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Name(s) Sabrina Alkayfee

Lesson #, Lesson Title Unit 2 Lesson 6


Date and Day of the Week Tuesday and Wednesday
Grade Level and Class Grades 10 and 11
Period and Length 2 class periods (45 minutes times 2)
Materials Needed
Periodic Table of Elements, Worksheet, Music for transitions

Instructional Context (What do I know about my students?)


What are the special needs and abilities of my students?

This will be an integrated co-teaching classroom. The majourity of my students have taken the Chemistry regents once and did not pass.
Another portion of my students have never taken the Chemistry regents, but are below grade level for math and reading comprehension.

I would work with my co-teacher to create differentiated learning objectives for students with Individual Education Plans (IEPs).

How does this lesson connect to and build on prior learning or previous lessons?
Unit 2 - Atomic Structure and Bonding
The unit the revolves around the central essential question: How is the structure of an atom like other systems models?
The prior lessons in the unit covered the following standards:

❏ The modern model of the atom has evolved over a long period of time through the work of many scientists. (3.1a)
❏ Each atom has a nucleus, with an overall positive charge, surrounded by negatively charged electrons. (3.1b)
❏ Subatomic particles contained in the nucleus include protons and neutrons. (3.1c)
❏ The proton is positively charged, and the neutron has no charge. The electron is negatively charged. (3.1d)
❏ Protons and electrons have equal but opposite charges. The number of protons equals the number of electrons in an atom.
(3.1e)

How will this lesson prepare students for subsequent lessons?


● Students will be prepared to define what is an isotope of an element, and be able to calculate the weighted averages of an element.
● Students will be able to compare and contrast an atom’s “mass number” with its “atomic mass.''

What are common errors or misunderstandings of students related to the central focus of this lesson?
1. One common misunderstanding of the lesson relates to the atomic number. The atomic number also tells you how many protons an
atom has. When an atomic is electrically neutral, the number of neutrons and electrons is also equal to the number of protons. Students
may assume this is always the case for all isotopes of an element.
2. A second common misunderstanding is that all subatomic particles the proton, neutron and electron have the same mass.

Standards and Objectives


CCSS (list number of the standard and write out the portion of the standard addressed in this lesson)

STANDARD 4—The Physical Setting


Students will understand and apply scientific concepts, principles, and theories pertaining to the physical setting and living environment
and recognize the historical development of ideas in science.
Key Idea 3: Matter is made up of particles whose properties determine the observable characteristics of matter and its reactivity.
3.1 Explain the properties of materials in terms of the arrangement and properties of the atoms that compose them.
● 3.1e: Determine the number of protons or electrons in an atom or ion when given one of these values
● 3.1 f: Calculate the mass of an atom, the number of neutrons or the number of protons, given the other two values
● 3.1 n: Given an atomic mass, determine the most abundant isotope
● 3.1 n: Calculate the atomic mass of an element, given the masses and ratios of naturally occurring isotopes
ELA/Literacy
● RST.9-10.7: Translate quantitative or technical information expressed in words in a text into visual form (e.g., a table or chart) and
translate information expressed visually or mathematically (e.g., in an equation) into words.
● WHST.9–12.9: Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

Mathematics
● MP.2: Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
● MP.4: Model with mathematics.

What is the central focus of this lesson? What are the essential questions of this lesson?

The central focus of this lesson is for students to see other relationships between an atom’s subatomic particles and its identity. Students
will learn how this relationship help them find an atom’s atomic number and mass number. (Bloom’s Taxonomy: Application)

List concrete, specific and measurable (observable) learning objectives for the lesson [“what” will be learned]
1. If given an atom’s number of protons and neutrons, students will be able to calculate the atom’s mass number, for 85% of each
case study provided..
This is based on Performance Indicator 3.1g, The number of protons in an atom (atomic number) identifies the element. The sum of the
protons and neutrons in an atom (mass number) identifies an isotope. and 3.1f The mass of each proton and each neutron is approximately
equal to one atomic mass unit. An electron is much less massive than a proton or a neutron.
2. If given the number of protons, neutrons and electrons an atom has and the periodic table of elements, students will be able to
predict an atom’s identity for at least 85% of the case studies provided.
This is based on Performance Indicator 3.1g, The number of protons in an atom (atomic number) identifies the element. The sum of the
protons and neutrons in an atom (mass number) identifies an isotope and 3.1f The mass of each proton and each neutron is approximately
equal to one atomic mass unit. An electron is much less massive than a proton or a neutron.

“Reach” Objective

“Below Level Objective”

Identify Academic Language Objectives and Functions (students will analyze, define, explain, justify, etc.) [“how”]
A system is an organized group of related objects or components; models can be used for understanding and predicting the behavior of
systems. When investigating or describing a system, the boundaries and initial conditions of the system need to be defined and their inputs
and outputs analyzed and described using models.

The atom is a system comprised of subatomic particles: the proton,the neutron, and the electron. The student must understand that this
model was used to explain the properties of chemical bonding, and additional experimentation with radioactivity provided evidence that
atomic nuclei contain protons and neutrons. Changes in motion result from the interaction of matter and energy.

In order for students to be able to participate in today’s lesson they must understand the following terms: atom, atomic mass, atomic
number, atomic mass unit, compound, electron, element, isotope, mass number, neutron, nucleus, orbital, protons, wave-mechanical
model. Students must be able to use these content specific words in writing, in conversation with myself and their peers, and readings.

Based on my pre-assessment of my students, they have been introduced to about 90% of the words mentioned. The new terms include:
atomic number, mass number, isotopes, atomic mass unit, and atomic mass. I will support the use of the new academic terms by asking my
students to use the new vocabulary in collaborative work, when sharing an answer with the class, in writing responses to prompts, and as I
circulate the room to guide my students.

Assessments Related to this Lesson


The Assessments…
● Provide evidence of full range of subject specific understanding
● Are differentiated
● Allow for meaningful student feedback (rubrics, self-assessment, teacher feedback)

Assessment Type Purpose/Objective


(formative/summative)
Formative To ensure that my students are ready to learn about today’s topic, I need to make
Do Now sure that prior concepts have been adequately mastered. Prior concepts include, the
anatomy of the nuclear atom (Rutherford Atomic Model). As the students are
working through the Do Now questions via the technology component, I will be
circulating the room and engaging in teacher feedback. I am listening to hear self-
assessment from my students in terms of grasping the content.
This allows me to stimulate the recall of prior learning.

Written Formative During the mini lesson, students will use Table 1 titled, “What Do I Know?”. The
objective is to inform me of the students’ learning progress. Based on the students’
answers I will be able to formatively assessment
Formative I will be circulating the room, and asking guided questions to aid students in
Cold Call understanding the different concepts
Stop and Jot

Poll Everywhere 1. How many protons and electrons are in:


a. Fluorine? (Atomic number = 9)
b. Calcium (atomic number = 20)
c. aluminum (atomic number = 13)

2. Which of these descriptions is incorrect?


a. proton:positive charge, in nucleus mass of = 1 amu
b. electron: negative charge, mass of = 0 amu, in nucleus
c. neutron: mass of =1 amu, no charge
(Multiple Choice)
3. (Open ended question) What is the difference between the mass number
and atomic mass?
Formative If given the number of protons, neutrons and electrons an atom has and the
Classwork Activity 1 periodic table of elements, students will be able to predict an atom’s identity for at
“The Mystery Atom” least 85% of the case studies provided.

Classwork Activity 2 Formative See Worksheet Artifact Below. Students will complete Table 2 which asks
students to connect the number to protons and electrons to the atom’s identity and
atomic number.
Exit Ticket Formative What are the differences between protons, neutrons and electrons? (Please use
I will read the exit ticket complete sentences).
aloud, and let them know
that they have 4 minutes
to complete the
assessment.

Instructional Strategies and Learning Tasks that Support Diverse Student Needs
● Activities are sequenced
● Explicit questions for students are carefully worded to facilitate high-level inquiry and discussion
● Planned supports are evident (if students do not understand this, then I will…)
● Scaffolds address varying students’ language needs
Time Instructional Strategies and Learning Tasks Rationale & Questions

1. Engagement/Anticipatory Set
a. As the students enter the class, I will give each a. This will take place towards the end of the class (least 15
5-10 minutes student a paper with characteristics of their assigned minutes)Students cannot let their partner see their paper. For
mystery atom. They are going to pair up. One will example, my atom has 4 protons, 5 neutrons. What am I? Students
give their partner hints about their assigned atom. The can use those clues to identify the atom. Students will have 5
partner has to locate the atom and identify it on the minutes to do the activity towards the end . I will remind the class
Periodic Table by the end of the class. of how much time everyone has left. I will be circulating around the
b. I want to engage my students by first having room, in case anyone needs guidance.
them complete a Do Now Discussion using a
technology component, PollEverywhere. Students
b. They must answer the following open-ended questions for
must be able to explain that in the nuclear atom, the
the Do Now:
protons and neutrons are located in the positively 1. Which particles occupy the orbitals surrounding the
charged nucleus. The electrons are distributed around nucleus?
the nucleus and occupy almost all the volume of the 2. How can you describe the structure of the nuclear atom?
atom.
I then inform students of the lesson’s objectives.

2. Development As students are reading the following guided questions will be written on
the board to help guide students to what they should focus on:
25 minutes After the students are informed of the objective, they will
have 8 minutes to read the assigned text from the chapter, 1. What makes one element different from another?
“Distinguishing Among Atoms” from their textbook. 2. How can I determine an atom’s composition?

After the first 4 minutes of reading the section titled 3. How do isotopes of an element differ?
“Atomic Number and Mass Number”, students will 1
minute to complete each Poll Everywhere problem for the
number of protons and electrons in each atom. There will
be 3 elements, Fluorine, Calcium, and Aluminum.

We will review the answers together as a class. If I notice


that less than 80% of the class get the questions incorrect, I
will reteach the subject. If not, I will direct the students to
read the section titled, “Mass number”.

Students will then have 2 minutes to answer a multiple


choice question, and an open ended question on
PollEverywhere, Students will be asked to find the
statement that is inconsistent with the characteristics of a
subatomic particle, and to explain the difference between
mass number and atomic mass.

During cold call (6 minutes), the following questions will


be asked and worked through together as a class.

1. If the atomic number of Atom X is 12, what


information can I gain in terms of subatomic particles?
How many protons Does Atom X have? How many
neutrons does Atom X have? Electrons?
2. What is the mass of Atom Y, if we are told that the
atom has 13 protons, 14 electrons, and 13 neutrons.
By working through the above exercises as a class, I will
link the new content to the student’s prior knowledge on
atomic theory.

Students will have 5-6 minutes to complete Table 2 on the


Worksheet.

3. Closure 1. If you know the atomic number and mass number of an atom of
an element, how can you determine the number of protons, neutrons, and
15 minutes ● Includes the mystery atom Identification (5 electrons in that atom?
minutes) 2. What makes isotopes of the same element chemically alike? If
● Share out (5 minutes) Isotopes are chemically alike, but physically different, propose which
● Exit Ticket (5 minutes) subatomic particles are responsible for determining an element’s chemical
reactivity.

Teacher Self-Assessment and Reflection

● Explain how your lesson activities build on each other to facilitate student understanding.

● Predict areas where you might have problems in the lesson. Explain how your scaffolds will help you respond to potential misunderstandings.

● Discuss the research and/or theories that support your learning tasks.

● Explain how your assessment(s) are differentiated and provide evidence of addressing the learni ng goal.

Should be in paragraph form and have substantial information here. Reference to Gagne’s vocabulary. Do not put bullet points here.

References:
Bronx River High School Name ______________________

Chemistry – Mrs. Alkayfee Date _______________________

Atomic Structure – Let’s Go Subatomic!

Today’s Objectives:
● If given an atom’s number of protons and neutrons, I will be able to calculate the atom’s mass number and atomic number
● If given the number of protons, neutrons and electrons an atom has and the periodic table of elements, I will be able to predict an atom’s
identity

Do Now Discussion: Poll everywhere Questions

Table 1: What do I Know?


Protons Neutrons Electrons
Mass (amu)
Charge (+/-/0)
Location of Particle

What information about an element can be learned from the periodic table? A periodic table lists all elements that have been discovered. What
information about an element can be learned from the periodic table? A periodic table lists all elements that have been discovered. Elements are
different because they contain different numbers of protons.The atomic number of an element tells you how many protons are in the nucleus of
an atom of that element.
Table 2: Completing the Table

Element Atomic Number Protons Electrons

S 16 ______ ______

V _____ 23 ______

______ _____ _____ 5

Most of the mass of an atom is concentrated in its nucleus and depends on the number of protons and neutrons. The total number of protons and
neutrons in an atom is called its mass number.

# of neutrons = mass number - atomic number

Group Activity

Names of group members:


______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

1. I am an atom with a mass of ____________ amu. I have _______ protons, _______ neutrons, and _______ electrons. What element am I?
Exit Ticket:
1. If you know the atomic number and mass number of an atom of an element, how can you determine the number of protons, neutrons, and electrons in
that atom?
2. What makes isotopes of the same element chemically alike? If Isotopes are chemically alike, but physically different, propose which subatomic particles
are responsible for determining an element’s chemical reactivity.

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