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Date: _________

A. TOPIC: Illustrations of Quadratic Equations

B. OBJECTIVES:

At the end of the lesson, the students are expected to:


1. define a quadratic equation.
2. write quadratic equations in standard form.
3. define “root of an equation”.
4. find the solution set of a quadratic equation 𝑎𝑥 2 + 𝑏𝑥 + 𝑐 = 0 by factoring.

C. PROCEDURE:

I. Activity

Activity 1: Do you remember these products?


Directions: Find each indicated product then answer the questions that follow.

1. 3(𝑥 2 + 7)
2. 2𝑠(𝑠 − 4)
3. (𝑤 + 7)(𝑤 + 3)
4. (𝑥 + 9)(𝑥 − 2)
5. (2𝑡 − 1)(𝑡 + 5)

Questions:

1. How did you find each product?


2. In finding each product, what mathematics concepts or principles did you apply?
3. How would you describe the products obtained?
Are the products polynomials? If YES, what common characteristics do these
polynomials have?

II. ANALYSIS

Activity 2: Another Kind of Equation!


Directions: Below are different equations. Use these equations to answer the questions
that follow.

𝑥 2 − 5𝑥 + 3 = 0 9𝑟 2 − 25 = 0 𝑐 = 12𝑛 − 5

2𝑠 + 3𝑡 = −7 1/2𝑥 2 + 3𝑥 = 8 6𝑝 − 𝑞 = 10

8𝑘 − 3 = 12 4𝑚2 + 4𝑚 + 1 = 0 𝑟 2 = 144
1. Which of the given equations are linear?
2. How do you describe linear equations?
3. Which of the given equations are not linear? Why?
How are these equations different from those which are linear?
What common characteristics do these equations have?

III. ABSTRACTION

 A quadratic equation in one variable is a mathematical sentence of degree 2 that


can be written in the following standard form.

𝑎𝑥 2 + 𝑏𝑥 + 𝑐 = 0, where a, b, and c are real numbers and 𝑎 ≠ 0.

In the equation, 𝒂𝒙𝟐 is the quadratic term, bx is the linear term, and c is the constant
term.

Example 1 : 2𝑥 2 + 5𝑥 − 3 = 0 is a quadratic equation in standard form with a = 2,

b = 5, and c = -3.

Example 2 : 3𝑥(𝑥 − 2) = 10 is a quadratic equation. However, it is not written in


standard form. To write the equation in standard form, expand the product and make
one side of the equation zero.

3𝑥(𝑥 − 2) = 10 3𝑥 2 − 6𝑥 = 10

3𝑥 2 − 6𝑥 − 10 = 10 − 10

3𝑥 2 − 6𝑥 − 10 = 0

The equation becomes 3𝑥 2 − 6𝑥 − 10 = 0, which is in standard form.

In the equation 3𝑥 2 − 6𝑥 − 10 = 0, a = 3, b = -6, and c = -10

IV. APPLICATION

Activity 3: Quadratic or Not Quadratic?


Directions: Identify which of the following equations are quadratic and which
are not? If the equation is not quadratic, explain.

1. 3𝑚 + 8 = 15 6. 25 − 𝑟 2 = 4𝑟
2. 𝑥 2 − 5𝑥 + 10 = 0 7. 3𝑥(𝑥 − 2) = −7
1
3. 12 − 4𝑥 = 0 8. (ℎ − 6) = 0
2
4. 2𝑡 2 − 7𝑡 = 12 9. (𝑥 + 2)2 = 0
5. 6 − 2𝑥 + 3𝑥 2 = 0 10. (𝑤 − 8)(𝑤 + 5) = 14
Activity 4: Set Me To Your Standard!
Directions: Write each quadratic equation in standard form, 𝑎𝑥 2 + 𝑏𝑥 + 𝑐 = 0
then identify the values of a, b, and c. Answer the questions that follow.

1. 3𝑥 − 2𝑥 2 = 7 6. (𝑥 + 7)(𝑥 − 7) = −3𝑥
2. 5 − 2𝑥 2 = 6𝑥 7. (𝑥 − 4)2 + 8 = 0
3. (𝑥 + 3)(𝑥 + 4) = 0 8. (𝑥 + 2)2 = 3(𝑥 + 2)
4. (2𝑥 + 7)(𝑥 − 1) = 0 9. (2𝑥 − 1)2 = (𝑥 + 1)2
5. 2𝑥(𝑥 − 3) = 15 10. 2𝑥(𝑥 + 4) = (𝑥 − 3)(𝑥 − 3)

Questions:

1. How did you write each quadratic equation in standard form?


2. What mathematics concepts or principles did you apply to write each quadratic
equation in standard form? Discuss how you applied these mathematics concepts or
principles?
3. Which quadratic equations did you find difficult to write in standard form? Why?

Activity 5: Dig Deeper!


Directions: Answer the following questions

1. How are quadratic equations different from linear equations?


2. How do you write quadratic equations in standard form? Give at least 3 examples.
3. The following are the values of a, b, and c. that Edna and Luisa got when they
expressed 5 − 3𝑥 = 2𝑥 2 in standard form.
Edna: a = 2 ; b = 3 ; c = -5
Luisa: a = -2 ; b = -3 ; c = 5

Who do you think got the correct values of a, b, and c? Justify your answer.