Sie sind auf Seite 1von 52

AP Research: Course Syllabus and Pacing Calendar

Overview of the AP Capstone

The AP Capstone program allows students to develop and practice reasoning processes that
help them make intentional, strategic decisions. These reasoning processes are embedded
within the following learning objectives:

• Situating – being aware of the context of one’s own as well as others’ perspectives,
realizing that individual bias can lead to unfounded assumptions
• Choosing – making intentional and purposeful choices, realizing that choices have both
intended and unintended consequences
• Defending – being able to explain and justify personal choices, logic, line of reasoning,
and conclusion
• Connecting – seeing similarities within and across disciplines, concepts, and cultures
that may at first seem disparate

The AP Capstone Diploma


Students typically take AP Seminar in the 11th grade, followed by AP Research. Students
who earn scores of 3 or higher in AP Research and AP Research and on four additional AP
Exams of their choosing will receive the AP Capstone Diploma. This signifies their outstanding
academic achievement and attainment of college-level academic and research skills.
Alternatively, students who earn scores of 3 or higher in AP Seminar and AP Research will
receive the AP Research and Research Certificate signifying their attainment of college-level
academic and research skills.
AP Research: Course Overview
AP Research, the second course in the AP Capstone program (AP Seminar is a pre-
requisite course), allows students to deeply explore an academic topic, problem, issue, or idea
of individual interest. Students design, plan, and implement a year-long investigation to address
a research question. Through this inquiry, they further the skills they acquired in the AP
Seminar course by learning research methodology, employing ethical research practices, and
accessing, analyzing, and synthesizing information.

Throughout the course, Students reflect on their skill development, document their
processes, and curate the artifacts of their scholarly work through a process and reflection
portfolio (PREP). The course culminates in an Academic Paper (AP) of approximately 4,000-5000
words and a Presentation with an Oral Defense (POD).

All students come to the AP Research course with varied skill sets and abilities, it is
necessary to clarify what research really entails and to build competence in dealing with
academic and college-level sources (such as peer-reviewed journal articles and research
studies; foundational, literary, and philosophical texts; personal sources such as reports,
speeches and interviews), and to include the use of artistic works and performances to gain a
rich appreciation and understanding of the issues that they will explore in the course. The use
of these resources is essential in ensuring students get at the expected rigor of the AP Capstone
program generally and the AP Research course specifically. Through scaffolded in-class activities
and regular meetings with the AP Research Teacher and consultant, students will develop
greater confidence in using these sources as the course progresses.

The AP Research course will be the primary course in which research skills are taught
and practiced. The course focuses on research methods of two or more disciplines rather than
any one specific field; students develop an understanding of the different disciplines’
paradigms, ways of knowing, and inquiry methods for the purpose of determining which
method best fits their chosen topic of inquiry/research question. Each student then uses a
selected method to complete his or her investigation.

Key Concepts

AP Research is not tied to a specific content area. Rather, it emphasizes, and strives for
competency in, core academic skills. Students gain Essential Knowledge (EK) (“What students
will know…”) and develop and apply discrete skills identified in the Learning Objectives (LO’s)
(“What students will demonstrate…”) of the Enduring Understandings (EU’s) (“What students
will remember in the long-term…”) within the following five Big Ideas, represented by the
acronym QUEST. The meaning of QUEST is outlined on succeeding pages and is associated with
the following essential questions.

1. Question and Explore (challenge and expand the boundaries of the student’s current
knowledge)

• How might others see the problem or issue differently?


• What questions have yet to be asked?
• What do I want to know, learn, or understand?
• How does my research question shape how I try to answer it?
• How does my project goal shape the research or inquiry I engage in to achieve it?
2. Understand and Analyze Arguments (contextualize arguments and comprehend author’s
claims)

• What strategies will help me comprehend a text?


• What is the main idea of the argument or artistic work and what reasoning does the
author use to develop it?
• What biases may the author have that influence his or her perspective?
• Does this argument acknowledge other perspectives?
• How can I assess the quality or strength of others’ research, products, or artistic works?

3. Evaluate Multiple Perspectives (consider individual perspectives and the larger


conversation of varied points of view)

• What patterns or trends can be identified among the arguments about this issue?
• What are the implications and/or consequences of accepting or rejecting an argument?
• How can I connect the multiple arguments? What other issues, questions, or topics do
they relate to?
• How can I explain contradictions within or between arguments?
• From whose perspective is this information being presented, and how does that affect
my evaluation?

4. Synthesize Ideas (combine knowledge, ideas, and the student’s own perspective into an
argument)

• How do I connect and analyze the evidence in order to develop an argument and
support a conclusion?
• Are there other conclusions I should consider?
• How does my scholarly work emerge from my perspective, design choices, or aesthetic
rationale?
• How do I acknowledge and account for my own biases and assumptions?
• What is the most appropriate way to acknowledge and attribute the work of others that
was used to support my argument?
• How do I ensure the conclusions I present are my own?
5. Team, Transform, and Transmit (collaborate, reflect, and communicate the student’s
argument in a method suited to his/her audience)

• How can I best appeal to and engage my audience?


• What is the best medium or genre through which to reach my audience?
• How might I adapt my written and oral presentations for different audiences and
situations?
• How might my communication choices affect my credibility with my audience?
• Which revision strategies are most appropriate to developing and refining my project at
different stages?
• How do I provide feedback that is valuable to others? How do I act upon feedback I have
received?
• How can I benefit from reflecting on my own work?
Visualizing the Capstone Pedagogical Framework
AP Research Scoring

Just as the AP Seminar course helped students move from discussing and analyzing texts
to building an argument through inquiry from sources such as those listed above, the AP
Research course continues building upon AP Seminar skills to form new understandings of a
topic selected by the student and deemed appropriate by the AP Research teacher through
approval of an Inquiry Proposal process (see below). As in the AP Seminar course, students will
present their finding sin a written work (in AP Research, the Academic Paper) and through a
Presentation and Oral Defense. Unlike AP Seminar, there is no formal group work or final
written exam for AP Research; the AP Research summative assessment is based solely on the
Academic Paper (75%) and the Presentation and Oral Defense (25%).

AP Research Through-Course Performance Task—100% of AP Research Score

Component Scoring Method Weight

Academic Paper (4,000–5,000 words) College Board scored 75%

Presentation and Oral Defense (15– Teacher scored 25%


20 minutes total for both the
presentation and 3–4 questions from
a panel of 3 evaluators that follows).

As indicated above, the Academic Paper is an original 4,000 to 5,000 word academic
paper that includes the following components: Introduction; Method; Process or Approach;
Results, Products, or Findings; Discussion, and Analysis, and/or Evaluation; Conclusion and
Future Directions; and Bibliography. While the AP Research teacher and a consultant will
provide guidance in the development of this paper, it is the student’s own work and clear
guidelines regarding the roles of the teacher and consultant will be shared with the student at
each step of the process. Students must understand that plagiarism will NOT be tolerated; any
sources used by the student, through direct quotations and/or paraphrasing, must be properly
cited. Failure to do so will result in a ZERO grade for that component of the course (See
“Plagiarism Policy” below).

The research process in AP Research is not simply about collecting evidence or facts and
then piecing them together. Instead, the research process is about inquiry – asking questions
and coming to solutions and conclusions through serious thinking, discussion, and reflection.
The student researcher will seek relevant information in articles, books, and other sources and
develop an informed perspective built upon, but not merely derivative of, the ideas in the
examined material. As a result, the research process is recursive meaning that students will
regularly revisit ideas, seek new information when necessary, and reconsider and refine their
research question, topic, and/or approach. While the Academic Paper and Presentation and
Oral Defense are the assessed manifestations of this process, other products, exhibits, and/or
performances may be used by students to develop their ideas further.

To keep track of this process of inquiry, students are required to keep a Process and Reflection
Portfolio (PREP) journal, a formative assessment tool which will be shared with the AP Research
teacher. This will consist of a Google Drive folder developed at the start of the academic year.
The PREP will allow students to document their experiences in the course. Students can
continually use the PREP to chart their engagement with the QUEST ideas, with special
attention paid to:

• Their choice of a research question and what prompted their interest in the topic
• Their research process, including important sources (documents, people, multimedia)
• Analysis of evidence as it becomes available
• Changes in the direction of the project and/or initial assumptions
• Ways in which the students have worked on their own or as part of a larger intellectual
community
• Challenges encountered and solutions attempted

To demonstrate these experiences, the PREP may include annotated bibliographic


entries of important sources, conversations with the teacher and consultant, personal
reflections, commentary about course assignments and class notes, and any other insights that
contribute to a rich description of the development of the student in the course. As students
will be required to have a one-on-one appointment with their AP Research teacher each week
to discuss their work, it is hoped that the student will be able to manage his or her time
effectively and use these meetings to continue developing and revising their work throughout
the year.

Upon completion of the Academic Paper, students will be required to plan and deliver a
final summative assessment in the form of a Presentation of their work and an Oral Defense
(POD). The presentation is expected to use various media to support and enhance the student’s
report of key findings, description of the chosen approach and challenges arising from the
same, and a defense of the findings by answering questions posed by a panel of AP Research
“experts” comprised of the AP Research teacher and the student’s consultant(s).

Visualizing the Academic Paper


Inquiry Proposal

Prior to engaging in their research, students will submit to the AP Research teacher an
Inquiry Proposal Form, which clearly identifies the topic of study, research question,
preliminary research, and methodological and ethical considerations. Only once approval has
been granted will the student be allowed to seek a consulting expert and begin the research
process in earnest. If the proposed inquiry requires a more extensive consideration of ethics
and potential harm (for example, involvement of human subjects), approval will not be granted
until the Proposal has also passed review by an Institutional Review Board (IRB).

General Classroom Expectations


In AP Research, students must:

• Listen, follow directions promptly, and be productive in the classroom


• Raise hands before speaking, and neither interrupt the teacher nor their peers
• Respect their classmates and their peers
• Complete tasks in a prompt and punctual matter
• Apply themselves and strive for excellence

Specific Course Policies


1. Participation is mandatory. You have a duty to your fellow students to be here to
discuss, critique, and improve their ideas.

2. Reading is mandatory. This course is intended to be a remedial writing and research


course and the reading load is intensive. The readings inform the course content and
enable us to have meaningful and informed discussions on the course material. Read
every assignment.

3. Discussion and critical analysis are key elements of the AP Research course. The
discussion only works, though, when we are willing and able to share our beliefs and
arguments –even when they’re unpopular. So, the most important rule: respect others.
In practice, this means two things:

o Listen respectfully to the arguments of others.


o If someone in class is making it difficult for you to speak –whether it’s a fellow
student or myself– come and talk with me, and we’ll do something about it.

4. You have an obligation to learn about what counts as plagiarism and avoid it. Most
plagiarism isn’t deliberate, but the result of misunderstanding what counts as
acceptable academic practice. See the attached departmental policies.

5. Please make every effort to arrive in class on time. Please do not leave the class before
the period is over. Please wait for the class to end before you pack your bag to leave. I
will make every effort to end when the period ends. If you must arrive late or leave early
for any special circumstances, please let me know beforehand.

6. You are required to turn your cell phones and other electronic devices off during the
class period. Cell phones will not be in use unless otherwise specified by the teacher.

7. The use of a laptop in class is also discouraged, except in the case where it
accommodates a disability. If you use a laptop and you are found to be engaging in an
activity unrelated to the class, you will be asked to either hand the laptop to the
instructor for the duration of the class or you will be asked to leave the class
immediately. However, if you wish to use a laptop in class, please sit towards the front
of the class.
Plagiarism
Students who plagiarize (use another's written work and/or ideas without crediting the
source) any part of an assignment will automatically receive a "0" on that assignment and will
be referred to administration for disciplinary purposes. This is non-negotiable. Students who
plagiarize on an element of the AP Research exam itself will have their scores immediately
cancelled.
The AP Research course is designed to be reading and writing intensive. Any instances of
plagiarism discovered in student writing will result in immediate referral to the Law Magnet
administration. The Law Magnet follows a two-strike policy when it comes to plagiarism. The
first instance of plagiarism in a student’s record results in punishment assigned by a teacher;
the second will see the student expelled from the campus.
AP Capstone Policy on Plagiarism and Falsification or Fabrication of Information
Participating teachers shall inform students of the consequences of plagiarism and
instruct students to ethically use and acknowledge the ideas and work of others throughout
their course work. The student's individual voice should be clear, and the ideas of others must
be acknowledged, attributed, and/or cited.
A student who fails to acknowledge the source or author of any and all information or
evidence taken from the work of someone else through citation, attribution, or reference in the
body of the work, or through a bibliographic entry, will receive a score of 0 on that particular
component of the AP® Research and/or AP Research Performance Assessment Task. In AP®
Research, a team of students that fails to properly acknowledge sources or authors on the
Written Team Report will receive a group score of 0 for that component of the Team Project
and Presentation.
A student who incorporates falsified or fabricated information (e.g., evidence, data,
sources, and/or authors) will receive a score of 0 on that component of the AP Research and/or
AP Research Performance Assessment Task. In AP Research, a team of students that
incorporates falsified or fabricated information in the Written Team Report will receive a group
score of 0 for that component of the Team Project and Presentation.
Grading Policy
AP Research follows the Dallas Independent School District grading policy, although it
differs from them somewhat in including a participation/attendance grade, which contributes
to a student's overall Homework average.
 Classwork/Homework/Participation: 50 percent
 Tests: 20 percent
 Projects/Products: 20 percent
 Six-Week Exam Grades: 10 percent
Participation
Attendance will be taken at the beginning of every class and factors into a student’s
participation score. It is an expectation that students are present and ready to participate
meaningfully during every class session, at the time when the bell rings. Students are expected
to participate in class, through demonstrations of content mastery, compliance with teacher
instructions, and through class engagement. Students who engage in disruptive behavior in
class (e.g., involving cell phones or laptops, or inappropriate comments) will lose participation
points.
Policy Specifics
1. Students are considered “tardy” if they arrive to class after the bell.
2. Students are considered “absent” if they arrive to class 15 minutes after the start
of class.
3. Tardy students will automatically earn a maximum score of “70” for their daily
participation grade.
4. Absent students will automatically earn a maximum score of “50” for their daily
participation grade.
Forms of Negative Participation
The following behaviors will have an immediate negative impact on your daily
participation grade. Students will automatically earn a maximum score of “70” for their
daily participation grade if they engage in any of the following:
1. Disruptive talking
2. Not raising hands
3. Leaving the classroom without permission
4. Inefficient or unproductive classwork
5. Unsanctioned Phone, earbud, or laptop use
6. Sleeping in class
Forms of Positive Participation
The following behaviors will have an immediate positive impact on your daily
participation grade. Students will be on their way to a maximum score of “100” for their
daily participation grade if they engage in any of the following:
1. Productive classroom talking or discussion
2. Productive, focused in-class work
3. Punctuality
4. Being alert and respectful in class
Late Assignments
Assignments are expected to be completed by their designated due dates, whether they
are assigned for homework or classwork. Assignments submitted after the due date will be
accepted for a penalty. Assignments that are between 1 and 5 calendar days late will
automatically earn a maximum score of “70.” Assignments that are between 6 and 10 calendar
days late will automatically earn a maximum score of “50.” Assignments will not be accepted 10
days after they were assigned.
Extra Credit
No extra credit will be provided in this course at any point.
Required Teacher Resources

• One three-ring notebook with dividers or outlines and documents


• One college-ruled spiral notebook
• Blue or black ink pens
• Number 2 pencils
• Post-its
• Highlighters

Religious Observance

Religiously observant students wishing to be absent on holidays that require missing


class should notify their teacher inwriting at the beginning of the semester and should discuss
with their teacher, in advance, acceptable ways of making up any missed work.
Extracurricular Activities

Students who must miss class due to participation in an officially sanctioned, scheduled
extracurricular activity may make up class assignments, but it is the responsibility of the student
to plan with the instructor prior to any missed scheduled examination or other missed
assignment for making up the work.

Laptop Policy
Students can use laptops in class only for the purpose of taking notes. Other types of
laptop use (e.g., Facebook) can be distracting to other students in the course. If I catch you
looking at websites on your computer during class, I will deduct participation points. This is
non-negotiable.
Cell Phone Use
Cell phone use is explicitly prohibited in the classroom. You will automatically lose
participation points if you use your cell phone in class. If you use your cell phone during an
exam, I will assume that you are cheating, and your grade will suffer accordingly. This is non-
negotiable.
A Note of Cell Phones
There is a considerable body of research suggesting that the presence of one’s own
smartphone may occupy limited-capacity cognitive resources, thereby leaving fewer resources
available for other tasks and undercutting cognitive performance. Results from two
experiments conducted in 2017 at the University of Texas at Austin indicate that even when
people are successful at maintaining sustained attention—as when avoiding the temptation to
check their phones—the mere presence of these devices reduces their cognitive functioning.
Phones, in a word, make us dumber.
The full text of the study that found this can be found here. This article from the
Harvard Business Review further substantiates these findings.
It is not because I am fickle or capricious that I insist you put your phones away in my
classroom. It is because they make you less able to do the things you need to do.
Instructor Contact Information

• Ross Smeltzer
• Email: rsmeltzer@dallasisd.org
• Office hours: Tuesdays 4:30-5:00 in Room 205. Also, by appointment if necessary. I will
not permit you to be in my room at other times.
• Contact hours: You may email me between the hours of 8:00 AM and 6:00 PM. I will try
to respond to emails within 24 hours of receiving them.
Course Readings

The required text for the Judge Barefoot Sanders Law Magnet AP Research course is the
following:

1. The Craft of Research, Third Edition, by Wayne C. Booth, Gregory G. Colomb, and Joseph
M. Williams.

This text will be posted on Google Classroom, as indicated above. It can also be obtained by
following this link:

Scheduling Principles

1. First day for students is August 20, 2019


2. PREP Reflection Assignments will be assigned and completed weekly
3. AP Research Student Sample papers will be analyzed every six weeks for an exam grade
4. 5-minute presentations will be completed at the conclusion of every major project and
paper element.
5. The number of weeks in my pacing calendar does not match the number in the Dallas
Independent School District Calendar. This is because I count breaks as part of the
school year and expect you to use them to enhance your skills and further your projects.

Course Pacing Guide

For the purposes of this guide the following abbreviations have been used:

• CR = The Craft of Research, Third Edition


• RQ = Research Question
• AB = Annotated Bibliography
• IRB = Institutional Review Board
• IPF = Inquiry Proposal
• LR = Literature Review
• CW = Classwork
• HW = Homework
Key Dates and Course Milestones

Course Milestone Due Date

RQ Selected End of August

PREP Creation End of August

Annotated Bibliography End of September

Method Selected Mid to Late October

IPF and IRB Late October to Early November

Literature Review Late October and Early November

Methods Late November, after Thanksgiving Break

Raw Data Submission Mid-January

Results and Findings Early February

Discussion and Analysis Early March

Introduction, Conclusion and Abstract Middle of March, after Spring Break

Presentation Design Mid-April

Final Presentation Delivery April 8 – 10, 2020

Academic Paper Delivery April 30, 2020

Unit Week Dates Topic Class Readings and Assignments


Research 1 8/20 – Course CW
Basics 8/21 Introduction
Course introduction and Policies
Google Drive Setup
What is the Scientific Method? Additional
viewing of Animated Science. Episode 1. The
Scientific Method
The PREP binder
Course Vocabulary Assigned – Exam in one
week

HW

Students read an AP Research sample paper


and use it to complete PREP 1

PREP 1 = What are the differences between the


research writing and argumentative writing?

1 8/22 – Developing CW
8/23 the RQ
Viewing and discussion of Scientific Studies:
Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)
Note: Focus on the importance of good science
and research responsibilities
Discussion of AP Research HW paper
Characteristics of a good research question
Topic to Question to Significance
FINER
Elevator speech of summer questions
Group critiques of summer questions

HW

Students read an AP Research sample paper


Students review AP Research sample rubric
Students grade paper

1-2 8/24 – Developing CW


8/27 the RQ
Hook: TED Talk - The case for curiosity-driven
research | Suzie Sheehy
Discussion of AP Research HW Paper
Discipline Discussion: Direct Lecture

HW

PREP 2 = What discipline of research interests


you most? Why?

2 8/28 – Developing CW
8/29 the RQ
Hook: ADVANCED WRITING: Evaluating Sources
Vocabulary exam
Lecture: Collecting and Synthesizing Sources
How to Speed Read = “Predatory Reading”
Introduction to Annotated Bibliography
Assignment
AB Assignment
o 50 Resource List with short descriptions
o 10 Discipline-Specific Research Studies
o 10 Historical Sources for Topic
o 10 Current Arguments for/against Topic
o 10 Research Methods that could help
you answer your initial question
○ 10 OPEN Sources (Visuals, Social Media,
etc.)
50 source AB due by 9/24 and 9/25

HW
Read and summarize key ideas from Chapters 5
and 6 of CR

2 8/30 – Finalizing the CW


8/31 RQ
Hook: TED Talk – The unheard story of David
and Goliath | Malcolm Gladwell
Advanced RQ Lecture
Terms to Know: Assumptions and Hypotheses,
Focus, Scope, Feasibility, Value, the Gap
Student revisions of RQ

HW

Final RQ due by 9/4 and 9/5: Final RQ


assignment also discusses Gap, Feasibility,
Scope, Hypotheses and Focus

3 9/4 – Finalizing the CW


9/5 RQ and AB
development Hook: How to Read a Research Paper by Siraj
Raval
Elevator Speech of finalized RQ
Student critiques of RQ
Refresher on AB
The Purpose of Research Collection
Terms to Know: Style Guides, Discipline-
Specific Styles
Student research

HW

PREP 3 = Looking Ahead: How can you conduct


a study to answer this research question?
20 sources required by 9/10 and 9/11
3 9/6 – Student CW
9/7 Research
Elevator Speech of finalized RQ
Student critiques of RQ
In-class research (5 AB sources added)

HW

Read and summarize key ideas from Chapter


13 of CR and identify the citation styles
associated with chosen research discipline

4 9/10 – Student CW
9/11 Research
Hook: TED Talk - How language shapes the way
we think | Lera Boroditsky
Discuss creative research outcomes
In-class research (5 AB sources added)
20 sources submitted at start of class

HW

50-source AB due by 9/24 and 9/25

4 9/12 – Student CW
9/13 Research
Elevator Speech: How has your RQ evolved by
conducting research in your discipline?
In-class research (5 AB sources added)

PREP 4 = How did you evaluate the sources you


used to ensure that they would be credible,
valid, and reliable? Which sources did you
discard and why?
4-5 9/14 – Student CW
9/17 Research
Elevator Speech: Elevator Speech: How has
your RQ evolved by conducting research in
your discipline?
In-class research (5 AB sources added)

HW

Annotated Bibliography due 9/24 and 9/25

5 9/18 – Intro and Lit CW


9/19 Review
Hook: Not all scientific studies are created
equal - David H. Schwartz
Use this to discuss source criticism and good
sources
Lecture on Intro and Literature Review
Terms to know:
o Introduction
o Literature Review
o Purpose
o Line of Reasoning
o Inductive/Deductive
o Assumptions/Hypotheses
o Multiple Perspectives
In-class research (5 AB sources added)

HW
Annotated Bibliography due 9/24 and 9/25

5 9/20 – Intro and Lit CW


9/21 Review
Advanced Lit Review Lecture
o Discipline-Based Modeling of
Introduction Element
o Tense: Past versus Present
o Use of History versus Current
Information
o Inductive or Deductive rationale
regarding RQ
Students outline their Literature Review

HW

Annotated Bibliography due 9/24 and 9/25

6 9/24 – Intro and Lit CW


9/25 Review
Hook: TED Talk
Why Helmets don’t Prevent Concussions...
Discussion of AP Research exam format and
structure
Students outline their Literature Review

HW

PREP 5 = How does your introduction and


literature review justify that there is a gap in
your body of knowledge?

6 9/26 – Analysis of CW
9/27 Academic
Paper Exam = in-class analysis of student AP Research
paper
Designate hook based on sample selected

HW

PREP 6 = Respond to the following:


o How did you evaluate the sources you
collected to make sure they would be
credible, valid, and reliable? Which
sources did you discard, and why?
o What was one obstacle or challenge
you encountered while implementing
your research method, and how did you
address it?
o What was the most important source of
information you found while
conducting your research, and why was
it important to your research process?

Intro and 7 9/28 – LR Comp CW


Lit Review 10/1
and Elevator Speech of LR
Method Review of Student LR
Skill development = Summarizing sources
Student individual writing

HW

LR assigned for 10/25 and 10/26


IP assigned for 11/6 and 11/7

7 10/2 – LR Comp CW
10/3
Elevator Speech of LR
Review of Student LR
Skill development = Critiquing sources
Student individual writing

HW

LR assigned for 10/25 and 10/26


IP assigned for 11/6 and 11/7
7 10/4 – LR Comp CW
10/5
Hook: Presentation answering the following =
Which of the various perspectives you explored
was the most difficult for you to incorporate
into your research inquiry and why?
Skill development = TBD
Student individual writing

HW

Design RQ presentation with official Lit Review


Elevator Pitch

8 10/8 – LR Comp CW
10/9
Official Lit Review Elevator Pitch
Students independently present their key
sources as justification for their research
question. Each presentation should take no
more than one minute.
Student individual writing

HW

PREP 7 = Which of your sources was the most


influential, and in what way is that influence
apparent in your conclusion or result?

8 10/10 – LR Comp CW
10/11
Official Lit Review Elevator Pitch
Students independently present their key
sources as justification for their research
question. Each presentation should take no
more than one minute.
Student individual writing

HW

PREP 8 = What method do you think you may


use to collect data? How would this method
connect to your research question?

8-9 10/12 – Intro to CW


10/15 Methods
Hook: Read and critique the methods section
of the Wakefield vaccine study from the Lancet
Advanced Methods Lecture
Terms to know:
o Design
o Method
o Triangulation
o Quantitative
o Qualitative
o Feasibility
Video resource: Why you should love statistics
| Alan Smith

HW

Read and summarize The Selection of a


Research Approach

9 10/16 – Intro to CW
10/17 Methods
Hook: 3 ways to spot a bad statistic | Mona
Chalabi
Discussion of HW reading
Advanced discussion of Qual and Quant
methods
Read Methods section of sample AP Research
academic paper

HW

Method Design due 10/23 and 10/24

10 - 11 10/18 – Ethical CW
10/22 Methods
Hook: Have students critique unethical
research methods (pharmaceutical trials in
India)
Discussion of SciShow’s Human
Experimentation: The Good, The Bad, & The
Ugly
Terms to Know:
o Ethics
o Validity
o Nonmaleficence
o Debriefing
o Dehoaxing
o Informed Consent
o IRB
Lecture Outline:
Ethics could include: Research Misconduct,
Treatment of Participants, Ethical Dilemmas,
Ethical Guidelines, Benefice and
Nonmaleficence, Fidelity and Responsibility,
Integrity, Justice, Respect for People’s Rights
and Dignity, Institutional Approval, Informed
Consent, Dispensing Informed Consent,
Deception, Debriefing, Confidentiality,
Nonhuman Research,

IRB/IPF Submissions Due 11/6 and 11/7


HW

PREP 9 = After you chose your research


question/project goal, which information
guided your choice of research method/article
process?

11 10/23 – Method CW
10/24 Element in
Academic Students learn the ins-and-outs of the Method
Paper Element
Method element in the Discipline
Individualized Method Outline
Terms to know:
o Justification
o Participants
o Subjects
o Ethical Considerations
o Instruments
o Procedure
Method design due and presented in peer
groups

HW

Design Method section outline based on model


papers

11 10/25 – Composition CW
10/26 of Method
Procedure Lit review due and peer grading
and Composition of rudimentary procedure
Instrument Composition and Justification of All
instruments
Method Presentation assigned for 11/14 and
11/15
Components of Methods Presentations
o Overall Research Design with
Justification (81, Leedy/Ormrod)
o Method of Research (Specific ways of
collecting data)
o Description of Participants/Subjects
o Ethical Considerations (if needed)
o Description of Instruments (Detailed)...
Validity
o Procedure (Others must be able to
reproduce the experiment) ... Step-by-
step guide

HW

IRB/IPF Submissions Due 11/6 and 11/7


Method Presentation due

12 10/29 – Research CW
10/30 Validity in
Primary and Reflection: What major concerns do you have
Secondary regarding the ethics of your research?
Research Lecture: Validity should include: Internal
Validity, External Validity, Construct Validity
Review student sample Methods section
Students finalize Methods outline

HW

PREP 10 = What ethical considerations are


most apparent in your method? How can they
be addressed?

12 10/31 – Analyzing an CW
11/1 AP Research
Academic Exam = In-class analysis of student AP Research
Paper paper
Finalized Lit Review due at start of class

HW

TBD

Research 12 – 11/2 – Test Debrief CW


Ethics 13 11/5 and Final
Methods Day Test debrief
Students may:
o Complete IRB and IPF
o Edit Lit Review
o Design Method Presentation

HW

IRB/IPF Submissions Due 11/6 and 11/7

13 11/6 – IRB and IPF CW


11/7 Submissions
Students peer review IPF or IRB Forms
Students edit docs as needed
Students complete the following:
o Informed Consent,
o Waiver,
o Debriefing Form

HW

Method Presentation assigned for 11/14 and


11/15

13 11/8 – IRB and IPF CW


11/9 Submissions
Students peer review IPF or IRB Forms
Students edit docs as needed
Students complete the following:
o Informed Consent,
o Waiver,
o Debriefing Form

HW

Method Presentation assigned for 11/14 and


11/15

14 11/12 – Presentation CW
11/13 and Oral
Defense Presentation and Oral Defense Rubric
Discussion
o Students will discuss the AP Research
rubric provided by College Board
o This conversation will increase their
awareness of the expectations
regarding presentation building
o Students will re-write the rubric to
meet their specific research needs
o Students will review one presentation
and will score it based on the
knowledge gained yesterday.
o Students, as groups, will defend their
decision in presentation scoring.

HW

Students finalize Methods presentations

14 11/14 – Methods CW
11/15 Presentation
Delivery Methods presentations delivered
Peer grading as they are completed

HW

Thanksgiving project assigned = Draft Methods


section completed (1,000 words)

14 11/16 Study Hall CW

Students work on Methods section in any


classes meeting before Thanksgiving Break

Thanksgiving Break

Data 16 11/26 – Finalizing the CW


Collection 11/27 Method
Section Reflection: What will you need to design and
accomplish to implement your chosen research
method?
Peer review of Methods and Lit Review
Individual Editing

HW

Final method section and lit review due 12/14


and 17

16 11/28 – Revising the CW


11/29 Lit Review
Literature Review: Peer Revision and
Housekeeping
Major Concerns:
o Style and Works Cited
o Demonstrating the existence of a
research Gap
o Rubric Row 3 (Validating the credibility
of sources)

HW

PREP 11 = How do you plan to collect, store


and analyze data from your research method?

16 - 17 11/30 – Revising the Method: Peer Revision and Housekeeping


12/3 Methods Major Concerns:
Section o Audience can follow instructions
regarding method
o Method can be replicated by future
researchers

HW

Students review AP Research sample paper,


focusing on paper Appendix
Students determine what documents they will
need for their Appendices

17 12/4 – Overview of CW
12/5 Appendices
Hook: Sleep is your superpower | Matt Walker
Appendices Documents
o Order of Documents in SAME EXACT
order as presentation in academic
paper (Alpha listing of docs).
o Clarity of Documents for audience
members

HW

Draft Appendix due 12/18 and 12/19


17 12/6 – Quantitative CW
12/7 Data
Hook: How statistics can be misleading - Mark
Liddell
Descriptive Statistics:
Mean, Median, Mode, Standard Deviation
Terms to know:
o Descriptive
o Inferential
o Trend
o Statistical Relevance
o Variable

HW

PREP 12 = How do you plan to use quantitative


techniques to communicate your findings to
your audience? What makes this technique the
best fit for your data?

18 12/10 – Quantitative CW
12/11 Data
Hook: How to spot a misleading graph - Lea
Gaslowitz
Terms to Know:
o Inferential Statistics
o T-Testing
o Estimation
o Hypothesis Testing
o Sampling Distributions
o Change over Time?

HW

Read and summarize Chapter 15 of CR on


Communicating Evidence Visually
18 12/12 – Qualitative CW
12/13 Data and
Visualizing Reflection: PREP Reflection 13 = How do you
Data plan to use quantitative techniques to
communicate your findings to your audience?
What makes this technique the best fit for your
data?
Lecture on Data Representation
Key Concepts:
1. Thematic Grouping
2. Preliminary Discussion of Visuals
Terms to Know
o Context
o Purpose
o Visuals
o Engagement
o Effective Organization
Review sample Qualitative AP Research

HW

Finalize Data Collection, Analysis, and Storage


Raw data for project submitted on 1/16 and
1/17

18 - 19 12/14 – Raw Data CW


12/17 Work
Hook: Storytelling with Data from Tableau

Discussion of rules for data collection from CR


End with Spurious Correlations:
Independent student work on data collection
and analysis

Finalize Data Collection, Analysis, and Storage


Raw data for project submitted on 1/16 and
1/17

19 12/18 – Analyzing an CW
12/19 AP Research
Academic Exam = In-class analysis of student AP Research
Paper paper
Finalized Lit Review due at start of class

HW

Finalize Data Collection, Analysis, and Storage


Raw data for project submitted on 1/16 and
1/17

Winter Break

Data 22 1/8 – Academic CW


Collection 1/9 Paper
Finalized Structure PREP Reflection 14 = What unanticipated turn
did you encounter as your research
progressed? What were the reasons for this
change in direction or focus, and how did you
modify your method or approach?
Lecture
Additional Components of Academic Paper
o Findings
o Analysis
o Limitations

HW

Final data collection and analysis due 1/16 and


1/17
22 1/10 – Academic CW
1/11 Paper
Structure PREP Reflection 15 = Think about the initial
curiosity that led to your inquiry. What other
areas of inquiry might that same curiosity lead
to?
Lecture
Additional Components of Academic Paper
o Implications/Conclusion
o Future Directions
o Abstract (Actually goes at start of paper
but requires entire paper to be written)

HW

Final data collection and analysis due 1/16 and


1/17

23 1/14 – Academic CW
1/15 Paper
Structure PREP Reflection 16 = If you had three more
months to work on this research
question/project goal, what additional research
strategies would you put into practice?

Discipline Based Modeling of Second Half


Primary and Secondary Models for:
o Science
o Social Science
o History
o Humanities

Discussion: How does your discipline treat each


of the additional components to the academic
paper?
HW

Final data collection and analysis due 1/16 and


1/17

Results 23 1/16 – Revisiting the CW


and 1/17 Results and
Findings Findings PREP Reflection 17 = What unanticipated turn
Section Section did you encounter as your research
progressed? What were the reasons for this
change in direction or focus, and how did you
modify your method or approach?
Results and Findings Lecture
Terms to know:
o Claims
o Findings
o Raw Data
o Visuals
o Graph Types
Students compose findings outline
Raw Data Submission

HW

Findings presentation assigned for 1/31 and


2/1
Findings section due 2/6 and 2/7
Findings section outline due 1/18 and 1/22

23 - 24 1/18 – Findings CW
1/22 Composition
Discussion of findings outlines
TED Talk Viewing – The power of introverts |
Susan Cain
Independent Writing
HW

Findings presentation assigned for 1/31 and


2/1
Findings section due 2/6 and 2/7

24 1/23 – Findings CW
1/24 Composition
Elevator speech of core research findings
Independent Writing

HW

Findings presentation assigned for 1/31 and


2/1
Findings section due 2/6 and 2/7

24 - 25 1/25 – Findings CW
1/28 Composition
Elevator speech of core research findings
Independent Writing

HW

Findings presentation assigned for 1/31 and


2/1
Findings section due 2/6 and 2/7

25 1/29 – Findings CW
1/30 Composition
Elevator speech of core research findings
TED Talk Discussion - What makes a good life?
Lessons from the longest study on happiness |
Robert Waldinger
Use this to assess how expert researchers
discuss their findings
Independent Writing

HW

Findings presentation assigned for 1/31 and


2/1
Findings section due 2/6 and 2/7

25 1/31 – Findings CW
2/1 Presentations
Students deliver findings in 5-10 minutes
lectures
Students peer grade one another

HW

Findings Section due 2/6 and 2/7

26 2/4 – Findings CW
2/5 Presentations
Students deliver findings in 5-10 minutes
lectures
Students peer grade one another

HW

Findings Section due 2/6 and 2/7

26 2/6 – Finding CW
2/7 Section
Finalizing PREP Reflection 18: How might your
conclusions/findings/product relate(s) to the
current body of work in the community or
field?
Students peer review one another’s Findings
sections
Students independently edit

HW

Students complete outline of Discussion and


analysis section

Analysis 26 - 27 2/8 – Revisiting the CW


Section 2/11 Analysis
Section Analysis Element Lecture
Use Rubric Rows 5-6 to Introduce
Major Areas of Focus:
Begin connecting research back to the major
body of knowledge
Integrate sources within Analysis
Line of Reasoning Pattern that is clear to
audience and that encourages synthesis of
findings with interpretation and significance
o Trend
o Frequency (Most to least)
o Thematic
o Instrument Based
Individual outlining

HW

Students revise Discussion and Analysis Section


outline

27 2/12 – Limitations CW
2/13 and
Implications PREP Reflection 19: What might be the real-
world implications or consequences (influence
on others’ behaviors, decision making
processes, or discoveries) related to your
findings?
Discussion of Limitations and Implications
Individual writing

HW

Discussion and Analysis section completed by


3/6 and 3/7

27 - 28 2/14 – Discussion CW
2/19 and Analysis
Writing In-class writing

HW

Discussion and Analysis section drafted by 3/6


and 3/7

28 2/20 – Conclusions CW
2/21 and Future
Directions Lecture discussing key concepts from the
Composition Conclusion Section:
Terms to Know:
o Conclusion
o Context
o Connections
o Understanding
o Articulate
o Advantage/disadvantage
o Rationale
o Future Direction
o Implication
o Consequence

HW
Discussion and Analysis section drafted by 3/6
and 3/7
Students read and summarize chapter 16 in CR

28 - 29 2/22 – Introductions CW
2/25
Discussion of Chapter 16 in CR
Lecture on context and bridging to the research
question
Lecture discussing key concepts from a paper
introduction

HW

Discussion and Analysis section drafted by 3/6


and 3/7

29 2/26 – Abstracts CW
2/27
PREP Reflection 20 = What was the
fundamental argument/idea in your research?
How does this argument/idea relate to the
primary purpose of your research?
Discussion of Abstract elements
Students outline personal abstracts

HW

Discussion and Analysis section drafted by 3/6


and 3/7

29 2/28 – Individual CW
3/1 Writing
Students work individually to compose
Discussion and Analysis sections of paper
HW

Discussion and Analysis section drafted by 3/6


and 3/7

30 3/4 – IMP CW
3/5 Discussion
Discussion of Presentation Rubric
Discussion of Slide Deck Composition
Focus on these concepts:
o Aesthetic Appeal
o Audience Clarity
o Engagement
o Oversimplified
Discussion of How to make stress your friend |
Kelly McGonigal
(Focus on the use of hooks and humor in the
talk, coupled with the strategy of visuals and
surprising information)

HW

Spring Break project assigned


Students compose introductions, conclusions,
and abstracts by 3/18 and 3/19

30 3/6 - IMP CW
3/7 Discussion
Refresher on Introductions, Conclusions, and
Abstracts
Oral Defense Rubric Reviewed
Walk through each POD question using the ACE
answering method
o Answer
o Cite
o Explain
Key Terms:
o ACE Method
o Illogical
o Superficial
o Developed
o Justification
o Reflection

HW

Spring Break project assigned


Students compose introductions, conclusions,
and abstracts by 3/18 and 3/19
30 3/8 Study Hall CW

Depending on course sections, students get


time to work independently

HW

Spring Break project assigned


Students compose introductions, conclusions,
and abstracts by 3/18 and 3/19

Spring Break

Final 32 3/18 – Presentation CW


Presentati 3/19 Design
on Design Hook: How to sound smart in your TEDx Talk |
and Will Stephen
Delivery Refresher on rubric
Students design Multimedia Presentation
Students Gather PREP Responses into Oral
Defense Responses
HW

Slide Deck due for presentations on 3/28 and


3/29

32 3/20 – Presentation CW
3/21 Design
Students design Multimedia Presentation
Students Gather PREP Responses into Oral
Defense Responses

HW

Slide Deck due for presentations on 3/28 and


3/29

32 - 33 3/22 – Presentation CW
3/25 Design
Students design Multimedia Presentation
Students Gather PREP Responses into Oral
Defense Responses

HW

Slide Deck due for presentations on 3/28 and


3/29

33 3/26 – Analysis of CW
3/27 Academic
Paper Exam = in-class analysis of student AP Research
paper
Designate hook based on sample selected

HW
Slide Deck due for presentations on 3/28 and
3/29

33 3/28 – Practice Mini CW


3/29 Presentations
Presentation Practice
Rapid fire peer practice allows students to
present their entire slide deck to various peers
up to three times
Students will also give feedback to one

HW

Final Presentation delivery 4/8 – 4/10

34 4/1 – Practice Mini CW


4/2 Presentations
Presentation Practice
Rapid fire peer practice allows students to
present their entire slide deck to various peers
up to three times
Students will also give feedback to one

HW

Final Presentation delivery 4/8 – 4/10

34 4/3 – Practice Mini CW


4/4 Presentations
Presentation Practice
Rapid fire peer practice allows students to
present their entire slide deck to various peers
up to three times
Students will also give feedback to one

HW
Final Presentation delivery 4/8 – 4/10
34 - 35 4/5 – Presentation CW
4/8 Delivery
Students deliver final presentations to
committee

HW

Paper revision

35 4/9 – Presentation CW
4/10 Delivery
Students deliver final presentations to
committee

HW

Paper revision

Paper 35 4/11 – Preliminary CW


Revision 4/12 Revision
Preliminary Discussion of Peer Revision Activity
Initial Read of Academic Paper
Peer Revision of Introduction Element
Rows 1-3

HW

Finalize Paper

36 4/15 – Editing CW
4/16
In-class Editing

HW
Finalize Paper

36 4/17 – Second Edit CW


4/18
Second Read of Academic Paper
Peer Revision of Method/Findings/Analysis
Elements
Rows 4-6

HW

Finalize Paper

36 – 4/19 – Editing CW
37 4/22
In-class Editing

HW

Finalize Paper

37 4/23 – Final Edit CW


4/24
Third Read of Academic Paper
Peer Revision of Conclusions and Introductions
Rows 7-9

HW

Finalize Paper

37 4/25 – Editing CW
4/26
In-class Editing
HW

Finalize Paper

38 4/29 – Paper CW
4/30 Submission
Submit paper
Breathe Sigh of Relief
Exhale
Nap

HW

N/A

AP 38 5/1 – Reflection AP Research Reflection Project


Research 5/2
Reflection 38 - 39 5/3 –
5/6
39 5/7 –
5/8
39 5/9 –
5/10
40 5/13 –
5/14
40 5/15 –
5/16
40 – 5/17 –
41 5/20
41 5/21 –
5/22
41 5/23 –
5/24
Final 5/27 –
5/29