Sie sind auf Seite 1von 85

[ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III]

2018/2019

ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III Class File

ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III

Class File

TOURIST ACTIVITIES MANAGEMENT

Rosa Silva/ Vânia Duarte

2018/2019

|

1

[ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III]

2018/2019

Table of Contents

Accommodation

3

Types of hotels

4

Hotel organisation and staff

19

Reservations, check-in & check-out

27

Dealing with complaints

39

Catering

41

Types of Restaurants

42

Food Preparation

52

Taking Orders and Making Suggestions

57

At the Bar

68

Different Types of Bar

69

Types of Drinks

74

Taking Bar Orders and Presenting the Bill

81

|

2

[ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III]

2018/2019

Accommodation

[ ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III ] 2018/2019 Accommodation | 3

|

3

[ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III]

2018/2019

Types of hotels

The hospitality industry: an overview

Three Categories of the Hospitality Industry

Adapted from http://smallbusiness.chron.com/three-categories-

hospitality-industry-58524.html

hospitality-industry-58524.html The hospitality industry's backbone is comprised of

The hospitality industry's backbone is comprised of customer service, a concept shared by all segments of the industry. A small business may focus on one or all facets of hospitality. How accomplished you and your staff are at serving others will determine your business' level of success. You may find it easier to excel in just one category of the hospitality industry. However, though costs and challenges will increase, owning or managing several facets of hospitality can provide you with many more opportunities to generate success. Food and Beverage In hospitality, food and beverage reigns supreme. It is the largest element of the hospitality industry and can take the form of high-end restaurants, fast-food eateries, catering establishments and many other manifestations. The food and beverage trade can symbiotically function as part of other businesses, such as in bowling alleys or movie theaters. When your restaurant is part of a hotel, food and beverage can dramatically enhance the overall guest experience by offering excellent food and first-class customer service. Accommodations Hotels, bed and breakfast enterprises and other places offering lodging represent a broad segment of the hospitality industry. Types of businesses run the gamut from extravagant resorts to hostels and campgrounds. Your business' focus on providing lodging should integrate comfort, efficiency and attentive customer service as its foundation. Travelers value thoughtful treatment and simple amenities. When they feel appreciated and catered to, your guests will tell others about their experience and may become repeat customers. Travel and Tourism Another chief segment of the hospitality business encompasses transportation. This includes airlines, trains, cruise ships and the staff for each. Flight attendants and cruise staff function as food servers and hoteliers in their efforts to provide food or drink and a comfortable experience. Business travelers and vacationers alike form the basis for this area of hospitality. Travel and tourism requires knowledgeable employees in information technology, and they are also considered a part of hospitality. Destinations such as amusement parks draw thousands of people, all of whom want to benefit from great customer service while enjoying a memorable adventure. Economics The three foremost categories of the hospitality industry are driven by, and dependent on, a strong economy. Your small hospitality business will thrive when people are able to go out to eat or enjoy traveling. Conversely, when economic times are challenging, you may decide to bolster the basics of your business. For example, food and beverage businesses might offer special activities, such as a fundraiser, or meal discounts on certain days of the week. As a hotel owner, you might branch out and provide conference or special event facilities, or transportation options such as specials on limousine services.

| Accommodation

4

[ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III]

2018/2019

Find in the text the words or phrases (in bold) which match the definitions below:

1.

A person who manages or owns a hotel

2.

A budget-oriented, shared-room ("dormitory") accommodation that accepts individual travellers (typically backpackers) or groups for short-term stays, and that provides common areas and communal facilities.

3.

A commercial establishment providing lodging, meals, and other guest services, with a minimum of six letting bedrooms, of which at least three must have attached (en suite) private bathroom facilities.

4.

A company that owns and operates many aircrafts that are used for carrying passengers and goods to different places.

5.

A deduction from the face amount of an invoice, made in advance of its payment.

6.

A person who brings your food and drinks at a restaurant (aka a waiter or waitress)

7.

A person who is on holiday away from where they usually live.

8.

A place (such as a room in a hotel) where travelers can sleep and find other services

9.

A place to which people frequently or generally go for relaxation or pleasure, especially one providing rest and recreation facilities for vacationers

10.

A room provided for singular events such as business conferences and meetings.

11.

A series of connected railroad cars pulled or pushed by one or more locomotives

12.

A social function or activity, such as a raffle or musical concert, held for raising funds.

13.

A social, cultural and economic phenomenon that entails the movement of people to countries or places outside their usual environment for personal or business/professional purposes.

14.

A steady customer that is usually highly valued by businesses that they patronize since they typically require minimal additional marketing efforts to retain.

15.

A structure, outside of a structure, or both inside and outside of a structure, to hold banquet or where a wedding ceremony, for example, may occur.

16.

A very large passenger ship that makes a roundtrip with several enroute stops, and takes on passengers only at the port where the trip begins and ends.

17.

Accommodation offered by an inn, hotel, or especially a private home, consisting of a room for the night and breakfast the next morning for one inclusive price.

18.

All forms of technology that involve any form of electronic data (aka IT)

19.

Americanism meaning any restaurant or other commercial establishment serving food.

20.

An airline employee who serves meals, attends to passengers' comfort, etc., during a flight (aka cabin attendant).

21.

An unscheduled public passenger service provided by a specific motor vehicle where the agreed fare for a journey is decided before the journey begins.

22.

Commercially operated enterprise that offers rides, games, and other forms of entertainment, usually outdoors.

23.

Easily prepared processed food served in snack bars and restaurants as a quick meal or to be taken away.

| Accommodation

5

[ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III]

2018/2019

24.

Higher in price and of better quality than most others.

25.

Not a regular feature of the service, but designed for a particular day or occasion.

26.

Open piece of ground where a camper can pitch a tent or park a camper. It comprises several campsites - these are dedicated areas set aside for camping and for which often a user fee is charged.

27.

The "food flow" (from the purchasing of the foods to service to the customer) mainly concerned with the delivery and presentation of the food to customer, after completion of the food production. It may involve transportation if there is a separation of production and service facilities.

28.

The act or process of moving people or things from one place to another.

29.

The business of providing food service at a remote site or a site such as a hotel, public house (pub), or other location.

30.

The process of ensuring customer satisfaction with a product or service. It can take the form of an in-person interaction, a phone call, self-service systems, or by other means.

31.

To go from one place to another, as by car, train, plane, or ship; take a trip; journey.

TYPES OF ACCOMMODATION

Matching

A. Label each of the following pictures. Use the words in the list.

castle

lodge

tent

motorhome/ RV

motel

trailer

a. b. c. d. e. f.
a. b. c. d. e. f.
a. b. c. d. e. f.

a.

b.

c.

a. b. c. d. e. f.
a. b. c. d. e. f.
a. b. c. d. e. f.

d.

e.

f.

| Accommodation

6

[ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III]

2018/2019

B. Match each type of accommodation on the left with its definition on the right.

Accommodation Types

Definitions

1. Guest House

 

5 star establishment providing all the features and facilities of a normal hotel, in a unique and exclusive style. These properties are generally

A

small, feature top class service and are marketed to the affluent.

2. B&B

 

A building run by a private operator or non-profit membership organisation, where beds and sometimes meals and other services and facilities are provided.

3. Small Hotel

 

A hotel with a 5-star quality award that has a range of leisure and sporting facilities. These include an 18-hole golf course, swimming pool and leisure centre, and country pursuits.

4. Hotel

 

A

hotel with a minimum of 6 letting bedrooms and a maximum of 20.

Most bedrooms have ensuite or private facilities. These hotels serve breakfast, dinner and, normally, lunch, and they have a drinks licence (though it may be a restricted licence). They are normally run by the owner(s) and reflect their own personal style.

5. International Resort

 

A

house usually with at least 4 letting bedrooms, some with ensuite or

Hotel

private facilities. It is usually run as a commercial business. Breakfast is available and evening meals may be provided.

6. Self-catering

 

A

house, cottage, apartment, chalet or similar accommodation, with self-

catering facilities, which is let normally on a weekly basis to individuals, although shorter breaks may be available.

7. Serviced Apartment

 

A licensed establishment with at least 20 letting bedrooms, of which most have ensuite or private facilities. They serve breakfast, dinner and, normally, lunch, and they usually have a drinks licence (it may be a restricted one).

8. Lodge

 

park that offers holiday homes and static holiday caravans and, most likely, touring and camping pitches.

A

9. Inn

 

park that offers touring pitches, and may offer camping pitches as well. (no static holiday caravans).

A

10.

Restaurant with

 

Accommodation offering bed and breakfast, usually in a private house. They normally accommodate no more than 6 guests, and may or may not serve an evening meal.

Rooms

11.Campus

 

Available at or made available by an institution of higher education when

Accommodation

it

is not being used for its prime function as student accommodation,

typically the summer, Easter and Christmas holiday periods. It may be in Halls of Residence or student 'village' complexes. Can be serviced or self catering.

12. Hostel

 

B&B accommodation within a traditional inn or pub. The bar and

restaurant is open to non-residents, and provides food at lunchtime and

in

the evening.

13. Holiday Park

 

Essentially self-catering places where services such as cleaning are available. Meals and drinks may also be available, either to each apartment or in a restaurant and/or bar on site.

| Accommodation

7

[ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III]

2018/2019

14. Touring Park

For tented accommodation only.

15. Camping Park

Guest House- or B&B-style accommodation on a working farm.

16. Country House

Non-Hotel style accommodation in quiet location providing breakfast and evening meal by arrangement.

17. Farm

Overnight accommodation, usually purpose-built and situated close to a major road or city centre. Reception hours may be restricted and payment may be required on check-in. There may be associated restaurant facilities.

18. Boutique Hotel

The restaurant is the most significant part of the business, and is usually open to non-residents as well as those staying there. Breakfast is usually provided.

Source: Accommodation Types In http://ayrshire-arran.com/accommodation/accom_type/. 4 October 2009.

Setting the Standard Reading

By John Glatt

What makes a good resort a great resort? Certainly the basics – the comfort of the room, the calibre of the restaurant, a beautiful location - are part of the answer to this age-old question. But to be ranked as truly great, a resort must offer something more than the basics, however excellent. It must anticipate all the needs of not just the typical guest, but every guest; it must focus on the smallest details, which, insignificant on their own, stockpile over your stay into a mountain of difference. Hardest of all, it must provide this rarefied level of service in a way that is constant, yet completely unobtrusive. To pass through the front gates of The Datai resort, on the mystical Malaysian island of Langkawi (north of Penang on the country's west coast), is to enter a different world. Set in the middle of a virgin tropical rain forest, the resort combines the most modern comforts with its natural surroundings, to create an idyllic, ultra-Iuxurious retreat. The Datai’s relatively easy access from Kuala Lumpur and Singapore (30 minutes and one and a half hours, respectively) makes it the perfect place to unwind for a couple of days at the end of a business trip. After settling down in one of the resort's 40 well-camouflaged villas - each with its own sunning terrace, personal CD player and elevated veranda – guests can take a leisurely stroll through the untouched rainforest, on the lookout for two rare species of monkey (the dusky leaf and the long-tailed macaque) and many other exotic animals, down to the white-sand private beach. Over in Sabah, on the island of Borneo, you will find the Renaissance Sandakan Hotel, larger than the Datai, with 110 rooms, yet sharing the same easy partnership with its surroundings - a narrow strip of land between steep-sided hills and the waters of the Sulu Sea, a color chart of blues. "The resort is part of the magnificent natural attractions of Sandakan," explains Julian Wong, associate director of sales. "Its focal point is a freeform landscaped pooI, with a waterfall and a Jacuzzi, backed by tropical rain forest." When guests can bear to leave its tranquil environment, they will find plenty to explore. Twenty-five minutes away by car is the world-famous Sepilok Orang Utan Rehabilitation Center and Forest Reserve, home to the endangered apes as well as hundreds of types of rare birds, mammals and trees. Slightly further from the hotel is the Kinabatangan River, which offers a truly thrilling experience on the wild side. Drift down the river on the lower delta and observe first-hand the bizarre proboscis monkeys, orangutans, macaques, crocodiles and civet cats. For the adventurous traveller who lacks the time to escape to a remote island, the Hotel Sofitel Metropole in the heart of Hanoi is the urban alternative, a historic gem filled with grandeur and romantic memories. Standing within a stone’s throw of the magnificent Opera House and Hoan Kiem Lake, the French colonial style hotel has long been a Hanoi landmark with its classical white facade, original wrought-iron features

| Accommodation

8

[ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III]

2018/2019

and elegant wood-panelled interior.

Vietnam’s first officially accredited five-star property, the Metropole was built at the turn of the century by private French investors and soon became the rendez-vous for colonial society. "Here you see the wives of French army officers, the wives of French officials, and a few brilliant and seductively gowned Congais or Eurasians in the arms of men who are not generally their husbands," observed the writer Edgar Snow in

1931. The Metropole managed to survive through the dark days of the Vietnam War keeping its grandiose

splendour intact. It hosted film star Jane Fonda when she arrived in 1972 and stayed for two months,

delivering her famous radio broadcasts to U.S. troops. Today the mood of the 244-room hotel remains little changed from the original, even after an ambitious multi-million dollar refurbishment, completed in March

1992. Since then it has welcomed an array of VIP guests, including American President George Bush and

the ex-United Nations Secretary General Boutros Boutros Ghali. Far away in terms of mood from the hustle and bustle of Hanoi is the spiritual tranquillity of Kupu Kupu Barong International Resort near the island’s unofficial cultural capital of Ubud. Described as "the most exotic hideaway resort" by Andrew Harper’s Hideaway Report, it began life as a humble restaurant seven years ago and now attracts such names as Mick Jagger and Jerry Hall, Phil Collins, Sting and Boris Becker. Perched high in the Balinese mountains, Kupu Kupu (meaning "Butterfly") has 19 luxury bungalows all overlooking the Ayung River and step upon sculpted step of carefully tendered rice paddies. "The resort is authentic Balinese," says resort manager Michael Carlyle proudly. "Everything we offer is steeped in local culture and tradition, from its local fabrics and furniture to its fine cuisine". There are mountain bikes for guests and a gallery filled with Balinese handicrafts.

DECIDE WHETHER THE FOLLOWING SENTENCES ARE TRUE (T), FALSE (F) OR NOT GIVEN (NG).

1) The basic facilities in a resort do not play any role in its classification.

2) When a resort is excellent, the customer is always very much aware of the service being provided.

3) The Datai resort is a luxurious mixture of natural scenery and modernity.

4) You may find several rare species of birds when taking a walk in the rainforest that surrounds the Datai resort.

5)

The Renaissance Sandakan Hotel fails to blend in with the surrounding area.

6)

The Renaissance Sandakan Hotel is so exquisite that guests may find it difficult to leave its premises.

7) It is possible to do some jet-skiing on the Kinabatangan River.

8) The Hotel Sofitel Metropole is, in itself, a tourist attraction of Hanoi.

9) The Vietnam War affected the magnificence of the hotel.

10)

beginning.

The Kupu Kupu Barong International Resort was planned to be luxury accommodation from the very

Key Concepts Useful definitions

Hotels are classified according to the hotel size, location, target markets, levels of service, facilities provided, number of rooms, ownership and affiliation, etc.

1. Size (or number of rooms)

Under 200 rooms

200 to 399 rooms

400 to 700 rooms

• More than 700 rooms

| Accommodation

9

[ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III]

2018/2019

These categories enable hotels of similar size to compare operating procedures and statistical results.

2. Target Markets

Hotels target many markets and can be classified according to the markets they attempt to attract. Common type of markets include business, airport, suites, residential, resort, timeshare, casino, convention and conference hotels.

3. Levels of service

World class service: Luxury/Five Star hotels target top business executives, entertainment celebrities, high-ranking political figures, and wealthy clientele as their primary markets. They provide upscale restaurants and lounges, valet and concierge services and also private dining facilities. Mid-Range Service: Hotels offering mid-range, or otherwise 3 to 4 star hotels, appeal to the largest segment of the travelling public. This kind of hotel does not provide elaborate service and have a adequate staffing. They also provide uniformed service, food and beverage room service, in-room entertainment, Wi-Fi etc. Budget / Limited Service: These hotels provide clean, comfortable, safe, inexpensive rooms and meet the basic need of guests. Budget hotels appeal primarily to budget-minded travellers who want a room with minimum services and amenities required for a comfortable stay, without paying unnecessary, additional cost for costly services.

4. Ownership and Affiliations

Independent / Single owner / Family owned Hotels: They do not have identifiable ownership or management affiliation with other properties. These hotels do not follow any corporate policies or procedures. Chain hotels: Belonging to a chain imposes certain minimum standards, rules, policies and procedures that restrict affiliate’s activities. In general, the more centralized the organization the stronger the control over the individual property.

Management systems Vocabulary development

Hotels may be managed:

on an independent basis

as part of a consortium (country-house hotels for instance)

as part of a corporate chain

A. Match the systems of management of corporate chains on the right with their definitions on the left (adapted from The Hotel Business, Maxim's).

1. The headquarters corporation puts up the necessary money to build and operate a new hotel or to buy and refurbish an old one.

a. franchise agreement

| Accommodation

10

[ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III]

2018/2019

2. This is a partnership in which both the chain and local investors put up part of the capital necessary for a new construction or the purchase of a building.

3. The chain takes over empty premises which it operates according to its own procedure in return for a fee or a profit percentage.

4. An agreement by which a chain grants to a hotel operator the right to use its plans, procedure manuals and advertising material and to operate his hotel under its name.

b. direct investment

c. joint venture

d. management contract

B. Study the vocabulary below and then fill in the gaps in the sentences. Remember to use the correct form of the verbs.

a. a no-show

l. international clientele

b. basic amenities

m. intimate atmosphere

c. budget accommodation

n. medium-range establishments

d. central-booking system

o. occupancy rate

e. choice location

p. overlook

f. continental breakfast

q. package deal

g. develop customer loyalty

r. refurbish

h. family-run

s. turnover

i. first-class facilities

t. within easy access

j. franchise

u. overnight stay

k. in transit

1. The superb luxury hotels in London offer …………………………… to their ………………………….……… .

2. Airport hotels usually provide overnight accommodation for people ………………………….……… .

3. The ………………………….……… contract allows an independent hotelier to benefit from the brand,

reputation and financial security of a well-known chain.

4. Several of the rooms in the resort hotel ………………………….……… the sea.

5. Hoteliers are adamant about receiving compensation when ………………………….……… occurs.

6. Many hoteliers nowadays are determined to increase their ………………………….……… in spite of

the difficult economic situation.

7. The London Tourist Board provides an excellent ………………………….… for advance reservations.

8. Many bed-and-breakfast establishments are ………………………….……… .

9. Four-star hotels usually enjoy a ………………… and are ……………… of the main tourist attractions.

10. The aim of hotel managers is to ………………………….……… and increase their ………………….………

| Accommodation

11

[ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III]

2018/2019

11. The hotel has recently been ………………………….……… so as to offer an ………………………….………

much to the delight of the regulars.

12. Young people would prefer to stay in ………………………….……… so as to have more money to

spend on sightseeing.

13. Motels offer ………………………….……… for travellers and are ideal for an ……………………….……… .

14. The

a ………………………….……… is included in the room rates.

hotels

belonging

to

a

2-star

chain

are

…………….……………….………

and

15. A ………………… can include transport, transfer to and from the hotel and full or half board.

C. Replace the words in italics with a suitable phrasal verb from below. Remember to put the verbs into the correct forms.

back up

cut down on (sthg)

look into

put forward

cater for

look forward to

point out

turn into

1)

The hotel has had to reduce its staff due to a fall in its occupancy rate.

2)

It's the third time the head receptionist has told you there was a mistake on Mr Jameson's file.

3)

Many towels have disappeared recently; the housekeeper asked the chambermaids to examine this situation.

4)

The season has been so hard! The staff are waiting for their holidays impatiently.

5)

Private investors are transforming this old mansion so as to create a spa hotel.

6)

After refurbishment the hotel will receive essentially upmarket customers.

7)

During the heads of departments meeting, the restaurant manager supported the head chef's idea of a new summer menu.

8)

Hiring a female pastry chef was also suggested by the head chef.

Language study & practice Past simple vs. Present perfect

Read the questions in italics then circle the most suitable answer. Justify your choice.

1. Which hotel is still popular, a or b?

a. The hotel was popular for a long time, however it had to be downgraded and in the process, it lost most of its clients.

b. The hotel has been popular for a long time, that's why it is always fully-booked.

| Accommodation

12

[ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III]

2018/2019

2. While having a drink, a manager tells his wife about a difficult day at work. Which of the below sentences does he use?

a. The chef hasn't turned up today, which means we'll have to phone round to find a

replacement.

b. The chef didn't turn up today, so we had to phone round and find a replacement.

3. A former concierge is talking about the job he used to have. Which sentence would he use, a or b?

a. As a concierge I have always had to solve problems.

b. When I was a concierge I always had to solve problems.

4. I am going on holiday next week, which of the two sentences gives me relevant information about the hotel now?

a. In spite of the economic crisis the hotel has remained fashionable.

b. In spite of the economic crisis the hotel remained fashionable.

5. You are writing the obituary of a chef, which of the two sentences will you use?

a. Over the years he has improved his skills.

b. Over the years he improved his skills.

6. Which of the sentences refers to a person's background experience, which refers to a period of time in the life of a person?

a. I have worked as a housekeeper.

b. I worked as a housekeeper.

Language study & practice Collocations

A. ONE WORD is missing from each of these sentences. Which one? The missing words are all adjectives and they are in the box at the side of the page. The first one has been done for you as an example.

0) The guest rooms have been refurnished with luxurious carpets and fittings.

1) I'm sorry that you haven't been happy with your hotel: we'll find you accommodation immediately. 2) In addition to the main restaurant there is a cafeteria and a bar.

3) The best conference hotels provide a

member of

staff for each conference to liaise with the organizer and ensure the event proceeds smoothly.

4) If you can't put us in have rooms on the same floor?

rooms, could we at least

ADJECTIVES

adjoining

alternative

dedicated

en suite

luxurious

comfortable

| Accommodation

13

[ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III]

2018/2019

5) Some of the rooms look out onto a main road, so I'm afraid they might be a little 6) We are a city centre hotel mainly catering to guests.

7) It's a south-facing room so it's nice and

8) From the terrace, you have a marvellous view over the countryside.

9) I'm sorry: we haven't got any tried the Grand? 10) The hotel has 25 bedrooms, all with 11) Our restaurant is open both to 12) The hotel is divided into separate 13) There are more find the dining room chairs too hard. 14) The hotel has guests.

all day.

rooms. Have you

bathrooms. and to guests. apartments. chairs in the lounge, if you

gardens for the exclusive use of

noisy

non-residents

private

self-catering

self-service

short-stay

sunny

surrounding

vacant

B. Match each of the words in the centre to one group of adjectives that can be used to describe them.

spacious

 

indoor

air-conditioned

grass

double

hard

friendly

outdoor

polite

bathrooms

Olympic

rude

prices

heated

bedrooms

   

interesting

beaches

high

well-organized

swimming-pools

reasonable

varied

tennis courts

low

excursions

   

lovely

weather

clean

warm

restaurants

safe

humid

hotel staff

sandy

private

expensive

large

international

en-suite

seafood

| Accommodation

14

[ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III]

2018/2019

C. Which adjectives can be used with which nouns? Tick (Ѵ) the appropriate boxes:

room view staff entertainment spacious gorgeous superb comfortable marvellous friendly lively
room
view
staff
entertainment
spacious
gorgeous
superb
comfortable
marvellous
friendly
lively

D. Complete the sentences by choosing a word from column a) and a word from column b).

a)

b)

play-

access

safety

size

stair

nurse

king-

rail

resident

bus

wheelchair

changing

nappy-

lift

courtesy

room

1) If the weather is bad, the children at the hotel can use the play-room on the ground floor. 2) In order to cater for guests who have babies, we have installed facilities in the toilets. 3) There's no need to get a taxi from the airport. We provide a

4) Because many of our clients are elderly, we have a need medical attention. 5) As the stairs are quite steep, we have fitted a

6) One

for disabled guests. 7) A number of our rooms now have

complaints that the beds were too small. 8) We decided that the cheapest way of giving people in wheelchairs access to the first floor was to install a

provide

in case they

of

the

toilets

on

the

ground

floor

has

been

widened

beds

as

to

we have had

| Accommodation

15

[ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III]

2018/2019

E. Read the extract from yet another brochure and fill in the gaps with the following words. The first

one has been done for you.

air-conditioned

entertainment

facilities

furnished

informal

lies

relax

rustic

setting

situated

spacious

value

Tradewinds is 1 situated in 2

twenty miles from the city of Mombasa and within easy reach of some shops. It

grounds on the south coast at Diani, just over

3

on a spectacular white-sand beach, fringed by palm trees.

The main building is 4

manner, and the hotel's 5

the swimming pool is an 6

in

style, with a thatched roof in the local African

include a restaurant, bar, hairdresser, and shop. By

snack bar and a smaller pool for children. Evening

7

is provided by live bands or a disco. The modestly 8

rooms have a balcony or terrace, are fully 9

shower.

Opinion: In a superb 10

outstanding 11

, and have a telephone and

, this is a simple, medium-class hotel offering

for money, and an ideal place to unwind and 12

before going on a safari.

F.

Match the plan on the left with its description on the right.

a)

American plan

i) bed only

b)

Demi-pension

ii) bed and breakfast

c)

European plan

iii) bed, breakfast and lunch or dinner

d)

Continental plan

iv) bed, breakfast, lunch and dinner

G.

Match the definitions with the types of room they describe.

a)

A room occupied by one person.

b)

A room with one large bed for two people.

c)

A room with two single beds for two people.

d)

A room with three single beds, or a double bed and a single bed, suitable for occupation by

three people.

e) A set of two or more rooms, including a bedroom and a sitting room.

f) A large room with a partition to separate the bedroom area from the sitting room area.

g) A well-furnished and luxurious suite at the top of the building.

h) A room with four or more beds, particularly suitable for a family with children.

i) A room not used as a bedroom, where guests may read, watch television, etc.

j) Two or more rooms with a door to allow access from one room to another.

1. suite

4. single room

7. connecting/ adjoining room

2. family room

5. penthouse

8. triple room

3. twin room

6. double room

9. junior suite

10. lounge or sitting room

| Accommodation

16

Hotel facilities & services International symbols

[ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III]

2018/2019

A. Study the following symbols for Bed & Breakfast facilities and their meaning.

The symbols below have been carefully chosen to give a quick visual reference of the most essential services and conditions on offer by a large majority of the UK-BedandBreakfast listed Establishments. Whilst the list is not exhaustive, a few more have been listed under Additional Facilities, however, where an Establishment has a Brochure Entry, you may find additional facilities information listed here. Just click on the symbol to find out more information.

Parking Available Parking facilities can vary enormously from Establishment to Establishment, from Private Parking on Premises, Limited Parking facilities can vary enormously from Establishment to Establishment, from Private Parking on Premises, Limited Spaces, On road/Off road, Shared Spaces, to a Voucher System in a nearby car park. Do not forget seasonal variance might also have an influence. If parking facilities are important to you then you are strongly advised to verify availability prior to your stay.

Smoking Bannedstrongly advised to verify availability prior to your stay. A strict NO SMOKING policy is in

A strict NO SMOKING policy is in force at premises displaying this sign. Smoke alarms may be

present and Guests that flaunt this ban will be asked to leave immediately without refund. If you smoke albeit only on occasion this is not the type of Establishment for you. You have been warned!

Smoking Restricted For those of you that are prepared to restrict your smoking to certain areas, Establishments For those of you that are prepared to restrict your smoking to certain areas, Establishments displaying this symbol might be for you. You are advised to check with the Establishment concerned as to the availability of smoking areas. Smoking may be confined to bedrooms or certain areas, e.g. smoking rooms. Smoking will not be tolerated outside the designated areas.

Children Welcome Where this symbol is displayed the Host has indicated that children are welcome, however you Where this symbol is displayed the Host has indicated that children are welcome, however you are advised to enquire if there is a minimum age restriction and also the degree of facilities available for the age of your child/children e.g. Cot Availability, Games Room, Etc.

Television Where this symbol is displayed all bedrooms will contain a colour TV minimum 14inch with Where this symbol is displayed all bedrooms will contain a colour TV minimum 14inch with the basic channels available. If the premises also have a residents’ room this may also contain a TV. If your requirements are for more than the basic channels then check with the Host prior to booking.

Tea and Coffee Making Tea and coffee making facilities are available in all bedrooms. These are replenished on a Tea and coffee making facilities are available in all bedrooms. These are replenished on a daily basis. Personal preferences might be available. Check with premises if this is of importance to you otherwise be prepared for the basic compliment.

Evening Meals Available Evening meals are usually available at these premises at an additional cost. Evening meals are usually available at these premises at an additional cost.

A menu would probably be available in advance. Alternatively a Host might have an

agreement/recommendation with a local Establishment where you can obtain evening meals. Last

sitting time might apply. Check with your Host for availability.

Special Dietstime might apply. Check with your Host for availability. Vegetarian Meals are available from Establishments

Vegetarian Meals are available from Establishments displaying this symbol. Those of you that require a special diet may also be catered for. Please check with the Host if you requirements are

of a special nature.

Suitable for Pets The dog symbol is displayed at Establishments where primarily, dogs are accepted, usually by The dog symbol is displayed at Establishments where primarily, dogs are accepted, usually by

| Accommodation

17

[ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III]

2018/2019

arrangement. However other pets might also be accepted by arrangement. You are strongly advised to contact the Host concerned, with details of your pet and verify the facilities available before booking.

Central Heating Establishments displaying this symbol will ensure that all areas available to Guests e.g. hallways, bedrooms, Establishments displaying this symbol will ensure that all areas available to Guests e.g. hallways, bedrooms, lounges, dining rooms etc. are heated to a comfortable level during your stay.

Cycle Storage For those of you that are keen to explore the local area, Hosts that display For those of you that are keen to explore the local area, Hosts that display this sign offer the facility to store your cycle securely during your stay, overnight or when not required. Please satisfy yourself that the facilities on offer can accommodate all your cycles at a given date. Some Establishments may have limited space. You are strongly recommended to ensure that your cycles are insured to their full value as Hosts may have only limited or no insurance cover for cycles.

Accessible to a wheelchair user travelling independently.may have only limited or no insurance cover for cycles. Accessible to a wheelchair user travelling

Accessible to a wheelchair user travelling with assistance.Accessible to a wheelchair user travelling independently. Accessible to someone with limited mobility, able to walk

Accessible to someone with limited mobility, able to walk a few paces and up a maximum of three steps.Accessible to a wheelchair user travelling with assistance. Rooms The number and type of rooms available

Rooms

The number and type of rooms available at the Establishment.

The number and type of rooms available at the Establishment. Rates # S Number/Single Room(s) #

Rates

# S Number/Single Room(s)

# T Number/Twin Room(s)

# D Number/Double Room(s)

# F Number/Family Room(s)

£

pppn

Per Person Per Night

prpn

Per Room Per Night

B. What do the following icons mean? Write the answers in the corresponding slots.

(1)

(2)

(3)

(4)

(5)

| Accommodation

18

[ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III]

2018/2019

[ ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III ] 2018/2019 Hotel organisation and staff A. Front of the House

Hotel organisation and staff

A. Front of the House

1. Reception or Front Office

a)

Reception Manager/ Front Office Manager/

- is responsible for guests’ room keys.

Head Receptionist

b) Receptionist/ Reception Clerk

- connects all outgoing and incoming calls

c) Reservations Clerk

- is in charge of the reception area

d) Night Clerk

- receives room reservations, records them and informs other departments

e) Key Clerk

responsible for checking guests in and out, allocating rooms and giving information and assistance

-

f) Switchboard Operator

-

takes care of reception area during the night shift

2. Hall Porter’s Department

a) Head Hall Porter/

- is responsible for dry-cleaning and pressing guests’ clothes

Concierge

b)

Doorman

- carries guests’ luggage

 

- is the person responsible for the entrance of the hotel. He arranges tickets

c)

Bellboy/ Bellhop

for sight-seeing, theatre, cinemas and other events, is responsible for guests’ mail, assists guests with various hotel services and deals with enquiries

d)

Porter

- shows guests to their rooms, delivers messages and mail

e) Parking Attendant

- is responsible for the Hall Porter’s Department during the nightshift

 

- assists guests in and out of vehicles in front of the hotel, opens the hotel

f) Cloakroom Attendant

door and orders taxis

g) Lift Boy/ Lift Attendant

- is in charge of the room where the guests leave their coats, umbrellas, etc

h) Night Porter

- is responsible for the Car Parking or for parking guests’ cars

i) Valet

- is responsible for the lifts

3. F & B – Food and Beverage Department (Restaurant and Bars)

a) Food and Beverage Manager/ Catering

- takes food trays up to guests in their rooms

Manager

b)

Head Waiter/ Maître d’ hotel/ Maître d’

- takes guests’ orders and serves them

| Accommodation

19

[ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III]

2018/2019

c) Station Waiter/ Waitress

- serves drinks at the bar

d) Wine Waiter

- is in charge of the restaurants and bars

e) Lounge Waiter

- sets and cleans tables and pours water

f) Busboy/ Waiter’s Assistant

- welcomes guests to the restaurant, checks reservations

and shows them to their table. Supervises staff’s work in the dining-room and deals with complaints

g) Barman/ Bartender

-

serves guests at the lounge

h) Room Service Waiter

helps guests choosing the wine, advises them on wines and takes drink orders

-

B. Back of the House

1.

Management

a. Manager is the person in overall charge of the hotel. However, as he/she also negotiates with tour operators and co-ordinates the whole business, he/she is not at the hotel all the time, so he/she must have an:

b. Assistant Manager is responsible for the day-to-day running of the hotel (deals with guests, solves problems, handles complaints).

Some hotels have two managers, who work in alternate shifts; they are called the Duty Managers. to be on/off duty at a particular time day shift (day staff) – from 8 am to 4 pm or from 3 pm to 11 pm night shift (night staff) – from 11 pm to 8 am

2. Cashier’s Office/ Accountancy

a. Cashier/ Accountant – is responsible for the accounts and billing. Sometimes also changes currency and keeps the safe deposit boxes.

3.

Housekeeping

a) Housekeeper

- cleans the rooms and the public areas of the hotel

b) Floor Attendant

- is responsible for guests’ laundry

c) Chambermaid/ Room Maid

- tidies and cleans guests’ rooms

d) Cleaner

- is in charge of linen, decorations and general cleanliness of the hotel

e) Laundry Maid

is responsible for the cleanliness and often also room service of a specific floor

-

4. F & B – Food and Beverage Department (Kitchen)

a. Head Chef/ Chef de Cuisine – plans menus and trains and supervises kitchen staff.

b. Second Chef/ Sous Chef – cooks food and is training to be a chef.

c. Cook – cooks food.

d. Platewash Assistant – washes the dishes.

| Accommodation

20

[ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III]

2018/2019

5.

Miscellaneous

a. Maintenance Engineer – takes care of the technical equipment in the hotel.

b. Storekeeper is in charge of managing stock and supplying the various departments.

A FAMILY AFFAIR

Reading

the various departments. A FAMILY AFFAIR Reading Gérard and Sylvie Bonnet have been sharing the duties

Gérard and Sylvie Bonnet have been sharing the duties of running their ten-bed roomed hotel in the Dordogne for the past fifteen months. In that time, they have taken just three days off work: two for funerals and one for a wedding (their own). On my travels, I have met quite a few of these young, workaholic hoteliers. ”What makes you do it?” I ask Gérard, whose arms are plunged deep in soapy water. “We both used to work for a large, famous hotel in Paris”, he replies. “I became the Front Office Manager and Sylvie was my assistant. It was great, but after a while we felt that we needed a change. We wanted a challenge!” It was not long before Gérard was faced with one which came as an inheritance: ‘Le Petit Bijou’. They have not looked back since. “We have a very regular clientele, which we inherited with the building”, adds Sylvie. “This means that it has been easy to plan ahead, but naturally there has been some resistance to change. For example, I was about to fill in the old well at the front of the drive with concrete, but some of the guests made such a lot of fuss that I couldn’t!” “The best thing about running a small hotel”, says Gérard in his impeccable English “is that we can provide our guests with the personal touch. Only having a few customers at a time, I soon learnt how Monsieur Lefevre likes his eggs cooked and what brand of cigarette he smokes.” Of course, the smaller hotel suffers from a slower turnover of stock. Unusual items might simply perish of old age while waiting to be used. Sylvie’s solution is simple:” If we suddenly need something, we send out ‘petit Jacques’ to the local hypermarket”. Only nineteen, Jacques, Gérard’s younger brother, also came with the hotel. He exudes Gallic charm and wit and genuinely does not seem mind the heavy workload. Set in the stunning green paradise that is the Lot, Le Petit Bijou looks set for a rosy future. Tourists flock to the area in their thousands come summer. But a low occupancy rate in the winter quarters means the Bonnets have fewer permanent staff than they would like. Fortunately, they do not suffer from the high labour turnover rate that some small hotels do, but that is because they rely heavily on the largely untrained help of family and friends when the big rush is on.

| Accommodation

21

[ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III]

2018/2019

From my bedroom window, admiring the view, I see Gérard loading his Citroën van with produce from the kitchen garden at the back of the house. “In the low season we produce more

than we need, so we sell any extra to the local stores. I try to get the best price, but I’m not so good at-how do you say-bargaining?”, he tells me over a glass of wine at dinner on the eve of my

departure.

(Source: HARDING, Keith; HENDERSON, Paul; High Season: English for the Hotel and Tourist Industry, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1994, p.34).

1. Write sentences to explain the following vocabulary from the text:

a. regular clientele

b. personal touch

c. slower turnover of stock

d. Jacques… also came with the hotel

e. heavy workload

f. low occupancy rate

g. high labour turnover rate

h. the big rush

i. bargaining

Example: A ‘regular clientele’ means customers who repeatedly visit an establishment.

2. People who manage the cleaning teams in hotels are called housekeepers. Study this housekeeper’s

checklist and then complete the description of how each hotel room is prepared for the next guests by using the passive.

ü open the windows

ü strip the beds

ü dust the furniture

ü vacuum the carpet

ü put clean sheets on the beds

ü place welcome chocolates on pillows

ü empty waste bins

ü restock the minibar

ü wipe down all bathroom surfaces with disinfectant

ü scrub toilet with toilet brush

ü wash bathroom floor

ü replace towels, soap and toilet paper

ü shut windows and check room

ü report any missing or damaged items to supervisor

“As soon as guests have checked out, every room is cleaned thoroughly. The windows

The

, and the carpet on the beds, on the pillows (one per guest). The waste

In the

bins (g)

and welcome chocolates (f)

(d)

bedside tables, desk and shelves (c)

(a)

to air the room. The beds (b)

Next, clean sheets (e)

,

and the minibar (h)

bathroom, all surfaces (i) (j)

(k)

Finally, the windows (m)

with disinfectant, and the toilet with a toilet brush. The bathroom floor

and the room

Towels, soap and toilet paper (l)

(n)

to make sure it is spotless. Any items to be replaced

(o)

to the supervisor.”

| Accommodation

22

[ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III]

2018/2019

3. Hotel departments and staff. Answer the clues to find the hidden word. The first one has been done for you as an example.

1 P U R C H A S I N G 2 3 4 5
1
P
U
R
C
H
A
S
I
N
G
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12

1. I work in the

Department — we are responsible for ordering and buying

everything that the other departments need and for keeping control of stocks. (10)

2. Some large hotels have a

Officer who hires new employees, conducts interviews,

and generally looks after the staff. (9)

3. There's no problem if you come back after midnight - the night

4. In the

will let you in. (6)

Department, we are responsible for paying bills and salaries, and for the

financial side of the hotel. (8)

5. There s a vacancy for a

at

the Medici Hotel — the job involves cleaning the

guests' rooms, making the beds, and making sure that everything looks right. (11)

6. , to make theatre bookings, organize tours, travel arrangements, and so on. (9)

7. I work in the

As a

you will be expected to look after guests ' special requests, and you'll have

Office, so I deal directly with the guests, and for this kind of job you

need to have good social skills. (5)

8. The General

9. The restaurant are looking for an experienced produce imaginative cuisine. (4)

10. I'm a

has overall responsibility for the running of the hotel. (7)

with good pastry skills who can

, so part of my job is to welcome the guests and give them their room keys;

you need to have a friendly, outgoing personality for this kind of work. (12)

11. Peter is the head of the needs repairing. (11)

12. The

Department, so contact him if you notice anything that

is in charge of the cleaners and chambermaids, and is responsible for

making sure that the rooms look as they should. (11)

| Accommodation

23

[ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III]

2018/2019

WHOS WHO IN HOTEL AND CATERING

Reading

Milan Havel works for a large hotel in London. He is giving a presentation about the hotel's organization.

“My name's Milan Havel, and I'm an assistant manager at the hotel Ambassador in London. There are two assistant managers, and one of us is always on duty at busy times. The general manager has overall responsibility, of course, and we report directly to her. We are responsible for the day-to-day running of the hotel. We plan the work schedules, manage the accounts, and deal with any problems to do with staff or guests. We have a staff of about 100 people. Basically, there are four departments, each with its own manager. Firstly, there's front of house – that's receptionists, the people who deal with our guests on a daily basis. They check guests in and out, take reservations, make sure that everyone is getting the service they need. The reception team usually consists of a supervisor and two or three receptionists, depending on the time of day. They report to the front of house manager, who is also in charge of the porters and doormen. Then there's housekeeping – all the services to do with the rooms. The head housekeeper is in charge of this. She has a team of maids who make up the rooms, provide towels and bed linen, and ensure that everything is ready for a new guest. She also looks after laundry and cleaning in other parts of the hotel. The Banqueting and Conference manager organizes all the events that take place in the hotel. That could be a one-day conference for twenty people, or a big corporate function with hundreds of guests. He has a team of event organizers who look after groups and parties. For smaller functions we use our in-house catering staff, but for big occasions we employ agency staff by the hour. And finally, there's the food and beverage manager who is responsible for the restaurant and the kitchen. Three people report directly to him: the headwaiter, the bar manager and the head chef. The headwaiter manages the specialist wine waiters and the other waiters and waitresses. The bar manager is responsible for the bar staff. The head chef manages the kitchens and under him comes the assistant or sous-chef. Finally the kitchen porters who come at the bottom of that reporting line.”

1. Complete the jobs descriptions (a-h) with job titles in the F&B department.

a. The

b. The

c. The

d. The

on which wine to choose.

The

e.

f. The

g. The

h. The

manages the bars on a daily basis.

wash dishes and do very simple jobs in the kitchen.

serve drinks to customer, mix cocktails, and clean all the glasses.

looks after the wines in the wine cellar, and advises customers

manages

the day-to-day running of the kitchen.

serve food to restaurant customers.

helps the head chef and looks after the kitchen staff.

is responsible for the restaurant and the waiting staff.

| Accommodation

24

[ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III]

2018/2019

EXAM PRACTICE

English in Use

A. Read the text below, fill in each gap with one word that best fits each of (1-4).

HOTELS' LOFTY AMENITY SOOTHING JET LAG

by Barbara De Lillis from USA Today, April, 2008

Jet lag can occur when someone crosses three or more time zones and a thrown-off biological

(1)

and irritable and have (2)

to be tougher than

flying west. Does jet lag make you feel like a walking zombie? Your hotel might be able to help you. Hotels are increasingly addressing jet lag, betting that helping the exhausted guest can (4) them into grateful – and loyal — customers. Most of the hotels tackling jet lag are upscale.

crossed, the traveller's age and direction of travel: flying east (3)

concentrating. Symptoms vary by number of time zones

disrupts daily rhythms. Not everyone gets it, but those who do can feel exhausted

B. Complete the text by forming adjectives using the word in capitals at the end of each line and the suffixes below. You may need to make more than one change to the word given to form the correct adjective.

The Ross Hotel

-ly

-less

-al

- ing

-able

-ful

-ous

For the most 1

rooms in town, all available at extremely

COMFORT

2

rates, look no further than the Ross Hotel. You will

REASON

always find a warm welcome here from our highly 3

staff,

PROFESSION

who are keen to be 4

to guests at all times. We are in the

HELP

best location in town, and many of our rooms have 5

views

EXCEPT

of the coast. There are also 6

tourist attractions that are

COUNT

well worth visiting in the 7

area. Our dining room has an

SURROUND

excellent reputation, particularly for the 8

dishes of the

TRADITION

region. So take advantage of one of our 9

special offers.

NUMBER

Phone the number below to find out about our very low 10

DAY

rates and our rates per week.

| Accommodation

25

[ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III]

2018/2019

VOCABULARY EXPANSION

The Hotel Room

A. Label the following items.

EXPANSION The Hotel Room A. Label the following items. (1) (5) (2) (6) (3) (7) (4)

(1)

The Hotel Room A. Label the following items. (1) (5) (2) (6) (3) (7) (4) (8)

(5)

The Hotel Room A. Label the following items. (1) (5) (2) (6) (3) (7) (4) (8)
The Hotel Room A. Label the following items. (1) (5) (2) (6) (3) (7) (4) (8)

(2)

The Hotel Room A. Label the following items. (1) (5) (2) (6) (3) (7) (4) (8)

(6)

Hotel Room A. Label the following items. (1) (5) (2) (6) (3) (7) (4) (8) (9)
Hotel Room A. Label the following items. (1) (5) (2) (6) (3) (7) (4) (8) (9)

(3)

Room A. Label the following items. (1) (5) (2) (6) (3) (7) (4) (8) (9) (10)

(7)

Room A. Label the following items. (1) (5) (2) (6) (3) (7) (4) (8) (9) (10)
Room A. Label the following items. (1) (5) (2) (6) (3) (7) (4) (8) (9) (10)

(4)

A. Label the following items. (1) (5) (2) (6) (3) (7) (4) (8) (9) (10) (11)

(8)

Label the following items. (1) (5) (2) (6) (3) (7) (4) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12)

(9)

(10)

(11)

(12)

(9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16)
(9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16)
(9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16)
(9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16)

(13)

(14)

(15)

(16)

(3) (7) (4) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) (17) (18) (19) (20)

(17)

(3) (7) (4) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) (17) (18) (19) (20)

(18)

(3) (7) (4) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) (17) (18) (19) (20)

(19)

(3) (7) (4) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) (17) (18) (19) (20)

(20)

| Accommodation

26

[ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III]

2018/2019

Reservations, check-in & check-out

A. Before you read name each room according to the icons (1-6).

1

4

2

5

3

6

according to the icons (1- 6). 1 4 2 5 3 6 B. Read the interview
according to the icons (1- 6). 1 4 2 5 3 6 B. Read the interview
according to the icons (1- 6). 1 4 2 5 3 6 B. Read the interview
according to the icons (1- 6). 1 4 2 5 3 6 B. Read the interview
according to the icons (1- 6). 1 4 2 5 3 6 B. Read the interview
according to the icons (1- 6). 1 4 2 5 3 6 B. Read the interview

B. Read the interview with Fiona McGovan, a tourism student who has recently completed a work placement

at a hotel, and answer the questions.

A placement at the Mansion Hotel

Trainee Fiona McGovan talks to Milli Patel about her recent work experience.

MP: You've just finished working in a hotel, haven't you?

FM: That's right, I was in a three-star hotel called the Mansion Hotel.

MP: What kind of things did you have to do?

FM: At the beginning I was on reception. I had to take bookings, confirm reservations and welcome the guests when they arrived. I also had to deal with the money side of things, take payments, check the petty cash, do the accounts, change currency, all the basic front office things, and of course liaise with all the other departments.

MP: What sort of things did you find easy or particularly difficult?

FM: It wasn't easy because there were so many things to do and I was on my feet all day long. At first, it wasn't easy to use the computer system but it didn't take too long to get used to.

MP: Were there any problems you had to deal with?

| Accommodation

27

[ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III]

2018/2019

FM: Well, yes there was one occasion when a woman had made her booking months before and written to confirm. But when she arrived her room had been let out and so she was redirected to another hotel.

FM: What happened to her booking?

FM: Well, because she arrived after 6 pm, that's when the rooms are released. Anyway, the next day she came back to see whether there'd been any phone calls or faxes and she'd also arranged to meet someone in the lobby. But in fact the person she was going to meet had been told to go to another hotel. And it wasn't even the one she was staying at but a different hotel altogether.

MP: She must have been really fed up.

FM: She was and she let us know. But the worst thing was when she came across someone from her company who was staying with us and who had checked in at half past nine. I think we lost a customer there!

1.

Tick (Ѵ) the things she had to do.

a)

deal with money

b)

take bookings

c)

serve in the bar

d)

organise seminars

e)

communicate with other sections

2.

What did she find particularly difficult?

a)

using the computer system

b)

the quantity of work

c)

staff relationships

d)

checking the accounts

3.

Why was the guest's room not waiting for her?

a)

She hadn't made a booking.

b)

She had arrived at the wrong hotel.

c)

Her room had been given to a colleague.

d)

Someone else had been given her room.

4.

Why did the woman come back to the hotel?

a)

The room had been released.

b)

She needed to collect her bags.

c)

She was going to talk to someone.

d)

She'd received a phone call.

5.

How did the woman react?

a)

She was angry.

b)

She complained to her colleague.

c)

She insulted the staff.

d)

She left without saying a word.

| Accommodation

28

[ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III]

2018/2019

Find words in the text which mean the same as these.

a) handle

b) small change

c) foreign money

d) work closely with

e) accustomed to

f) given to another person

g) annoyed

h) met

C. In this conversation a customer is making a telephone reservation. Put the lines of the conversation into

the correct order and number them in the boxes on the left. For example, “Barnes Hotel. Good afternoon. Can I help you?” is the first line in this conversation.

£42.50 a night including breakfast.

Barnes Hotel. Good afternoon. Can I help you?

Could I have your name for the reservation?

Davies.

Double, please.

OK. That's fine. We'll be there in half an hour.

Single or double?

Thank you. Goodbye.

Thank you Mr Davies. We'll look forward to seeing you in about half an hour.

What are your rates?

Yes, do you have any rooms free for tonight?

Yes, we do have a couple of rooms.

D. In the following telephone conversation, underline the correct option from the words in italics. The first

one has been done for you.

HOTEL: Good morning, Landsdown Hotel. 1 Can/Could I help you?

GUEST: Good morning. Could I 2 have/speak Reservations, please?

HOTEL: Certainly. 3 Wait/Hold the line, please. I'll 4 put/connect you through.

GUEST: Thank you.

HOTEL: I'm sorry, 5 I'm afraid/I regret the line’s busy. Will you 6 hold/hang on?

| Accommodation

29

[ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III]

2018/2019

GUEST: Yes, that's 7 fine/splendid.

HOTEL: It's 8 ringing/calling for you now talking/speaking. How can I help you?

GUEST: Hello, 10 this is/here is Michael Nelson from Killick & Co. I rang earlier to book two singles from the 18th.

HOTEL: Yes, Mr Nelson, I remember. What can I 11 do/make for you?

GUEST: Could I change that to three singles, again from the 18th?

HOTEL: I'm 12 afraid/sorry, could you repeat that? It's a 13 faint/bad line.

GUEST: Yes, could I have another single room for the same dates?

HOTEL: Yes, 14 obviously/of course. I'll see to that now. I'd be 15 grateful/delighted if you could 16 repeat/confirm that in writing.

GUEST: 17 Surely/Certainly. Thank you for your help.

HOTEL: 18 Your/You're welcome. Goodbye.

Reservations. Jane Watson 9

MAKING HOTEL RESERVATIONS

Listening

Listen (High Season, unit 4) to these two callers phoning the Hotel Melissa to make reservations. Complete the information in the chart below:

 

Caller 1

Caller 2

Name of guest(s)

   

Arrival date

   

No. of nights

   

Room type

   

Company/Individual

   

Stayed before

   

Method of payment

   

Credit card no.

   

Address

   

Reservation no.

   

Special requests

   
 

LANGUAGE STUDY & PRACTICE

| Accommodation

30

Politeness – Indirect Questions

[ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III]

2018/2019

1. When asking questions, it is often more polite to use an indirect form. Example: What time will you arrive? (direct) Do you know what time you will arrive? (indirect)

2. What do you notice about the word order and use of auxiliary verbs in indirect questions? Do you have any idea how long it takes? I was wondering if you could arrange a bottle of champagne. Could you tell me how many people there are in the group?

3. We can also use a past tense to make a question less direct:

How much did you want to pay, sir? (= how much do you)

A. Make these questions sound more polite using the word in brackets or starting as shown.

a) What's your name? (tell)

……

b) Can you spell that? (would)

c) What kind of room do you want? (could)

d) What time will you get here? (know)

e) How will you pay? (be)

f) Sign the visitors' book, will you? (mind)

g) Is it possible to have an adjacent room?

I was wondering …

h) Is there a florist's near here?

Do you know if …

i)

Can I leave my cases here after I've vacated the room?

I

was wondering

j)

How long will the taxi take to arrive?

Could you tell me …

| Accommodation

31

[ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III]

2018/2019

B. Read the direct phrases, then write them more politely. Choose from the following:

Could you

Please

Would you like me

Shall I

May I suggest

There's been a slight misunderstanding

I'm afraid

Would you mind

Just a moment

Would you like

Actually

Direct

More polite

1) Wait a minute!

,

please.

2) We haven't got any left.

we

 

haven't got any left.

3) Sit down, please.

,

take a seat.

4) You're wrong. I'm not the head waiter.

,

I'm not the

head waiter.

5) Do you want some water?

some water?

6) Move to another table!

moving

to another table?

7) Confirm that tomorrow, please.

confirm

that tomorrow, please?

8) Do you want a taxi?

to get

 

you a taxi?

9) You've got the wrong date.

about

 

the date.

10) Try this organic wine.

that you

try this organic wine?

11) Do you want my help?

help you?

C.

Put the words into the right order. you vacated me have could tell rooms which been?

 

1)

2)

the any you have repaired when idea air conditioning will do be?

3)

would I wondering if room you was changing mind your.

4)

tonight what you know do time be you'll back?

5)

noise making you mind please would just a less little?

 

6)

many you let group know how could people are there me in your?

 

| Accommodation

32

 

[ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III]

2018/2019

THE CHECK IN

Listening

A. Look at these sentences. Most of them for welcoming someone, but two are not suitable. Cross out the

two you think are unsuitable.

1. Good evening, how may I help you?

2. Hello, what do you want?

3. It's good to see you again, Ms Black!

4. It's nice to see you again, Mr White.

5. Back again, Mrs Grey?

6. Hello again, Ms Green, and welcome!

7. Good afternoon, madam, do you have a reservation with us today?

8. Good evening, Mr Brown. How nice to see you again!

B. Below are some extracts from a conversation between a receptionist and a guest checking in without a

reservation. Put them in the order (from 1 to 10) in which you think you will hear them.

1. Would you like an Executive at £125 or a Standard at £95?

2. And may I take your home address, please?

3. It's room 760 on the seventh floor.

4. Hello.

5. And the name, sir, is

6. Here's your credit card, passport, and here ' s your key.

7. This is your registration card. Can you just check through the details, please?

8. Just the one night?

9. Because you ' re not a British citizen, I ' ll require your passport in order to complete the registration.

10. How will you be settling your account, sir?

?

DEALING WITH GUESTS

Reading

The Swan Hotel

sir? ? D EALING WITH GUESTS Reading The Swan Hotel When I rang to book a

When I rang to book a room at The Swan, the receptionist sounded doubtful. 'I don't think we've anything that weekend,' she said. ‘No, wait – there's just one.' The Swan, dating back to 1821, is the Georgian building at the end of town. We had to smile at the comical scene that greeted us when we arrived. A disorganised receptionist; an over-talkative salesman with his back to us and two foreign guests reduced to communicating in sign language. At last, we made it to our small, nothing out of the ordinary, brown and cream room with a double bed

| Accommodation

33

[ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III]

2018/2019

and a view of the gardens. Coming downstairs again we met another talkative character. Colin Vaughan, the owner, amused us with stories of the army, difficult guests, VAT and how the hotel had been used as a bookshop before he bought it ten years ago: ‘It took me six long weeks to get rid of all those books.' Today, the Swan is a traditionally furnished hotel with generous areas of red, flowery carpet and a large number of cherry-red sofas and armchairs. After a wander around town, a blonde girl broke the news that we couldn't have dinner in their restaurant that evening because members of the Chamber of Commerce were having dinner there and the other public rooms had been booked by a rugby club. Assuming we would be served two bar meals instead, we made our way to the bar. Yet we were confused. We thought the girl had said something about a table for us in the room next to the bar? We made our way there and sat down. To our surprise, restaurant menus were brought. So she had meant it! We were further surprised when we were led into a small plain dining room where several tables had been laid including one large one occupied by people eating bar meals. By now 'we were even more confused. We suspected the hotel management was, too! Oh dear! I had asked for local baked trout without its lemon and ginger sauce. It arrived with. However, the chef more than made up for the situation by removing the skin complete with sauce and then skilfully filleting the fish. Again, surprisingly good – as was my husband's pork with mustard sauce. Nevertheless, it would have been nice to have been told beforehand about the dining arrangement – after all, it's not just the food one pays for, it's the sense of occasion too – and, in an ideal world, we would have had something knocked off the bill.

A. Tick () the best option (a-d) for each statement (1- 6).

1.

Before arriving at the hotel the writer

a)

had been there the weekend before.

b)

had not been in contact with the hotel.

c)

had been unable to get through.

d)

had been lucky to get a room.

2.

The hotel

a)

was built in 1821.

b)

looks ordinary.

c)

is in the town centre.

d)

looks impressive.

3.

The writer's first impression was one of

a)

enthusiasm.

b)

anger.

c)

amusement.

d)

disappointment.

4.

We learn that the room was

a)

ordinary.

b)

attractive.

c)

well-furnished.

d)

at the back of the hotel.

5.

What do we learn about the owner?

a)

He is energetic.

b)

He is a good salesman.

c)

He pays attention to detail.

d)

He has a sense of humour.

6.

Which of these is NOT true?

a)

They ate in a separate dining room.

b)

The waiter misunderstood the order.

c)

The food was unsatisfactory.

d)

The chef was competent.

B. Find in the text words or expressions that mean the same as:

1. too chatty

2. do away with

3. walk (noun)

4. simple

5. a discount

| Accommodation

34

[ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III]

2018/2019

THE CHECK OUT

Listening

A. What would you say to a guest who is checking out and paying the bill? Match A and B to make

complete sentences.

A

 

B

1. How would

2

a) the mini-bar today?

2. Have you used

3

b) you like to pay?

3. Everything is

4

c) charge is 10%.

4. How will you

5

d) included.

5. The service

6

e) be paying?

B. Four guests are checking out of the Ocean Hotel. They are paying their bills. Listen (Be My Guest, Unit

15, List. 1) to the conversations between the guests and the hotel employee. Tick () the correct answers.

Guest 1

Guest 3

He pays by:

cheque account credit card traveller's cheque

He pays by:

credit card

cheque

cash

account

His bill comes to:

417

His bill comes to:

893

463

918

470

983

473

988

Service included:

yes

Also on the bill:

meeting rooms

no

breakfasts

Guest 2

Guest 4

She pays by:

credit card cheque account cash traveller's cheque

She pays by:

credit card

cash

cheque

Her bill comes to:

319

Her bill comes to:

223

359

230

 

390

232

399

320

ID is a:

bank guarantee

She leaves a tip:

yes

card passport

no

nothing

| Accommodation

35

[ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III]

2018/2019

C. Fill in the missing words in the sentences below. Choose from the verbs in the table, use each one only once and remember to put it in the correct form.

calculate

incur

liaise

settle

check out

issue

overcharge

sign for

dispute

itemise

return

vacate

1) At the end of their stay guests …

2) During their stay at a hotel, guests will … they use in the hotel.

3) When a hotel guest eats in the hotel restaurant he/she will be asked to … before leaving.

4) Some hotels … and the guest is free to leave.

5)

should …

6) Most hotels ask guests who are leaving to … lunchtime.

7) A computer also makes it much easier to …

8) The receptionist will ask the guest to … hotel.

9) The receptionist will … safe keeping.

10) Guests may …

11) In order to avoid problems the receptionist should … departments in the hotel.

12) Guests will be very unhappy if the hotel … pay more.

a charge if they disagree with it.

at reception.

charges for the services which

the meal

a luggage pass to show that payment has been received

what

they

are

paying

for,

so

the

hotel

their rooms before

Guests

usually

wish

to

see

exactly

the bill to show each item separately.

any discount.

their bills before leaving the

any valuables which have been deposited for

with the other

them and asks them to

before leaving the any valuables which have been deposited for with the other them and asks

| Accommodation

36

[ENGLISH FOR TOURISM III]

2018/2019

Cash or cheque?

A. Match the expressions on the left with the definitions on the right. For example: i. hard cash means money in notes and coins, as opposed to cheques or credit cards.

example: i. hard cash means money in notes and coins, as opposed to cheques or credit

| Accommodation

37