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JU L Y 29, 2019

Evaluation and
Student
Assessment
Nyka Isaiah P. Grena
Curriculum
Evaluation and
Student Assessment
TODAY'S DISCUSSION

differentiate these ideas


explore examples of techniques that can be used
discuss the appropriateness of different standards
describe some of the key questions and issues that
must be addressed
four different models of curriculum evaluation
What is
Curriculum?
A COMPREHENSIVE OVERVIEW
OF WHAT STUDENTS SHOULD
LEARN, HOW THEY WILL LEARN
IT, WHAT ROLE THE INSTRUCTOR
IS PLAYING, AND THE
FRAMEWORK IN WHICH
LEARNING AND TEACHING WILL
TAKE PLACE.
Challenges of Change Management in E-Learning
Teachers are constantly scanning their own classrooms,
sizing up everything they can about what is happening
there.  They make many decisions intuitively on the basis
of such informal observations, their past professional
experience, and their general beliefs about good practice. 
Only less frequently do they find it necessary (or even
possible) to formally evaluate some of the many things
happening in their classrooms.
MARSH AND WILLIS, 2007
STUDENT
ASSESSMENT
Participants examine
considerations about student
assessment that are regularly
included in curriculum
materials.

CURRICULUM
EVALUATION
The participant is guided
through an analytical schema to
plan the evaluation of curricula.
CURRICULUM EVALUATION
an internal activity and process
conducted by the various units within
the education system for their own
respective purposes.
an external or commissioned review
processes. These processes might
examine, for example, the effectiveness
of curriculum content, existing
pedagogies and instructional
approaches, teacher training and
textbooks and instructional materials.
Student assessment
Assessment of student learning has always
been a powerful influence on how and what
teachers teach and is thus an important source
of feedback on the appropriateness
implementation of curriculum content.
Fulfilling the diverse objectives of diagnosis,
certification and accountability requires
different kinds of assessment instruments and
strategies selected to achieve specific
purposes.
Four Models of Curriculum Evaluation

STAKE'S DAVIS',
THE TYLER THE TABA
COUNTENAN PROCESS
MODEL MODEL
CE MODEL MODEL
account information from emphasizing inductive is a model focusing on This model provides a
the active learner and reasoning, was created by the qualitative simple overview of the
pays close attention to Hilda Taba who believed influences to the processes involved in"
how well the goals and that true curriculum
objectives of the
traditional curriculum evaluation.
should be developed by
curriculum are supported quantitative designs, It is suitable for use by
the teacher, rather than
by the experiences and with judgment being either individual
decided upon by
activities provided, was maintained as the teachers or teams of
named after its creator,
administration or another
major function of the teachers.
Ralph Tyler authority.
one who evaluates.
Assessing/Evaluating the
Curriculum
INTENDED VS
IMPLEMENTED VS
ACHIVED CURRICULUM
PURPOSES OF CURRICULUM
ASSESSMENT

1. Highlight curriculum expectations.


2. Gather information about what students know and can do.
3. Motivate students to learn better.
4. Motivate and encourage teachers to meet the identified needs of
students.
5. Provide evidence to tell how well the students have learned.
6. Obtain feedback that helps teachers, students and parents make
good decisions to guide instruction.
INTENDED
CURRICULUM

Refers to the objectives set at the


beginning of any curricular plan.

Establishes the goal, specific purposes


and immediate objectives to be
accomplished.

The intended curriculum answers what


the curriculum writer wants to do.
SOME QUESTIONS TO ASSESS
INTENDED CURRICULUM:

1. Are the objectives achievable within the learners’ developmental


levels?
2. Can the objectives be accomplished within the time frame?
3. Are the resources adequate to accomplish the objectives?
4. Are the objectives specific and clear?
5. Are there ways of measuring the outcomes of the objectives?
6. Are the objectives observable?
7. Are the objectives doable?
8. Are the objectives relevant?
IMPLEMENTED
CURRICULUM

Refers to the various learning activities or


experiences of the students in order to
achieve the intended curricular
outcomes.
SOME QUESTIONS TO ASSESS
IMPLEMENTED CURRICULUM:

1. Are the learning activities congruent with the stated objectives?


2. Are the materials and methods appropriate for the objectives set?
3. Does the teacher have the skill to implement the activities or use the strategy?
4. Does the teacher utilize the various ways of doing to complement the learning styles of
the students?
5. Are there alternative activities for the learners to do to accomplish the same objectives?
6. Do the activities motivate the learners to do more and harness their potentials?
7. Do the activities provide maximum learning experiences?
8. Do the activities utilize multiple sensory abilities of the learners?
9. Do the activities address multiple intelligences of the learners?
ACHIEVED
CURRICULUM

Refers to the curriculum outcomes based


on the first two types of curriculum, the
intended and the implemented. It is now
considered the product. It can be the
learning outcomes, or a material product
itself, like a book, module or instructional
material.
SOME QUESTIONS TO ASSESS
ACHIEVED CURRICULUM:

1. Do the learning outcomes achieved by the learners approximate the level of


performance set at the beginning of the curriculum?
2. Are the learning outcomes achieved higher or lower than the objectives set?
3. Do the achieved learning outcomes reflect knowledge, skills and attitudes and skills
intended to be developed?
4. How many percent of the learners in the same class perform higher that the level set
at the beginning?
5. Do the curricular outcomes reflect the goals and the aspirations of the community
where the curriculum was implemented?
What is the range of
assessments and
evaluations that students
and teachers face?
National -- Scholastic Aptitude Test; standards developed by national professional
organizations (e.g., the National Council of Teaching Mathematics)
State -- state mastery tests; Regents exams; state portfolio initiatives
Local District -- standardized tests subscribed to by schools or districts; system-wide
or multischool portfolio initiatives
School/Classroom -- informal checks for understanding; observation; dialogues;
quizzes; tests; projects; portfolios
Three Methods of Assessment

PERFORMANCE PROJECTS PORTFOLIOS


ASSESSMENT designed to draw upon a range of used to assess effort, progress,
skills from the student, who may work proficiency, or some combination and
to document and evaluate the work
individually or in groups to special application of these skills.
that students have accomplished
accomplish the goals that have been
during some fixed period of time
set
Examples
Performance ESSAYS
Assessment ORAL QUESTIONS
TRADITIONAL QUIZES
TESTS
OPEN-ENDED PROMPTS
Examples
CREATE A COMPUTER
GAME THAT TEACHES
MATH FACTS.
DESIGN AND BUILD A Projects
WORKING PROTOTYPE OF
A NON-FOSSIL-FUEL
VEHICLE.
MAKE A MAP OF YOUR
NEIGHBORHOOD, NOTING
YOUR FAVORITE PLACES.
Examples
COLLECT FIVE PIECES OF
YOUR WRITING WITH
EXAMPLES OF
PREWRITING/BRAINSTORM
ING, DRAFTS, PEER-

Portfolios
EDITING NOTES, AND
FINAL COPIES.
CREATE AN ART
PORTFOLIO OF AT LEAST
EIGHT PIECES. IT SHOULD
BE SUITABLE TO SUPPORT
APPLICATION TO AN
UNDERGRADUATE SCHOOL
OF FINE ARTS.