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INTRODUCTION

Marpol 73/78 is the International Convention for


the Prevention of Pollution From Ships, 1973
as modified by the Protocol of 1978.
("Marpol" is short for marine pollution and 
73/78 short for the years 1973 and 1978.)
Marpol 73/78 is one of the most important 
international marine environmental
conventions. It was designed to minimize 
pollution of the seas, including dumping, oil 
and exhaust pollution. 
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The Objectives
At the end of the course, the trainees must
be able to:
Define marine pollution 
 Discuss the impact of marine pollution
 Describe how ships contribute to marine 
pollution
 Enumerate and explain ways of preventing 
marine pollution
 State the rules governing marine pollution
 Explain the principles involved in preventing 
marine pollution by cargo oil through specific 
construction and requirements for oil tanker 
and to comply with the relevant operational 
requirements 2
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 Its stated object is: to preserve 

the marine environment through 
the complete elimination of 
pollution by oil and other harmful 
substances and the minimization 
of accidental discharge of such 
substances.

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INTRODUCTION
 The original MARPOL Convention was 

signed on 17 February 1973, but did not 
come into force. The current Convention is 
a combination of 1973 Convention and 
the 1978 Protocol. 
 It entered into force on 2 October 1983. As 
of 31 December 2005, 136 countries, 
representing 98% of the world's shipping 
tonnage, are parties to the Convention
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All ships flagged under countries that 
are signatories to MARPOL are 
subject to its requirements, 
regardless of where they sail, and 
member nations are responsible for 
vessels registered under their 
respective nationalities.

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Marpol Annex I
Regulation for the Prevention of Pollution by Oil
entered into force 02 Oct. 1983/Revised 01 jan. 2007

Basic Principle of Marine Pollution


As seen from the space, the blue
color of the planet earth is the vast
water of ocean surrounding the
beautiful planet about 70% of earth
is comprised of water.
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Ocean are the biggest stores of water 
on earth.
Water leaves the oceans through the 
evaporation and then enters again 
through rainfalls, lakes, rivers and 
ground water.

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There was a time man thought that the 
ocean was infinite and everything was 
absorbed by it. 
Ocean and seas literally became the 
receptors of almost all kinds of refuse 
originating from shore, as well as 
waste coming from ship.

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 In 1972, the united nation conference 
on human environment was held in 
stockholm, sweden.
 The conference provided an 
international forum to resolve 
environmental issues that included 
marine environment.

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 In the same year, another international 
conference  was held in london.
 This was the international convention on 
the prevention of pollution by dumping 
of waste and other matters ( london 
dumping convention)

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 In 1973, the international convention
for the prevention of marine pollution
from ships was adopted.
 This has been the most comprehensive
convention as regard to the protection
of marine environment coming from
ship.
 This convention was modified by the
1978 protocol relating thereto.
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 It is popularly called MARPOL 73/78.
 From this convention, the international
regulation for prevention and control of
marine pollution become an important
concern of the marine community.

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VARIOUS MEANING OF POLLUTION
 The word pollution defined as something that
makes a pure thing impure. Scientifically,
pollution is the chemical gaseous and organic
waste, which contaminate air, soil, or water.
 Anything that pollutes these earth’s element

is called pollutant.

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 Environmental pollution basically refers 
to all kinds of pollution in the earth 
environment.
 There are different meaning of 
environmental pollution.
 The meaning depend on what part of 
the earth element has been polluted. 
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 The marine pollution is only one type of 
environmental pollution.
 For the purpose of distinguishing marine 
pollution from the other types of 
environmental pollution

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 Air pollution is also called atmospheric
pollution. Atmosphere outside our home
may contain pollutants such as dust, smoke,
vapors, etc.
 Substantial quantities of these pollutants
stay within the atmosphere for a period of
time.

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 The quantities and duration oftentimes
create harmful effect to person, places,
animal, and things.
 Dust, fuel exhaust, and air rockets debris
are some of the air pollutants which result
from man’s entry to space.

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 Water pollution is refer to alteration opf 
water which reduces the quality of its 
usefulness to people, plants, animals, 
and properties.
 Water pollution can be considered as a 
major pollution in the Philippines and 
other developing countries.

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 Sound pollution refers to any sound that is
too loud and irritating to human ears is
called sound pollution. Noise is measured in
decibels

20
 Pollution from solid waste or refuse are in form
garbage, rubbish, demolition debris, street litters,
etc.they originate from the activities of both
human and animal.

21
 Pollution from hazardous waste are 
either liquid or solid waste or a 
combination of waste that pose or 
create hazard to human or living 
organism for the following reason:
– Waste are non degradable
– Waste can be biologically magnified
– Waste tend to cause detrimental 
cumulative effect 22
 The hazardous waste can be categorized
in accordance to the following:
– Chemical waste
– Radioactive substance waste
– Biological waste
– Flammable waste
– Explosive waste

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 Marine pollution after knowing the
concept of other types of environmental
pollution, it is now distinguish the
meaning of marine pollution.
 In defining marine pollution, the united
nation conference on environment and
development (UNCED) used the definition
adopted by the group of expert on scientific
aspect of marine pollution (GESAMP).

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 Marine Pollution is defined as “an 
introduction of man directly or indirectly, 
of substance or energy into the marine 
environment (including estuaries) 
resulting in such deleterious effect as 
harmful to living resources, hazard to 
human health, hindrance to marine 
activities including fishing, impairment of 
quality for use of sea water and 
reduction of amenities.

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AIR POLLUTION

HAZARDOUS WASTE 28
International concern on marine 
pollution
In the last fifty years, expression of 
concern towards prevention and control 
of marine pollution and protection of 
marine environment were brought into a 
number of international conferences. The 
following is the series of international 
convention relating to marine pollution in 
the 2nd half of the 20th century
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HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT
Oil  enters  the  sea  as  a  result  of 
natural  phenomena;  it  also  enters 
the  sea  as  a  result  of  man’s 
activity. 
Whether  through  natural  seepage, 
accidental  spill,  or  long-term,  low 
level discharges, the pressure of oil 
in  the  marine  environment  is  to 
some extent unavoidable.
 

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HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT
In  tonnage  terms,  the  most  important 
pollutant  resulting  from  shipping 
operations is oil. 
The  National  Academy  of  Science 
(NAS) of the United States estimated in 
1980  that  as  much  as  3.54  million  tons 
of oil entered the sea every year, 
some  1.5  million  tons  of  which  resulted 
from  the  transport  of  oil  by  sea  (the 
remainder  came  from  kind  based 
activities and included industrial wastes, 
urban run-off and natural seeps).
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HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT
The  ships  of  the  world  tanker  fleet  have 
changed dramatically in size. In 1950’s ships 
of 30,000 tons deadweight were regarded as 
a  very  large;  today,  tanker  of  250.000  tons 
deadweight are commonplace.
  A much greater quantity of oil enters the sea 
as  a  result  of  normal  tanker  operations, 
usually associated with the cleaning of cargo 
residues  (clingage)  which  takes  place  when 
the  ship  is  returning  from  the  port  of 
discharge to take on cargo oil. 

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HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT
The  amount  of  clingage  normally 
amounts  about  0.4%  of  cargo 
carrying  capacity  –  about  800  tons 
on a 200,000 dwt crude oil carrier. 
During  ballasting  and  cleaning  as 
much  as  half  of  this  can  be  lost 
overboard unless slops are retained 
on board. 

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HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT
In  tonnage  terms,  this  still  probably 
the  biggest  source  of  oil  pollution 
from  ships  –  about  700,000  tons  a 
year,  according  to  the  NAS  –  but  it 
has  declined  considerably  in  recent 
years.

34
Pollution
Any inconvenience or 
damage caused by 
human activities to 
humans, plants 
animals and to our 
environment as a 
whole by spreading 
compounds to air, 
water or land.

35
Effects of Marine Pollution
It blankets the surface interfering with
the oxygen exchanged between the
sea and the atmosphere.
Blankets the seabed, interfering with
the growth of marine life
elements are mostly toxic and can
enter the food chain
oil may enter sea water distilling
inlets and it may be deposited on tidal
mudflats again with detrimental result
interferes with the recreational uses of
beaches

36
Main Sources of Marine Pollution
Land-based Sources:
by products of industry
run-off from agricultural 
pesticides and herbicides
effluents discharged from 
urban areas
Exploration and 
exploitation activities

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Main Sources of Marine Pollution

Shipping and Maritime Industry


collision
grounding  or accidental 
discharge
operational discharges
 tank washing
 ballasting / deballasting
 machinery space discharge
 docking 

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Some of the best known cause of oil pollution

by tanker accidents :

Braer – 1993 Shetland Island, 
U.K
Oil lost-85,000 MT
Sea Empress – 1996 Melford 
Haven
Oil lost-72,000 MT
Exxon Valdez – Alaska, U.S.A 
Oil lost-37,000 MT
Torrey Canyon – 1967 Sicily 
Isle, U.K 
Oil lost-119,000 MT

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Some of the best known cause of oil pollution

Urquiola Castillo de Beliber


1976 La Corona, spain South Africa
Oil lost-100,000 MT Oil lost- 252,000 MT
Hawaiian Patriot Amoco Cadiz
1977 Honolulu, Hawaii 1978 Brittany, France
Oil lost-95,000 MT Oil lost-223,000 MT
Atlantic Empress Haven 
1979 Off Tobago  1991 Genoa, Italy
Oil lost- 287,000 MT Oil lost 144,000 MT
Abt Summer Odessy
1991 Angola 1988  Nova  Scotia 
Oil lost-260,000 MT Canada 40
Oil Lost – 132,000 MT
41
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International Convention to Control the
Marine Pollution

1929  –  An  International  Conference 


was held in Washington D.C in attempt 
to  control  the  discharge  f  oil  into  the 
sea.

1948  –  IMCO  was  established  in 


Geneva and changed to IMO in 1982

43
International Convention to Control the
Marine Pollution
1954  –  International  Convention  for  the 
Prevention  of  Pollution  of  the  sea  by  oil 
(OILPOL ‘54) 
 Hosted by U.K 
 Entered into force in 1958
 Distinction  was  made  between  oil  and  oily 
mixtures  from  machinery  space  and  from 
cargo tanks.
 Oil  was  defined  as  crude  oil,  fuel  oil  and 
heavy diesel oil.
 Prohibited  zones  were  laid  down  for  the 
discharge of cargo oil into the sea. (50 nm /  44
100 ppm / reception facility)
International Convention to Control the
Marine Pollution
1958 – IMO assumed OILPOL’54 and
entered into force. The depository/
secretariat function in relation to
convention were transferred to IMO
1967 – Torrey Canyon incident and the
biggest pollution incident at that time and
IMO decided to convene on 1969 in
response to the incident. They raised
question about the technical and legal
aspects. 45
International Convention to Control the
Marine Pollution
 1969 – IMO decided to convene an
International Conference on 1973
- Amendments on the requirements
regarding the quality of the effluents.
- Limitations on the quantities of oil
which tankers were permitted to
discharge into the sea.

46
International Convention to Control the
Marine Pollution
1973  –  IMO  adopted  International 
Convention  for  the  prevention  of 
pollution from Ships (MARPOL ‘73) and 
incorporated OILPOL ’54 in response to 
Torrey Canyon incident.
- Agreement  was  made  on  the 
contamination  of  the  sea,  land  and  air 
by ships.
- Two protocols were made
- It  needs  to  be  ratified  by  15  IMO 
member  countries  with  50%  gross 
tonnage of the world fleet
47
International Convention to Control the
Marine Pollution

1976  –  Only  3  IMO  member 


countries  ratified  the 
Convention with only 1 % GT of 
the  total  world  fleet.  (Jordan 
Kenya and Tunisia)
1976-77 – Two tanker incidents 
(Urquiola and Hawaiian Patriot)
48
International Convention to Control the
Marine Pollution
1978 –  IMO  held  a  conference  on 
(TSPP)  Tanker Safety and Pollution 
Prevention  and  it  includes  tanker 
design and operation in response to 
the two tanker incident
They  incorporated  the  1978 
Protocols  to  1974  SOLAS 
Convention  and  adopted  on 
February 17, 1978.
49
International Convention to Control the
Marine Pollution

The condition to entry into force:
States  become  party  to  the 
convention  by  first 
implementing  ANNEX  I  and 
ANNEX II. 
 1983  –  October  2,  MARPOL 
73/78  entered  into  force  for 
Annex I and II
50
MARPOL 73/78
International Convention for the Prevention of 
Pollution  from  Ships  adopted  on  November 
1973 modified by a protocol of 1978.
 
It  contains  comprehensive  provisions 
compared to the previous conventions

– An  abbreviation  derived  from  the  words 


marine and pollution
– It  is  directed  towards  limiting  marine 
pollution caused by damaged to ships and 
day to day operation of the ships.

51
MARPOL 73/78

Objective of the
MARPOL 73/78
MARPOL 73/78 desires 
to achieve the complete 
elimination of intentional 
pollution of the 
environment by OIL and 
other harmful substance 
and to minimize 
accidental discharge. 
52
MARPOL 73/78
MARPOL Convention consists of:
– 20 Articles
– 2 Protocols and
– 6 annexes
MARPOL Annex I contain:
– 39 regulations
– 7 chapters
– 3 Appendices
53
MARPOL 73/78
International Convention for the Prevention of
Pollution from Ships adopted on November
1973 modified by a protocol of 1978.

It contains comprehensive provisions


compared to the previous conventions

– An abbreviation derived from the words


marine and pollution
– It is directed towards limiting marine
pollution caused by damaged to ships and
day to day operation of the ships. 54
MARPOL 73/78
Annex I
Chapter 1 – GENERAL
Regulation
1 Definition
2 Applications
3 Exemptions and waivers
4 Exception
5 Equivalents
55
MARPOL 73/78
Annex I
Chapter 2 – Surveys and Certifications
Regulation
6 Surveys
7 Issue or Endorsement of Certificates 
8 Issue or Endorsement of Certificates 
another Government
9 Form of Certificate
10 Duration and Validity of Certificate
11 Port State Control operational on 
requirements
56
MARPOL 73/78
Annex I
Chapter 3 – Requirements for Machinery 
spaces of all ships
(Part A - Construction)
Regulation 
12 Tanks for Oil Residues
 sludge 
13 –Standard Discharge Connections

57
MARPOL 73/78
Annex I
(Part B - Equipment)
Regulation 
14 oil filtering equipment
(Part C – Control of Operational 
Discharge of Oil)
Regulation 
15 Control of Discharge of Oil
16 Segregation of oil and water ballast 
and carriage of oil in forepeak tank 
17 oil Record Book (Part I) 58
MARPOL 73/78
Annex I
Chapter 4 – Requirements for the Cargo 
area  of  Oil tankers
(Part A - Construction)
18 – Segregated ballast tanks
19 – double hull and double bottom 
requirements for oil tankers delivered on 
or after July 6, 1996 
20 – double hull and double bottom 
requirements for oil tankers delivered on 
or after July 6, 1996
59
MARPOL 73/78
Annex I
 Regulation

          21 – Prevention of oil pollution 
from oil tankers carrying heavy 
grade oil as cargo
22 – Pump-room bottom protection
23 – Accidental oil outflow 
performance
24 – damage assumptions
25 – Hypothetical outflow of oil  60
MARPOL 73/78
Annex I
Regulation 
26  –limitations  of  size  and 
arrangement of cargo tanks
27 – Intact stability
28 – Subdivision and stability
29 – Slop tanks
30–pumping,  piping  and 
discharge  arrangement
61
MARPOL 73/78
Annex I
(Part B - Equipment)
Regulation
       31 – Oil discharge monitoring 
and control   system
32 – Oil/Water interface detector
33 – Crude oil washing 
requirement
62
MARPOL 73/78
Annex I
(Part C – Control of operational 
discharge of oil)
Regulation
34 – Control of discharge of oil
35 – Crude oil washing operation
36 – Oil Record Book (Part II)
63
MARPOL 73/78
Annex I
Chapter 5 – Prevention of oil 
Pollution arising   from an oil 
pollution incident

Regulation
      37 – shipboard oil pollution 
emergency plan
64
MARPOL 73/78
Annex I
Chapter 6 – Reception Facility
Regulation 
38 – Reception facility
Chapter 7 – Special requirements 
for fixed and floating platforms
Regulation 
39 – Special requirements for 
fixed and floating platforms 65
ARTICLES OF MARPOL 73/78

Regulate  the  relationship  between 


states and foreign ships.

Regulate  the  extent  to  which  a  port 


state interfere with a foreign ships.

66
ARTICLES OF MARPOL 73/78
Cooperation between states when 
investigating violation
Protocol 1 – concern the duty of 
Master to report
Protocol 2 – deals with arbitration in 
cases of disputes

67
Technical Annexes of MARPOL
73/78
Annex 1 – Oil (Oct. 2, 1983)
Annex 2 – NLS (April 6, 1987)
Annex 3 – Harmful Substance Carried in

Package form (July 1, 1992)


Annex 4 – Sewage (Sept. 27, 2003)
Annex 5 – Garbage (Dec. 31, 1988)
68
Party to MARPOL 73/78
Coastal State –  main  function  of 
which is  surveillance

Port State – main function of which is 


for  inspection  and  if  necessary 
detention

Flag State –  main  function  of  which 


is compliance 69
Vessel Regulation Terms
Flag State
- Nation where a vessel is registered

- Vessel is essentially granted nationality

Port State
- Nation where a vessel intend to dock

Coastal State
- Nation within which a vessel passes
through a territorial sea or EEZ
70
Flag State Responsibility
- Regulates safety
- Manning of ship and competence of crew
- Sets  construction,  design,  equipment  and 
seaworthiness standards
- Enforce regulation on high seas
- Must inspect at periodic intervals
- Issue an IOPP certificate

71
Benefits of Port State control

- Improved  efficiency  for 


collecting  evidence  and  finding 
violations

- Reduces  needs  for  coastal 


states  to  interfere    with  ships 
while in transit
72
Regulation 11 : Port State Control on
Operational Requirements

(1) A  ship  when  in  port  or  an  offshore 


terminal  of  another  party  is  subject  to 
inspection by officer duly authorized by 
such  party  concerning  operational 
requirements  under  this  annex,  where 
there  are  clear  grounds  for  believing 
that the master or crew are not familiar 
with  essential  ship  bound  procedures 
relating to the prevention of pollution by 
oil.
73
Reporting of Incidents
Article 8 of MARPOL 73/78
Requires  ships  Master  to  report 
incident  involving  the  discharge  of 
harmful substance into the sea.
Actions  by  coastal  state  is  often 
necessary  and  it  is  important  that 
states  are  informed  of  any  incident 
resulting in the discharge of harmful 
substance.

74
Reporting of Incidents

The  reporting  requirements 


apply  not  only  to  actual 
discharges but also to  probable 
discharge

75
Reporting of Incidents
Harmful  substances  covered  by  the 
reporting requirements:
a. Oil
b. NLS
c. Harmful  substances  in 
packaged form
An  initial  report  must  be  sent  to 
the  nearest  coastal  state  as  soon 
as  possible  by  the  fastest 
telecommunications  means 
available. 76
Reporting of Incidents
Contents of initial report as:
- Name of ship, call sign, flag
- Frequency or radio guarded channel
- Name, address, telex and telephone number 
of owner and representative 
- Type of ship
- Date and time (URC) of incident
- Description of the incident, including damage 
sustained
- Ship’s  position,  course,  speed,  as 
appropriate at time of incident
- Type of oil involved
77
- Other cargo carried
Regulation 1 - definition
OIL – is defined in Annex 1 as petroleum 
in  any  form  including  crude  oil,  fuel  oil, 
sludge, oil refuse and refined products

78
Regulation 1 - definition

OILY MIXTURE –  a  mixture  with 


any oil content
OIL FUEL –  any  oil  used  as  fuel 
in  connection  with  the 
propulsion  and  auxiliary 
machinery  of  the  ship  in  which 
such oil is carried
79
Annex 1 – Oil 

 Annex 1 oil ranges form crude 

oil, heavy products oil and light 
distillates. It is either used 
onboard or carried as cargo.

80
Annex 1 – Oil 
The scope of Annex 1 is wider than 
that of the preceding OILPOL ’54 
convention which limited itself to 
persistent or black oils. Generally, 
Annex 1 prohibits the discharge of 
oil into the sea.
2 sources of oil/ water discharges 
are:
- Machinery spaces 
- cargo/ballast tanks spaces 81
Principles of Environmental protection

- Minimize the generation of oil and water 
mixtures
- Separate oil from water where mixtures 
cannot be avoided
- Set limits to the quantity of oil which may be 
discharged into the sea
- Set effluent standards so as to render any 
discharge harmless to take extra protective 
measures for special areas and coastal 
zones 
82
Principles of Environmental protection

Carrying oil in tanks which are


protected from direct impact by
collision and grounding
- Limit the size of the cargo tanks

- Carrying oil in ships which have a


greater survival capability in case
of damage
83
Principles can be implemented through:

Construction requirements
Equipment requirements
Operational requirements

84
Construction, Equipment and Operating
requirements can be verified by the following:

Survey and certification – flag state


control
Boarding and inspection – port
state control
Airborne surveillance – coastal
state control
85
85
Oil Record Book
 port and flag state control record of oil

content produced by oil

Discharged Monitoring and Control


Systems
 Port and flag state control

86
87
Regulation 38: Reception Facility

 The government party to


MARPOL 73/78 must ensure to
provide the reception facilities in
all their ports to collect ship’s
residues and without causing
undue delay to ships
88
Control of Oil Discharges from
Machinery spaces

 Waste Oil – generated in


machinery spaces by a number of
sources such as crankcases and
gear cases which used lubricating
oil and oil purifiers which creates
oil sludge.
89
Measures to minimize the generation
of oily waste

It can be minimized by:


- Reconditioning (purifying)

- Incinerating (onboard incinerator)

- Disposal to shore reception facility

90
SPECIAL AREAS
Means a sea area for recognized
technical reasons in relation to its
oceanographical location, ecological
condition and to the particular
character of its traffic, the adoption of
special mandatory methods for the
prevention of sea pollution by oil is
prohibited.
91
SPECIAL AREAS
1. Mediterranean sea 6. Gulf of Aden
2. Baltic Sea 7. Antarctic Area
3. Black sea 8. North – West
European Waters
4. Red sea 9. Gulf of Oman
5. Gulf sea

92
SPECIAL AREAS

In respect of Antarctic area, any discharge into the sea of oil 
or oily mixtures  from any ship shall be prohibited.

93
SPECIAL AREAS

94
95
Discharge Provisions
Regulation 15 ( Control of operational discharge of oil )
MACHINERY SPACE - OUTSIDE SPECIAL AREA

Discharges of oil or oily mixtures from ships shall be


prohibited.

From ships of 400 gross tonnage and above shall be


prohibited except for the following conditions:
1. the ship is proceeding en route
2. the mixtures are processed by filtering equipment
3. without dilution does not exceed 15ppm
4. does not originate from cargo pump room
5. not mixed with cargo residues

96
Discharge Provisions 
 Regulation 15 ( Control of operational discharge of oil )  
                  
     MACHINERY SPACE  - IN SPECIAL AREA

Discharges of oil or oily mixtures from ships


shall be prohibited.
From ships of 400 gross tonnage and above
shall be prohibited except for the following
conditions:
1. the ship is proceeding en route
2. the mixtures are processed by filtering
equipment
3. without dilution does not exceed 15ppm with

automatic stopping
4. does not originate from cargo pump room97
Discharge Provisions
MACHINERY SPACE
Outside Special area Within Special area
Regulation 15 Regulation 15

1. En route 1. En route
2. Oil filtering equipment 2. Oil filtering equipment with
3. 15 ppm level alarm and automatic
4. Not from cargo pump stopping
room 3. 15 ppm
5. Not mixed with cargo 4. Not from cargo pump room
residues 5. Not mixed with cargo
98
residues
Construction and Equipment for
Machinery Spaces for Environmental
Protection ( Reg.16)
 Ships delivered after

1979 should no
longer be provided
with dual purpose
tanks (ex. to hold
fuel oil or ballast)

99
Construction and Equipment for
Machinery Spaces for Environmental
Protection ( Reg.16)
If dual purpose
tanks are necessary,
such as the deep sea
tugs, any oil water
mixtures may only
be discharged into
the sea in
compliance with the
discharge provisions.
100
Construction and Equipment for
Machinery Spaces for Environmental
Protection ( Reg.16)
 Prohibition on the
use of forepeak tank
or tank forward of
the collision
bulkhead to carry
oil since they are
considered to be
vulnerable to
damage.
101
Regulation 12 Sludge Tank
Every ships of 400 gross tonnage shall be
provided with sludge tank to receive all
residues from machinery spaces.
Piping to and from sludge tank shall have
no direct connection overboard or to
reception facilities other than the
standard discharge connection.

102
Fitting of one or more
bilge water holding
tanks which collect the
bilge water generated
in port

103
Regulation 14 Oil Filtering
Equipment
Any ships shall be fitted
with oil filtering
equipment approved by
the administration based
on IMO specification.
For ships of 10,000 gt and
above, it shall be
provided with alarm
arrangement.

104
The administration may waive the
requirements for Filtering
equipments to ships:

Engaged exclusively on voyages within


special area and high-Speed Craft
provided that the ship:

- has holding tanks


- must retained onboard the oily bilge
and be discharged to reception
facility
- port of calls must have reception
facilities
105
Oil Filtering Equipment

106
Types of Filtering Systems

Coalesce type filter


The filter tank
contains a
hydrophilic
material i.e. a
material with a
capability for
absorbing or
taking up water
rather than oil. 107
Types of Filtering Systems

Absorption type
filter
The bed consist
of a material
which is
oleophilic i. e.
with a capability
for taking up oil
rather than
water.
108
Oily water separators and auxiliary
equipment possible problems
 The first problem centers on the capacity
of the oily separators.
 The second problem is that the
separation process is adversely affected
by detergents used in cleaning the engine
room and its bilges, or by emulsifiers
present in lubricating oil.
 Another problem is caused by the
deterioration in the quality of fuel oil.
109
3 Ways of Disposing Residues

1. Mixing with
bunkers
2. Discharge to
shore reception

facilities
3. Incineration
110