lmaflum amethane
2 .4 ,6· T1 ichlm aphenol
2,4,5-Trichloraphenol
~2(2' I
t p1opion1c
,2,4 ,5· T1 khlmopheno
' acid .
_, l ,2·11 ichlmop1opane
~ ~• l•l•••• l•• .... ••• .. ll•l/ . . . 1.1 . . .

1,2.3· T richlmaprapane
1,3.5· T11rnt1obenzene
Vinyl ace late
Vinyl chlm ide
V1nyhdene chlo1 ide
i'Xyl'e 'ii'eS' (rnrx~~ rsom
~
198 CLEANUP CR!TERIA FOR SOIL AND GROUNDWATER

UTAH
STATUS
D Regulation D Guideline
D Exists D Exists
D Proposed D Proposed

D In Development DSoil
D Expected Availability D Groundwater
D Both Soil & Groundwater
~None D Other

COMMENTS
1. Utah complies with U.S. EPA regulations.
2. Utah groundwater and soil cleanup levels one determined
on a site specific basis, with the Action Level used as a start+
ing point. Action Levels for contaminated groundwater are
0.5 mg/L for TPH, 0.005 mg/L for benzene, 1 mg/L for tolu+
ene, 0. 7 mg/L ethylbenzene, 10 mg/L for xylene, 0.02 mg/L
for naphthalene, and 10 mg/L for oil and grease. Action Lev+
els for contaminated soil are 30-100 ppmw for TPH, 0.2
ppmw for benzene, 100 ppmw for toluene, 70 ppmw for
ethylbenzene, 1000 ppmw for xylenes, 100 ppmw for Total
Recoverable Petroleum Hydrocarbons, and 300 ppmw for oil
and grease.

REFERENCE

Contact; Scott Goodwin


Office~ Solid and Hazardous Waste
Agency: Depa rt men t of En vimnmenta I Qua Ji ty
Address; 288 N. 1460 West
Salt Lake City, UT 84114
Phone; 801+538·6170
STATE C!.EANUP STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 199

VERMONT
STATUS
121 Regulation D Guideline
121 Exists 09/29/88 D E xists
D Proposed D Proposed
D In Development OSoil
D E xpected Availability 121 Groundwater
D Both Soil & Groundwater
0 None D Other

COMMENTS
1. If an enforcement standard is exceeded, the Agency must (b) prevent exceedance of the Preventive Action Limit, or
be notified. The Agency will evaluate the information and, (c) ensure that the Enforcement Standard is not exceeded.
depending on cause and significance, may require a response
to achieve compliance with the Enforcement Standard. 3. For carcinogens, the Agency nses a one in a million risk as
acceptable for a risk assessment.
2. If a Preventive Action Limit is exceeded, the Agency must
be notified. The Agency will evaluate the information and, 4. Soil cleanup standards are established on a case-by-case
depending on cause and significance, may require a rcsporn;c basis for each specific site.
to
(a) minimize the contaminan t concentration where techni-
cally and economically feasible,

REFERENCE
S!Jl" nl Vnmolll, Agcncy of NJLurJl Rcsourccs, lkp<11 L11wn1 o[ Envi·
ron men LJI Cmiwrva 1ion. Chap1 er 12. Ground \VJ Lcr P1 <llCCL ion Ru k