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Basic patterns of movement

The following diagrams show the approximate placement of beats in 2, 3, 4 and 6 (from 6/8 or
6/4, not 3 with subdivision such as 3/2).

2 3

1 2
1 1

6
4

2 1 3
3 2 1 4 5

Patterns without internal upbeats / auftakts


The following diagrams show the placement of nodes in 2, 3, 4 without auftakts plus
superimposition showing how they relate to standard 4-pattern. These are special movements
used where the tip needs to be active (a fast three for example where movement in one is too
vague) but a “real” pattern will be too heavy and create a tendency of rallentando.
Simple patterns of movement
4
Use a range of strict tempi either side of the "base"
Large numerals indicate movement pattern.
The exercsie should be completed four ways: with amplitude from wrist only, from forearm,
with whole arm and with varying degrees of amplitude whilst maintaining strict tempo.

q c.90 ("base" tempo)


4
Energised beats

Pulse

6
6
[from modified 4 pattern]

3
[from modified 3 pattern]

Beats 4 2
Pulse
6 3
4 2

Beats
33 22
4 4
Pulse
3 2
4 4

11
5
5
[from modified 4 pattern]

Beats 4 4
Pulse
1 5
4 4

33
44 2 3
Beats 4 4 4 4
Pulse
3 4 2 3
4 4 4 4
33 6
6 22 33
Beats 4 4 4 4
Pulse
3 6 2 3
4 4 4 4

7
7 [from modified 4 pattern]

5
5 33
Beats 4 4 4
Pulse
7 5 3
4 4 4
© 2014 Jonathan Brett
Developing control of the tip of the baton

This exercise uses a simple down and up movement connecting to an even pulse of four - so, for
example, where there is a 3:1 subdivision, the tip of the baton will need to travel 3 times as fast in one
direction as in the other whilst with triplets a speed ratio of 2:1 is needed.
Each section should be repeated a number of times before moving to the next. The exercise should
be completed with a number of variations:
! A range of strict tempi, provided by an external source.
! Strict tempi, from counting.
! Accelerando and rallentando.
! A range of movement style from maximum separation of each pulsation or subdivision (i.e. a
slight stop on each) to as smooth as possible whilst retaining the sense of subdivision in the
movement of the baton.
! A range of movement amplitude.

(A) (B) (C) (D) (E) (F)


No subdivision 2:2 subdivision 1:3 subdivision 3:1 subdivision Triplet 1:2 Triplet 2:1

3, 4 4 4 4 3 3

3 1

1 3 2 1
2 2

1, 2 2 1 3 1 2

More complex subdivisions can then be practised, such as:

(G) (H) (I) (J) (K) (L) (M) (N)


6 6 6 6 6 8 8 8

5 1 7 1
5 1 1 7
1 5 1 1 7
4 2 6 2
1 4 2 5 2 6
3 3 5 3
2 4 2 2 6
3 3 3 5
2 4 4 4

3 2 4 1 5 4 3 5

© 2014 Jonathan Brett


Co-ordinating movement with simple pulse content
5
Use a range of strict tempi either side of the "base", also with accel and rit.
Large numerals indicate movement pattern.
The exercsie should be completed for each pulse option

q c.90 ("base" tempo)


4
Energised beats

3 3 3 3

Pulse

Beats

Pulse

2
C c
Beats

Pulse C c
1
Beats

Pulse

2
Beats

Pulse

4
Beats c

Pulse c

Beats

Pulse
© 2014 Jonathan Brett
Elements of music

Item

Articulation
Balance
Cues / entrances
Dynamics
Harmonic tension
Interpretative structure
Intonation
Notes
Phrasing
Rhythm / ensemble
Rhythmic shape
Tempo

© 2014 Jonathan Brett