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Title of Article

First Name MI. Surname, First Name MI. Surname, &


First Name MI. Surname, First Name MI. Surname
Name of Department
Bulacan State University – Meneses Campus

Abstract

Summarize your whole thesis manuscript into 300 words. Do not indent the first line. This section
should provide the most important aspects of your study. The introductory sentence should
describe the research problem and address the reason why the study is important. It may seek to
address the research gap. The next sentence should briefly describe the study’s methodology. For
quantitative research, you can write, “Through a quasi-experiment carried out over an eight-week
period with undergraduate students (n = 100) in a state university, the study investigated . . .” For
qualitative research, you can write, “By conducting key informant interviews with community
leaders (n = 6) and health officials (n = 9) in an urban village in Bulacan, this study explored . . .”
These foregoing examples already provide the readers information regarding the number of people
involved in the study, the research method you employed, and the place where you conducted the
study (you may choose not to provide the name of the specific place). Afterwards, you present the
most important findings of your study in one to two sentences. The same goes when presenting
your conclusions and recommendations or implications. Use the present tense of verbs in stating
your results or conclusions that have continuing applicability (e.g., The research reveals that . . . ).
However, use the past tense in describing how the variables were measured in the study (e.g., This
study employed . . . ). Use the active voice.

Keywords: lorem ipsum; dolor; consectetur; cras pretium (Include four or five most important
concepts. Use specific keywords that capture the most relevant aspects of your thesis. )

I. Introduction

Introduce the specific problem and discuss why it is important. You may start with a brief
background about the topic. In particular, you can write about how the topic has been studied or
has been developed as a research area. You may also argue why the topic has not been fully studied
despite its relevance. If it has been fully studied, justify why there is still a need to study it. You
may then pay attention to addressing the research gap in the body of literature.

Establishing the importance of the topic can be done at the micro or macro level. The
importance of the topic can be established for a particular discipline (e.g., “Investigating self-
efficacy is a continuing concern within the field of . . .”), community, or a wider society (e.g.,
“One of the increasingly recognized public issues is . . .”). A summary of literature may also be
offered (e.g., “Recent developments in educational psychology have highlighted the need for . .
.”).
The next part should focus on specifying the issues that underlie the topic. In doing so, you
are highlighting the problem of your study (e.g., “However, the availabil-ity of new technologies
presents a challenge to educators . . .”). You may also pay atten-tion to what has not been studied
yet in the body of literature (e.g., “Previous studies concerning academic motivation have not
dealth with . . .”). This then becomes your opportunity to present the research gap (e.g., “There has
been limited analysis of . . .”).

The last part should provide the readers an idea of you intend to pursue your study (e.g.,
“This thesis intends to determine . . .”). This is the part where you have to answer why there is a
need to study your topic. It is also important to point out the po-tential contribution of your study
to the body of knowledge or literature or its implica-tions to policy or practice (e.g., This study
aims to contribute to the research base about . . .”).

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State clearly the research objectives. Use the declarative form in stating the main and specific
objectives of your study (e.g., The general objective of this study is to (for quantitative research,
use verbs such as determine, analyze, investigate, and examine; for qualitative research, use verbs
such as explore, understand, describe, and discover).

II. Methods

Methods and Techniques of the Study


Describe your research design (use past tense). You may choose from the following:
qualitative, descriptive, correlational (explanatory), correlational (predictive), experimental, or
mixed methods research design. Define it (use present tense). Provide the rationale or explain the
reason for using it. Also include the limitations in using it.
For your next paragraph, you may discuss the specific research method you employed (use
past tense). You may choose from the following: in-depth interview, key informant interview,
focus group discussion, survey, or true experiment (post-test design; pre-test post-test design).
Define it (use present tense). Provide the rationale or explain the reason for using it.

Population and Sample of the Study


Describe the population that the respondents or participants represent. Describe the
geographical or socioeconomic location. Provide the rationale for choosing them as sample for
your study. The following are the terms that you have to use for each method (and throughout the
thesis manuscript): respondents for survey, participants for experiment, informants for key
informant interviews and in-depth interviews, and participants or discussants for focus group
discussion.

Sampling Design
Describe your sampling procedures in selecting the sample from the population.
Provide the rationale for using the sampling method (Justify its use.) You may choose from the
following: simple random sampling, systematic random sampling, stratified random sampling,
purposive sampling, snowball sampling, or convenience sampling.

Research Instrument
Describe in detail the contents of your instrument. If you utilized more than one research
instrument, list them and discuss how you used each of these instruments. Indicate if you adapted
a research instrument with permission from other author/s. If you developed your own research
instrument, discuss the steps you undertook from its creation to validation. Examples of research
instruments are the following: questionnaire (survey), test (pre-test or post-test; experiment), and
interview schedule or guide (qualitative research).

Data Gathering Procedures


Describe specifically how you collected the research data. This may include steps prior to
and during the data collection. You should be able to discuss the step-by-step procedures you
carried out throughout the period of your data collection.
An important aspect of your study is how you employed ethical considerations. Discuss how
you ensured the following considerations: confidentiality, privacy, anonymity, informed consent,
statistical treatment of data.

Data Analysis
Identify the descriptive and inferential statistics (for quantitative studies) or analysis (for
qualitative studies) that will be employed in the study. You may choose from the following
statistical tools: frequency, percentage, weighted mean, Pearson Correlation (for continuous
variables) (if no violations in the assumptions; otherwise, use Spearman Correlation [for ordinal
variables; use median]), Chi-square (for categorical/nominal variables), Multiple Regression,
Linear Regression, Ordinal Regression, ANOVA (for continuous variables; three groups), t-test
(for continuous variables; two groups) (if no violations in the assumptions; otherwise, use Kruskal-
Wallis Test and Mann-Whitney U Test [for ordinal variables; use median]). For qualitative

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research, you may indicate if you conducted coding through content analysis, thematic analysis,
or thematic network analysis.
If you used a questionnaire that incorporates a Likert scale, you should provide a table for
the range, scale, and interpretation. The same goes with providing a table of interpretation for
Pearson Correlation or Spearman Correlation. Here’s an example:
Range Scale Interpretation
4.21 – 5.00 5 Strongly Agree
3.41 – 4.20 4 Agree
2.61 – 3.40 3 Neither Disagree nor Agree
1.81 – 2.60 2 Disagree
1.00 – 1.80 1 Strongly Disagree

III. Results and Discussion

Write the title of this subsection in bold letters (Each subsection of this chapter should be
aligned to each research question in your ‘Statement of the Problem’ section.)

Present a summary of your data in table and figure forms. Use the APA format. Refer to
tables by their number (e.g., “As shown in Table 1, . . .”; “Table 2 indicates . . .”; “Table 3 shows
. . .”). Do not write “the table shows” or “the table below (or above) shows”.

Table X

Pretest and Posttest Mean and Standard Deviation for Direct Instruction and
Web 2.0-based Instruction

Direct Web 2.0-based


Instruction Instruction
Test n = 15 n = 16
M SD M SD t-value df p-value Decision

Pretest 77.07* 1.83 77.06** 1.77 .01 29 .995 Accept

Posttest 86.61 6.11 89.95 5.48 -19.39* 29 .000 Reject


Note. This is where general notes to a tables are provided. This includes definitions of
abbreviations. The word ‘Note’ should be italicized.
* This asterisk pertains to a probability note (p value) for two-tailed tests. Examples are: *p <
.05, two-tailed. **p < .01, two-tailed. ***p < .01, two-tailed.

This dagger pertains to a probability note (p value) for one-tailed tests. Examples are: †p < .05,
one-tailed. ††p < .01, two-tailed. †††p < .01, two-tailed.

Notice how each table should be given table number and a table title below it. Capitalize
each word of the title. Do not make any text in any part of this section bold or bigger. Horizontal
lines should only be found between the title and the table, between the column labels and the data,
and below the data. Also pay attention to the use of Note, asterisk, and dagger below the table.
Here is an example of a table for showing descriptive results:

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Table 1
Profile of the Respondents
Frequency and Percentage Distribution of the Respondents

Profile Frequency Percentage


Sex
Female 74 100
Male - -

Age
18-27 11 14.9
28-37 12 16.2
38-47 18 24.3
48-57 19 25.7
58-67 12 16.2
68-77 2 2.7

Civil Status
Single 17 23.0
Married 41 55.4
Widowed 10 13.5
Separated 6 8.1

Here are other examples with corresponding explanations:

Table X

Weighted Mean Scores of the Respondents’ Attitudes toward Mental Health

Frequency
SD D N A SA Weighted
Item Interpretation
n n n n n Mean
(%) (%) (%) (%) (%)

1. Item 4
4 24 146 122 3.27 Neutral
(1.3
(1.3) (8.0) (48.7) (40.7)
)

n
2. Item n n n n 2.41 Disagree
(0.0
(0.0) (0.0) (0.0) (0.0)
)

n
3. Item n n n n 2.51 Neutral
(0.0
(0.0) (0.0) (0.0) (0.0)
)

4. Item n
n n n n 2.42 Disagree
(0.0
(0.0) (0.0) (0.0) (0.0)
)

n
5. Item n n n n 2.35 Disagree
(0.0
(0.0) (0.0) (0.0) (0.0)
)
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If the table is split into two parts, write ‘Table X
Table 1 (continued) (continued)’ on the next page. Weighted Mean

n
6. Item n n n n 2.01 Disagree
(0.0
(0.0) (0.0) (0.0) (0.0)
)

7. Item n
n n n n 2.39 Disagree
(0.0
(0.0) (0.0) (0.0) (0.0)
)

Overall Weighted Mean 2.48 Disagree

Note. SD = Strongly Disagree; D = Disagree; N = Neutral; A = Agree; SA = Strongly Agree

The questions that need to be addressed are applicable to other statistical treatments:
(What does the table show? Do not discuss all the details found in the table. Focus on the highest
or lowest [extreme] values.) The respondents were asked to rate their level of agreement with the
statements. It is evident in Table X that the weighted mean scores of the attitudes of the respondents
towards (name of the variable). (What is the overall mean score?) As shown in Table 1, it is
noticeable that they answered ‘disagree’ in majority of the statements with a weighted mean score
of 2.48 (OR they disagreed with majority of the statements (M= 2.48). (What are the specific
results that have the highest mean values [or the lowest mean values]? What do the result/s
mean?) The lowest level of agreement was reflected in the perception that once an individual has
experienced mental health problem, he or she is no longer capable of surviving it throughout his
or her life (M = 2.01).
(What does the result mean?) The respondents were thus consistent in terms of their
perception that everyone can be hit by mental health problems. They also perceive that using labels
to stigmatize individuals with such problems is not acceptable.How will you relate your result to
finding/s from previous studies? (Go back to your Chapter 2 then paraphrase such relevant
findings.) This result was consistent with that of Dela Cruz (2016) which highlighted the
occurrence of stigma associated with experiencing mental health issues. According to Delos Santos
(2015), while this may be a common negative condition, it is still inevitable that such issues could
affect anybody. (You may also cite findings which contradict the results of your study.)

Write the title of this subsection in bold letters (Each subsection of this chapter should be
aligned to each research question in your ‘Statement of the Problem’ section.)
Present a summary of your data in table and figure forms. Use the APA format. Refer to
tables by their number (e.g., “As shown in Table 1, . . .”; “Table 2 indicates . . .”; “Table 3 shows
. . .”). Do not write “the table shows” or “the table below (or above) shows”.
Independent Samples T-test
Table 2

Pretest and Posttest Mean and Standard Deviation for Direct Instruction and
Web 2.0-based Instruction

Direct Web 2.0-based


Instruction Instruction
Test n = 15 n = 16
M SD M SD t-value df p-value

Pretest 77.07* 1.83 77.06** 1.77 .01 29 .995

Posttest 86.61 6.11 89.95 5.48 -19.39* 29 .000


***p < .001, two-tailed.
As shown in Table 2, the average pretest performance score of those who utilized Facebook
(M = 7.56, SD = 1.27) was not significantly different from that of those who were exposed to

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paper-and-pencil-based learning (M = 7.98, SD = 1.23). Since the p-value is greater than the
significance level of 0.001, the null hypothesis is accepted. This means that regardless of the
learning mediums used, both groups improved in a similar manner. (Discussion follow. Relate
your result to finding/s from previous studies. Go back to your Chapter 2 then paraphrase such
relevant findings. You can cite findings which either agree with or contradict the results of your
study.)
The results further show that statistical difference existed between the two groups, t(67) =
-0.64, p = .524. The control condition participants (M = 9.91, SD = 1.70) had higher posttest scores
than the experimental condition participants (M = 8.31, SD = 1.76). With the p-value lower than
the significance level of 0.05, the null hypothesis is rejected. This indicates that the participants
from paper-and-pencil-based learning condition significantly performed better than the
participants from Facebook-based learning condition. (Discussion follows. Relate your result to
finding/s from previous studies. Go back to your Chapter 2 then paraphrase such relevant findings.
You can cite findings which either agree with or contradict the results of your study.)

Write the title of this subsection in bold letters (Each subsection of this chapter should be
aligned to each research question in your ‘Statement of the Problem’ section.)
Present a summary of your data in table and figure forms. Use the APA format. Refer to
tables by their number (e.g., “As shown in Table 1, . . .”; “Table 2 indicates . . .”; “Table 3 shows
. . .”). Do not write “the table shows” or “the table below (or above) shows”.

Table 3 One-way ANOVA

Descriptive Statistics for Perceived Usefulness by Experimental Condition


Control
Experimental Experimental
(Paper-and-
(Facebook Group) (Blogger Group)
pencil Group)
Dependent Variable n = 34 n = 35
n = 31
M SD M SD M SD

Perceived
4.06 0.68 3.90 0.55 4.12 0.47
Usefulness

Table 3 indicates that there were no significant differences among the groups in terms of
perceived usefulness, F(2,97) = 1.45, p = .239. In Table 2, participants from the paper-and-pencil
group reported higher rating than the participants from the two experimental groups. This may be
attributed to the similarity of the three learning mediums in terms of providing participants useful
learning tools. (Discussion follows. Relate your result to finding/s from previous studies. Go
back to your Chapter 2 then paraphrase such relevant findings. You can cite findings which
either agree with or contradict the results of your study.)

Table 4 Pearson Correlation

Pearson Correlation Coefficients for the Relationship between Self-efficacy and Intrinsic
Motivation

Intrinsic Motivation
Self-efficacy
r p-value

Talent -.090 .360

Context .084 .394

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Effort -.251* .010
*p < .05, two-tailed.

(What does the table show?) Table 4 provides the summary of the calculated Spearman
rho that tests the relationship between self-efficacy and intrinsic motivation. (Which among the
variables is statistically significant?) It can be gleaned from the table that among the variables,
effort was found to have a weak, negative correlation with intrinsic motivation, which was
statistically significant, r = -.251, n = 30, p = .010. (What does the result mean?) This means that
the higher the level of self-efficacy of the respondents, the lower the level of their intrinsic
motivation and vice-versa. This result suggests that the respondents who have higher level of self-
efficacy in terms of the effort they exerted in their academic endeavors tend to rate themselves
with a lower level of intrinsic motivation, and vice versa. RELATED STUDIES (Discussion
follows. Relate your result to finding/s from previous studies. Go back to your Chapter 2 then
paraphrase such relevant findings. You can cite findings which either agree with or contradict
the results of your study.)
(What about if the result yielded no significant relationship?) However, no significant
relationships was established between context and intrinsic motivation, r = .084, n = 30, p = .394.
Similarly, there was no significant relationship between effort and intrinsic motivation, r = .084,
n = 30, p = .394. (Discussion follows. Relate your result to finding/s from previous studies. Go
back to your Chapter 2 then paraphrase such relevant findings. You can cite findings which
either agree with or contradict the results of your study.)
Note: “n” pertains to the sample size

Write the title of this subsection in bold letters (Each subsection of this chapter should be
aligned to each research question in your ‘Statement of the Problem’ section.)
Present a summary of your data in table and figure forms. Use the APA format. Refer to
tables by their number (e.g., “As shown in Table 1, . . .”; “Table 2 indicates . . .”; “Table 3 shows
. . .”). Do not write “the table shows” or “the table below (or above) shows”.

Table 5

Categories Developed through Thematic Analysis (Global Theme: Community resilience to


climate-related disasters)

Codes Basic themes Organizing themes


Prior experiences with natural Need to be prepared Sense of preparedness
disasters and self-sufficient
Presence of mind
Sense of urgency
Stocking up on essentials
Securing lives and properties
Reliance on television and radio Reliance on
Dependence on warnings issued by communication
local officials channels
Word of mouth
Family and neighbor support during Emotional and physical Sense of togetherness
difficult situation support
Care from families and neighbors
Presence of other individuals
Generosity
Strong community spirit

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The thorough analysis of the texts resulted in the generation of 30 codes, which were further
organized into eight basic themes and six organizing themes. As shown in Table 1, the thematic
network analysis surfaced the following dominant organizing themes: sense of preparedness, sense
of togetherness, (only two organizing themes are provided in this example) effective leadership
of local authorities, service provision at the macro level, rebuilding in a self-reliant manner, and
preparedness for future disasters. These themes are further explored in the succeeding sections.

Sense of preparedness. The experiences of the participants with major natural disasters
became instrumental in fostering a sense of preparedness at the microsystem level. In particular,
their experiences with previous disasters taught them valuable lessons on securing their lives and
properties. In particular, one participant stated: “(Typhoon) Ondoy had become a lesson because
most of the houses were affected by flood.” (Informant 6)
Hence for the succeeding occurrences of natural disasters, the participants demonstrated
presence of mind and sense of urgency. Once they were alerted about an impending calamity, they
immediately stocked up on food, water, and medicines and put all their clothes at higher place.
Some participants even had to tie down parts of their houses. As shared by a local official:
“Definitely, they were somehow ready. Upon knowing that a typhoon was coming, they
started preparing . . . they secured the rooftops of their houses. They then started buying their food
and prepared candle and flashlight. They had become more prepared.”(Informant 3)
The reliance on television and radio for updated weather information was substantial in
alerting the community to prepare for disasters. At the mesosystem level, it helped that the local
authorities roamed around the village to issue warnings to the residents. Participants who were
near the fish ponds relied on their observations of the increase in water level. Word of mouth also
became a crucial means of timely communication in the neighborhood. These practices were
evidenced in the following statements:
“When they knew that flooding would occur, the Barangay Tanod gave us signal and told
us, ‘You have to prepare.’ They really gave us warnings.” (FGD Participant 1)
“Once we heard from the TV reports that floodwater would rise, that water would be
released from the dam, we started preparing for it. We immediately put our valuables at a higher
place then we started running everywhere.” (Informant 3)

IV. Conclusions

Use the present tense. The conclusions should be aligned to your Findings section. For
instance, if you have four specific sets of findings, you should also have four major conclusions.
Each conclusion should answer the “so what” question (For instance, so what if you already know
that majority of the students strongly agreed about their level of self-efficacy.) List them in
numbered form.
1. Write your first major conclusion here, drawing from your first set of findings.
2. Write your second major conclusion here, drawing from your second set of findings.
3. Write your third major conclusion here, drawing from your third set of findings.
4. Write your fourth major conclusion here, drawing from your fourth set of findings.
V. Recommendations

Use the present tense. The recommendations should be aligned to your ‘Conclusions’
section. For instance, if you have four major conclusions, you should also have four major
recommendations. You may suggest actions (do not use the word ‘must’) to stakeholders who are
most likely to benefit from your research (you may go back to your ‘Significance of the Study’
section.) List them in numbered form.
1. Write your first recommendation here based on your first conclusion.
2. Write your second recommendation here based on your second conclusion.
3. Write your third recommendation here based on your third conclusion.
4. Write fourth recommendation here based on your fourth conclusion.

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References

Surname1, I. I., Surname2, I.I., & Surname3, I.I. (Year). Title of article. Title of Periodical, Volume

Number (Issue Number), pp-pp. doi:xx.xxxxxxxxx

Surname1, I. I., Surname2, I.I., & Surname3, I.I. (Year). Title of article. Title of Periodical, Volume

Number (Issue Number), pp-pp. doi:xx.xxxxxxxxx

Surname1, I. I., Surname2, I.I., & Surname3, I.I. (Year). Title of article. Title of Periodical, Volume

Number (Issue Number), pp-pp. Retrieved from http://www.wwwwww./www

Surname1, I. I., Surname2, I.I., Surname3, I.I., Surname4, Surname5, I.I., Surname6, I.I., . . .

Surname12, I.I. (Year). Title of article. Title of Periodical, Volume Number (Issue Number),

pp-pp. doi:xx.xxxxxxxxx

(Follow strictly the format of each reference entry. The lines after the first line of a citation
should be indented. Please check the succeeding pages for the formatting of each type of
reference material).

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CREATING THE REFERENCE LIST

PERIODICALS (JOURNAL, NEWSPAPER, MAGAZINE)


General Form:
Surname1, I. I., Surname2, I.I., & Surname3, I.I. (Year). Title of article. Title of Periodical,
Volume Number (Issue Number), pp-pp. doi:xx.xxxxxxxxx

Journal article with doi (digital object identifier):


Surname1, I. I., Surname2, I.I., & Surname3, I.I. (Year). Title of article. Title of Periodical,
Volume Number (Issue Number), pp-pp. doi:xx.xxxxxxxxx

Journal article without doi (digital object identifier):


Surname1, I. I., Surname2, I.I., & Surname3, I.I. (Year). Title of article. Title of Periodical,
Volume Number (Issue Number), pp-pp. Retrieved from http://www.wwwwww./www
Note: Use the URL of the journal’s home page. Remove the hyperlink.

Journal article with more than seven authors:


Surname1, I. I., Surname2, I.I., Surname3, I.I., Surname4, Surname5, I.I., Surname6, I.I., . . .
Surname12, I.I. (Year). Title of article. Title of Periodical, Volume Number (Issue
Number), pp-pp. doi:xx.xxxxxxxxx

Surname1, I. I., Surname2, I.I., Surname3, I.I., Surname4, Surname5, I.I., Surname6, I.I., . . .
Surname12, I.I. (Year). Title of article. Title of Periodical, Volume Number (Issue
Number), pp-pp. Retrieved from http://www.wwwwww./www

Magazine Article:
Surname1, I. I., Surname2, I.I., Surname3, I.I., & Surname4 (Year, Month). Title of article. Title
of Periodical, Volume Number (Issue Number), pp-pp.

Magazine Article (Online):


Surname1, I. I., Surname2, I.I., Surname3, I.I., & Surname4 (Year, Month). Title of article. Title
of Periodical, Volume Number (Issue Number), pp-pp. Retrieved from
http://www.wwwwww./www

Newspaper Article:
Surname1, I. I., Surname2, I.I., Surname3, I.I., & Surname4 (Year, Month Day). Title of article.
Title of Periodical, Volume Number (Issue Number), pp-pp.
Note: Use “p.” or “pp.” before the page number/s. (example, [discontinuous] pp. B4, B6;
[continuous] pp. B4-B6; [single] p. B4)

Newspaper Article (Online):


Surname1, I. I., Surname2, I.I., Surname3, I.I., & Surname4 (Year, Month Day). Title of article.
Title of Periodical. Retrieved from http://www.wwwwww./www
Note: Put the URL of the online newspaper’s home page.

BOOKS
General Format:
Surname1, I. I., & Surname2, I.I. (Year). Title of work. Location: Publisher.

Book (Printed):
Surname1, I. I., & Surname2, I.I. (Year). Title of work. Location: Publisher.

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Book (Electronic version):
Surname1, I. I., & Surname2, I.I. (Year). Title of work [ xxxxxx version]. Retrieved from
http://www.wwwwww./www

Surname1, I. I., & Surname2, I.I. (Year). Title of work [ xxxxxx version]. doi:xx.xxxxxxxxx

Dictionary/Encyclopedia (Printed):
Surname1, I. I. (Ed.). (Year). Title of work. Location: Publisher.

Entry in a Dictionary/Encyclopedia (online):


Surname1, I. I. (Year). Entry. In I.I. Surname (Ed.), Title of work (ed.). Retrieved from
http://www.wwwwww./www

Entry in a Dictionary/Encyclopedia (online, no author):


Entry. (Year). In Title of work (ed.). Retrieved from http://www.wwwwww./www

TECHNICAL AND RESEARCH REPORTS

Government Report:
Name of Government Agency. (Year). Title of work (Report Number, Contract Number, or
Monograph Number). Retrieved from http://www.wwwwww./www

NGO Report:
Surname1, I. I. (Year). Title of work (Report Number, Contract Number, or Monograph
Number). Retrieved from Name of Agency website: http://www.wwwwww./www

THESES/DISSERTATIONS
Thesis or Dissertation (Database Service):
Surname, I.I. (Year). Title of work (Master’s thesis). Retrieved from Name of database.
(Accession or Order No.)
Note: or (Doctoral dissertation)

Unpublished thesis or dissertation:


Surname, I.I. (Year). Title of work (Unpublished master’s thesis). Name of Institution, Location.
Note: or (Unpublished doctoral dissertation)

Thesis or Dissertation (Web, from the US):


Surname, I.I. (Year). Title of work (Master’s thesis, Name of Institution). Retrieved from
http://www.wwwwww./www
Note: or (Doctoral dissertation, Name of Institution)

Thesis or Dissertation (Web, outside the US):


Surname, I.I. (Year). Title of work (Master’s thesis, Name of Institution, City or Province,
Country). Retrieved from http://www.wwwwww./www
Note: or (Doctoral dissertation, Name of Institution, City or Province, Country)

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