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CHAPTER - 5

DATA ANALYSIS, INTERPRETATION AND


PRESENTATION

5.1 INTRODUCTION

5.2 RELIABILITY FOR DATA COLLECTED

5.3 ANALYSIS OF PART A OF THE QUESTIONNAIRE

5.4 ANALYSIS OF PART B OF THE QUESTIONNAIRE

5.5 ANALYSIS OF PART C OF THE QUESTIONNAIRE

5.6 ANALYSIS OF PART D OF THE QUESTIONNAIRE

5.7 ANALYSIS OF PART E OF THE QUESTIONNAIRE

5.8 ANALYSIS OF PART F OF THE QUESTIONNAIRE

5.9 CONCLUSION

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5.1 INTRODUCTION

The integration of non-bank financial institution as an important facet of the financial system is
positively related to the development of small and medium scale enterprises. Small and medium
scale enterprises are the backbone of all economies and a key source of economic growth, job
creation and innovation in both developed and emerging market economies. Small and medium
scale enterprises in Nigeria have limited access to bank credit due to lack of collateral to match
the fund needed. Furthermore, it is difficult for small and medium scale enterprises to access
long-term fund from stock market genuinely on their incapability to get listed due to stringent
listing requirements. The constraints faced by small and medium scale enterprises in accessing
long-term financing can be eased by non-bank financial institutions provision of small and
medium-sized loans. Similarly, non-bank financial institutions can assist small and medium
scale enterprises in the business expansion which result in employment generation for the
economy.

This study is aimed to analyze the role of microfinance in mobilizing savings for non-banking
financial institutions in the area of Jodhpur rural. Therefore, this study examines various issues
of microfinance in pertaining to the moneylenders. This chapter presents the results of statistical
analysis of survey data and analysis. In addition, questions designed to elicit qualitative
responses from moneylenders of Jodhpur rural.

Therefore, data and information on which the study is based are both qualitative and quantitative.
In the first phase of the analysis, the study provides an updated analysis of Responses collected
from the respondents.

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5.2 RELIABILITY FOR DATA COLLECTED

Reliability comes to the forefront when variables developed from summated scales are used as
predictor components in objective models.
Reliability coefficient tested by using Cronbach’s alpha (α) analysis and it is a measure of
internal consistency, that is, how closely related a set of items are as a group. It is considered a
measure of scale reliability. In order to measure the reliability for a set of two or more constructs,
Cronbach’s alpha is a commonly used method where alpha coefficient values range between 0
and 1 with higher values indicating higher reliability among the indicators.
An alpha value of 0.60 and 0.70 or above is considered the criterion for demonstrating internal
consistency of new scales and established scales respectively. Reliability of the measurements
was determined using Cronbach’s Coefficient alpha. In this research, following are the research
for the data collected from moneylenders for the mobilization of savings through microfinance in
Jodhpur rural.
Table 5.1: Case Processing Summary for the money lenders
Case Processing Summary
N %
Cases Valid 550 100.0
Excludeda 0 0.0
Total 550 100.0
a. Listwise deletion based on all variables in the procedure.

Source: Author’s Compilation

From the above Table 5.1, it could be interpreted that total case followed under examinations,
which were found valid, were 550. Total numbers of cases were 550. There were no missing or
excluded cases were recognized. All the responses collected through respondents and governed
by the questionnaire were systematically filled and specific attention was given to all the
respondents if required so that proper and confirmed responses about the issues could be
collected.

Table 5.2: Reliability Statistics for the responses of moneylenders

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Reliability Statistics
Cronbach's Alpha N of Items

89.26 27
Source: Author’s Compilation

From above Table 5.2, it could be easily recognized that Cronbach value for the responses of the
27 respondents of the study was found as 89.26, which is an excellent representation of the
quality of data and confirms approx 89.26% reliability of the collected data. Cronbach's an
(alpha) is an important psychometric instrument to measure the reliability of data. The reliability
coefficient indicates that the scale for measuring trust and commitment is reliable. Therefore,
various statistical tools can be applied and tested.

5.3 ANALYSIS OF PART A OF THE QUESTIONNAIRE

This part of the questionnaire has been designed to enquire about some qualitative information
regarding the demographic profile of the managers like name, department, designation and
years of experience of the money lenders of Jodhpur Rural.
Table 5.3: Descriptive encoding of the Demographic Profile of Respondents [Personnel] for
statistical analysis
Name of Variable Description Encoded As
Gender Male 1
Female 2
Age Group < 20 years 1
From 20 to 30 2
From 30 to 40 3
40 and above 4
Income level Less than 5000 per 1
month
From 5000 to 7000 per 2
month
From 7000 to 10000 3

4
per month
More than 10000 per 4
month
Resident of Bhopalgarh 1
Bilara 2
Jodhpur 3
Luni 4
Osian 5
Phalodi 6
Shergarh 7
Pali 8
Education Secondary 1
Higher Secondary 2
Graduate 3
Postgraduate and 4
above
Marital status Bachelor 1
Married 2
Divorce and others 3
Family members 4 members 1
5 members 2
6 members 3
Earning members 2 members 1
3 members 2
4 members 3
Main occupation Self-employed 1
Business 2
Service 3
Employment type Public 1
Private 2

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Working sector Handloom 1
Raw silk 2
Khadi Cloth 3
Handicrafts 4
Khadi & Village 5
Industries
Powerlooms 6
Hosiery 7
Sandstones, Mines, 8
and building materials
Others 9
Residence of Rural 1
Urban 2
Source: Author’s Compilation

Gender: is classified into two categories that are males (encoded as 1) and females (encoded as
2), Age Group: is divided into 4 sections that are < 20 years (encoded as 1), From 20 to 30
(encoded as 2), From 30 to 40 (encoded as 3), 40 and above(encoded as 4), Income level: is
divided into 4 sections, Resident of classified into 8 Regions, Education is divided into 4 sections
that are Secondary, Higher Secondary, Graduate, Post graduate and above and other
demographic variables are Marital status, Family members, Earning members, Main occupation,
Employment type, Working sector, Residence of which are also divided into different categories
and encoded between (1-9). Therefore, all the demographic variable are used for the statistical
analysis of the research study.

Table 5.4: Descriptive Statistics of Demographic profile of Respondents [Personnel]


Descriptive Statistics
N Minimum Maximum Mean Std. Deviation
Gender (A2) 550 1 4 2.16 .927
Age (A3) 550 1 2 1.45 .498
Income (A4) 550 1 3 2.03 .628

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Resident (A5) 550 1 8 3.23 2.121
Education (A6) 550 1 4 1.78 .846
Marital status (A7) 550 1 3 1.73 .732
Family members (A8) 550 1 3 1.65 .695
Earning members (A9) 550 1 3 2.06 .741
Main occupation (A10) 550 1 3 2.16 .829
Employment type 550 1 2 1.09 .290
(A11)
Working sector (A12) 550 1 9 3.25 2.159
Residence (A13) 550 1 2 1.48 .500
Valid N (listwise) 550

Source: Author’s Compilation

Table 5.4 presents the descriptive statistics of demographic profile of respondents in which all
the (200) respondents have given the information about their gender, age, income, educational
qualifications, marital status, family members, earning members, main occupation, Employment
type, Working sector, Residence and hence no missing value is visible. Above table has given
the mean and standard deviation.

Table 5.5: Frequency table of Gender


Gender (A2)
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative
Percent
Valid Male 261 47.5 47.5 47.5
Female 289 52.5 52.5 100.0
Total 550 100.0 100.0
Source: Primary Data

Graph 5.1: Frequency graph of Gender

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550
600
500
400 289 Frequency
261
300
Percent
200 100
47.5 52.5
100
0
Male Female Total

Source: Primary Data

Table 7.1 indicates that there are 550 total respondents divided into two groups that are male and
female of which 289 are female respondents and 261 are male respondents. As the frequency
table clearly shows, that there is an imbalance between male and female respondents. Female
category of respondents is up to 52.5 and the male category is up to 47.5 this result shows the
extremely small number of male respondents as compared to the female respondents and hence it
is very much clear that female entrepreneurs are more satisfied in relationship-based banking for
microfinance in mobilizing savings for non-banking financial institutions.

Table 5.6: Frequency table of Age


Age (A3)
Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent
Valid < 20 years 167 30.4 30.4 30.4
From 20 to 30 158 28.7 28.7 59.1
From 30 to 40 195 35.5 35.5 94.5
40 and above 30 5.5 5.5 100.0
Total 550 100.0 100.0
Source: Primary Data

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Graph 5.2: Frequency graph of Age

550
600
500
400
Frequency
300 195
167 158 Percent
200 100.0
100 30.4 28.7 35.5 30 5.5
0
< 20 years From 20 to 30 From 30 to 40 40 and above Total

Source: Primary Data


According to Table 5.6 and graph 5.2, Agewise classification out of 550 respondents is done,
there are 167 respondents found in < 20 years age group whereas 158 respondents found in From
20 to 30 years age group whereas 195 respondents respond in From 30 to 40years age group and
30 respondents provide responses in 40 and above age group.
As the frequency graph of age groups, it clearly shows, that there is an imbalance between the
respondents of four age groups and the age group from 30-40 years has the highest number of
respondents among all the four groups.

Table 5.7: Frequency table of Income Level


Income (A4)
Frequency Perce Valid Cumulative
nt Percent Percent
Vali Less than 5000 per 100 18.2 18.2 18.2
d month
From 5000 to 7000 per 333 60.5 60.5 78.7
month
From 7000 to 10000 117 21.3 21.3 100.0
per month
Total 550 100.0 100.0

Graph 5.3: Frequency graph of Income Level

9
600 550

500

400
333
300 Frequency
Percent
200
100 117 100
100 60.5
18.2 21.3
0
Less than 5000 per From 5000 to 7000 From 7000 to 10000 Total
month per month per month

According to Table 5.7 and graph 5.3, Income Level wise classification out of 550 respondents is
done, Now the income level classification is done under three categories in which highest
(60.5%) of the respondents were found in the income level of 5000 to 7000 per month and
afterwards 21.3 % in from 7000 to 10,000 per month income level and a very low among three is
18.2 % in less than 5000 per month income level and hence it is very much clear that from
income level 5000 to 7000 per month entrepreneurs are more working for relationship-based
banking for micro finance in mobilizing savings for non-banking financial institutions.

Table 5.8: Frequency table of Resident


Resident (A5)
Valid Cumulative
Frequency Percent Percent Percent
Valid Bhopalgarh 181 32.9 32.9 32.9
Bilara 35 6.4 6.4 39.3
Jodhpur 132 24.0 24.0 63.3
Luni 61 11.1 11.1 74.4
Osian 44 8.0 8.0 82.4
Phalodi 42 7.6 7.6 90.0
Shergarh 28 5.1 5.1 95.1

10
Pali 27 4.9 4.9 100.0
Total 550 100.0 100.0

Graph 5.4: Frequency graph of Resident

600 550

500

400

300
Frequency
181
200 132 Percent
100.0
100 61 44 42
32.9 35 24.0 28 27
6.4 11.1 8.0 7.6 5.1 4.9
0

According to Table 5.8 and graph 5.4 presents the Frequency graph of Resident, under this 550
respondents from different regions are taken for the purpose of study, Now the demographic
variable ‘Resident’ is classified under eight categories in which highest (32.9%) of the
respondents were found in the residents of Bhopalgarh and afterwards 24.0 % in Jodhpur and a
very low among all eight variables is 4.9 % in Pali and hence it is very much clear that from
Bhopalgarh respondents were at highest rate and are more working for relationship-based
banking for micro finance in mobilizing savings for non-banking financial institutions.

Table 5.9: Frequency table of Education


Education (A6)
Valid Cumulative
Frequency Percent Percent Percent
Valid Secondary 238 43.3 43.3 43.3
Higher 224 40.7 40.7 84.0
Secondary

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Graduate 57 10.4 10.4 94.4
Post graduate 31 5.6 5.6 100.0
and above
Total 550 100.0 100.0

Graph 5.5: Frequency Graph of Education

600 550

500

400

300 238 Frequency


224
Percent
200
100.0
100 43.3 40.7 57
31
10.4 5.6
0
Secondary Higher Graduate Post graduate Total
Secondary and above

According to Table 5.9 and graph 5.5, under the Educational Qualification wise classification out
of 550 respondents, 238 (43.3%) were secondary, 224 (40.7%) were higher secondary, 57
(10.4%) were Graduate only 31 (5.6) respondents are in the postgraduate and above category.
This represents that the Qualification matters for working for relationship-based banking for
microfinance in mobilizing savings for non-banking financial institutions
.
Table 5.10: Frequency table of Marital Status
Marital status (A7)
Valid Cumulative
Frequency Percent Percent Percent
Valid Bachelor 241 43.8 43.8 43.8
Married 216 39.3 39.3 83.1

12
Divorce and 93 16.9 16.9 100.0
others
Total 550 100.0 100.0

Graph 5.6: Frequency Graph of Marital Status

600 550

500

400

300 241 Frequency


216
Percent
200
93 100.0
100 43.8 39.3
16.9
0
Bachelor Married Divorce and Total
others

According to Table 5.10 and graph 5.6, as the table data and graph is demonstrated that married
respondents were 216 (39.3%), Bachelor was 241 (43.8%) and 93 (16.9%) were divorced and
others out of 550 respondents. The table and graph clearly show that among the 550 respondents
bachelor respondents are more as compared to the married and divorce and other respondents.

Table 5.11: Frequency table of Family Members


Family members (A8)
Valid Cumulative
Frequency Percent Percent Percent
Valid 4 263 47.8 47.8 47.8
5 217 39.5 39.5 87.3
6 70 12.7 12.7 100.0
Total 550 100.0 100.0

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Graph 5.11: Frequency Graph of Family Members

600 550

500

400
Frequency
263
300
217 Percent
200
100.0
70
100 47.8 39.5
12.7
0
4 5 6 Total

From table 5.12 it could be interpreted Frequency table of Family Members shows the
frequency and percent of 4 (263) respondents, 5 (217) respondents and 6 (70) respondents of
microfinance moneylenders in Jodhpur.
From the above graph 5.12, it could be interpreted that Frequency graph of Family Members
shows that the earning members of respondents are high in the group 4 (263) with the 47.8% as
compared to the group 5 (217) and 6 (70) with the 39.5 % and 12.7%.

Table 5.12: Frequency table of Family Members


Earning members (A9)
Valid Cumulative
Frequency Percent Percent Percent
Valid 2 136 24.7 24.7 24.7
3 247 44.9 44.9 69.6
4 167 30.4 30.4 100.0
Total 550 100.0 100.0

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Graph 5.12: Frequency Graph of Family Members

550
600
500
400
247 Frequency
300
167 Percent
200 136
100.0
24.7 44.9 30.4
100
0
2 3 4 Total

From table 5.13 it could be interpreted Frequency table of Family Members shows the
frequency and percent of 2 (136) respondents, 3 (247) respondents and 4 (167) respondents of
microfinance moneylenders in Jodhpur.
From the above graph 5.13, it could be interpreted that Frequency graph of Family Members
Shows that the earning members of respondents are high in the group 3 (247) as compare to the
group 2 (136) and 4 (167).

Table 5.13: Frequency table of Main Occupation


Main occupation (A10)
Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent
Valid Self employed 151 27.5 27.5 27.5

Business 158 28.7 28.7 56.2


Service 241 43.8 43.8 100.0
Total 550 100.0 100.0

Graph 5.13: Frequency Graph of Main Occupation

15
600 550

500

400

300 Frequency
241
Percent
200 151 158
100.0
100
27.5 28.7 43.8

0
Self employed Business Service Total

From table 5.13 it could be interpreted Frequency table of Main Occupation shows the
frequency and percent of Self-employed (151) respondents, Business (158) respondents and
Service (241) respondents of microfinance moneylenders in Jodhpur.
From the above graph 5.13 it could be interpreted that Frequency table of Main Occupation
shows that the service respondents are more than of the business and self-employed respondents
with the percent of 43.8 (Service respondents) and 28.7 for (Business respondents), 27.5 for (Self
employed respondents) and thus it gives the result that Service respondents are at higher rate that
shows interest in microfinance for mobilizing savings From non-banking financial institutions as
compared to the Business and Self-employed employment occupation.

Table 5.14: Frequency table of Employment Type


Employment type (A11)
Valid Cumulative
Frequency Percent Percent Percent
Valid Public 499 90.7 90.7 90.7
Private 51 9.3 9.3 100.0
Total 550 100.0 100.0

Graph 5.14: Frequency Graph of Employment Type

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600 550
499
500

400
Frequency
300
Percent

200
90.7 100.0
100 51
9.3
0
Public Private Total

From table 5.14 it could be interpreted Frequency Graph of Employment Type shows the
frequency and percent of Public (499) respondents and Private (51) respondents of microfinance
moneylenders in Jodhpur.
From the above graph 5.14 it could be interpret that Frequency Graph of Employment Type
shows that the public respondents are more than of the private respondents with the percent of
90.7 (Public respondents) and 9.3 for (Private respondents) and thus it gives the result that Public
residents respondents are at higher rate that shows interest in microfinance for mobilizing
savings From non-banking financial institutions as compared to the private employment type.

Table 5.15: Frequency table of Working Sector


Working sector (A12)
Valid Cumulative
Frequency Percent Percent Percent
Valid Handloom 181 32.9 32.9 32.9

Raw silk 35 6.4 6.4 39.3


Khadi Cloth 132 24.0 24.0 63.3

Handicrafts 61 11.1 11.1 74.4

Khadi & Village 41 7.5 7.5 81.8

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Industries

Powerlooms 42 7.6 7.6 89.5

Hosiery 28 5.1 5.1 94.5


Sandstones, Mines, 27 4.9 4.9 99.5
and building
materials
Others 3 .5 .5 100.0
Total 550 100.0 100.0

Graph 5.15: Frequency Graph of Working Sector


600 550
500
400
300
181
200 132
100.0
100 61 41 42 Frequency
32.9 35 24.0 11.1 285.1 274.9
6.4 7.5 7.6 3 .5
0 Percent

From table 5.15 it could be interpret that Frequency table of Working Sector shows the
frequency and percent of Handloom (181), Raw silk (35), Khadi Cloth (132), Handicrafts (61),
Khadi & Village Industries (41), Powerlooms (42),Hosiery (28),Sandstones, Mines and building
materials (27) and Others (3), respondents of microfinance moneylenders in Jodhpur.
From the above graph 5.15, it could be interpreted that Frequency Graph of Working Sector
represents that the most higher working sector of Jodhpur rural is Handloom (181) with the
32.9% as compared to the other working sector after than Khadi cloth is with 132 respondents

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with the 24% then after Handicrafts (61) respondents with the 11.1% and then all other
categories of working sector. Hence it is concluded that handloom working sector is most
interesting in microfinance for mobilizing savings From non-banking financial institutions.

Table 5.16: Frequency table of Residence

Residence (A13)

Cumulative
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent
Valid Rural 288 52.4 52.4 52.4

Urban 262 47.6 47.6 100.0

Total 550 100.0 100.0

Graph 5.16: Frequency Graph of Residence

600 550

500

400
288 Frequency
262
300
Percent

200
100.0
100

0
Rural Urban Total

From table 5.16 it could be interpreted that Frequency table of Residence shows the frequency
and percent of rural (288) respondents and urban (262) respondents of microfinance male and
female moneylenders in Jodhpur.
From the above graph 5.16 it could be interpret that Frequency Graph of Residence shows that
the rural respondents are more than of the urban respondents with the percent of 52.4 (rural
19
respondents) and 47.6 for urban respondents and thus it gives the result that rural residents
respondents are at higher rate that shows interest in microfinance for mobilizing savings From
non-banking financial institutions.

5.4 ANALYSIS OF PART B OF THE QUESTIONNAIRE

This part of the questionnaire has been designed to enquire about some qualitative information
regarding the demographic profile of the managers like name, department, designation and years
of experience of the money lenders of Jodhpur Rural.

5.4.1 Economic Efficiency

H01: There is no significant difference between the economic efficiency of microfinance


male and female moneylenders in Jodhpur rural.
H11: There is a significant difference between the economic efficiency of microfinance
male and female moneylenders in Jodhpur rural.

Table 5.17: Levene's Test of Equality of Error Variances (Gender)


Levene's Test of Equality of Error Variances

Dependent Variable: Gender (A2)


F df1 df2 Sig.
46.862 4 524 .000
Tests the null hypothesis that the error variance of the dependent variable is equal across
groups.
a. Design: Intercept + B1EE

The Levene's take a look at of equality of errors variances phase of the output assessments one of
the assumptions of ANOVA -- namely that the variances of each condition are about identical. In
step with Table 5.18, we may want to interpret that the p-value (.691) is greater than α degree
(.05), this is, and it might be the case that the variances within the groups are approximately
identical. In this test at if the p-value is less than or same to α stage of the take a look at it will
present that variances are equal.

20
Table 5.18: Tests of Between-Subjects Effects (Gender)
Tests of Between-Subjects Effects
Dependent Variable: Gender (A2)
Source Type III Sum df Mean Square F Sig.
of Squares
Corrected Model .562a 4 .140 .560 .691
Intercept 44.851 1 44.851 179.006 .000
B1EE .562 4 .140 .560 .691
Error 131.291 524 .251
Total 1366.000 529
Corrected Total 131.853 528
a. R Squared = .004 (Adjusted R Squared = -.003)

From above Table 5.18, it could interpret that economic efficiency of microfinance male and
female moneylenders in Jodhpur rural is found Non-significant. The F statistics is 0.560 with 4
degrees of freedom. The ANOVA table gives F statistics = 0.560, p=0.691, for Gender (B1EE)
in 0.000 Table 5.18: Tests of Between-Subjects Effects (Gender). From the results, it can be said
that there is strong evidence between the genders. Gender significant value is equal to p-value
(.0691 >0.005) to accept the null hypothesis which shows there is no significant difference
between male and female for the economic efficiency of microfinance male and female
moneylenders in Jodhpur rural.

H02: There is no significant difference between the economic efficiency of microfinance


moneylenders among various residents of (Bhopalgarh, Bilara, Jodhpur, Luni, Osian,
Phalodi, Shergarh, and Pali)

H02: There is a significant difference between the economic efficiency of microfinance


moneylenders among various residents of (Bhopalgarh, Bilara, Jodhpur, Luni, Osian,
Phalodi, Shergarh, and Pali)

Table 5.18: Levene's Test of Equality of Error Variances (Residents)


21
Levene's Test of Equality of Error Variances

Dependent Variable: Resident (A5)


F df1 df2 Sig.
1.380 4 524 .240
Tests the null hypothesis that the error variance of the dependent variable is equal across
groups.
a. Design: Intercept + B1EE

Table 5.20: Tests of Between-Subjects Effects (Residents)


Tests of Between-Subjects Effects
Dependent Variable: Resident (A5)
Source Type III Sum df Mean Square F Sig.
of Squares
Corrected Model 14.935a 4 3.734 .834 .504

Intercept 192.097 1 192.097 42.919 .000


B1EE 14.935 4 3.734 .834 .504
Error 2345.345 524 4.476
Total 8176.000 529
Corrected Total 2360.280 528
a. R Squared = .006 (Adjusted R Squared = -.001)

H03: Economic efficiency not playing a significant role towards the Microfinance mobilises
savings for non-banking financial institutions.
H04: Economic efficiency not playing a significant role towards manages cost per borrower.
H05: Economic efficiency not playing a significant role towards the help in making loan
balance and saving balance.
H06: Economic efficiency not playing a significant role towards the help in increasing
Productivity.

22
Table 5.21: One-Sample Statistics for Economic efficiency
One-Sample Statistics
N Mean Std. Deviation Std. Error Mean

B2i (EE) 550 3.10 1.473 .063


B2ii (EE) 550 2.93 1.479 .063
B2iii (EE) 550 2.99 1.444 .062

B2iv (EE) 550 3.01 1.434 .061

Table 5.22: One-Sample Test for Economic efficiency


One-Sample Test
Test Value = 0
t df Sig. (2- Mean 95% Confidence Interval of
tailed) Difference the Difference
Lower Upper
B2i 49.349 549 .000 3.100 2.98 3.22
(EE)
B2ii 46.511 549 .000 2.933 2.81 3.06
(EE)
B2iii 48.513 549 .000 2.987 2.87 3.11
(EE)
B2iv 49.272 549 .000 3.013 2.89 3.13
(EE)

The significant value is equal to p-value (.000 < 0.005) so rejects the null hypothesis that says the
Economic efficiency not playing a significant role towards the Microfinance mobilises
savings for non-banking financial institutions and accepts the alternate hypothesis.
The significant value is equal to p-value (.000 < 0.005) so rejects the null hypothesis that says the
Economic efficiency not playing a significant role towards manages cost per borrower and
accepts the alternate hypothesis.

23
The significant value is equal to p-value (.000 < 0.005) so rejects the null hypothesis that says the
Economic efficiency not playing a significant role towards the help in making in loan balance
and saving balance and accepts the alternate hypothesis.
The significant value is equal to p-value (.000 < 0.005) so rejects the null hypothesis that says the
Economic efficiency not playing a significant role towards the help in increasing in Productivity
and accepts the alternate hypothesis.

5.5 ANALYSIS OF PART C OF THE QUESTIONNAIRE

H07: There is no significant difference between public and private employees perception about
the liquidity risks of microfinance moneylenders in Jodhpur rural.
H17: There is a significant difference between public and private employees perception about the
liquidity risks of microfinance moneylenders in Jodhpur rural.

Table 5.23: Levene's Test of Equality of Error Variances (Type of Employees)


Levene's Test of Equality of Error Variancesa

Dependent Variable: Employment type (A11)


F df1 df2 Sig.
.581 4 524 .676
Tests the null hypothesis that the error variance of the dependent variable is equal across groups.

a. Design: Intercept + C3LL

The Levene's take a look at of equality of errors variances phase of the output assessments one of
the assumptions of ANOVA -- namely that the variances of each condition are about identical. In
step with Table 5.35, we may want to interpret that the p-value (.676) is greater than α degree
(.05), this is, and it might be the case that the variances within the groups are approximately

24
identical. In this test at if the p-value is less than or same to α stage of the take a look at it will
present that variances are equal.

Table 5.24: Tests of Between-Subjects Effects (Type of Employees)


Tests of Between-Subjects Effects
Dependent Variable: Employment type (A11)
Source Type III Sum df Mean Square F Sig.
of Squares
Corrected Model .051a 4 .013 .144 .966

Intercept 138.984 1 138.984 1582.094 .000

C3LL .051 4 .013 .144 .966


Error 46.033 524 .088
Total 682.000 529
Corrected Total 46.083 528
a. R Squared = .001 (Adjusted R Squared = -.007)

From above Table 5.24, it could interpret that Type of Employees of microfinance
moneylenders in Jodhpur rural is found Non-significant. The F statistics is .144 with 4 degrees of
freedom. The ANOVA table gives F statistics= 1.44, p=.966, for Type of Employees (C3LL) in
Table 5.18: Tests of Between-Subjects Effects (Gender). From the results, it can be said that
there is strong evidence between the type of Employees. Type of Employees significant value is
equal to p-value (.966 > 0.005) so accept the null hypothesis which shows there is no significant
difference between public and private employees perception about the liquidity risks of
microfinance moneylenders in Jodhpur rural.

H08: There is no significant difference between rural and urban residents’ perception about the
liquidity risks of microfinance moneylenders in Jodhpur rural.
H18: There is a significant difference between rural and urban residents’ perception about the
liquidity risks of microfinance moneylenders in Jodhpur rural.

25
Table 5.25: Levene's Test of Equality of Error Variances (Residence-Rural & Urban)
Levene's Test of Equality of Error Variancesa
Dependent Variable: Residence (A13)
F df1 df2 Sig.
2.446 4 524 .046
Tests the null hypothesis that the error variance of the dependent variable is equal across
groups.
a. Design: Intercept + C3LL

The Levene's take a look at of equality of errors variances phase of the output assessments one of
the assumptions of ANOVA -- namely that the variances of each condition are about identical. In
step with Table 5.25, we may want to interpret that the p-value (.046) is greater than α degree
(.05), this is, and it might be the case that the variances within the groups are approximately
identical. In this test at if the p-value is less than or same to α stage of the take a look at it will
present that variances are equal.

Table 5.26: Tests of Between-Subjects Effects (Residence-Rural & Urban)


Tests of Between-Subjects Effects
Dependent Variable: Residence (A13)
Source Type III Sum df Mean Square F Sig.
of Squares
Corrected Model 1.370a 4 .343 1.371 .243
Intercept 262.269 1 262.269 1050.133 .000

C3LL 1.370 4 .343 1.371 .243


Error 130.868 524 .250
Total 1315.000 529
Corrected Total 132.238 528
a. R Squared = .010 (Adjusted R Squared = .003)

26
From above Table 5.26, it could interpret that Residence-Rural & Urban of micro moneylenders
in Jodhpur rural is found Non-significant. The F statistics is 1.371 with 4 degree of freedom. The
ANOVA table gives F statistics= 1.371, p=.000, for Residence-Rural & Urban (C3LL) in
Table 5.18: Tests of Between-Subjects Effects (Residence-Rural & Urban). From the results, it
can be said that there is strong evidence between the genders. Gender significant value is equal
to p-value (.243 < 0.005) so accept the null hypothesis which shows there is a significant
difference between rural and urban residents’ perception about the liquidity risks of microfinance
moneylenders in Jodhpur rural.

H09: There is no significant use of Proper investment guidelines for liquidizing risk.
H010: There is no significant use of Proper risk management policies to control risk.
H011: There is no significant use of appropriate standards and reports to minimize risk for
liquidizing risk.
H012: There is no significant use of monitoring helps in liquidizing risk.
H013: There is no significant use of qualitative internal communication in liquidizing risk.

Table 5.27: One-Sample Statistics for Liquidizing Risk


One-Sample Statistics
N Mean Std. Deviation Std. Error Mean

C4i (LR) 550 2.93 1.378 .059


C4ii (LR) 550 2.17 1.363 .058
C4iii (LR) 550 2.79 1.538 .066
C4iv (LR) 550 2.20 1.409 .060
C4v (LR) 550 2.35 1.237 .053

Table 5.28: One-Sample Test for Liquidizing Risk


One-Sample Test
Test Value = 0
t df Sig. (2- Mean 95% Confidence Interval of
tailed) Difference the Difference

27
Lower Upper
C4i (LR) 49.805 549 .000 2.927 2.81 3.04

C4ii (LR) 37.353 549 .000 2.171 2.06 2.29

C4iii (LR) 42.589 549 .000 2.793 2.66 2.92

C4iv (LR) 36.617 549 .000 2.200 2.08 2.32

C4v (LR) 44.459 549 .000 2.345 2.24 2.45

From Table 5.27 it could interpret that the mean score value of the C4i (LR) (2.93 ± 1.38), C4ii
(LR) (2.17 ± 1.37), C4iii (LR) (2.79 ± 1.53), C4iv (LR) (2.20 ± 1.41) and C4v (LR) (2.35 ± 1.23)
was above than the population normal score of ‘0’.

For liquidizing risk factor, T value is 49.805 and Sig. (2-tailed) value is .000 for 549 degree of
freedom shows that the difference between the sample estimated the population mean and the
comparison population mean is statistically significantly different, which shows that there is
significant use of Proper investment guidelines for liquidizing risk. The P-value of t-test with
unequal variance was .000, which was lesser than 0.05. This meant that there is significance
difference in mean score of pre-test and post-test with respect to gender at 5% level of
significance. As a result, the finding suggested that since there was is a significant difference to
be found in the mean scores of the pre-test and the post-test with respect to factor.

To control risk, T value is 37.353 and Sig. (2-tailed) value is .000 for 549 degrees of freedom
shows that the difference between the sample estimated the population mean and the comparison
population mean is statistically significantly different, which shows there is significant use of
Proper risk management policies to control risk. The P-value of t-test with unequal variance was
.000, which was lesser than 0.05. This meant that there is significance difference in mean score
of pre-test and post-test with respect to gender at 5% level of significance. As a result, the

28
finding suggested that since there is significant use of Proper risk management policies to control
risk.

To minimize risk of liquidizing risk, T value is 42.589 and Sig. (2-tailed) value is .000 for 549
degree of freedom shows that the difference between the sample estimated the population mean
and the comparison population mean is statistically significantly different, which shows there is
significant use of appropriate standards and reports to minimize risk for liquidizing risk.
The P-value of t-test with unequal variance was .000, which was lesser than 0.05. This meant
that there is significance difference in mean score of pre-test and post-test with respect to gender
at 5% level of significance. As a result, the finding suggested that since there is significant use
of appropriate standards and reports to minimize risk for liquidizing risk.
For monitoring helps into liquidizing risk, T value is 36.617 and Sig. (2-tailed) value is .000 for
549 degree of freedom shows that the difference between the sample estimated the population
mean and the comparison population mean is statistically significantly different, which shows
there is significant use of monitoring helps in liquidizing risk. The P-value of t-test with unequal
variance was .000, which was lesser than 0.05. This meant that there is significance difference
in mean score of pre-test and post-test with respect to gender at 5% level of significance. As a
result, the finding suggested that since there is significant use of monitoring helps in liquidizing
risk.

For use of qualitative internal communication in liquidizing risk, T value is 44.459 and Sig. (2-
tailed) value is .000 for 549 degree of freedom shows that the difference between the sample
estimated the population mean and the comparison population mean is statistically significantly
different, which there is no significant use of qualitative internal communication in liquidizing
risk. The P-value of t-test with unequal variance was .000, which was lesser than 0.05. This
meant that there is significance difference in mean score of pre-test and post-test with respect to
gender at 5% level of significance. As a result, the finding suggested that since there is no
significant use of qualitative internal communication in liquidizing risk.

29
5.6 ANALYSIS OF PART D OF THE QUESTIONNAIRE
There is no significant difference between cash investments of microfinance moneylenders
in Jodhpur rural towards the
H014: Funds with absolute returns are an investment implying low risks.
H015: Microfinance gives appropriate internal funds or retained earnings
H016: Borrowed from non-bank financial institutions which include microfinance
institutions, credit cooperatives, credit unions, or finance companies are good
H017: Selecting target segments, microfinance recognized the importance of coordinating
business for its savings in Jodhpur rural.
H018: Microfinance always acts the desired goal and elicits control for all the savings for
individual entrepreneurs and small businesses of Jodhpur rural
H019: Microfinance provides investments or actions to pay for themselves
H020: The Capital Investment Decisions hold a sizeable amount of the business resources
for a long period of time
Table 5.29: One-Sample Statistics for Cash Investments
One-Sample Statistics
N Mean Std. Deviation Std. Error Mean

D5i (CI) 550 3.24 1.093 .047


D5ii (CI) 550 3.41 1.051 .045
D5iii (CI) 550 2.97 1.058 .045
D5iv (CI) 550 2.93 1.547 .066
D5v (CI) 550 2.94 1.548 .066
D5vi (CI) 550 3.10 1.532 .065
D5vii (CI) 550 2.57 1.029 .044

Table 5.30: One-Sample Test for Cash Investments


One-Sample Test
Test Value = 0
t df Sig. (2- Mean 95% Confidence Interval of
tailed) Difference the Difference

30
Lower Upper
D5i 69.473 549 .000 3.236 3.14 3.33
(CI)
D5ii 76.008 549 .000 3.407 3.32 3.50
(CI)
D5iii 65.744 549 .000 2.965 2.88 3.05
(CI)
D5iv 44.348 549 .000 2.925 2.80 3.06
(CI)
D5v 44.550 549 .000 2.940 2.81 3.07
(CI)
D5vi 47.411 549 .000 3.096 2.97 3.22
(CI)
D5vii 58.574 549 .000 2.569 2.48 2.66
(CI)

From Table 5.29 it could interpret that the mean score value of the D5i (CI) (3.24± 1.093), D5ii
(CI) (3.24± 1.093), D5iii (CI) (3.24± 1.093), D5iv (CI) (3.24± 1.093), D5v (CI) (3.24± 1.093),
D5v (CI) (3.24± 1.093), D5vii (CI) (3.24± 1.093) was above than the population normal score of
‘0’.

For cash investments of microfinance moneylenders in Jodhpur rural, T value is 69.473 and Sig.
(2-tailed) value is .000 for 549 degrees of freedom shows that the distinction between the sample
calculable population mean and therefore the comparison population means is statistically
considerably very different, that shows that the funds with absolute returns are an investment
implying low risks. The P-value of t-test with unequal variance was .000, that was lesser than
0.05. This meant that there is significance Funds with absolute returns are an investment
implying low risks. Therefore, the null hypothesis is rejected and thus alternative hypothesis is
accepted.

31
For cash investments of microfinance moneylenders in Jodhpur rural, T value is 76.008 and Sig.
(2-tailed) value is .000 for 549 degree of freedom shows that the distinction between the sample
calculable population mean and therefore the comparison population mean is statistically
considerably very different, that shows that the Microfinance gives appropriate internal funds or
retained earnings. The P-value of t-test with unequal variance was .000, that was lesser than
0.05. This meant that there is significant difference between Microfinance gives appropriate
internal funds or retained earnings. Therefore, the null hypothesis is rejected and thus alternative
hypothesis is accepted.

For cash investments of microfinance moneylenders in Jodhpur rural, T value is 65.744 and Sig.
(2-tailed) value is .000 for 549 degrees of freedom shows that the distinction between the sample
calculable population mean and therefore the comparison population mean is statistically
considerably very different, that shows that the Borrowed from non-bank financial institutions
which include microfinance institutions, credit cooperatives, credit unions, or finance companies
are good. The P-value of t-test with unequal variance was .000, that was lesser than 0.05. This
meant that there is significant difference between Borrowed from non-bank financial institutions,
which include microfinance institutions, credit cooperatives, credit unions, or finance companies
are good. Therefore, the null hypothesis is rejected and thus alternative hypothesis is accepted.

For cash investments of microfinance moneylenders in Jodhpur rural, T value is 44.348 and Sig.
(2-tailed) value is .000 for 549 degrees of freedom shows that the distinction between the sample
calculable population mean and therefore the comparison population means is statistically
considerably very different, that shows that the Selecting target segments, microfinance
recognized the importance of coordinating business for its savings in Jodhpur rural. The P-value
of t-test with unequal variance was .000, that was lesser than 0.05. This meant that there is
significant difference between Selecting target segments, microfinance recognized the
importance of coordinating business for its savings in Jodhpur rural. Therefore, the null
hypothesis is rejected and thus alternative hypothesis is accepted.

For cash investments of microfinance moneylenders in Jodhpur rural, T value is 44.550 and Sig.
(2-tailed) value is .000 for 549 degrees of freedom shows that the distinction between the sample

32
calculable population mean and therefore the comparison population mean is statistically
considerably very different, that shows that the Microfinance always acts the desired goal and
elicits control for all the savings for individual entrepreneurs and small businesses of Jodhpur
rural. The P-value of t-test with unequal variance was .000, that was lesser than 0.05. This meant
that there is significant difference between Microfinance always acts the desired goal and elicits
control for all the savings for individual entrepreneurs and small businesses of Jodhpur rural.
Therefore, the null hypothesis is rejected and thus alternative hypothesis is accepted.

For cash investments of microfinance moneylenders in Jodhpur rural, T value is 47.411 and Sig.
(2-tailed) value is .000 for 549 degree of freedom shows that the distinction between the sample
calculable population mean and therefore the comparison population mean is statistically
considerably very different, that shows that the Microfinance provides investments or actions to
pay for themselves. The P-value of t-test with unequal variance was .000, that was lesser than
0.05. This meant that there is significant difference Microfinance provides investments or actions
to pay for themselves. Therefore, the null hypothesis is rejected and thus alternative hypothesis is
accepted.

For cash investments of microfinance moneylenders in Jodhpur rural, T value is 58.574 and Sig.
(2-tailed) value is .000 for 549 degree of freedom shows that the distinction between the sample
calculable population mean and therefore the comparison population mean is statistically
considerably very different, that shows that the funds with absolute returns are an investment
implying low risks. The P-value of t-test with unequal variance was .000, that was lesser than
0.05. This meant that there is significant difference between Funds with absolute returns are an
investment implying low risks. Therefore, the null hypothesis is rejected and thus alternative
hypothesis is accepted.

5.7 ANALYSIS OF PART E OF THE QUESTIONNAIRE


H021: Nonbanking financial institutions are not accountable for effective Carrying Cost.
H022: Nonbanking financial institution not helping in productive Capacity utilization
H023: Nonbanking financial institution is not associated with carrying the cost

33
H024: Nonbanking financial institution do not take incoming returns to cover costs

Table 5.31: One-Sample Statistics for Carrying Cost


One-Sample Statistics
N Mean Std. Deviation Std. Error Mean
E6i (CC) 550 2.17 1.123 .048
E6ii (CC) 550 3.16 1.417 .060
E6iii (CC) 550 3.11 1.471 .063
E6iv (CC) 550 2.93 1.481 .063

Table 5.32: One-Sample Test for Carrying Cost


One-Sample Test
Test Value = 0
t df Sig. (2- Mean 95% Confidence Interval of
tailed) Difference the Difference
Lower Upper
E6i 45.236 549 .000 2.165 2.07 2.26
(CC)
E6ii 52.309 549 .000 3.160 3.04 3.28
(CC)
E6iii 49.511 549 .000 3.105 2.98 3.23
(CC)
E6iv 46.382 549 .000 2.929 2.81 3.05
(CC)

From Table 5.31 it could interpret that the mean score value of the E6i (CC) (2.17 ± 1.123), E6ii
(CC) (3.16 ± 1.417), E6iii (CC) (3.11 ± 1.471), E6iv (CC) (2.93 ± 1.481) was above than the
population normal score of ‘0’.

34
For Govt. Policy factor T value is 45.236 and Sig. (2-tailed) value is .000 for 549 degree of
freedom shows that the difference between the sample estimated population mean and the
comparison population mean is statistically significantly different, which shows that Non-
banking financial institutions are not accountable for effective Carrying Cost.

For Govt. Policy factor T value is 52.309 and Sig. (2-tailed) value is .000 for 549 degree of
freedom shows that the difference between the sample estimated the population mean and the
comparison population mean is statistically significantly different, which shows that Non-
banking financial institution not helping in productive Capacity utilization

For Govt. Policy factor T value is 49.511 and Sig. (2-tailed) value is .000 for 549 degree of
freedom shows that the difference between the sample estimated the population mean and the
comparison population mean is statistically significantly different, which shows that Non-
banking financial institution is not associated with carrying the cost

For Govt. Policy factor T value is 46.382 and Sig. (2-tailed) value is .000 for 549 degree of
freedom shows that the difference between the sample estimated the population mean and the
comparison population mean is statistically significantly different, which shows that Nonbanking
financial institution do not take incoming returns to cover costs

H025: There is no significant difference among the perception of various income groups of
microfinance moneylenders about the carrying costs of in Jodhpur rural.
H125: There is a significant difference among the perception of various income groups of
microfinance moneylenders about the carrying costs of in Jodhpur rural.

Table 5.33: Levene's Test of Equality of Error Variances (Income)


Levene's Test of Equality of Error Variancesa

Dependent Variable: Income (A4)


F df1 df2 Sig.
.472 4 544 .756

35
Tests the null hypothesis that the error variance of the dependent variable is equal across
groups.
a. Design: Intercept + E7CC
The Levene's take a look at of equality of errors variances phase of the output assessments one of
the assumptions of ANOVA -- namely that the variances of each condition are about identical. In
step with Table 5.33, we may want to interpret that the p-value (.756) is greater than α degree
(.05), this is, and it might be the case that the variances within the groups are approximately
identical. In this test at if the p-value is less than or same to α stage of the take a look at it will
present that variances are equal.

Table 5.34: Levene's Test of Equality of Error Variances (Income)


Tests of Between-Subjects Effects
Dependent Variable: Income (A4)
Source Type III Sum df Mean Square F Sig.
of Squares
Corrected Model 2.466a 4 .616 1.574 .180

Intercept 812.818 1 812.818 2075.265 .000

E7CC 2.466 4 .616 1.574 .180


Error 213.068 544 .392
Total 2476.000 549
Corrected Total 215.534 548

a. R Squared = .011 (Adjusted R Squared = .004)

From above Table 5.34, it could interpret that income efficiency of microfinance moneylenders
in Jodhpur rural is found Non-significant. The F statistics is 1.574 with 4 degree of freedom. The
ANOVA table gives F statistics= 1.574, p=.180, for Income (E7CC) in Table 5.18: Tests of
Between-Subjects Effects (E7CC). From the results, it can be said that there is strong evidence
between the genders. Gender significant value is equal to p-value (.180 < 0.005) so accept the

36
null hypothesis which shows there is no significant difference among the perception of various
income groups of microfinance moneylenders about the carrying costs of in Jodhpur rural.

5.8 ANALYSIS OF PART F OF THE QUESTIONNAIRE

H026: There is no significant difference between the male and female microfinance
moneylenders about the payback periods in Jodhpur rural.
H126: There is a significant difference between the male and female microfinance
moneylenders about the payback periods in Jodhpur rural.

Table 5.35: Levene's Test of Equality of Error Variances (Gender)

Levene's Test of Equality of Error Variancesa

Dependent Variable: Gender (A2)


F df1 df2 Sig.
15.436 3 545 .000
Tests the null hypothesis that the error variance of the dependent variable is equal across
groups.
a. Design: Intercept + F8PP

The Levene's take a look at of equality of errors variances phase of the output assessments one of
the assumptions of ANOVA -- namely that the variances of each condition are about identical. In
step with Table 5.35, we may want to interpret that the p-value (.000) is greater than α degree
(.05), this is, and it might be the case that the variances within the groups are approximately
identical. In this test at if the p-value is less than or same to α stage of the take a look at it will
present that variances are equal.

Table 5.36: Levene's Test of Equality of Error Variances (Gender)

37
Tests of Between-Subjects Effects
Dependent Variable: Gender (A2)
Source Type III Sum df Mean Square F Sig.
of Squares
Corrected Model 6.288a 3 2.096 8.745 .000
Intercept 632.234 1 632.234 2637.737 .000
F8PP 6.288 3 2.096 8.745 .000
Error 130.630 545 .240
Total 1413.000 549
Corrected Total 136.918 548
a. R Squared = .046 (Adjusted R Squared = .041)

From above Table 5.36, it could interpret that Gender of microfinance male and female
moneylenders in Jodhpur rural is found Non-significant. The F statistics is 8.745 with 3 degree
of freedom. The ANOVA table gives F statistics= 8.745, p=.000, for Gender (F8PP) in Table
5.18: Tests of Between-Subjects Effects (Gender). From the results, it can be said that there is
strong evidence between the genders. Gender significant value is equal to p-value (.000 < 0.005)
so reject the null hypothesis which shows there is significant difference between the male and
female microfinance moneylenders about the payback periods in Jodhpur rural.

H027: There is no significant difference among the various income microfinance


moneylenders about the payback periods in Jodhpur rural.
H127: There is a significant difference among the various income microfinance
moneylenders about the payback periods in Jodhpur rural.

Table 5.35: Levene's Test of Equality of Error Variances (Income & Payback Period)
Levene's Test of Equality of Error Variancesa

Dependent Variable: Income (A4)


F df1 df2 Sig.

38
10.336 3 545 .000
Tests the null hypothesis that the error variance of the dependent variable is equal across
groups.
a. Design: Intercept + F8PP

The Levene's take a look at of equality of errors variances phase of the output assessments one of
the assumptions of ANOVA -- namely that the variances of each condition are about identical. In
step with Table 5.35, we may want to interpret that the p value (.439) is greater than α degree
(.05), this is, and it might be the case that the variances within the groups are approximately
identical. In this test at if the p value is less than or same to α stage of the take a look at it will
present that variances are equal.

Table 5.36: Tests of Between-Subjects Effects (Income & Payback Period)


Tests of Between-Subjects Effects
Dependent Variable: Income (A4)
Source Type III Sum df Mean Square F Sig.
of Squares
Corrected Model 1.066a 3 .355 .903 .439

Intercept 1101.416 1 1101.416 2798.894 .000

F8PP 1.066 3 .355 .903 .439


Error 214.467 545 .394
Total 2476.000 549
Corrected Total 215.534 548
a. R Squared = .005 (Adjusted R Squared = -.001)

From above Table 5.36, it could interpret that Income & Payback Period of microfinance
moneylenders in Jodhpur rural is found Non-significant. The F statistics is .903 with 3 degree of
freedom. The ANOVA table gives F statistics= .903, p=.439, for Income & Payback Period in

39
Table 5.36: Tests of Between-Subjects Effects (Income & Payback Period). From the results, it
can be said that there is strong evidence between the respondents. Income & Payback Period
significant value is equal to p-value (.439 >0.005) so accept the null hypothesis which shows
there is no significant difference among the various income microfinance moneylenders about
the payback periods in Jodhpur rural.

H028: There is no significant difference between the male and female microfinance
moneylenders about the hybrid securities in Jodhpur rural.
H128: There is a significant difference between the male and female microfinance
moneylenders about the hybrid securities in Jodhpur rural.

Table 5.37: Levene's Test of Equality of Error Variances


Levene's Test of Equality of Error Variancesa

Dependent Variable: Gender (A2)


F df1 df2 Sig.
14.687 4 544 .000
Tests the null hypothesis that the error variance of the dependent variable is equal across
groups.

a. Design: Intercept + F9HS


The Levene's take a look at of equality of errors variances phase of the output assessments one of
the assumptions of ANOVA -- namely that the variances of each condition are about identical. In
step with Table 5.37, we may want to interpret that the p-value (.362) is greater than α degree
(.05), this is, and it might be the case that the variances within the groups are approximately
identical. In this test at if the p-value is less than or same to α stage of the take a look at it will
present that variances are equal.
Table 5.38: Tests of Between-Subjects Effects (Gender & Hybrid Securities)
Tests of Between-Subjects Effects
Dependent Variable: Gender (A2)
Source Type III Sum df Mean Square F Sig.
of Squares

40
Corrected Model 1.087a 4 .272 1.088 .362
Intercept 740.368 1 740.368 2965.147 .000
F9HS 1.087 4 .272 1.088 .362
Error 135.831 544 .250
Total 1413.000 549
Corrected Total 136.918 548

a. R Squared = .008 (Adjusted R Squared = .001)

From above Table 5.38, it could interpret that Gender & Hybrid Securities of microfinance male
and female moneylenders in Jodhpur rural is found Non-significant. The F statistics is 1.088 with
4 degree of freedom. The ANOVA table gives F statistics= 1.088, p=.362, for Gender &
Hybrid Securities (F9HS) in Table 5.18: Tests of Between-Subjects Effects (Gender). From the
results, it can be said that there is strong evidence between the genders. Gender & Hybrid
Securities significant value is equal to p-value (.362 >0.005) so accept the null hypothesis which
shows there is no significant difference between the male and female microfinance moneylenders
about the hybrid securities in Jodhpur rural.

5.9 CONCLUSION

This part was framed for examining the role of microfinance in mobilizing savings for non-
banking financial institutions. This part of thesis aimed at investigating to carry out the operation
of microfinance and moneylender for the mobilizing of savings in the areas of Jodhpur rural. For
this purpose, the data collection was done through a systematic and structured questionnaire. The
questionnaire was administered for the respondents to understand the understanding of
microfinance among the moneylenders specific to Jodhpur Rural Rajasthan State of India.

This part has enquired some parameters to know about microfinance, it is about building
permanent local financial institutions that can provide financial services to the poor people on a
permanent basis. Such institutions should be able to mobilize resources and recycle domestic

41
savings, extend credit and provide a range of services, thus dependence on funding from donors
and government will gradually diminish as local financial institutions and private capital market
flourish.

Micro-savings is another product that is increasingly becoming the mainstream of microfinance


operations. MFIs and other professions actors are transforming to formal regulated institutions.
MFI offers good voluntary savings services which typically attract more savers than borrowers.
Micro saving consists of small deposits account offered to lower income families or individuals
as an incentive to store funds for future use. They are designed just like normal saving accounts
although minimum depots are usually waived or very low allowing users to save small amounts
of money and not be charged for the services. People who save are better prepared to cope with
any unforeseen expenses.

Microfinance, which is the provision of a variety of financial services to poor, low-income people
and micro and small enterprises that lack access to banking and related services, is proving vital
to empowering communities. Many development experts agree that microfinance, when properly
harnessed and supported, can economically empower individuals and small enterprises and
enable them to contribute to and benefit from economic development.

Thus, Microfinance is evolving continually with ongoing financial sector reforms, the adaptation
to new policy frameworks and technology and the introduction of innovative products.

Reliability of collected data was measured by Cronbach’s alpha (α) analysis, which is a
commonly used method where alpha coefficient values range between 0 and 1 with higher values
indicating higher reliability among the indicators. According to this analysis, the captured data
was up to mark and can be used for further analysis. The sample population comprised of 550
moneylenders as the respondents of the Jodhpur rural.

Total 550 Questionnaires were distributed on convenience sampling method, where researcher
took care of those respondents who can systematically fill the questionnaire. The researcher gave

42
a brief about the questionnaire and objective of research so that the respondents could better give
their responses to the administered question under different questions of the questionnaire.

This chapter of the thesis has analyzed the data on the basis of some factor like:

PART A

Demographic Factor: all the variables under this factor analyzed the role of the microfinance
for the mobilizing of savings. All the factor shows the result that microfinance is the today’s need
for the moneylenders for their work so as to earn more money and make economy efficient.

PART B

Economic Efficiency: this part includes some analysis on the basis of economic efficiency that
says the Economic efficiency is playing a significant role towards the help in increasing
Productivity.

PART C

Liquidity Risks: this part includes some analysis on the basis of liquidity risk and therefore it
concludes that there is no significant difference between public and private employees perception
about the liquidity risks of microfinance moneylenders in Jodhpur rural it also shows that there is
a significant difference between rural and urban residents’ perception about the liquidity risks of
microfinance moneylenders in Jodhpur rural with the .

Part D

Cash Investments: which include microfinance institutions, credit cooperatives, credit unions, or
finance companies are good and Microfinance always acts the desired goal and elicits control for
all the savings for individual entrepreneurs and small businesses of Jodhpur rural and put more

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emphasis on Microfinance which is always acts the desired goal and elicits control for all the
savings for individual entrepreneurs and small businesses of Jodhpur rural.

PART E

Carrying Cost and Capacity Utilization: this part includes some analysis on the basis of
liquidity risk and therefore it concludes that Non-banking financial institutions are not
accountable for effective Carrying Cost and Non-banking financial institution not helping in
productive Capacity utilization.

PART F
All the variables under this factor analyzed the role of the microfinance for the mobilizing of
savings and various income microfinance moneylenders about the payback periods in Jodhpur
rural and thus it concludes that moneylenders are in favor of microfinance for mobilization of
savings.

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